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sodium vegetarian recipes

Tofu Almond Stir-Fry

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Hoisin is a Cantonese dipping sauce made from sweet potatoes, vinegar, garlic and chili peppers; you can find it in the Asian ingredients section of most supermarkets. Here, it adds immense flavor to tofu, which gets a pre-soak in vegetable broth for even more flavor. This recipe was created by Trudy Slabosz, who writes the blog veggie.num.num. Serves 4 For the tofu: - 1 package (10.5 ounces) firm tofu, cubed - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 egg white - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon salt For the sauce: - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce To complete the Tofu Almond Stir-Fry: - 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 5 shallots, sliced - 5 ounces button mushrooms, sliced - 1 can (15 ounces) baby corn, drained - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 1 green bell pepper, sliced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 1/­­2 ounces blanched almonds, toasted To prepare the tofu: In a medium bowl, soak the tofu cubes in vegetable broth for 30 minutes. Strain the tofu and reserve the broth. Drain tofu on a bed of paper towels. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg white, corn starch, hoisin sauce and salt. Add the drained tofu and gently toss to coat well. To prepare the sauce: In a medium saucepot over high heat, bring the reserved broth, cornstarch, hoisin and soy sauce to a boil. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes, or until the sauce darkens and thickens slightly. To complete the Stir-Fry: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu ; cook 10, turning occasionally, until crisp and golden on all sides. Transfer to a fresh bed of paper towels to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the same skillet. Add the shallots, mushrooms, baby corn, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes, or until the mushrooms are tender, but the bell peppers are still crisp. Add the tofu; cook 1 minute more, tossing gently, until the tofu is heated through. Pour the sauce over the stir-fry and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the almonds The post Tofu Almond Stir-Fry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Mash

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted until brown, then blended with Greek yogurt and vegetable broth for a flavorful, creamy cauliflower puree. This cauliflower mash can be served on the side in place of mashed potatoes and offers a healthy dose of the vitamin K! This recipe is from Ashley of Sprout. Serves 4 - 1 head cauliflower, cut into 1 inch florets - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup plain Greek yogurt - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth, divided - whole wheat breadcrumbs, for garnish - fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil. Season with the salt and pepper. Spread the florets onto a baking sheet in 1 layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges of the cauliflower are deep brown. Transfer the roasted cauliflower florets to a blender. Add the yogurt and 1/­­2 cup of the vegetable broth to the blender. Blend until smooth. If cauliflower mash seems too thick, add a little more vegetable broth, 1 tablespoon at a time until the mash has reached desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide into 4 portions, sprinkle each with breadcrumbs and parsley. Enjoy! The post Cauliflower Mash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is marinated in lime juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano and cayenne pepper. The tempeh is grilled and accompanied by bell peppers and red onions in this Tex-Mex treat, perfect for a quick weeknight meal. This recipe comes to us from Allison of Nourish Network. Serves 5 - 1/­­3 cup and 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided - 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 2 garlic cloves, grated - 2 8-ounce packages soy tempeh - 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - salt and black pepper, to taste - 8 6-inch corn tortillas   Cut the tempeh into 1/­­4 inch by 2 inch strips. Place 1/­­3 cup of the olive oil with the lime juice and soy sauce in an 8 inch dish. Season with the cumin, oregno, cayenne pepper and garlic. Combine 1/­­3 cup oil, juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano, cayenne and garlic in an 8-inch dish. Add tempeh, tossing to coat thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for 2-12 hours, stirring occasionally. Heat a large cast-iron grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush pan with oil. Add half of tempeh to pan. Cook for 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes more. Place in a warm bowl and repeat with the remaining tempeh. Place the onion and bell pepper with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the bell pepper and onion to pan used to cook the tempeh. Cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the bell pepper and onion is tender and fragrant. Heat the tortillas directly over the flame of a gas stove or in a dry nonstick pan. Place 2 tortillas on each plate. Top evenly with tempeh and bell pepper mixture and enjoy. The post Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup

