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Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

yesterday 09:00 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Easy Vegan Soups for Fall & Winter

November 9 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Mina Rome‘s easy vegan soups for fall and winter have us daydreaming of cold fall days with a cozy blanket and warm comfort food. Soups are an absolute must for colder days, and the possibilities are just endless — even for vegan soups! So why not add a few more recipes to your vegan soup arsenal with this video? Mina shares recipes for Creamy Broccoli Soup + BBQ Chickpeas, One Pot Pasta Soup,  and Roasted Sweet Potato and Carrot Soup. All easy, and all delicious! Here’s how to make them: Read the full recipes in the video description here. The post Easy Vegan Soups for Fall & Winter appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Pumpkin French Toast

November 8 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin French ToastVegan Pumpkin French Toast with Pumpkin Cornbread, pumpkin pie spices and Caramelized Apples! Breakfast for fall. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be gluten-free with gluten-free cornbread I had another batch of pumpkin cornbread but no soup to finish it up with. Oh well, we could have finished it up as is (its so good!), but I decided to make pumpkin french toasts with it.  The Pumpkin french toast batter has generous amount of pumpkin puree and pumpkin pie spices mixed with a bit of starch and non dairy milk. The bread is soaked for a few seconds then pan fried. I love this batter with my pumpkin cinnamon swirl Sandwich bread. The combination with the pumpkin cornbread is even more delicious. Cornbread doesnt get soggy. It has pumpkin and spices already which get amplified with the pumpkin + spices in the batter. And is topped with spiced apples. Fall spices everywhere! Try not to eat these right off the skillet.  I served these with apples cooked with coconut sugar, mainly because the photos with just butter weren’t looking as fun :). These french toasts are very delicious as is! Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin French ToastThe post Vegan Pumpkin French Toast appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options

October 31 2017 Vegan Richa 

25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day! Seasonal Casseroles, Chilis, Gratin, Pot pies, Pasta, Soups, and Curries! Many are 1 Pot meals. Vegan Fall Recipes. Gluten-free Soy-free options. Is it cooling off where you live yet? Here are 25 meals to make on a chilly day. Squashes, chilis, gratins, pot pies, casseroles and curries. 25 Delicious Fall Vegetarian MealContinue reading: 25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free optionsThe post 25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe

October 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipecabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. one of the popular street food recipes which can be served as a sides dish or as a starters. the taste resembles very similar to veg manchurian recipe, but cabbage fritters are on more crispier side. it tastes great when served with veg hot and sour soup or schezwan fried rice. Continue reading cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

3 Healthy And Hearty Vegan Soup Recipes

October 19 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Simply Quinoa knows the way to our hearts–warm and hearty soup for a chilly fall day! And she’s sharing not one, but THREE awesome soups that you can add to your vegan recipe arsenal: Detox Green Soup, White Quinoa Chili, and Roasted Red Pepper + Tomato Quinoa Soup. All of these soups are easy to make and are sure to satisfy all your fall comfort food cravings. Best of all, soups are great for making ahead of time and freezing, so you can have them whenever you like! Check out the video tutorial below for more details: Full recipes below: Detox Green Soup White Quinoa Chili Soup Roasted Red Pepper + Tomato Quinoa Soup The post 3 Healthy And Hearty Vegan Soup Recipes appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-StyleMany people were introduced to Chef Fabio Viviani when he was a contestant on the Emmy-winning Bravo competition series Top Chef. His career began years before he became a Fan Favorite and has only flourished in the years since. This spring, Viviani released his latest cookbook, Fabios 30-Minute Italian: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick and Easy Recipes. As a friend and supporter of Meatless Monday he includes many meat-free recipes that are simple enough to make for the first dinner of the week. Anyone familiar with Viviani knows that he isnt merely a chef. Since gaining popularity on Top Chef, he has capitalized on his entrepreneurial spirit and sense of humor to bring his cuisine to as many people as possible, especially home cooks. While cultivating a successful career as a businessman, frequent television guest, and author, he has always focused on recipes that are attainable for anyone aspiring to cook at home (but perhaps a little intimidated by complicated recipes). In February, he launched his YouTube cooking show, Fabios Kitchen, which features several meat-free recipes that are designed to be easy to make in little time. He says: When my wife and I had our son Gage, our lives became really busy. I needed to learn how to make delicious food at home in a shorter amount of time. I wrote this cookbook to teach others how they can make meals in under 30 minutes. As a chef, I like cooking with meat but I also really like cooking with vegetables - its all about how you season the ingredients! The dishes were using for Meatless Monday are packed with flavor - and best of all theyre meat free! Meatless Monday is happy to bring some of Vivianis delicious vegetarian recipes from Fabios 30-Minute Italian to your table. Here are a few of them: Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa Fabios 30-Minute Italian is available to purchase on Amazon. The post Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles and eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is more common for a frittata) but it’s just because we are lazy and it’s the easiest method. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good, has a short ingredient list and has quickly become one of our favorite last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, their were still mushrooms left in the bag. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. It’s amazing how you can turn a simple tortilla into a dinner just by adding some more vegetables to it. Especially if you also serve it with a side salad. These particular mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in large quantities in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on not only saves time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic looking. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also improves the rustic look. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 15 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and calls for less oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We actually prefer making this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with other vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla Makes approx 8 slices 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan along with salt and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft and translucent, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be just done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter and a little salt. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Add salt and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Crack the eggs in a bowl, add salt and pepper and whisk. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered for the tortilla not to stick to it). Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mixed Mushroom Soup

