soup - vegetarian recipes

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soup vegetarian recipes

Asparagus Corn Chowder

yesterday 14:40 Golubka Kitchen 

Asparagus Corn Chowder We sent out this simple asparagus chowder recipe as a little bonus in our newsletter a few years ago. Since then, it’s become a total spring staple for us, and we cook it almost every time there’s good asparagus around. It also turned out to be a crowd pleaser, since we heard back from a lot of people who made and loved it (those are the best emails to get, always). This spring, while making the chowder yet again, we realized that we should probably publish it here and make it readily accessible to everyone at all times :) This delicate chowder is a great dish for showcasing asparagus – there’s few ingredients, so the tender, green qualities of asparagus can really shine. The recipe comes together so quickly, too (you can watch the whole process in our Instagram stories later today)! The key here is not to overcook the asparagus, since it’s at its best when bright green and snappy. Otherwise, it turns into something brown, mushy, and generally unappealing. It’s barely cooked in this recipe – just quickly sautéed with some lemon juice and flash blanched in broth and coconut milk. This recipe definitely allows for all kinds of improvisation with spring produce. You can use any tender spring greens that you can find this time of year, as well as herbs – chives with their pretty blossoms, basil, and mint all work great here. You can swap in peas or fava beans for some of the corn or ramps for some of the onion. Have fun with the toppings, too. An assertive flavored oil like chili oil would be great, but a drizzle of good quality olive oil is always delicious as well. Something crunchy like toasted pumpkin seeds or croutons would be heavenly on top, and lots of herbs, always. Hope you’ll give this one a try :) Asparagus Corn Chowder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 teaspoon cumin - freshly ground 1 teaspoon coriander - freshly ground 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste kernels from 2 ears of sweet corn or about 2 cups frozen and thawed corn freshly ground black pepper 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends cut off, sliced into bite-size pieces 3 cloves garlic - minced juice of 1 lemon 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened canned coconut milk 1½ cups vegetable broth or water 4 cups spring greens, such as spinach, arugula, watercress, etc. handful of fresh basil or mint leaves (optional) chives/­­chive blossoms - for garnish (optional) chili oil, basil oil or olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the cumin, coriander, onion and a few pinches of salt, sauté for 5 minutes. Add the corn, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and cook, stirring, for another 5 minutes. Add the asparagus and garlic and sauté until the asparagus is bright green, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for a minute. Add the coconut milk and vegetable broth/­­water and bring to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the greens to wilt them. Transfer about half of the soup to an upright blender along with the basil/­­mint, if using, and blend until creamy. Return the blended mixture back to the soup pot and stir to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve garnished with chives and chive blossoms, a drizzle of oil or any other desired toppings. 3.5.3226 The post Asparagus Corn Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Recipe | Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Gelato

April 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This is the recipe that finally made me realize that our freezer does not get as cold as it should. All last summer, I was on a Zoku kick and I made popsicles at least once a week, if not more. It was our first summer in North Carolina and it was hot. I had never been much of a popsicle person, but in that hot weather, suddenly they were all I wanted to eat. In my popsicle making frenzy, I noticed that the Zoku was taking much, much longer than it should have to freeze my popsicles. So naturally, I blamed the Zoku. In December, I got my ice cream maker. I’ve used it a few times and each time, the ice cream turned out a little bit soupy. I blamed the ice cream maker. So when I made this Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Gelato, it was the same story–it just barely set in the ice cream maker, so I decided to Google it and see what was going on. There were virtually no bad reviews for it and the few bad reviews there were had comments saying, “Your freezer probably isn’t cold enough!” Oh. So that’s why the Zoku […]

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Salsa-Style Nectarine Panzanella from Cook Share Eat Vegan Mediterranean Dolma Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Ramen Miso Soup

April 3 2019 VegKitchen 

Ramen Miso Soup Make your regular ramen soup amazing with this combination of miso, mushrooms, zucchini, and tofu. This ultra-comforting soup meal can be easily personalized to your taste. Save Print Ramen Miso Soup Serves: Continuing reading Ramen Miso Soup on VegKitchen

