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Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables

November 2 2018 VegKitchen 

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables Despite the fairly long ingredient list, this Thai-style tofu dish is a quick, easy preparation with lots of  healthy components. You need only some noodles or grains and a simple salad to make a satisfying meal. This is a nice change of pace from more common soy sauce flavored stir-fries, but its every bit as delectable. Serves: 4 to 6 14- to 16-ounce tub extra-firm tofu or two 8-ounce packages tempeh, any variety 2 tablespoons safflower oil 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced 8 baby carrots, halved lengthwise 2 cups small broccoli florets 2 cups fresh pineapple chunks, or one 15- to 16-ounce can pineapple chunks, drained (reserve juice for a different use) One 15-ounce can baby corn, drained 1 cup diced ripe tomatoes 1 cup reduced-fat coconut milk 2 teaspoons good quality curry powder, more or less to taste 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon red or green curry paste, or Sriracha sauce, optional 2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro, or more, to taste Salt to taste Hot cooked grains (rice, quinoa, or couscous) or noodles If using tofu, cut it into 6 slabs crosswise. Blot well on paper towels or […] The article Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables appeared first on VegKitchen.

Pineapple Rice Pudding

October 26 2018 VegKitchen 

Pineapple Rice Pudding Kids of all ages can enjoy this updated comfort food -- rice pudding --as a snack or dessert, or even as an offbeat lunch box offering, packed in a thermos. This version is made with brown rice, almond milk, and for extra fruity flavor, crushed pineapple. Serves: 4 to 6 3/­­4 cup short- or medium- grain brown rice  3/­­4 cup vanilla almond milk 1/­­2 cup dark or golden raisins 1/­­4 cup maple syrup 1 cup well-drained crushed pineapple 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for topping Pinch of nutmeg Combine the rice with 2 1/­­2 cups water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently until the water is absorbed, about 30 minutes. When done, stir in the almond milk, and simmer until absorbed.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes, then stir in the remaining ingredients.  Divide the rice pudding among 4 serving dishes. Sprinkle each with a little extra cinnamon and serve warm or at room temperature. Nutrition information: Calories: 247;  Total fat: 3g;  Protein: 3g;  Fiber: 2.6g;  Carbs: 53g; Sodium: 29mg The post Pineapple Rice Pudding appeared first on VegKitchen.

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based recipe is low in sodium and helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 7 - 1  tablespoon minced  Garlic - 1  tsp, leaves  Oregano – Dried - 1  teaspoon  Allspice - 2  lemon yields  Lemon Juice – Fresh - 1  cup, whole  Raw Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas - 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 1/­­2  cup chopped  Carrots - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Yellow Bell Pepper, Raw - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Red Bell Pepper, Raw - 3  large  Cucumber – Peeled - 1  cup  Couscous – Dry   1. In a large bowl, mix together chilled couscous, cucumbers, red pepper, yellow pepper, carrots, snow peas, and corn. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, All spices, dried oregano, minced garlic, and olive oil. The post Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is infused with fresh squeezed orange juice and vegetable stock, while pumpkin is tossed with shallots, orange wedges and chickpeas. Tangy feta cheese stands out on a warm backdrop of toasted walnuts and slow roasted orange, all dressed with a reduced balsamic. This recipe comes from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 - 1 cup quinoa, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - juice from 1 orange - 1 orange, peeled and cut into wedges - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 pounds pumpkin, diced into 1 centimeter cubes - 1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned and rinsed - 5 shallots, quartered - 1/­­4 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup balsamic vinegar - 2 cups rocket lettuces - 7 ounces feta cheese*, crumbled *optional Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Place the quinoa, vegetable stock and juice from one orange into a medium pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside. Cut the remaining orange into wedges. Toss the orange wedges, pumpkin pieces, chickpeas and shallots with the olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and put in the oven. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until chickpeas are crisp and pumpkin is tender. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Place a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Toast the walnuts for 2-3 minutes, or until golden. Remove to a bowl and set aside. Place the balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Allow the vinegar to come to a simmer. Whisk for 4-5 minutes, or until the balsamic has reduced by half and the vinegar is syrupy. Set aside to cool. Place the quinoa in a large bowl. Add the roasted orange pumpkin mixture, toasted walnuts and rocket lettuces. Crumble the feta cheese on top, if using. Dress the salad with 2-3 tablespoons of balsamic reduction, or to taste, and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place equal portions in 4 bowls atop extra rocket lettuce. Sprinkle with a little more balsamic reduction if desired and enjoy. The post Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty Italian Minestrone

