sorghum - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Navratri (2018)

Best Vegan Restaurants – Seattle

Masala paniyaram recipe | masala appe | instant masala kuzhi paniyaram

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas










sorghum vegetarian recipes

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sorghum Breakfast Bowl

May 10 2017 VegKitchen 

Sorghum Breakfast Bowl Sorghum is one more healthful, hearty ancient grain thats making a big comeback, like what happened with quinoa, farro, and einkorn. Because of sorghum’s small size, mild flavor, and interesting texture, its a perfect grain for a warm cereal. This sorghum breakfast bowl is sure to please. Despite its incredibly good-for-you nutrition profile, sorghum is a bit […] The post Sorghum Breakfast Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!

March 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!March is always one of our favorite times to sit down at the table. Its National Nutrition Month , where good food and food thats good for you are served on the same plate. This year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that you Put Your Best Fork Forward, encouraging parents to teach healthy eating habits to their children. At Meatless Monday, we couldnt agree more. The academy also suggests filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Of course, we believe in filling the whole plate with tasty veggies, fruits, nuts and whole grains. In fact, the nutrients in particular foods can actually help with certain health issues. So in celebration of National Nutrition Month, were going to spotlight specific foods each week that have a direct link in helping to reduce the risk of a chronic preventable disease. First up: Whole grains!   Heart Disease - Leading Cause of Death Among Women You may remember hearing about this last month during the American Heart Associations Wear Red event. Its a serious health issue . Cardiovascular disease is listed as the underlying cause of nearly 801,000 deaths in the U.S. each year (about one of every three).   Whole Grains and Veggies Lower the Risk of Heart Disease In a research study , health experts concluded an inverse association between dietary whole grains and cardiovascular disease. In other words, by eating more whole grains, you have less risk of developing heart disease. In a separate study , experts found that a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is linked to a lower risk of all causes of death, particularly heart disease. Long story, short, whole grains and veggies are definitely heart smart.   Eat Healthy - and Tasty Turns out you can have the best of both worlds: nutritious, flavorful veggies and wholesome tasty whole grains. See some of our favorite recipes below: Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad   Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad   Barley Fried Rice The post Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad

January 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sorghum is an ancient grain enjoying newfound popularity for its nutrient and fiber content. Paired with sweet potatoes, cranberries and pumpkin seeds in this salad, this dish is a nutritional powerhouse! This dish comes to us from Cara of Street Smart Nutrition. Serves 6 - 2 1/­­2 cups sorghum, cooked - 2 1/­­2 cups sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1/­­2? cubes - 1 1/­­2 Tablespoons olive oil - Pinch of salt and pepper - 1/­­3 cup dried cranberries - 1/­­3 cup pecans, halves or pieces - 1/­­4 cup pumpkin seeds - 1/­­4 to 1/­­2 cup crumbled goat cheese or feta Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes, then roughly chop into 1/­­2? cubes. In a large mixing bowl, combine sweet potatoes with olive oil, salt, and pepper and gently toss to combine. Spread evenly in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until edges begin to slightly brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly. In a separate bowl, add the cooked sorghum, sweet potatoes, dried cranberries, pecans, pumpkin seeds, and goat cheese. Gently fold together until combined. Serve warm or at room temperature, or store in the refrigerator for 3-4 days. The post Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Summer Greek Salad