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal VeggiesSpring has officially sprung, so its time to explore the local farmers markets and forage the grocery aisles for fresh seasonal vegetables. Trying new meatless recipes is a great way to utilize all of the ripe fruits and vegetables coming into season. Weve gathered delicious plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday bloggers  and influencers featuring spring produce such as asparagus, spinach, sweet peas and broccoli. Enjoy the tastes of spring! Scallion Pancakes from Bianca Patka Lemony Spring Risotto from Healthy Voyager Spring Green Shakshuka from Happy Kitchen Asparagus Avocado Tomato Salad from Blondelish   Sweet Potato Pizza from It’s a Healthy Lifestyle Asian Noodles with Gingery Prune Sauce from Jackie Newgent Spring Leek and Asparagus Soup from The Domestic Dietitian Penne Pasta with Arugula Pesto, Red Potatoes and Spring Vegetables from She’s Cookin Flageolets and Dandelion from Soulful Vegan Ravioli in Creamy Garlic and Spinach White Sauce from The Kitchen Docs   Invite your friends and family to join you in a celebration of spring with these plant-based recipes. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

sweet corn soup recipe | sweet corn veg soup | chinese sweet corn soup

March 19 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

sweet corn soup recipe | sweet corn veg soup | chinese sweet corn soupsweet corn soup recipe | sweet corn veg soup | chinese sweet corn soup with step by step photo and video recipe. soup recipes are a non-native dish to the indian cuisine. it was introduced later and has gathered a lot of interests and appreciations with many indian house holds. particularly the indo chinese soup recipes have become default starters for any meal. one such soup recipe is sweet corn soup recipe made with corn kernels. The post sweet corn soup recipe | sweet corn veg soup | chinese sweet corn soup appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Curried Red Lentil & Quinoa Bowls with Cilantro-Mint Chutney

March 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I think red lentils might just be the least appetizing food you can cook. Well, visually, at least. When you cook split lentils, they fall apart--kind of like split peas in split pea soup. I spent a lot of time trying to think of ways to make curried red lentils look attractive, but sometimes you just have to let curried red lentils be curried red lentils. You do you, lentils! You do you. So they’re not pretty, but I assure you, these Curried Red Lentil & Quinoa Bowls are delicious. I had the curried red lentil recipe in my pocket for a while and I just wasn’t quite sure what to do with it. I tried serving it over cauliflower steaks, but that was kind of weird. Serving it over quinoa is much better! It also makes this recipe a great source of protein--the quinoa has 6 grams per serving and the lentils have 10. Because I used Madras curry powder in this recipe instead of sweet, the lentils are a little bit spicy. You can add a dollop of Greek yogurt to your bowl to cool it down a bit, or make a batch of Cilantro-Mint Chutney. I love […]

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

65 Easy Vegan Recipes for Beginners

March 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

65 Easy Vegan Recipes for Beginners65 Easy Vegan Recipes for Beginners! Easy 1 Pot Meals, soups, stir fries, curries, burgers, pizza, Tacos, breakfast and dessert to get you started on your journey. Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree options Transitioning into and maintaining a vegan diet can have its challenges in the beginning. It can get overwhelming at times to replace some loved meals, try new ingredients, flavors and textures. Here are a few choice recipes from the blog to help you out! Many are 1 Bowl, 30 Minute easy recipes, some longer depending on your cooking experience. There are quick Pastas, Veggie bakes, Soups, Curries, Stir fries, noodles, Bowls, there are Burgers, tacos, pizza. Also breakfast- sweet and savory, and some desserts to please everyone. There’s something for everyone, many different flavors, cooking styles, ingredients, options.  Lets keep those plans we made in Jan to eat well rolling along. Do let me know in the comments about which recipes you found easy and accessible. Looking for something specific, check my Recipe index. Also check out my cookbooks for even more options and inspiration(available everywhere in the world and often also in libraries). Continue reading: 65 Easy Vegan Recipes for BeginnersThe post 65 Easy Vegan Recipes for Beginners appeared first on Vegan Richa.

beetroot soup recipe | beetroot and carrot soup | beet soup recipe

February 27 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

beetroot soup recipe | beetroot and carrot soup | beet soup recipebeetroot soup recipe | beetroot and carrot soup| beet soup recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. soup recipes are generally purpose based meals served typically just before the meal. but there are some soup recipes which are served for its health benefits and also for the abundant supply of nutrients. one such rich, tasty and flavoured soup recipe is beetroot soup recipe suitable for all age groups. The post beetroot soup recipe | beetroot and carrot soup | beet soup recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

tomato soup recipe | creamy tomato soup recipe

February 22 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

tomato soup recipe | creamy tomato soup recipetomato soup recipe | creamy tomato soup recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. it is very easy to make rich, classic and creamy tomato soup. just make sure you have chosen well ripped, juicy red tomatoes and cook them well. also top up with generous amount of cream to make it delicious. The post tomato soup recipe | creamy tomato soup recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan

February 18 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan1 Pot Vegan Lentil Soup made in Instant Pot or Saucepan. This Easy Lentil Vegetable Soup is warming, comforting and so filling. 30 Minute Freezer friendly, Everyday Ingredients. Gluten-free, Soyfree, Nutfree Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Lentil soups in various forms are pretty much a staple in the house. Whats not to love! A Comforting Bowl of delicious brothy or creamy, veggies and lentils that are cooked just perfect.  Soups make a great 1 Pot meal with any veggies added in. Adjust the cooking time based on lentils used (there are various types of lentils! which might need a few minutes less or more cooking time) and make it brothy/­­stewy, or creamy by blending some of the soup or adding some coconut milk. Simple spices such as cumin, curry powder(which you can change up or omit), garlic and tomatoes adding amazing flavor to the broth, with a good helping black pepper to add warmth and amazing flavor. So much deliciousness in a bowl! Use other spices and herbs for variations. See tips below to make the best lentil soup every time!!Continue reading: Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

LOVE Soup with Pistachio Dukkah

February 14 2019 Green Kitchen Stories 

LOVE Soup with Pistachio Dukkah Hey there! We haven’t posted for a while because we wanted to get our new site ready (soon there!!!). But we got tired of waiting and felt like making a little food contribution on V-day so we cooked a red soup with cute and tasty toppings on. Unfortunately our kids rated this soup as “One of the worst soups they have ever eaten!” so that was kind of a bummer. But don’t listen to them. Your Valentine’s date hopefully has better taste than our kids. Because this is a good and simple little number with creamy cauliflower and potatoes, earthy beetroots and tasty spices. We serve it with sauerkraut and a generous drizzle of pistachio dukkah on top. So, happy Valentine’s Day. Cook this soup for someone you like. Make sure to top it with lots of dukkah. And don’t let your kids try it. We also made giant dino kale chips by brushing whole dino kale leaves with oil and salt and roasting them on 150°C /­­ 300°F for 20 min or until crisp. Peace, Love and Beetroots! /­­Lul Beet & Cauliflower Soup Serves 4-6 This is a vegan soup but you could add a little cream or plant based cream if you want to make it extra round and creamy (maybe our kids would have liked it more then ;) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 head (500 g /­­1 lb) cauliflower, cut into florets and stem chopped 4 (300 g /­­ 10 oz) beetroots, peeled and chopped 2 potatoes vegetable stock or water, to cover 1 tsp sea salt lemon juice, to taste Heat oil in a saucepan and stir-fry onion, garlic, fennel seeds and cumin seeds until fragrant and golden. Add cauliflower florets and the chopped stem, beetroots, water and salt and cover with a lid and bring to the boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for 20 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. Use a stick blender to blend the soup smooth. Taste and adjust the flavours, adding in a little lemon for acidity and a splash of cream if you prefer. Serve in bowls topped with a drizzle of olive oil, fermented sauerkraut and Pistachio Dukkah Spice Blend. Pistacchio & Hazelnut Dukkah Spice Blend 4 tbsp pistachio nuts 4 tbsp hazelnuts 2 tbsp coriander seeds 2 tbsp cumin seeds 2 tbsp fennel seeds 4 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp nigella seeds 1 tsp sea salt Place pistachio nuts and hazelnuts on a dry frying pan and gently roast on low to medium heat for 3 minutes. Transfer to a pestle and mortar or a food processor. Now add coriander, cumin, fennel and sesame seeds to the pan and gently roast for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then transfer to the nuts and add nigella seeds and sea salt as well.  Bash it up in a pestle and mortar or pulse a few times in the food processor, we´re looking for a nice crunchy texture, not a powder. Store in an airtight glass.

Valentines Beet Soup

February 13 2019 VegKitchen 

Valentines Beet Soup This original and colorful soup is a variation of Borsch, a traditional soup in Russia, Ukraine, and Poland. I love this soup’s subtle blend of flavors. It’s a salty sweet treat that warms and sparks your taste buds. Continuing reading Valentines Beet Soup on VegKitchen