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

The cannellini beans give this traditional Italian soup fiber and protein. An easy weeknight dinner that makes great leftovers, this hearty soup is a great way to eat your vegetables on a cold winter night. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton‘s book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live--One Meal at a Time. Serves 4 to 6 - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 medium yellow onion, diced - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice - 2 carrots, chopped - 1 medium zucchini, chopped - 5 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon ground pepper - 1 cup alphabet, macaroni, or other pasta - 1/­­2 bunch kale, torn into bite-size pieces - 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed, and drained - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsleyfor garnish In a large stockpot, saute onion in olive oil on medium heat until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute. Add tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to boil. Add pasta and cook for 7 to 9 minutes until al dente. Stir in kale, beans, tomato paste, thyme, and basil. Simmer for 5 minutes more. Garnish with more chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsley. PRO-TIP: Ladle soup into individual containers, allow to cool, seal containers, and freeze for up to three months for easy work lunches or quick homemade dinners! The post Hearty Italian Minestrone appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rice Paper Rolls

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These Vietnamese treats are filled with vermicelli, Chinese cabbage and bean sprouts and seasoned with lime, mint, chili and cilantro. A shallot miso dipping sauce provides the perfect balance to these light rice paper rolls with unexpectedly intense flavors. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the dipping sauce: - 1 tablespoon water - 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce** - 1 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** -  1/­­2 shallot, finely diced -  1/­­2 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped -  1/­­2 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon miso paste** To complete the rice paper rolls: - 4 ounces vermicelli, cooked according to instructions - 1 cup Chinese cabbage, shredded -  1/­­2 cup bean sprouts - 1 bell pepper, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup cilantro, finely chopped - 1 fresh red chili - Juice of 1 lime - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce** - 15-20 rice paper sheets** *Found in Asian markets or the ethnic food or sauce sections of most grocery stores. To make the dipping sauce: In a medium bowl whisk together the water, chili sauce and soy sauce. Whisk in the shallot, mint, cilantro and miso paste until thoroughly combined. To complete the rice paper rolls: After the vermicelli noodles are cooked, drain and rinse well. Roughly chop the cooked noodles. In a large bowl combine the chopped noodles, cabbage, sprouts, bell pepper, mint, cilantro and chili. Dress the veggie filling with the lime juice, soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Toss until well mixed. Soak one individual rice paper sheet in a large bowl of water for 15-30 seconds, or until just soft. Pat dry on a clean towel. Place 2 tablespoons of filling inside the soaked rice paper roll. Fold in the edges and then roll them up firmly. The edges should seal neatly when pressed together with your fingers. Repeat the rice paper roll soaking and filling process individually until all the rice paper sheets are used up. Serve the rice paper rolls with dipping sauce on the side. The post Rice Paper Rolls appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tacos with Black Bean Salsa and Tofu

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

These meatless tacos are light, fresh and bursting with flavor! They’re packed with veggies and gain protein from the tofu, which soaks up the fruity and subtly spicy ancho chili marinade. This recipe comes to us from Goya, a Meatless Monday partner. Makes 12 tacos For the Salsa: - 1 can (15.5 oz.) low sodium black beans, drained and rinsed - 1 medium tomato, seeded and diced - 1 small red onion, finely chopped - 1 tbsp. chopped cilantro - 1 tsp.low-sodium adobo seasoning - 1 tsp. lemon juice - 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil For the Tacos: - 2 Ancho chiles, stemmed and seeded - 3 tbsp. lemon juice - 2 tbsp. corn oil - 1 tsp. low-sodium adobo seasoning -  1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin - 1 tsp. minced garlic -  1/­­2 tsp. dried oregano leaves - 1 container of extra-firm tofu - 1 avocado - 12 corn tortillas - 1 can (16 oz.) reduced sodium refried beans, warmed according to package instructions (optional) - Lime wedges, for garnish In medium bowl, stir together black beans, tomato, onions, cilantro, adobo, lemon juice and olive oil until well combined; cover and set salsa in refrigerator until ready to serve. Place chiles in medium bowl and cover with hot water. Let sit for about 15 minutes. Transfer chiles and 3 tablespoons soaking water to blender. Add lemon juice, corn oil, Adobo, cumin, garlic and oregano to blender. Blend on high speed until smooth, about 1 minute. In bowl, combine chile mixture with drained slices of tofu; cover and chill in refrigerator for at least 15 minutes. Heat grill or grill pan over medium-high heat. Add marinated tofu and cook, flipping once until tofu is golden brown on both sides, about 2-3 minutes per side; transfer to plate. Empty the refried beans into a bowl and heat until warm. To assemble tacos, spread heaping spoonful of warmed refried beans onto each tortilla. Spoon reserved salsa on each tortilla and top with two or three pieces of tofu. Serve with lime wedges and slices of avocado. The post Tacos with Black Bean Salsa and Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Potato Ginger Curry