November 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says, “This thick and creamy soup reminds me a bit of potpie filling, but in soup form. The small ditalini pasta rings are the same size as the diced vegetables, making it easy for kids to scoop up a bit of everything in one bite. Made with no cream, not even homemade cashew cream, you wont believe how creamy it is. Youll be heading back for seconds in no time.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 3 carrots, peeled and diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced - 1 tablespoon (1 g) dried parsley - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried dill - 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 cup (32 g) all-purpose flour - 2 cups (475 ml) unsweetened almond milk or milk of choice, divided - 4 cups (946 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons (8 g) nutritional yeast (optional) - 1 cup (110 g) dry ditalini pasta or similar small pasta shape (gluten-free, if desired)   Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the carrots, celery, and bell pepper and sauté 4 to 5 minutes until starting to soften.   Add the parsley, basil, thyme, dill, salt, and flour and stir to combine, scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom of the pot. Slowly pour in 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) of milk while whisking continuously, again scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom; a flat whisk is convenient here, but a balloon whisk will work as well. Whisk until the flour is completely incorporated.   Add the remainder of the milk, vegetable broth, and nutritional yeast, if using. Whisk to combine. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once boiling, add the pasta, and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until the pasta is cooked through, stirring often to prevent the pasta from sticking.   Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary.   Swap it! For a gluten-free option, use brown rice flour instead of all-purpose flour. The post Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL Goes Vegan. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Dumpling Ramen Bowls

March 29 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Dumpling Ramen Bowls In our house, were crazy about ramen bowls.  Theyre one-dish meals that are healthful, versatile, and easy-to-make. What’s not to love? The cheapest and easiest noodles to use in ramen bowls are the eponymous ramen noodle bricks that you can find in any grocery store for about 20 cents each. (Just be sure to throw away the seasoning packet — nasty stuff in there!) When I have rice noodles on hand, I use them instead of the ramen noodles, and Ive also been known to use leftover linguine or angel hair pasta. For the broth, you can go with adding a regular vegetable soup base (I like Better than Bouillon brand) or even miso paste to water.  Were tom yum soup fanatics, so more often I will season my broth with a great tom yum soup base I found that contains no animal products. The vegetables and other ingredients you add to your bowls are only limited by your imagination (or, more accurately, whats in your fridge).  Usually I add some diced extra-firm tofu (sautéed when I have the time, or just simmered with everything else when Im in a hurry).  Ive also been known to add pieces of vegan sausage (as I did here) as well as meatballs when I have them on hand. I add whatever veggies I have on hand, whether fresh or frozen. These bowls are also a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables. One of my favorite additions to ramen bowls are Asian dumplings.  I live in a rural area, so until recently, if I wanted Asian dumplings, Id have to take a road trip to a city with an Asian market. But the nice people at Nasoya sent me samples of their organic Nasoya Vegan Dumplings to try for this post. I’m also happy to report that my local Food Lion now carries these dumplings (they’re in the fresh produce section next to the tofu), so I can now enjoy organic vegan dumplings anytime!  Click here for coupons to give them a try — they’re available in two flavors - Tofu Vegetable and Thai Basil Vegetable. Below is my recipe for Dumpling Ramen Bowls.   They can be made super-quickly if you use the simmer-everything-together method, or you can take a few extra minutes to saute some of the ingredients separately (such as the dumplings) and add more flavor to the final result. I especially like to use my electric wok when I make these bowls because I find that it makes it easier, whichever method I use.   Heres a recipe using my preferred method in which I saute a few of the components first:  Dumpling Ramen Bowls 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil 1 package Nasoya Vegan Dumplings 1 1/­­2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 cups water 2 teaspoons vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base 2 packages ramen noodles or rice noodles 1/­­2 cup shredded carrots 2 cups fresh baby spinach or baby bok choy 1 cup cooked broccoli florets (or other cooked vegetable, optional 2 diced vegan sausage links or 1 cup diced extra-firm tofu, optional Sriracha, to taste, optional Thai basil leaves or cilantro, optional garnish Black sesame seeds, optional garnish Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the dumplings and stir-fry until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.  Add a splash of water, if needed to keep the dumplings from sticking. Remove the dumplings from the wok, and set aside. Reheat the wok or skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes to brown nicely and soften.  Remove the mushrooms from the wok and set aside.  Bring the the water to a boil in the wok or medium saucepan. Stir in the soup base until blended. Add the ramen noodles, carrot, and remaining soy sauce and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Divide the noodle mixture into large soup bowls, arranging the carrots and spinach on top of the noodles.  Return the dumplings and mushrooms to the wok and heat until hot.  Arrange the dumplings and mushrooms on top of the noodles, next to the spinach and carrots.  Add the cooked broccoli and vegan sausage and stir-fry for a minute to heat through.  To serve, drizzle each bowl with sriracha, if using.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Garnish with basil or cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. Makes 2 to 4 servings   NOTE: For the quick, no-oil, Simmer-Everything-Together Method, use the above ingredients (except the oil) and proceed as follows: Heat the water in a large saucepan.  Add the soy sauce and vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base and bring to a boil.  Add the Nasoya Vegan Dumplings and return the water to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the ramen noodles, mushrooms, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles and dumplings are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, and spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Stir in any additional cooked veggies, tofu, or other ingredients, as desired. Divide the soup into bowls, arranging a few of the dumplings on top of each serving.  Drizzle with a little sriracha, if desired. Garnish with a few Thai basil or cilantro leaves and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. The post Dumpling Ramen Bowls appeared first on Robin Robertson.

khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu

March 5 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichukhichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu with step by step photo and video recipe. generally the street food or snacks recipes are termed as greasy or not an healthy food. most of them are either deep fried with high cholesterol or perhaps having high sodium content in it. but then there is this healthy snack or dish made with rice flour known as khichu recipe or papdi no lot from gujarati cuisine. The post khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Spicy Spaghetti Squash Ramen with Homemade Vegan Kombu Dashi

January 7 2019 Meatless Monday 

Swapping spaghetti squash for ramen noodles adds extra veggies to this flavorful dish, which also features crispy pan-fried tofu, caramelized onions, broccoli, mushrooms and fresh ginger. This recipe comes to us from Austin at Building Our Rez.   Serves 4 - For the Tofu - 1 14 oz block extra-firm tofu, pressed - 3 tbsp cornstarch - 2-4 tbsp oil   - For the Dashi - 8 cups vegetable broth - 8 oz dried mushrooms - 1/­­3 cup low sodium soy sauce - 1 tbsp sesame oil - 1 onion, sliced - 6 garlic cloves - Thumb-sized piece ginger, peeled and grated (about 2 tbsp grated) - 1/­­4 cup rice vinegar - 1-2 tbsp. chili oil (depending on your heat tolerance) plus more for topping - 1 8-inch piece of kombu (seaweed)   - For the Veggies and Toppings - 1 spaghetti squash - Your choice of veggies, such as 1 head of broccoli (about 2 c chopped florets) and 1 bell pepper, chopped - 1/­­2 cup green onions, sliced - 1 14 oz can coconut milk   Add all ingredients for the dashi except the kombu to a pot. Bring to a boil and allow to simmer while the spaghetti squash is cooking 45 minutes – 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 400?F. Slice the spaghetti squash in half, lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and discard. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place cut side down on a greased baking sheet and bake for 45-50 minutes, flipping halfway or until cooked through. Cut your veggies. We cut our broccoli into florets and chop our bell pepper into 1/­­2 in pieces and add to the skillet with 1 tbsp. oil. Cook until veggies are cooked but still have a little bit of a bite. Slice green onions for topping and set aside. When the spaghetti squash is done, remove from oven and allow to cool. Cook the tofu. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the tofu. The cornstarch make it want to stick together so make sure to sprinkle it in piece by piece so the cubes get to cook individually. Be careful at this step: the oil tends to splatter when you add the tofu. Allow to cook over medium-high heat about 4-6 minutes or until browned. Flip tofu cubes over and cook 4-6 minutes on the other side. Add the kombu to the dashi and simmer (do not boil) for 20 minutes. Strain the dashi through a sieve to strain out all the large items. Taste the dashi for flavor and seasonings. Even the low sodium soy sauce lends a decent amount of salt, but add more if necessary. Add more chili oil if you desire a spicier broth. Assemble your bowl. Place spaghetti squash into bowls. Ladle broth over top. Layer on veggies and tofu on top with a drizzle of coconut milk, green onions and more chili oil if desired. The post Spicy Spaghetti Squash Ramen with Homemade Vegan Kombu Dashi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Pineapple Rice Pudding