Dumpling Ramen Bowls

March 29 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Dumpling Ramen Bowls In our house, were crazy about ramen bowls.  Theyre one-dish meals that are healthful, versatile, and easy-to-make. What’s not to love? The cheapest and easiest noodles to use in ramen bowls are the eponymous ramen noodle bricks that you can find in any grocery store for about 20 cents each. (Just be sure to throw away the seasoning packet — nasty stuff in there!) When I have rice noodles on hand, I use them instead of the ramen noodles, and Ive also been known to use leftover linguine or angel hair pasta. For the broth, you can go with adding a regular vegetable soup base (I like Better than Bouillon brand) or even miso paste to water.  Were tom yum soup fanatics, so more often I will season my broth with a great tom yum soup base I found that contains no animal products. The vegetables and other ingredients you add to your bowls are only limited by your imagination (or, more accurately, whats in your fridge).  Usually I add some diced extra-firm tofu (sautéed when I have the time, or just simmered with everything else when Im in a hurry).  Ive also been known to add pieces of vegan sausage (as I did here) as well as meatballs when I have them on hand. I add whatever veggies I have on hand, whether fresh or frozen. These bowls are also a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables. One of my favorite additions to ramen bowls are Asian dumplings.  I live in a rural area, so until recently, if I wanted Asian dumplings, Id have to take a road trip to a city with an Asian market. But the nice people at Nasoya sent me samples of their organic Nasoya Vegan Dumplings to try for this post. I’m also happy to report that my local Food Lion now carries these dumplings (they’re in the fresh produce section next to the tofu), so I can now enjoy organic vegan dumplings anytime!  Click here for coupons to give them a try — they’re available in two flavors - Tofu Vegetable and Thai Basil Vegetable. Below is my recipe for Dumpling Ramen Bowls.   They can be made super-quickly if you use the simmer-everything-together method, or you can take a few extra minutes to saute some of the ingredients separately (such as the dumplings) and add more flavor to the final result. I especially like to use my electric wok when I make these bowls because I find that it makes it easier, whichever method I use.   Heres a recipe using my preferred method in which I saute a few of the components first:  Dumpling Ramen Bowls 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil 1 package Nasoya Vegan Dumplings 1 1/­­2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 cups water 2 teaspoons vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base 2 packages ramen noodles or rice noodles 1/­­2 cup shredded carrots 2 cups fresh baby spinach or baby bok choy 1 cup cooked broccoli florets (or other cooked vegetable, optional 2 diced vegan sausage links or 1 cup diced extra-firm tofu, optional Sriracha, to taste, optional Thai basil leaves or cilantro, optional garnish Black sesame seeds, optional garnish Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the dumplings and stir-fry until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.  Add a splash of water, if needed to keep the dumplings from sticking. Remove the dumplings from the wok, and set aside. Reheat the wok or skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes to brown nicely and soften.  Remove the mushrooms from the wok and set aside.  Bring the the water to a boil in the wok or medium saucepan. Stir in the soup base until blended. Add the ramen noodles, carrot, and remaining soy sauce and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Divide the noodle mixture into large soup bowls, arranging the carrots and spinach on top of the noodles.  Return the dumplings and mushrooms to the wok and heat until hot.  Arrange the dumplings and mushrooms on top of the noodles, next to the spinach and carrots.  Add the cooked broccoli and vegan sausage and stir-fry for a minute to heat through.  To serve, drizzle each bowl with sriracha, if using.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Garnish with basil or cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. Makes 2 to 4 servings   NOTE: For the quick, no-oil, Simmer-Everything-Together Method, use the above ingredients (except the oil) and proceed as follows: Heat the water in a large saucepan.  Add the soy sauce and vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base and bring to a boil.  Add the Nasoya Vegan Dumplings and return the water to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the ramen noodles, mushrooms, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles and dumplings are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, and spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Stir in any additional cooked veggies, tofu, or other ingredients, as desired. Divide the soup into bowls, arranging a few of the dumplings on top of each serving.  Drizzle with a little sriracha, if desired. Garnish with a few Thai basil or cilantro leaves and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. The post Dumpling Ramen Bowls appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Nearly-Instant Thai Coconut Corn Soup

March 11 2019 VegKitchen 

Nearly-Instant Thai Coconut Corn Soup Here’s a soup that’s great for any kind of weather, not just when it’s chilly and rainy. Because it’s ready to serve in 20 minutes, it’s for any time you want soup in a hurry. You can even chill it and serve it cold on warm days. Continuing reading Nearly-Instant Thai Coconut Corn Soup on VegKitchen

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’