June 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Greek Salad I’m getting over a bad cold that really took me down by surprise, and finding myself craving plates of vegetables and not much else, after having no appetite for a few days. Having a big batch of this summery Greek salad in the refrigerator has been helpful for regaining some strength and vibrance. I’ve been making salads like this one quite a lot these past few hot months, they are can serve as a great fridge clean-out aid, and are just really delicious. I love to order a bowl of good Greek salad when out. Everything about the combination of fluffy lettuce (original Greek salad does not come with lettuce, I’ve learned), juicy tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, briny olives, a bit of sharpness from onion, and creamy feta is just right. This is my upgraded and loaded summer version of Greek salad, with the addition of protein-rich chickpeas, grilled and raw zucchini, bell peppers, spears of asparagus and green beans, and various herbs. Since I’m wanting to eat plants only while getting over this cold, I opted out of feta cheese, replacing it with savory toasted pine nuts and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast – the vegan answer to cheese. If you haven’t tried nutritional yeast yet, it’s a really neat and nourishing little topping, composed entirely of flakey, deactivated yeast, and with a surprisingly cheesy, nutty flavor. Enjoy :) Summer Greek Salad   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the dressing 3 garlic cloves - minced 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup olive oil for the salad ½ red onion - sliced thinly juice of ½ lemon handful asparagus - tough ends removed handful green beans - strings removed if present 1-2 small to medium zucchini - grilled 2 cups romaine lettuce - torn 1 cup cooked chickpeas 1 small to medium yellow summer squash - shaved w/­­ a vegetable peeler 1 cup cherry tomatoes 1-2 heirloom tomatoes - sliced 1 small English cucumber - sliced 1 red or yellow bell pepper - sliced 1 cup olives ½ cup pine nuts - toasted nutritional yeast - for sprinkling, to taste handful basil leaves - torn handful parsley and dill - finely chopped Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients in a small jar, whisk until smooth. to make the salad Place red onion in a small bowl, squeeze lemon juice over it, toss to coat and and let marinate while making the salad. Grill, blanch or saute asparagus and green beans until crisp-tender and bright green. Grill the zucchini. Arrange romaine lettuce, chickpeas, yellow squash ribbons, tomatoes, cucumber and bell pepper slices, olives, asparagus, green beans, and grilled zucchini on a large platter. Drain onion slices and scatter them over the salad. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and sprinkle with pine nuts and nutritional yeast. Garnish with fresh herbs. Serve immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summer Greek Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrate Whole Grains Month This September!

September 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

September is Whole Grains Month, and theres no better time to discover all the delicious, healthy reasons to eat whole grains! This year the Whole Grains Council is celebrating in September by running an Instagram photo contest throughout the month. The contest theme is Share the Goodness of Whole Grains, it’s a perfect excuse to share your favorite whole grains with others! Make some muffins for friends with whole-grain flour, whip up a flavorful cous cous dish for a potluck meal, or share your quinoa with coworkers. Click here to learn more about the promotions they’ll be hosting all month long. What are whole grains? All grains start out whole, but refined grains have certain parts of each grain taken away. Seeds, also called kernels, are made up of three edible parts - bran, germ, and endosperm. Whole grains are intact kernels, containing all three parts of the seed, while refined grains include only the endosperm. What makes whole grains so healthy? Whole grains are packed with fiber, protein, and essential nutrients for a healthy body. The bran and germ contain about 25% of a grains protein, a large amount of fiber, and at least seventeen key nutrients, making the whole grain a more nutrient-dense and healthy choice. Getting started with whole grains? Try these delicious whole grain recipes for Meatless Monday! Grains can be more than just baked goods! These recipes showcase some of the many ways to enjoy whole grains for any course at any meal. Blueberry Buckle Made with Whole Wheat or Spelt Flour, Spicie Foodie Indian Saffron Yellow Rice Pilaf, Ceara’s kitchen Quinoa Veggie Cakes, I Try to Eat Healthy Antipasto Couscous with Chickpeas, Bobs Red Mill Sorghum Salad with Cucumber and Feta, Naturally Ella Sweet Potato Black Bean Freekeh Salad, Nourish RDs Farro Caprese Salad, Bobs Red Mill The post Celebrate Whole Grains Month This September! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Methi Thepla – High Protein Savory Herbed Flatbread. Yeast-free