October 26 2018 VegKitchen 

Pineapple Rice Pudding Kids of all ages can enjoy this updated comfort food -- rice pudding --as a snack or dessert, or even as an offbeat lunch box offering, packed in a thermos. This version is made with brown rice, almond milk, and for extra fruity flavor, crushed pineapple. Serves: 4 to 6 3/­­4 cup short- or medium- grain brown rice  3/­­4 cup vanilla almond milk 1/­­2 cup dark or golden raisins 1/­­4 cup maple syrup 1 cup well-drained crushed pineapple 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for topping Pinch of nutmeg Combine the rice with 2 1/­­2 cups water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently until the water is absorbed, about 30 minutes. When done, stir in the almond milk, and simmer until absorbed.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes, then stir in the remaining ingredients.  Divide the rice pudding among 4 serving dishes. Sprinkle each with a little extra cinnamon and serve warm or at room temperature. Nutrition information: Calories: 247;  Total fat: 3g;  Protein: 3g;  Fiber: 2.6g;  Carbs: 53g; Sodium: 29mg The post Pineapple Rice Pudding appeared first on VegKitchen.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Roasted Chestnut Soup

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chestnuts are roasted sweet and balanced with apple cider vinegar and soy sauce in this simple soup. Red bell pepper slices and green onions top this winter warmer for a festive veggie crunch, making it perfect for your next holiday gathering. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 pounds whole chestnuts - 1 tablespoons olive oil - 1 large red onion, diced - 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar - a few dashes hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 2 green onions, sliced Place the chestnuts in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 1 hour. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Make an X on the flat side of each chestnut and place them, onto a baking sheet, cut side up. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven, roast for about 30 minutes and set aside to cool. When chestnuts are cool enough to handle, scoop their flesh out with a spoon. Dice the chestnut flesh. Place the olive oil into a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for about 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Add the vegetable broth, 4 cups of water and the diced flesh of the chestnuts. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the bits of chestnuts are very soft. Remove the stockpot from heat and stir in the Greek yogurt, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar and hot sauce to taste. Transfer the chestnut veggie stock mixture to a blender in batches. Puree until smooth. Strain through a sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide the soup into 4 bowls, top with festive red bell pepper and green onion slices and enjoy! The post Roasted Chestnut Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says: “This recipe reminds me a bit of pot roasts from my childhood. Of course, back then, it was beef, not mushrooms, but the flavor profiles are similar and both dishes are warm comfort food that make me want to curl up on the couch with a big bowl.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Garlic Mashed Potatoes: - 2 pounds (900 g) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 g) plant-based butter or (28 ml) extra-virgin olive oil -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) lite coconut milk, plus more as needed -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder, or to taste   - For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 carrots, peeled and diced - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced cremini mushrooms - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced shiitake mushrooms - 1 tablespoon (16 g) tomato paste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) tamari, coconut aminos, or soy sauce (gluten-free, if desired) - 2 teaspoons dried thyme - 2 teaspoons dried sage - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup (130 g) frozen green peas   For the Mashed Potatoes: Add the potatoes to a large pot on the stove. Cover the potatoes with water by 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm). Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the potatoes are tender and easily pierced with a knife. Drain and add the potatoes back to the pot. Add the butter and coconut milk. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth. Add additional milk 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time if you like your mashed potatoes a thinner consistency. Add the garlic powder and additional salt to taste. Switch to a spatula or wooden spoon to stir and incorporate the seasonings well. Set aside.   For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and carrots and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomato paste, tamari, thyme, sage, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Increase the heat to bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 10 minutes. Add the green peas, stir to incorporate, and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes to heat through.   Serve the Meaty Mushroom Stew over the Garlic Mashed Potatoes. The post Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan)

August 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) Some vegetarians find it difficult to give up cheese even though some know its not the best food to consume. Cheese is very high in calories and fat. To that, add sodium and cholesterol. The post Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Spinach Salad with Baked Tofu and Carrot Ginger Dressing