February 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ It seems like a lot of people still see broccoli stems a scraps to be thrown away, but the truth is that broccoli is delicious in its entirety. The stems make up the bulk of the weight for a reason – they are totally edible, incredibly tender inside, and very versatile. To prep them, all you have to do is peel away the tough outer skin, and you’ll be left with a velvety ‘heart,’ which kind of reminds us of an artichoke heart. It can be utilized in so many ways – in fried rice, soups, salads, gratin, latkes, and even apps. This ‘tartare’ is an unexpected little number to serve on a snack platter, but we think that it will pleasantly surprise any guests. It comes together with the help of staple pantry ingredients, and tastes indulgent…but in reality you’re eating a bunch of broccoli. Win-win all around. We came up with the idea for this recipe because broccoli stems get incredibly tender when steamed, and they take on flavor really well, like little sponges. We’ve seen various plant-based ‘tartare’ done before, like carrot tartare and avocado tartare, so we had the idea to try out something similar with broccoli stems. We marinated the stems with classic tartare ingredients like mustard, capers, and red onion (or shallot), and were so pleased with the result. Give broccoli stems a chance! And enjoy :) Broccoli Stem Tartare   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 4 broccoli stems (or 5-6 if theyre particularly thin) ⅛ of 1 red onion - finely chopped 2 teaspoons capers - minced 4 teaspoons mustard (mix of Dijon and grainy or just 1 type) 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons tamari sea salt black pepper red pepper flakes 5 tablespoons olive oil any herbs of choice - for garnish (optional) Instructions Prepare a steamer or steaming basket and boil water for steaming the broccoli stems. Peel the broccoli stems with a vegetable peeler, making sure to peel away all the tough outer skin, until youre left with the tender inner stem. Roughly chop the stems into about ½ thick rounds and place in the steamer basket. Steam for 10 minutes, or until very tender but not mushy. Once ready, chop the broccoli stems into finer pieces. You can chop them finely for a smoother tartare or leave them chunky for one with more bite. Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the onion, capers, mustard, apple cider vinegar, tamari, salt, black pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste, and mix. Pour in the olive oil, whisking it in to emulsify. Add the broccoli stems and mix to coat in the dressing. Transfer the tartare to an airtight container and ideally refrigerate for 30 min to an hour before serving, to allow the broccoli stems to marinate, and also for the olive oil to thicken, which will make the tartare easier to spread. Serve with your favorite crackers or toasted bread, garnished with any herbs of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fruit Leather Puzzle Tofu Saag Paneer, Spring Style Raw Onion Bread Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring

February 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until SpringSpring is still a month away so theres plenty of time to enjoy hearty winter soups that make this season delicious. To help you celebrate the last few weeks of winter, weve gathered some of our favorite winter soup recipes that include seasonal vegetables, such as root vegetables, squash and parsnips. Enjoy these tasty plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday recipe gallery as we count down the days until spring arrives. Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup from Healthy with Nedi Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing from Fabio Viviani Curried Butternut Velvet Soup from She’s Cooking Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup from Tofu ‘n Sproutz Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips from MyRecipes.com Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth from Jackie Newgent, RDN Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup from Bean A Foodie Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Soup

February 20 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This delicious cream of cauliflower soup will delight the taste buds of even your pickiest child. Eating cauliflower contributes a significant amount of fiber to your diet and is a great food for dieters because it causes a feeling of satiety.

Vegan Lentil Soup – Instant Pot or Saucepan

February 18 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lentil Soup – Instant Pot or Saucepan1 Pot Vegan Lentil Soup made in Instant Pot or Saucepan. This Easy Lentil Vegetable Soup is warming, comforting and so filling. 30 Minute Freezer friendly, Everyday Ingredients. Gluten-free, Soyfree, Nutfree Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Lentil soups in various forms are pretty much a staple in the house. Whats not to love! A Comforting Bowl of delicious brothy or creamy, veggies and lentils that are cooked just perfect.  Soups make a great 1 Pot meal with any veggies added in. Adjust the cooking time based on lentils used (there are various types of lentils! which might need a few minutes less or more cooking time) and make it brothy/­­stewy, or creamy by blending some of the soup or adding some coconut milk. Simple spices such as cumin, curry powder(which you can change up or omit), garlic and tomatoes adding amazing flavor to the broth, with a good helping black pepper to add warmth and amazing flavor. So much deliciousness in a bowl! Use other spices and herbs for variations. See tips below to make the best lentil soup every time!!Continue reading: Vegan Lentil Soup – Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Vegan Lentil Soup – Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

idli sambar recipe | tiffin sambar | hotel style idli sambar recipe

February 14 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

idli sambar recipe | tiffin sambar | hotel style idli sambar recipeidli sambar recipe | tiffin sambar | hotel style idli sambar recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. there are different types of sambar recipes practiced across india. each has its own purpose which boils down to either to be served with rice or as side dish to south indian breakfast dishes. one such purpose based lentil soup is idli sambar or tiffin sambar made to be served with idli or dosa recipes. The post idli sambar recipe | tiffin sambar | hotel style idli sambar recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.


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