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Coriander, ginger and garlic are stir-fried first, which deepens the taste of this classic Thai red curry. Tomatoes, potatoes, onions and spinach take on the full flavor of the aromatically spiced sauce. This recipe comes to us from DanniBeth of Vegan Miss Adventures in the Kitchen. Serves 4 - 4 tomatoes - 2 tablespoons vegetable oil - 2 onions, cut into thick wedges - 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped - 1 garlic clove, chopped - 2 tablespoons ground coriander - 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks - 2 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - 1 tablespoons red curry paste - 8 ounces spinach leaves Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over high heat. Fill a medium bowl full of cold water. Put the tomatoes in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Leave for 2-3 minutes then plunge into the cold water to loosen the skins. Peel off the skins of the tomatoes. Cut each tomato into quarters. Remove and discard the seeds and central core of each tomato. Set tomato pieces aside. Preheat a wok over medium-high heat. When the wok is heated add the vegetable oil. Stir fry the onions, ginger and garlic in the vegetable oil for 2-3 minutes, or until seasonings begin to soften. Add the coriander and potatoes to the wok and stir-fry for 2-3 minutes. Add the stock and curry paste and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat and simmer gently for 10-15 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender. Add the spinach and the tomato quarters to the wok. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute, or until the spinach has wilted. Serve atop cooked rice to soak up the curry sauce. The post Thai Potato Ginger Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Red cabbage is chopped into ribbons and tossed with red wine vinegar, honey, coriander, soy sauce and chili powder for a sweet-sour-spicy flavor. Green apples soak up this delectable sauce, before this fruit veggie medley is topped with freshly grated ginger. Try this dish on the side in place of coleslaw. This recipe comes to us from Jenné of Sweet Potato Soul. Serves 4 - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 head red cabbage, washed & cut into ribbons - salt, to taste - 1/­­2 onion - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon honey - 1 bay leaf - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon low sodium tamari or soy sauce - 1 teaspoon red chili powder - 1/­­2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice with pulp - 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and cubed - 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated - fresh black pepper - orange slices*, for garnish Place the olive oil in a large, deep pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for 4-6 minutes, or until the onion begins to soften. Add the red cabbage ribbons, sprinkle with a little salt, stir and cover. Cook the cabbage for about 2 minutes, or until the cabbage begins to soften. Uncover the pot and coat the cabbage with the vinegar, honey, bay leaf, coriander, tamari or soy sauce and chili powder. Stir thoroughly, turn down heat to medium-low and cover again and cook 4-6 minutes. Uncover and pour in the orange juice, orange pulp and apple cubes. Cook about 10 minutes more, or until the cabbage has reached desired tenderness. Taste for seasoning and adjust to preference. Serve hot or warm, sprinkled with freshly grated ginger and black pepper. Garnish with sliced oranges, if using, and enjoy! The post Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup

November 14 2016 Meatless Monday 

Try this tomato Parmesan soup as a meal or side, easy to prepare in a slow cooker. Tomatoes have nutrients that you can see! The red pigment in these fruits are called carotenoids, more commonly known as Vitamin A. This rich and creamy soup brings you towards your daily dose of Vitamin A and comes to us from Life Currents. Serves 8 - 1 (28 oz) can low sodium crushed tomatoes, undrained - 4 carrots, sliced - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon dried basil - 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 bay leaf - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper -  1/­­4 cup olive oil -  1/­­4 cup butter -  1/­­2 cup flour -  1/­­2 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese - 2 cups milk Add the first nine ingredients (tomatoes through black pepper) to the bowl of a 4-quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 5-7 hours, or until vegetables are softened. About 30 minutes before serving the soup, prepare the roux. To prepare the roux, heat oil and butter over low heat in a sauce pan and add flour. Stir constantly with a whisk for 5-7 minutes, until roux is a smooth light brown paste. Slowly stir 1 cup of hot soup into the roux, until fully mixed in. Add another 3 cups soup to the mixture, and continue to stir until smooth. Add thickened soup back into the slow cooker, and mix in the Parmesan and milk. Cover and cook on low for another 30 minutes. Add seasonings to taste, and enjoy. The post Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese

October 7 2016 Meatless Monday 

Butternut squash is roasted and mashed with sunchokes in this root vegetable crowd pleaser. A Dijon mustard roux serves as the base for a luscious sauce in this hearty mac and cheese, finished perfectly with crunchy whole-wheat breadcrumbs. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Cold Cereal and Toast. Serves 10 - 1/­­2 small butternut squash, seeded - 2 medium sunchokes*, peeled - 12 ounces elbow macaroni - salt, to taste - 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper - 2 tablespoons unsalted butter - 2 tablespoons all purpose flour - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard - 1 3/­­4 cups nonfat milk - 1/­­4 cup low sodium vegetable stock - 4 ounces Muenster cheese, grated - 4 ounces cheddar cheese, grated - 1/­­2 cup whole-wheat breadcrumbs *Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes can be found at farmers markets or in the gourd section of vegetable aisle in some grocery stores.   Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a layer of aluminum foil. Lay the squash, cut side down, on the baking sheet. Add the peeled sunchokes to the sheet, place it in the oven and bake for about 25-30 minutes, or until the squash is tender when pierced with a butter knife. Scoop the squashs flesh into a large mixing bowl and mash it using a fork. Add the roasted sunchokes, mashing to incorporate them with the butternut squash. For the smoothest consistency, add the squash sunchoke mash to a food processor or blender and puree if desired. Place a large pot of salted water over medium-high heat. Cook the pasta according to package directions, or until al dente, drain, return to the pot, remove from heat and set aside to cool. Place a medium saucepan over medium heat. Melt the butter in the saucepan, then whisk in the flour and mustard. Continue whisking over medium heat for about 1 minute, then slowly add in the milk, stirring constantly. Bring the mixture to a simmer, lower heat to medium-low and keep simmering, whisking frequently, for 5-6 minutes, or until the mixture has thickened to the consistency of heavy cream. Season the sauce with the pepper and 1/­­2 teaspoon salt. Add the squash sunchoke mash, Muenster and cheddar, stirring with a wooden spoon until the cheese has melted. Pour the cheese sauce into the cooked macaroni, stirring to ensure all ingredients are evenly incorporated. Preheat your broiler. Pour the macaroni into a medium baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs. Broil for about 10 minutes, or until the bubbly with brown edges. Divide into 10 servings and enjoy! The post Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Fried Rice

September 26 2016 Meatless Monday 

Turn this classic takeout dish into a satisfying, home-cooked Monday night meal. This fried rice features three (three!) different types of mushrooms and is packed with even more veggies, not grease and salt. This recipe comes to us from Stefanie of Sarcastic Cooking. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 4 ounces shitake mushrooms, stems removed and chopped - 6 ounces portabella mushrooms, stemmed and chopped - 4 ounces button mushrooms, chopped - 1/­­3 cup diced yellow onion - 2 carrots, peeled and grated - 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce - 1 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce - 3-4 cups cooked white/­­brown rice, cooked according to instructions on packaging - 2 large eggs - 4 green onions, chopped - salt and pepper to taste Add olive oil to a large skillet or wok. Allow the oil to heat up for a minute or two over a medium flame. Add all the mushrooms. Stir to evenly coat in oil. Sautee mushrooms for 10 minutes until golden and crispy on the edges. Add the onion and carrot. Sautee an additional three to five minutes until onions become translucent. Remove the vegetables from the pan. Add to a plate and keep off to the side for later. Reduce the heat to low. Add the two eggs to a small mixing bowl and beat. Add in a little pinch of salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the hot pan and scramble. Cook until firm. Remove egg and add it to the plate with the veggies off to the side. Add chili garlic sauce and soy sauce to the pan, whisk to combine. Mix in the rice. Add in the cooked egg and mushrooms. Stir to make sure the flavors are evenly distributed. Lastly, mix in the green onions, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with additional soy sauce and hot sauce. The post Mushroom Fried Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Barley Fried Rice