July 20 2015 Vegan Richa 

Methi Thepla – High Protein Savory Herbed Flatbread. Yeast-free These multigrain flatbreads have chickpea flour, quinoa flour, coconut flour to add to the protein. plus a good load of sesame seeds. Spiced liberally with Indian spices and dried fenugreek, these can be served as is with chutney or as a side.  Use flours that you have, use the spices that you have and make this fabulous flatbread. Add a scoop of unflavored protein powder to amp up the protein even more.  You can make them gluten-free by substituting the wheat flour with chickpea flour. The gluten-free breads will be more delicate when you roll them out, so keep them a bit thicker. The traditional Methi thepla has more wheat flour, some chickpea flour and other flours such as sorghum or millet, and fresh or dried fenugreek. These are my modified version with quinoa flour and coconut flour to add more protein. to make traditional thepla, use 1 cup wheat flour, 1 cup chickpea flour and 1/­­4 cup flours like millet or sorghum. For variation, roast the chickpea flour for 3-4 minutes before using to make a dough for a nuttier flavor profile.  Continue reading: Methi Thepla – High Protein Savory Herbed Flatbread. Yeast-freeThe post Methi Thepla – High Protein Savory Herbed Flatbread. Yeast-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Gluten-Free Chocolate Cake

May 15 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Gluten-Free Chocolate Cake   Serves 12   GLUTEN FREE   INGREDIENTS: 1 stick unsalted butter, melted, plus 1 Tbs. softened butter for greasing pan 2/­­3 cup plus 2 Tbs. cocoa powder, divided 1 cup maple syrup 2/­­3 cup pitted dates 2 eggs 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/­­3 cup Gluten-Free Flour Mix 1/­­3 cup sorghum flour 1 tsp. baking powder pinch sea salt 1/­­2 cup bittersweet chocolate, melted 2 Tbs. toasted chopped walnuts   INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease 9 1/­­2 -inch Bundt pan with 1Tbs. butter, and dust with 2 Tbs. cocoa powder. 2. Blend maple syrup and dates in food processor until smooth. Add eggs, vanilla, and melted butter, and blend to combine. 3. Whisk together Gluten-Free Flour Mix, sorghum flour, baking powder, salt, and remaining 2/­­3 cup cocoa powder in medium bowl. Add flour mixture to food processor, and blend until combined. 4. Pour batter into prepared Bundt pan, and bake 30 to 35 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan, then unmold. Drizzle with melted chocolate and sprinkle with walnuts. Gluten-Free Flour Mix   Makes 3 cups   INGREDIENTS: 2 cups white rice flour 2/­­3 cups potato starch 1/­­3 cup tapioca starch   INSTRUCTIONS: Whisk together all ingredients until combined. Store in airtight container until ready to use. Sponsored content: Presented by Natural Gourmet Institute

Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes

November 23 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Both my husband’s and my family live far away, so instead we celebrate Thanksgiving with the other family – our friends. This tradition of friends getting together at our house has developed naturally over the past ten years that we’ve been living in our house on the West coast of Florida. I always look forward to that one Thursday in late November – usually, it’s cold enough to light a fire in our seldom used fireplace, and I have a bunch of new recipes ready for a test run. Our Thanksgiving table is never a traditional one – I rarely cook the same dish two years in a row and our international circle of friends assures plenty of exciting variety. This colorful pilaf is destined to join this year’s celebration. Up until recently, I had only heard of sorghum flour as a great gluten free option for baked goods. Then a bag of whole sorghum grains caught my eye in one of the isles of our health food store, and I had to try it out. Sorghum is a nutritious grain native to Africa. It has a nice, pleasantly chewy texture and neutral flavor, which combines very well with roasted juicy cranberries and grapes, Brussels sprouts, nuts and aromatic herbs. If you are still looking for a flavorful veggie dish to complete your Thanksgiving table, this one is a winner. Sorghum Pilaf Note: feel welcome to use different grains instead of sorghum, such as rice, barley, millet, farro, etc. 1 cup whole sorghum grains or other grains of choice – soaked in water overnight (important for sorghum) 1 lb brussels sprouts – ends trimmed and cut in half about 3 cups grapes (I specifically love Thomcord grapes here) 8 oz fresh or frozen cranberries large handful walnuts 3 tablespoons melted coconut or olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 teaspoons each chopped thyme, sage and rosemary sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1. Drain and rinse sorghum. Place it into a large saucepan, pour 3 cups filtered water over it and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower heat to simmer, add a pinch of salt and cook for 50-60 minutes or until soft (the sorghum will still be slightly chewy, but cooked). 2. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 450 F. In a large mixing bowl, combine the rest of ingredients and toss to coat. 3. Spread on a rimmed baking tray and bake for 15-20 minutes, until brussels sprouts feel soft when pricked with a fork, but not mushy. Gently stir and turn the tray halfway through the baking. 4. Spoon the cooked sorghum into a large mixing bowl and add the roasted brussels sprouts with fruits, nuts, herbs and their caramelized juices. Stir gently to combine. Taste for salt and pepper. Serve immediately or keep refrigerated in an air-tight container and serve cold or at room temperature.

Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts

March 12 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts Pumpkin, like other winter squashes, is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin B6. Vegan spelt pumpkin donuts are a fun way to celebrate the flavor of the season when the weather starts to get cooler. If you need gluten-free donuts, simply substitute oat flour and sorghum flour for the spelt flour, as noted below.The post Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding

January 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Happy New Year! Checking in with a quick breakfast recipe idea that was born out of my struggle to feed my very picky eight year old a nutritious breakfast. Chia pudding used to be a staple breakfast for her, flavored differently depending on the season or what was on hand, and I felt pretty good about her starting the day with a nice portion of the Omega-3 rich seeds. Then, one day she decided that she doesn’t like the texture of chia in her pudding any longer (too crunchy! too chewy!), and getting breakfast into her before leaving for school became a monumental task. I’m sure many parents out there can sympathize with me when I say I would pay money for this picky eating stage to be over. But for now, I deal with it by identifying a food Paloma loves and then trying to mask other nutritious ingredients with it. For example, she’s crazy about tomatoes, so I make a crushed tomato-based stew with other veggies mixed in, and she tends to be ok with eating that. Recently, Paloma’s been obsessed with our tahini hot chocolate, and I figured that blending chia seeds into a similar mixture and letting it sit to solidify into a pudding could work. The chia is still there, but not as noticeable since it’s whipped up with the rest of the ingredients. And it worked – the child is fed, chia is back in business, and I loved the result so much for its simplicity that I decided to share it here. I like to make this pudding the night before and let it chill in the refrigerator overnight for the chia to become its most springy self. I’m also planning on trying this one out with carob powder instead of cacao, just to ease up our cacao consumption. There are some links after the jump, have a peaceful Monday :) Patti Smith on the Here’s The Thing Podcast The Making of the Sqirl Cookbook Cover – one of our favorite cookbook covers of all time The Art of Forecasting Food Trends – a prediction for what’s hot in 2017: ‘Jackfruit! Sorghum! Harissa! And dont ignore horseradish, spirulina and Asian-inspired breakfasts. Authenticity and its cousin transparency are in. So is food inspired by Africa. Or maybe its the Philippines. Even French food has a constituency.’ Destroyer – an LA restaurant’s beautiful instagram Dreaming in French, The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis – currently reading Things to Come – can’t wait to see this movie Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 3-5 Ingredients for the pudding 5-6 prunes 1½ tablespoon raw cacao powder 4 tablespoons chia seeds 2-3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon almond butter ½ tablespoon tahini 2¼ cups water cacao nibs - for garnish hemp hearts - for garnish optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp (or other) protein ½ tablespoon mesquite powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon moringa powder Instructions Comine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until very smooth. Distribute between bowls or pour into a large jar, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour or overnight before eating. Garnish with cacao nibs and hemp hearts. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi

November 23 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi These gnocchi are one of my favorite fall dishes to make for company. The process of gnocchi-making is fun and gratifying, and the result is always a tasty, light and unmistakably autumnal crowd pleaser. These gnocchi are gluten-free (and can be vegan if ghee is substituted with coconut oil), with nutritious buckwheat flour and sweet winter squash acting as main ingredients. Even without eggs, these have a nice pillowy texture, thanks to the softness of pureed squash. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be interpreted and adapted based on the produce you have on hand. There is  a variation on these gnocchi in The Vibrant Table, where I use beets and sweet potato in place of squash. I went for the classic earthy combination of sage and squash for the herbal pairing here, which is hard to beat. I also like to serve these gnocchi alongside chimichurri, one of my favorite simple herb sauces. I like to make homemade sprouted buckwheat flour for this recipe, but you can also use store-bought flour, which is darker in color and has a slightly denser texture, but also a more distinct nutty flavor. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here. I want to take this opportunity to wish all U.S. readers a very Happy Thanksgiving and express my immense gratitude for your readership and support! Here are a few Thanksgiving table ideas: Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Gingery Pear Rutabaga Handpies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Butternut Squash and Cranberry Cookies

How to Use Gluten-Free Flours

July 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Use Gluten-Free Flours When it comes to cooking with gluten-free flour, its an absolute jungle out there. The internet, health food stores, and even conventional supermarkets provide an ever-expanding dizzying array of options. If youve experimented with gluten-free flours, you probably already discovered there is no one flour that does it all in terms of texture and taste, nor is every all-purpose flour mix suitable for all purposes. Frequent pitfalls include gummy, dry, and/­­or sandy textures. Sometimes gluten-free flours or mixes give flavors that are bitter or beany. The science of gluten-free is complex, especially in the realm of baking. In the absence of wheat gluten - which provides structure and holds moisture in baked goods - we need to create a suitable equivalent. Sometimes that equivalent is simply a gluten-free flour or flour mix paired with eggs. In this case, eggs provide the structure that GF flour lacks. But what about vegan applications? Generally, what we do is combine gluten-free flour or flours that have no power to bind (such as rice or sorghum flour) with a binding, absorbent starch (tapioca starch, potato starch, or arrowroot) and sometimes even guar or xanthan gum. The good news is: in the correct proportion, with some experimentation, adjustment, and a good recipe, you can achieve impressive results. So which flours are you likely to see in the marketplace? The most common are brown or white rice, oat, buckwheat corn, millet, quinoa, sorghum and teff. There are also bean (fava, chickpea, soy), nut, coconut, and even wine flours. The most common starches youll see include: corn starch, arrowroot, potato starch, and tapioca starch. For thickening sauces, we rely on starch, not gluten. I find rice flour - white or brown - perfectly suitable for this purpose. Starches, such as arrowroot or tapioca, are sometimes used, but I find they make sauces too gelatinous. For dredging proteins - tofu, tempeh, or bean burgers - a wide variety of gluten-free flours will suffice, but I like millet, oat, corn and rice flours. For baking, you can experiment with the multitude of all-purpose gluten-free flour mixes you find in stores, or you can make your own. With commercial, all-purpose mixes, youll probably want to start by using the manufacturers recipes as a jumping-off point and, once youre comfortable with the mix, experiment further. Are you the DIY type? Here are two good flour mixes to try: --The mix we use at Natural Gourmet Institute: 2 cups white rice flour + 2/­­3 cup potato starch + 1/­­3 cup tapioca starch flour --An easy, versatile mix: 1:1 ratio of sorghum flour and tapioca starch Meet the author: Elliott Prag is a Chef Instructor and the Curriculum Development Manager at Natural Gourmet Institute. Elliott holds a Bachelors Degree from Wayne State University, and graduated from NGIs Chefs Training Program in 1995. Thereafter, he worked in numerous natural food restaurants in New York City before developing his private chef business. In 1999, he expanded his business by founding Siegfried & Prag, Caterers. In 2003, Elliott traveled to Sofia, Bulgaria for two years, where he was Executive Chef of Kibea Restaurant, the first health-supportive restaurant in the Balkans.

Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus

June 15 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus By the time this post goes up, Paloma and I will be in Russia spending some much anticipated time with grandma. I will try to keep Instagram updated with some snaps from our travels. I leave you with this salad, made with plenty of nutritious grains, herbs, and two stars of the spring/­­summer farmer’s market – asparagus and strawberries. It’s a variation on one my all time favorite salads, from our book (Fava Bean, Quinoa, and Mint Salad on pg. 89) – simple, rich in textures, filling and very fresh. Mint is essential to the flavor here, so try not to skip it. Enjoy the beginning of summer! Multigrain Summer Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus for the salad 1 bunch asparagus 2 cups strawberries – sliced handful fresh mint leaves – chopped handful basil leaves – chopped (optional) 2 cups cooked grains (I used a combination of sorghum, red rice and spelt, but any grains like quinoa, faro, frekkeh, any type of rice, or even buckwheat would work fine here) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper (optional) for the dressing 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon maple syrup 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoons olive oil pinch of sea salt 1. Cut tough ends off the asparagus. Cook it your preferred way – blanch, steam or grill. I like to blanch asparagus in salted water for 3 minutes, then shock it in an ice bath, so it stays bright green and crispy. Slice into bite sized pieces. 2. Whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl until well combined and set aside. 2. Place cooked grains into a large mixing bowl. Add asparagus, strawberries and herbs. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss gently. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper if desired. This salad tastes best when eaten within a day.

Good Old-Fashioned French Toast Stuffed with Strawberries and Sweet Soy Cream

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | To make Sweet Soy Cream: Place soymilk in blender or food processor. With machine running, drizzle in oil very slowly until thoroughly blended with soymilk. Blend 1 minute more, or until mixture has consistency of heavy cream. Transfer to bowl, and stir in lemon juice. Flavor with agave nectar and vanilla and cinnamon (if using). Transfer to jar, and refrigerate until ready to use. (Recipe makes 3 cups; extra will keep one week.) 2 | To make Egg Foam: Whisk egg replacer with 1 cup water in metal bowl. Place bowl on burner over medium-high heat, and whisk 1 to 2 minutes, or until foam has fluffed to 11/­­2 times original size and reaches 100°F on instant-read thermometer. 3 | To make French Toast: Whisk together soymilk and vinegar in medium bowl. Whisk in Egg Foam, vanilla, agave nectar, and cinnamon, then whisk in oil. 4 | Coat large skillet with cooking spray, and heat over medium-high heat. Halve bread slices nearly to bottom, leaving attached at crust like spine of open book. Dip each piece of bread in soymilk mixture 30 seconds per side, then place in skillet. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, flipping once, or until French Toast is browned and crisp on both sides. 5 | To serve: Spoon 1/­­4 cup strawberries on bottom half of each French Toast slice. Fold top over, top with 2-Tbs. dollop of Sweet Soy Cream, then drizzle with sorghum syrup.