October 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

This mixed mushroom soup, or “zuppa di funghi misti,” as the Italians would say, is perfect for the fall season. The aromas and flavors provided by shallots, garlic, red wine and thyme excellently compliment the mushrooms’ earthiness. We love that this gourmet recipe is also perfect for home cooks! This recipe comes to us from Alicia Walter of Eataly’s La Scuola. - 4 cups mixed mushrooms, cut into 1/­­4-inch pieces, stems and scraps reserved - 5 cups water - 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil - 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms - 1/­­4 cup shallots, cut into small dice - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 sprigs thyme, leaves picked from stem and chopped - Pinch red chili flakes - 1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped into 1-inch pieces - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 cup red wine - Extra virgin olive oil - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 loaf rustic bread, sliced and grilled Prepare a mushroom stock by adding the reserved mushroom scraps and dried porcini mushrooms to a large stockpot filled with 5 cups of water. Simmer over low heat for at least 30 minutes and then strain. You should have 4 cups of stock. In a small stockpot, heat the olive oil until almost smoking. Add the mushrooms in one layer, working in batches if necessary. Once the mushrooms have been browned on one side, sprinkle with salt, add in a small spoonful of butter or oil and continue to cook until the mushrooms are browned on all sides. Remove the mushrooms from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat and add the shallots, garlic, thyme, red chili flakes and a pinch of salt. Add more olive oil if necessary. Cook until the shallots are soft. Add the tomato paste and cook until the color changes from bright red to brick red. Add in the red wine and boil until the alcohol has cooked off. Finally, add the kale and an additional pinch of salt. Sauté until soft. Slowly pour in the strained mushroom stock and simmer for ten minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place a quarter of the reserved mushrooms into a shallow bowl. Ladle the broth over the mushrooms. Top with a piece of grilled bread drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with garlic if desired. Enjoy immediately. The post Mixed Mushroom Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup

October 3 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Curried Almond Sweet Potato SoupThis Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup has it all: great taste, vibrant color, and the creamy goodness of almond butter. For this recipe, I use Frontier brand organic curry powder, a heady blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, mustard, fenugreek, cardamom, nutmeg, red pepper, cinnamon, and cloves, but most any curry spice blend should perform well. For a thinner soup, stir in a small amount of nondairy milk during the final heating. Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, chopped - 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes - 5 cups vegetable broth or water - 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks - 2/­­3 cup almond butter - 1 tablespoon curry powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - Salt - 1/­­4 cup chopped roasted almonds - Heat the oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. - Add the tomatoes, broth, and sweet potatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cook, uncovered, until the potatoes are soft, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the almond butter, curry powder, cayenne, and salt to taste. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. - Puree the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth, or use an immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Heat the soup over low heat until hot. Serve sprinkled with the chopped almonds. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Eatin Good in Granada

November 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although I dont think it formally deserves this title, so far Spain feels like the meat capital of the world. However, Granada (in the south of Spain) has a booming vegan scene thats growing every year!  I didnt get to spend much time in Granada, but I did have the opportunity to work with an incredible little vegetarian restaurant that offered a heap of superb vegan dishes by the name of AlLaurel. This cozy veggie bistro is centrally located by the famous Catedral de Granada and welcomes you in with chic styling, a delicious menu del día, and local artisanal wines and cervezas. While there I got to sample a few of their famous dishes including a leek and ginger soup, seitan skewers (drooling), and traditional tomato and avocado salad. The cuisine was fantastically fresh, obviously organic, and perfectly plated by Ále (short for Alejandro), the restaurants lead chef. I left AlLaurel with a happy tummy and a newfound respect for seitan. The next day, while in search for some lunch in town, I stumbled upon a little vegan tapas bar called El Ojú. You heard me right, a vegan TAPAS bar. You know, where you buy a drink and you […] The post Eatin Good in Granada appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl

November 2 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread with a few ingredients. Spiced, lightly sweet and great with soups, chilis or on its own with vegan butter and maple syrup or make sandwiches with it. Vegan Soy-free Recipe.  It is the season to plan winter meals and try out some holiday options to plan a menu! Lets start with this soft and delicious cornbread This Pumpkin Cornbread comes together very quickly. The pumpkin and the spices add a wonderful flavor and moistness to it. Just a touch of maple to keep it lightly sweet. It is perfect to snack on as is, and also great made more sweeter or savory. For a sweeter version, add some sugar and add more pumpkin pie spice. Add dried fruit or other additions. For a savory cornbread, reduce the maple, add some garlic powder, nutritional yeast, herbs!  Serve it with chili, soups, or slice thin to make sandwiches. What’s your favorite way to eat cornbread? Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 BowlThe post Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chipotle Corn Chowder

October 24 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chipotle Corn ChowderThis sweet, satisfying Chipotle Corn Chowder is made with frozen whole kernel corn. The garnish of pimientos and parsley adds a dash of color. Chipotle Corn Chowder - 1 tablespoon safflower oil - 1 medium onion, minced or shredded - 1 carrot, finely chopped or shredded - 1 russet potato, finely chopped or shredded - 1/­­4 teaspoon celery salt - 2 cups vegetable broth - 1 16-ounce bag frozen corn kernels - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - 2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­2 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked for 3 hours, then drained - 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley - 1 2-ounce jar chopped pimientos, drained - Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, and potato. Cover and cook for 4 minutes to soften. Stir in the celery salt, broth, corn, and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, stir in the coriander, liquid smoke, and almond milk, and cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. - While the soup is simmering, combine the drained cashews and chipotle in a blender with 1 cup of the simmering broth from the soup. Blend until smooth and creamy, then add 1 more cup of the soup and blend until smooth. Stir the mixture back into the soup. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with parsley and pimientos. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Chipotle Corn Chowder appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Meal Plan | Red Lentil Dahl, Sheet Pan Fajita Bowls & Slow Cooker Potato Soup

October 20 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes red lentil dahl, vegan sheet pan fajita bowls, and chard lentil & potato slow cooker soup.

pumpkin soup recipe | how to prepare easy creamy pumpkin soup

October 17 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

pumpkin soup recipe | how to prepare easy creamy pumpkin souppumpkin soup recipe | how to prepare easy creamy pumpkin soup with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe is very simple and is prepared by roasting the pumpkin and some onions. it is followed by grounding the roasted veggies into thick batter. later it is mixed and boiled with vegetable stock till it forms soup consistency. Continue reading pumpkin soup recipe | how to prepare easy creamy pumpkin soup at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

This isnt the split-pea type of pea soup but instead is made with fresh or frozen English peas--those bright green orbs--and then topped with a decadent dollop of mascarpone cheese mixed with cream cheese, which is the Italian answer to cr?me fraiche or sour cream, but better! Mint and peas are good partners but you dont find mint soup too often. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons butter - 3 cups green peas, thawed if frozen, 1/­­4 cup reserved for garnish - 2 shallots, finely chopped - 3 cups vegetable stock - 2 tablespoons cream cheese - 2 tablespoons heavy cream -  1/­­4 cup mascarpone cheese - Zest of 1 lemon -  1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley -  1/­­4 cup chopped mint - Salt and pepper  Preheat an oven to 400°F. Place olive oil, butter, peas and shallots on a sheet tray and roast in oven for 8 minutes. While in the oven, heat vegetable stock in a pot until right before boiling. Season stock with salt and pepper. Mix the cream cheese, heavy cream, and mascarpone in a stand mixer until combined and slightly loose--dont whip it too much. Add lemon zest and mix one more time to combine. Season with salt and set aside. When peas are done, add to stock and bring to a rapid boil. Reduce to a simmer, add parsley and mint, and cook for 5 minutes. Using a hand or stand blender, blend the soup until silky smooth. If too thick, add a touch of stock or water. Serve soup with a drizzle of the mascarpone mixture in the middle and the reserved fresh peas to garnish. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 52-53. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting down in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter in literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles, eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it off in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is the Italian way of doing it rather than the Spanish) but it’s just because we are lazy and it works so well. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good. It also has a rather short ingredient list and has become another one of our last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, the bag was still half full. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. Just adding a few more vegetables to a simple tortilla turns it into dinner rather than just a snack. Especially if served with a side salad. These mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on. Not only does it save time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also helps making it more rustic. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 20 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and we can reduce the amount of oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We make this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with another range of vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. or before placing it in the oven. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale & Mushroom Tortilla Makes approx 8 serving 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and smells sweet, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling salted water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be almost done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat (you should here them sizzling without burning) for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Salt generously and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered. Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

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