February 22 2016 Meatless Monday 

This healthy spin on fried rice features the nutritious whole grain barley in place usual white rice. Edamame adds protein to the dish while eggs, peas and carrots take up their traditional role in this popular dish. This recipe comes to us from Amber of Homemade Nutrition. Serves 4 – 6 - 1 teaspoon unsalted butter - 2 large eggs, cracked and mixed in a small bowl - 1 tablespoon canola oil or light olive oil, separated - 1/­­2 medium red onion, chopped - 2 cloves garlic, chopped - salt and pepper to taste - 1 cup frozen edamame (shelled) - 1 cup frozen peas and carrots - 3 1/­­2 cups cooked barley (or brown rice) - 1/­­4 cup + 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - red pepper flakes to taste (optional) - chopped cilantro for garnish (optional) Heat a large cast iron or nonstick skillet over medium low heat. Melt the butter, and cook the eggs until they are scrambled and just barely cooked through. Remove the eggs from the skillet and set aside. Turn the heat up to medium high, add 1 teaspoon of the oil, then add the onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the onion begins to soften. Add the edamame and peas and carrots and cook for about 2 more minutes. Add the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil, then add the barley. Stir the mixture, then let it sit for about 1 minutes, then stir again and let it sit for another minute (this is to allow the barley to brown). Repeat 2-3 more times. Finally, add the soy sauce, sesame oil, red pepper flakes (if using) and cooked egg and mix to combine everything. Remove from heat. Top with chopped cilantro for garnish. The post Barley Fried Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Roasted Chestnut Soup

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chestnuts are roasted sweet and balanced with apple cider vinegar and soy sauce in this simple soup. Red bell pepper slices and green onions top this winter warmer for a festive veggie crunch, making it perfect for your next holiday gathering. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 pounds whole chestnuts - 1 tablespoons olive oil - 1 large red onion, diced - 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar - a few dashes hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 2 green onions, sliced Place the chestnuts in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 1 hour. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Make an X on the flat side of each chestnut and place them, onto a baking sheet, cut side up. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven, roast for about 30 minutes and set aside to cool. When chestnuts are cool enough to handle, scoop their flesh out with a spoon. Dice the chestnut flesh. Place the olive oil into a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for about 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Add the vegetable broth, 4 cups of water and the diced flesh of the chestnuts. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the bits of chestnuts are very soft. Remove the stockpot from heat and stir in the Greek yogurt, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar and hot sauce to taste. Transfer the chestnut veggie stock mixture to a blender in batches. Puree until smooth. Strain through a sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide the soup into 4 bowls, top with festive red bell pepper and green onion slices and enjoy! The post Roasted Chestnut Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus

June 12 2017 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL goes Vegan. Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

EU Last Law: Ham Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools Hospitals