Late Summer Abundance Bowl

September 10 2014 My New Roots 

Late Summer Abundance Bowl   I have a serious shopping addiction. But its not for clothes, or house wares, or even kitchen tools. No. Its for health food. Although I am incredibly excited to go back to Canada every summer to see my family and friends, the other thing I unapologetically look forward to the most, is browsing the aisles of the natural foods co-op. Oh, I could spend hours upon hours wandering around, checking out whats new and exciting in the world of loose leaf teas, gluten-free bread, vegan ice cream, and sampling the latest nut butters. Did you know they now sell dehydrated kombucha scobies in bulk? Omigod, reeeally? So yea. I have a problem and Im not afraid to admit it. This year I found something very thrilling, and that was sorghum. I had heard of it before, but only in relation to the syrup that is made from the plant. I didnt know that the plant also produced a cereal! Omigod, reeeally? The silliest things light my fire. I guess you know this by now. Anyway. Sorghum. Its gluten-free, high in fiber and rich in iron and the B-vitamins. Sorghum is also very high in protein (more than quinoa!), yet it lacks lysine, an essential amino acid, so combining it with something that contains this amino acid is important. I chose chickpeas in this case so that we can cover our bases, and indeed make a perfect protein. Sorghum originates from Africa, then traveled through the Middle East and Asia along ancient trade routes and the Silk Road. Today sorghum is a staple food in India and Africa, but did you know it is the third most important cereal crop grown in America? Insanity!   Sorghum is very similar to millet in its nuttiness and dry quality. For this reason, it is perfect for cold salads and pilafs as the grains dont stick together. Like millet, this grain requires a lot of water for cooking too, at a 3:1 ratio. Although there was no mention of soaking the sorghum prior to cooking, I found that cooking it straight from dried took a very long time (more than one hour) and even required more water than suggested. When I cooked it again after soaking it overnight, the sorghum cooked a little faster (about 45 minutes) but still took almost 3 cups of water to reach the desired tenderness. You can find sorghum (obviously) at health food stores and gourmet grocers. I suspect that it will get more attention in the coming years as words of its awesomeness spreads, so be on the lookout. You heard it here first.   As summer wanes, we begin to see the gorgeous produce burst forth from all the warm temperatures and soft rains. Its a beautiful time of year because its the season when almost everything is in season! Tomatoes and cucumbers are at their best, fully ripe and juicy and sweet. My late summer abundance bowl celebrates all of this, with an Indian twist honoring the traditional Indian grain, sorghum. I played around with it quite a lot and eventually settled on using curry and coconut as base flavours, then combined with a kachumber salad and chickpeas. The cilantro, cumin seeds and citrus are bright and playful against the rich coconut-y vibes. You will love it.     Print recipe     Late Summer Abundance Bowl Serves 3-4 Coconut Curry Sorghum Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g sorghum, soaked overnight in 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 – 3 cups water 5 cardamom pods 1 cinnamon stick 1/­­2 tsp. whole black peppercorns 2 tsp. curry powder 2 slices organic lemon 3/­­4 tsp. sea salt 3/­­4 cup coconut milk Directions: 1. Rinse sorghum well, then place in a pot, cover with a few inches /­­ centimeters of water (recently boiled is best) and add the vinegar. Stir. Let sit overnight (or for 8 hours). Drain rinse and add to a pot with 2 1/­­2 cups of water, all spices, lemon, and salt. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 45-60 minutes. The sorghum is cooked when it is chewy and tender. If there is any crunch left in the grain after the water has been absorbed, add an extra half-cup (125ml) of water and simmer until the grains are tender. 2. Take sorghum off of the stove, remove the lemon and whole spices if possible (you can leave the peppercorns however). Pour in the coconut milk and fold to combine. The hot sorghum will absorb the coconut milk as it cools. Kachumber Salad 1 lb. /­­ 500g variety of Heirloom tomatoes 1 large English cucumber, sliced small handful cilantro, roughly copped 1/­­2 fresh chili, minced (green is traditional, but I used red Serrano) 1 tsp. whole cumin seeds 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. lime juice a few pinches sea salt Directions: 1. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant (be careful not to burn them!). 2. Cut the tomatoes into whatever shapes you like, according to the size of the fruit (the larger Coeur de Boeuf tomatoes I left in generous, thick slices). Place in a large bowl. Add the sliced cucumber, chopped cilantro and chili. 3. Whisk the olive oil, lime juice and salt together. Pour over the tomatoes and cucumber and fold gently to combine. Sprinkle with cumin seeds and serve. To Assemble: Coconut Curry Sorghum Kachumber Salad Chickpeas 1. Place sorghum, salad and chickpeas in a bowl. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt and extra cilantro if desired. Serve and enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * Great news everyone! Registration is now open for the cooking classes, lectures, and other events taking place next month in Amsterdam. I am so pumped to finally be teaching breakfast classes! Hoorah! My fav meal of the day plus tasty snacks - what could be better? Nothin. I will also be presenting 2 different lectures, giving a (free!) Q&A session at the America Book Center, and hosting a collaborative dinner at the world-renowned restaurant, De Kas. I am over the moon to be touring, teaching, and above all, connecting with you in person once again. Please visit Healthy Happy to learn more about all the events and book your space today. Looking forward to seeing you there!    


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!