April 1 2019 Meatless Monday 

This light, refreshing salad is a perfect side that can also stand on its own thanks to the protein-rich spinach and tofu. To save time, you can press the tofu and make the peanut sauce and dressing the night before for a quicker and easier prep time! This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 2 Spinach Salad 6  ounce  bag of spinach 3/­­4  cup  carrots 3/­­4  cup  edamame 3  tbsp  hemp seeds,  seeds 14  ounces  firm tofu,  drained, pressed and cut into 1″ cubes   Peanut Sauce 1/­­4  tsp  coconut oil,  olive oil can be substituted 2  garlic cloves,  minced 2  tbsp  low sodium tamari,  soy sauce or coconut aminos can be substituted 3/­­4  cup  water 1  cup  coconut milk,  canned 3/­­4  cup  coconut water 2  tbsp  red curry paste 3/­­4  cup  peanut butter,  smooth 1  tbsp  sorghum syrup,  honey can be substituted red pepper flakes,  optional   - Carrot Ginger Dressing 1/­­4  cup  olive oil 1  tsp  sesame oil 1/­­4  cup  white vinegar 2  tbsp  white miso,  white chickpea miso can be substituted 1  tbsp  tahini 2  medium carrots,  peeled and chopped 1  inch long  piece fresh ginger,  peeled and cut into circles 1  tsp  sorghum syrup,  honey can be substituted 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1/­­4  tsp  white pepper   Preheat oven to 400? F. To drain and press tofu, roll tofu in a clean dish towel and place on a clean plate. Cover tofu with the flat side of another plate. Stack three heavy books on top of plate and set aside to allow liquid to drain from the tofu for at least 15 minutes. (This step can be prepped the night before.) To make peanut sauce, heat coconut oil over medium heat in a medium saucepan. Add garlic, sauté until lightly browned. Whisk in tamari, water, coconut milk, and coconut water. Add curry paste and stir for 1 minute. Whisk in peanut butter and sorghum syrup, bring to a simmer. Cook for 5 minutes. Add red pepper flakes if desired. Remove from heat. Cut tofu into 1 inch cubes. Place tofu cubes in a single layer on a lined baking sheet pan with parchment paper. Bake until firm, approximately 20 minutes. Remove tofu from oven, baste tofu with 1/­­4 cup peanut sauce, set aside. In a high-speed blender add all of the ingredients for the carrot-ginger dressing, blend until smooth. Refrigerate the dressing for at least 15 minutes so the flavors meld. In a medium salad bowl, toss together spinach, carrots, edamame, 2 tablespoons hemp seeds, remaining peanut sauce, basted tofu, and 6 tablespoons of carrot ginger dressing in a large bowl. Sprinkle the top of salad with 1 tablespoons hemp seeds. The post Spinach Salad with Baked Tofu and Carrot Ginger Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Five Veggie Raw Pad Thai

March 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from Dr. Robert Graham, co-founder of FRESH Med . Dr. Graham says: Pad thai is one of my favorite recipes. I wanted to create a version for you with easy, healthy raw vegan ingredients. We chose zucchini noddles to make all the ingredients easy to find. This raw pad thai is gluten free, nutrient dense and look at all those gorgeous plants youre going to eat! Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 2 - 1 medium zucchini, spiraled or julienned - 2 large carrots, julienned - 1 red pepper, thinly sliced - 1 cup thinly sliced red cabbage - 3/­­4 cup frozen edamame, thawed - 3 green onions, thinly sliced on bias - 1 teaspoon sesame seeds (toasted) - optional: 1 cup of rice vermicelli noodles   - For the dressing: - 1 garlic clove minced - 1/­­4 cup raw almond butter (can also use peanut butter) - 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium tamari - 2 tablespoons water (may need more for desired consistency) - 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup (or other sweetener) - 1/­­2 tablespoon toasted sesame oil - 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger Directions: 1. Prep all the vegetables. Add the zucchini, carrots, pepper, and cabbage into one large bowl. Toss with hands to combine. 2. Prepare the dressing by processing all dressing ingredients in a food processor or vitamix. The dressing may seem a bit thin at first, but it thickens as it sits. 3. Top bowls with edamame, green onion, and sesame seeds. Pour on dressing and enjoy. The post Five Veggie Raw Pad Thai appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Corn-Stuffed Zucchini