April 1 2017 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

EU Last Law: Ham Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools HospitalsHam Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools and Hospitals Embargoed until April 1st In an uncharacteristic liberal style move the Govt has been in secret talks to ban ham, burgers, sausages and other processed meats in NHS hospitals and schools by 1st April 2018. In a 9th hour move the EU managed to sneak this new vegan law into the statute books before article 50 was invoked this week by PM Theresa May and thus automatically uploaded into our statute books via The Great Repeal Bill  New EU Vegan Rules on Meal Deals April 1st Until relatively recently ingredients such as testicles, rectum and udder were allowed in school sausages but regulations have been tightened up. A typical recipe for school/­­hospital sausages ("pork product" made "down to a price" to win a local authority contract - Guardian May 2003) now looks something like this; ?         50% "meat", of which 30% is pork fat with a bit of jowl ?         20% mechanically recovered chicken meat ?         17% water ?         30% rusk and soya ?         soya concentrate ?         hydrolysed protein ?         modified flour, dried onion, sugar, dextrose, phosphates, preservative E221 sodium sulphite, flavour enhancer, spices, garlic flavouring, antioxidant E300 (ascorbic acid), colouring E128 (red 2G). Casings: made from collagen from cow hide In the light of the World Health Organisations re categorisation of processed meat products (Risk: Highest -  Processed meat causes cancer IARC. WHO. BBC Oct 2015) and perhaps fearing resultant legal action from parents and school governors, heads of education and health departments have been discussing banning processed meat products. Ham Sandwiches become Vegan Hahm Sandwiches from 1st April The proposed plan is to replace all processed meats with like sounding plant based vegan products reveals junior health minister Ms Simmo Lay Leading Nutritionist Dr Bin MaFoud says In reality most of any beneficial nutrients in typical local authority purchased processed meat products comes from soya anyway so a move to plant based alternatives makes sense The food industry is now awash with very realistic processed meat alternatives that have same or better taste, texture and protein content than existing products. Patients and schoolchildren probably wouldnt even realise they are being given plant based alternatives. Menus would need to be re written with just omitting or adding one letter for trade description reasons so thus sausage becomes sossage, chicken becomes chikken, mince and burgers stays the same as does Hot Dog, ham becomes hahm and chorizo becomes Chorriso Says professor of food psychology Professor Joe King Many sandwich providers are ahead of the game already offering Vegan options School Packed lunches will not escape in case children swap food and schools risk being held responsible for future cancer risk. Ham sandwiches will join the school ban on chocolate and crisps that already exists in schools along with salami, sausages, bacon, beefburgers and hamburgers, chicken nuggets and pepperami. Ofsted will have the policing of new health standards in schools added to their list of responsibilities but it is not yet clear who will police the standards of food in hospitals as currently hospitals dont appear to have many standards for the quality of food. A Daily Mail reader, Ivor Beef, 68, from Barking, Essex said "If the EU thinks my son is going to eat more vegetables then they've go another think coming. Eating sausages and bacon and ham is a basic British human right along with bent bananas and blue passports. If  British citizens want to increase their risk of heart disease, stroke, cancers and diabetes than that's their sovereign right and the Euros can bog off back across the channel with their daft liberal ideas about saving the planet and national health. Karin Ridgers Founder of VeggieVison TV adds, Luckily there is a plant based version of everything nowadays so no one need miss out on taste and texture, the animals and planet will thank you and you could live longer too. http:/­­/­­www.cancerresearchuk.org/­­about-cancer/­­causes-of-cancer/­­diet-and-cancer/­­how-healthy-eating-prevents-cancer Date:  April 1st More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup

January 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This soup is free from dairy and gluten, and the white beans add body and protein without distracting from the rich sweet potato flavor. Try serving it with chopped green apple and a spoonful of Greek yogurt for a tangy flavor. To keep it vegan, skip the yogurt - tastes just as good! This recipe comes to us from Neda of Healthy with Nedi. - 2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and cut in pieces - 2 tbsp coconut oil - 1 red onion, chopped - 5 garlic cloves, chopped - 1 can white beans, rinsed and drained - 1 cup coconut milk - 2 cups low-sodium, vegetable stock - 1/­­2 cup water - 1 tbsp fresh sage - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - Sea salt & pepper to taste   Toppings (optional) - Sliced green apple - Greek plain yogurt - Fresh sage   Wash the potatoes with water, peel and cut them in large pieces. In a large pot, melt coconut oil over medium heat. Add the chopped onion, garlic, turmeric and sage. Sauté for 2 minutes, until translucent. Add the potatoes, stock, coconut milk, water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, and lower the heat to medium. Cook for 30 minutes, until the potatoes are soft. Add the canned beans and turn off heat. In small batches, transfer the vegetables to a high-powered blender. Add broth as you go, depending on how thick or thin you want the soup to be. For thicker, add less broth, and for thinner add more broth. Blend until smooth. Pour the soup back into the pot. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking. Ladle soup into bowls and enjoy with any of the suggested toppings! The post Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake

January 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Say cheese, because you’ll be smiling after tasting this Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese recipe. This recipes uses sweet potatoes to replace some of the cheese, making it a healthier choice. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie of Kroll’s Korner. Serves 4 For the mac and cheese: - 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed - 13 ounces elbow macaroni noodles (whole wheat or gluten free, if preferred) - 1/­­2 large onion, diced - 2 cups fresh spinach, chopped - 4 garlic cloves, chopped - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­4 cup all- purpose flour - 2 cups fat free milk - 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard - 1 teaspoon red pepper chili flakes - 6 ounces of four cheese blend - Salt and pepper, to taste   For the Breadcrumb Topping: - 1 cup Panko breadcrumbs - 1/­­4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese   Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Bring a medium pot of water to boil and add in the sweet potato that has been peeled and cubed up. Boil sweet potato for 10-15 minutes, or until tender. Drain sweet potatoes and then mash well. You should have ~2-2.5 cups of sweet potato. Next, cook the elbow noodles according to the package. While pasta is cooking, heat the olive oil in a large pan with onion and garlic. Cook for about 4-5 minutes over medium heat. Add the flour and whisk for 30 seconds and then slowly pour and whisk in the milk and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and continue to whisk. Mixture should begin to thicken after 3-5 minutes. Bring heat to low and mix in the mustard, salt, pepper, red pepper chili flakes, cheese and sweet potato. Stir well and then remove from heat. Add in the noodles and mix in well. Taste and adjust any seasonings you may want extra. Pour in a oven safe casserole dish and top with panko crumb/­­Parmesan cheese mixture. Place in oven, uncovered, for 10-15 minutes, or until it gets bubbly. Serve warm and enjoy! The post Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Green beans, bell peppers and chunks of pumpkin are seasoned sweet and spicy with chilis, curry paste and coconut water. Kaffir lime leaves and Thai basils herbal notes add depth to the flavor of this curry, finished off with a bright squeeze of lime. This recipe comes to us from Ashley of Ashleyz Sprout. Serves 4 - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 3 tablespoons red or yellow curry paste* - 1-2 Thai chilis*, minced - 1 can coconut water* - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sugar - 3 kaffir lime leaves* - 1/­­2 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup Fresno peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­2 8 ounce block extra-firm tofu, cubed - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin, peeled and cubed - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 1/­­2 cup Thai basil leaves* - 1 lime, cut into wedges *Found in Asian markets or the Asian section of some grocery stores. Place the oil into a large wok over medium-high heat. Season with the curry paste and Thai chilis. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until the spices become fragrant. Whisk the coconut water, sugar and lime leaves into the wok. Cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the green beans, bell peppers, Fresno peppers, tofu, pumpkin and vegetable stock to the wok. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes, or until the vegetables are cooked through. Add the Thai basil to the wok. Stir and remove from heat. Divide into 4 portions, top with a squeeze of lime and enjoy! The post Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever

October 4 2016 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever Aquafaba (bean water) is an amazing ingredient that can be used instead of egg whites, making it a boon to vegans everywhere, including those who thought lemon meringue pie was a ting of the past!  In Aquafaba, Zsu Dever’s groundbreaking new cookbook, you will find everything you ever wanted to know about using aquafaba, including a meringue primer, tips and tricks, and Zsu’s fabulous recipes, complete with clear instructions and gorgeous photos throughout. In this book, Zsu shares her recipe for an amazing lemon meringue pie, airy macarons, and light and luscious chocolate mousse,among other confections.  There are also savory recipes for burgers, quiche, and much more, including the deliciously crisp latkes (below).  In addition, Zsu answers the question “What do we do with all the leftover chickpeas?” with an entire chapter filled with fantastic chickpea recipes such as Curried Caribbean Coconut Chickpeas, Korean Dak Galbi, Pulled Chickpea Seitan Roast, and Shiro Wat. If you’re interested in learning more about transforming the bean liquid you used to through away into amazing sweet and savory delights, you’ll want to own a copy of Aquafaba.  Now here’s that latke recipe…. Latkes These latkes are perfectly crisp on the outside and melt-in-your-mouth on the inside. The added potato starch increases their crispiness, but it is not essential. Some russet potatoes tend to be on the drier side, but to be safe, place them in a lint-free kitchen towel, fold up the edges and give them a good wring to remove excess water. Serve this the traditional way, with nondairy sour cream and applesauce. (From Aquafaba, copyright (C) 2016 by Zsu Dever. Used by permission.) - 2 pounds russet potatoes - 1/­­2 medium onion - 1/­­4 cup aquafaba (see Note) - 1/­­4 cup potato starch, optional - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley, optional - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - High-heat oil, for frying, such as canola or peanut Peel the potatoes and shred them using either a food processor with the shredding blade or a box grater. Place them on a kitchen towel, fold up the edges, twist the towel around the potatoes, and squeeze out all the water that you can. Place the potatoes in a large bowl. Shred the onion and add it to the potatoes. Add the aquafaba, starch, parsley (if using), salt, baking powder, and black pepper. Mix very well. Heat about 1/­­2 inch of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add two or three kernels of popping corn and heat the oil until the corn pops; this is an indicator that your oil is hot enough. Remove and discard the popped corn. Using a 1/­­4-cup measuring cup, place 3 to 4 portions of the potato mixture in the hot oil and cook them until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Do not press down on the latkes. Flip the latkes and continue to cook another 2 minutes. Drain them on paper towels and serve as soon as possible. Make sure to give the potatoes a stir before measuring, and do not crowd the skillet or your latkes will not be crispy. Makes 14 to 16 latkes Note: Although aquafaba is best if homemade using the recipe provided in the book, you can use aquafaba from canned chickpeas. Use the organic, low-sodium, canned chickpeas and strain off the liquid into a measuring cup using a fine mesh strainer. Note the amount of liquid you acquired, then add it to a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the liquid reduces by 1/­­3. Cool the aquafaba completely before using. The post Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

These veggie burgers are a great meatless option for barbecues and gatherings, but also refrigerate well once cooked for meatless meals throughout the week. This recipe comes to us from from Plant-Powered for Life by Sharon Palmer, RDN, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Makes 10 servings (1 patty, bun, and lettuce leaf, and 2 tomato and avocado slices each) - 3/­­4 cup (156 g) uncooked farro - 3 cups (711 ml) water - 1 teaspoon reduced sodium vegetable broth base - One 15-ounce (425 g) can cannellini beans, no salt added, rinsed and drained (liquid reserved), or 1 3/­­4 cups cooked - 1 medium onion, finely diced - 1 cup (70 g) finely chopped mushrooms - 1 cup (110 g) grated carrots (2 medium) - 1/­­4 cup (29 g) chopped walnuts - 1/­­4 cup (15 g) chopped fresh oregano, or 1 teaspoon dried - 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives - 1/­­3 cup (52 g) uncooked old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup whole grain bread crumbs - 1 teaspoon low-sodium herbal seasoning blend - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - Pinch of sea salt, optional - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - Ten 1 1/­­2-ounce (43 g) whole grain buns - 10 lettuce leaves - 3 medium tomatoes, sliced into 20 slices - 2 avocados, sliced into 20 slices Place the farro in a pot with the water and broth base. Stir well, cover, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, cook for 35 to 40 minutes, and drain any leftover liquid. Place the cannellini beans in a mixing bowl and mash slightly with a potato masher, until thick and lumpy. Mix in the cooked farro, onions, mushrooms, carrots, walnuts, oregano, chives, oats, bread crumbs, herbal seasoning, black pepper, turmeric, and sea salt, if desired. Combine the ingredients using clean hands, then add 2 to 3 tablespoons of the reserved bean liquid to make a thick yet moistened mixture that sticks together. Chill for about 1 hour. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat. Form patties out of 1/­­2 cup of the bean mixture with your hands, mashing the ingredients together so that they do not crumble. Carefully place 3 to 4 patties at a time into the hot oil and cook for 6 minutes on each side, turning carefully. Repeat, adding 1 tablespoon of olive oil to the skillet with each batch of patties, until all the patties are done. Serve each patty with 1 bun, 1 lettuce leaf, 2 tomato slices, and 2 avocado slices. The post Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash

February 22 2016 Meatless Monday 

Carrots, sweet potatoes, green onions and mushrooms are seasoned with tamari, hot chili oil and sesame seeds in this everything-but-the-sink breakfast hash. Black beans, red cabbage and broccoli chunks finish this versatile day starter with extra protein and fiber, but feel free to adapt it to fit whatever leftover veggies you have in your fridge. This recipe comes to us from Stephanie of The Recipe Renovator. Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 6 ounces cremini mushrooms, sliced - 1 carrot, sliced into thin diagonals - 1 sweet potato, diced into 1/­­4 inch cubes - 2 green onions, sliced - 6 ounces firm or extra firm tofu - 2-4 tablespoons low sodium tamari - 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil - 1-2 teaspoons hot chili oil - 2 tablespoons sesame seeds - 1/­­4 head red cabbage, thinly sliced - 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced - 1 broccoli stalk, cut into small chunks - 1/­­2 cup black beans, rinsed and drained - salt and pepper, to taste Heat the oil in a large skillet or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, carrot, sweet potato and green onion to the pan. Cook, stirring intermittently, for about 10 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Crumble the tofu into the pan, breaking it up with your fingers as you add it to the vegetables. Stir to combine. Season the vegetable mixture with the tamari, sesame oil, chili oil and sesame seeds. Add the cabbage, garlic, broccoli and black beans to the pan. Stir until well combined and cook for about 5 minutes, or until the flavors have fully melded together. Season with salt and pepper to taste and enjoy! The post Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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