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Zucchini stuffed with corn is a delicious and healthy combination. This recipe is low in sodium, which helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 4 - 3/­­4  tsp, leaves  Dried Thyme - 1/­­2  tsp, ground  Black Pepper - 1/­­2  cup pieces  Mushrooms, White, Raw - 2  ounce  Cheddar Cheese – Low Fat - 4  tbsp chopped  Chives - 1/­­4  cup, chopped  Onion - 1 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 6  medium  Squash – Zucchini Cut zucchini in halves lengthwise. Cook in boiling water for 10 minutes. Carefully remove pulp. Drain corn and zucchini pulp well and combine with onion, mushrooms, pepper, chives, and thyme. Pile mixture in zucchini shells and place in a 13 X 9 inch pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 350 F for 20 minutes. The post Corn-Stuffed Zucchini appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tuscan Ribollita

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Ribollita is a traditional Tuscan stew featuring a mix of dark leafy greens, tomatoes, carrots, celery and aromatic herbs. Serve this dish alongside a loaf of warm, crusty bread for the perfect winter meal! This recipe comes to us from Cindy of Cindys Table. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided - 1 large yellow onion, diced - 2 carrots, peeled and sliced - 2 large stalks, celery, chopped - 1 large white sweet potato, chopped - 2 cups cabbage, coarsely chopped - 5 kale leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 Swiss chard leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more - 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, plus more - 8 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 (28 ounce) can petite diced tomatoes - 3 sage leaves - 3 bay leaves   In a large cast iron pan or soup pot over medium high heat, add 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Once hot, add in onion and cook for about 5 minutes until translucent. Add in carrots, celery and sweet potato. Continue cooking for 5 minutes. Add in cabbage, kale, swiss chard and garlic. Then stir together with a wooden spoon. Cover and continue cooking for 10 minutes. Pour in vegetable broth and petite diced tomatoes. Drop in the sage and bay leaves. Bring to a boil then cover and lower to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Refrigerate over night and reheat for 20 minutes over a medium temperature. Ladle each bowl and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil for serving. The post Tuscan Ribollita appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables

November 2 2018 VegKitchen 

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables Despite the fairly long ingredient list, this Thai-style tofu dish is a quick, easy preparation with lots of  healthy components. You need only some noodles or grains and a simple salad to make a satisfying meal. This is a nice change of pace from more common soy sauce flavored stir-fries, but its every bit as delectable. Serves: 4 to 6 14- to 16-ounce tub extra-firm tofu or two 8-ounce packages tempeh, any variety 2 tablespoons safflower oil 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced 8 baby carrots, halved lengthwise 2 cups small broccoli florets 2 cups fresh pineapple chunks, or one 15- to 16-ounce can pineapple chunks, drained (reserve juice for a different use) One 15-ounce can baby corn, drained 1 cup diced ripe tomatoes 1 cup reduced-fat coconut milk 2 teaspoons good quality curry powder, more or less to taste 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon red or green curry paste, or Sriracha sauce, optional 2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro, or more, to taste Salt to taste Hot cooked grains (rice, quinoa, or couscous) or noodles If using tofu, cut it into 6 slabs crosswise. Blot well on paper towels or […] The article Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables appeared first on VegKitchen.

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based recipe is low in sodium and helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 7 - 1  tablespoon minced  Garlic - 1  tsp, leaves  Oregano – Dried - 1  teaspoon  Allspice - 2  lemon yields  Lemon Juice – Fresh - 1  cup, whole  Raw Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas - 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 1/­­2  cup chopped  Carrots - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Yellow Bell Pepper, Raw - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Red Bell Pepper, Raw - 3  large  Cucumber – Peeled - 1  cup  Couscous – Dry   1. In a large bowl, mix together chilled couscous, cucumbers, red pepper, yellow pepper, carrots, snow peas, and corn. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, All spices, dried oregano, minced garlic, and olive oil. The post Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is infused with fresh squeezed orange juice and vegetable stock, while pumpkin is tossed with shallots, orange wedges and chickpeas. Tangy feta cheese stands out on a warm backdrop of toasted walnuts and slow roasted orange, all dressed with a reduced balsamic. This recipe comes from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 - 1 cup quinoa, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - juice from 1 orange - 1 orange, peeled and cut into wedges - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 pounds pumpkin, diced into 1 centimeter cubes - 1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned and rinsed - 5 shallots, quartered - 1/­­4 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup balsamic vinegar - 2 cups rocket lettuces - 7 ounces feta cheese*, crumbled *optional Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Place the quinoa, vegetable stock and juice from one orange into a medium pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside. Cut the remaining orange into wedges. Toss the orange wedges, pumpkin pieces, chickpeas and shallots with the olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and put in the oven. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until chickpeas are crisp and pumpkin is tender. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Place a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Toast the walnuts for 2-3 minutes, or until golden. Remove to a bowl and set aside. Place the balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Allow the vinegar to come to a simmer. Whisk for 4-5 minutes, or until the balsamic has reduced by half and the vinegar is syrupy. Set aside to cool. Place the quinoa in a large bowl. Add the roasted orange pumpkin mixture, toasted walnuts and rocket lettuces. Crumble the feta cheese on top, if using. Dress the salad with 2-3 tablespoons of balsamic reduction, or to taste, and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place equal portions in 4 bowls atop extra rocket lettuce. Sprinkle with a little more balsamic reduction if desired and enjoy. The post Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty Italian Minestrone

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

The cannellini beans give this traditional Italian soup fiber and protein. An easy weeknight dinner that makes great leftovers, this hearty soup is a great way to eat your vegetables on a cold winter night. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton‘s book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live--One Meal at a Time. Serves 4 to 6 - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 medium yellow onion, diced - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice - 2 carrots, chopped - 1 medium zucchini, chopped - 5 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon ground pepper - 1 cup alphabet, macaroni, or other pasta - 1/­­2 bunch kale, torn into bite-size pieces - 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed, and drained - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsleyfor garnish In a large stockpot, saute onion in olive oil on medium heat until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute. Add tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to boil. Add pasta and cook for 7 to 9 minutes until al dente. Stir in kale, beans, tomato paste, thyme, and basil. Simmer for 5 minutes more. Garnish with more chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsley. PRO-TIP: Ladle soup into individual containers, allow to cool, seal containers, and freeze for up to three months for easy work lunches or quick homemade dinners! The post Hearty Italian Minestrone appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rice Paper Rolls

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These Vietnamese treats are filled with vermicelli, Chinese cabbage and bean sprouts and seasoned with lime, mint, chili and cilantro. A shallot miso dipping sauce provides the perfect balance to these light rice paper rolls with unexpectedly intense flavors. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the dipping sauce: - 1 tablespoon water - 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce** - 1 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** -  1/­­2 shallot, finely diced -  1/­­2 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped -  1/­­2 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon miso paste** To complete the rice paper rolls: - 4 ounces vermicelli, cooked according to instructions - 1 cup Chinese cabbage, shredded -  1/­­2 cup bean sprouts - 1 bell pepper, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup cilantro, finely chopped - 1 fresh red chili - Juice of 1 lime - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce** - 15-20 rice paper sheets** *Found in Asian markets or the ethnic food or sauce sections of most grocery stores. To make the dipping sauce: In a medium bowl whisk together the water, chili sauce and soy sauce. Whisk in the shallot, mint, cilantro and miso paste until thoroughly combined. To complete the rice paper rolls: After the vermicelli noodles are cooked, drain and rinse well. Roughly chop the cooked noodles. In a large bowl combine the chopped noodles, cabbage, sprouts, bell pepper, mint, cilantro and chili. Dress the veggie filling with the lime juice, soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Toss until well mixed. Soak one individual rice paper sheet in a large bowl of water for 15-30 seconds, or until just soft. Pat dry on a clean towel. Place 2 tablespoons of filling inside the soaked rice paper roll. Fold in the edges and then roll them up firmly. The edges should seal neatly when pressed together with your fingers. Repeat the rice paper roll soaking and filling process individually until all the rice paper sheets are used up. Serve the rice paper rolls with dipping sauce on the side. The post Rice Paper Rolls appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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