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Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup

July 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soupmomos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup with step by step photo and video recipe. basically an extended version of traditional momos recipe which is served spicy achar or sesame or tomato based soup. it is mainly served as appetiser just before the meal, but can also be served as a starter. in this recipe, paneer based vegetable stuffing is used, but can easily mix and matched with any meat based momos too. Continue reading momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Banh Mi Sandwiches, Tofu Lettuce Wraps & Zucchini Boats

July 14 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: grilled veggie banh mi sandwiches; pasta with cilantro jalape?o pesto, fresh corn & tomatoes; grilled teriyaki tofu lettuce wraps with creamy sesame dressing; vegan zucchini taco boats; and crispy black pepper tofu.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds – Bateta Nu Shaak

June 26 2017 Vegan Richa 

Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds – Bateta Nu ShaakGujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds. Indian Spiced Potatoes with sesame seeds and peanuts. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Indian Gujarati Recipe. Bateta Nu Shaak.  Potatoes are made in various ways in many regional cuisines in India. Roasted with whole spices, roasted with garam masala, crisped up with rice flour, curried with tomato curry, paired with other vegetables and so on.  There are also several family recipes with a twist that often become a favorite. These Gujarati potatoes are a variation of the dish one of my friends often had in her tiffin(lunch box) in middle school. Simply spiced with whole spices and finished with toasted sesame seeds or peanuts. This dry Bateta nu shaak is easy and flavorful. These potatoes make a great side or addition to an Indian meal. They also are a fun addition to wraps and sandwiches.  Make these spicy Indian Potatoes. Serve as a side with Dals or Curries or make breakfast wraps with other roasted veggies/­­spiced chickpeas, crunchy greens and chutneys. Continue reading: Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds – Bateta Nu ShaakThe post Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds – Bateta Nu Shaak appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables

May 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fried rice gets a bad reputation for being to greasy, carb-y and lacking in veggies, but when you make your own quick version at home, it can become a healthy, veggie-loaded meatless meal! This recipe was developed by Alexandra Shytsman of The New Baguette and is featured in her free Weeknight Cooking E-book. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon coconut oil OR cold-pressed organic canola oil - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 2 medium garlic cloves, minced - 1 tablespoon minced ginger - Pinch of hot red pepper flakes - 1 medium yellow onion, cut into small dice - 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into small dice - 1 bell pepper, cut into small dice - 1 cup frozen edamame OR peas - 3 cups cooked brown rice, cold from the fridge* - 3 tablespoons soy sauce, divided - 1 egg - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - 2 scallions, chopped Heat coconut and sesame oils in a wok or large non-stick skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and pepper flakes, and cook for 1 minute. Add onion, carrot and pepper and cook until vegetables are just starting to brown, about 3 minutes, tossing occasionally. Mix in edamame or peas and cook for another minute. Add rice and stir to incorporate evenly. Cook until rice is heated through and starting to brown, 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. In a small bowl, beat the egg with 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Push the rice mixture to one side of the skillet and pour beaten egg onto opposite side. Stir the egg continuously until it is scrambled. Season rice mixture with remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, and toss everything in the skillet together to combine evenly. Garnish with sesame seeds and scallions. *To cook perfectly fluffy brown rice, bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a small pot, and season with 1/­­4 teaspoon salt. Turn heat down to low, add 1 cup of rice, cover tightly with a lid, and simmer until all water is absorbed, 15-20 minutes – do not stir rice while cooking. Turn heat off and let rice stand covered for another 10 minutes to steam. Fluff with a fork before serving/­­using. The post Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry

April 17 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry I could live on Asian-style stir-fries and noodle dishes. Theyre so versatile and simple to make, perfect for busy weeknights. Case in point, Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry. Its inspired by General Tsos Tofu, but dispenses with the cornstarch-battered, deep-fried tofu.This version, with pan-sautéed tofu, plenty of broccoli, and a savory, sweet, and spicy sauce even […] The post Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry appeared first on VegKitchen.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easiest Asian Slaw

August 1 2017 VegKitchen 

Easiest Asian Slaw This is the easiest Asian slaw recipe ever, since it requires a bare minimum of chopping (just the fresh herb!), and starts with pre-cut fresh vegetables. You can also shortcut your way to a flavorful dressing by using a good bottled brand of sesame-ginger, but if you want to make your own, by all means! This simple […] The post Easiest Asian Slaw appeared first on VegKitchen.

6 Health Benefits of Hummus

July 19 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Health Benefits of Hummus Hummus, the rich, creamy dip, is central to Middle Eastern cuisine. Most of us eat it because its so tasty; but we dont often consider the health benefits of hummus. But you can be sure that hummus is a good-for-you treat -- it consists mainly of chickpeas and sesame seeds. Lemon and garlic are also […] The post 6 Health Benefits of Hummus appeared first on VegKitchen.

Bánh M? Tostadas

July 11 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Bánh M? Tostadas East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. In this iteration, bánh m? ingredients find themselves on toasted tortillas instead of in a baguette to make Bánh M? Tostadas. Corn tortillas are usually used for tostadas, although wheat tortillas may be used if you prefer. Bánh M? Tostadas - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped - 2 cups finely shredded cabbage - 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalape?o chiles ((optional)) - 1 teaspoon dark (toasted) sesame oil - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1/­­4 cup minced scallions - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 (8-ounce) package baked tofu, cut into thin strips - 3 tablespoons soy sauce - 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce - 2 tablespoons rice vinegar - 1 to 2 teaspoons sriracha sauce - 1 teaspoon sugar Tostada shells: - 4 to 6 corn or flour tortillas - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil Toppings: - In a large bowl, combine the carrot, cucumber, cabbage, cilantro, and jalape?os, if using. Drizzle on the sesame oil and toss gently to combine. Set aside. - Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, scallions, and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the tofu and 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce and mix well to coat the tofu. Set aside to cool. - In a small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, the hoisin, vinegar, sriracha, and sugar, stirring well to blend. Tostada shells: - Preheat the oven to 400°F. Arrange the tortillas in a single layer on two baking sheets. Brush both sides of each tortilla with oil. Bake for 5 minutes on one side, then flip the tortillas over and bake for 2 to 3 minutes longer, until crispy. Watch carefully so they dont burn. To assemble: - Evenly divide the tofu among the tostada shells. Top each with some of the vegetable mixture, then the sauce. Serve immediately. Excerpted from 100 BEST VEGAN RECIPES, (C) 2016 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by Lucy Schaeffer. The post Bánh M? Tostadas appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Black Bean Noodles, Plantain Tacos & Mango Sushi Bowls

June 2 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: black bean noodle bowls with spicy sesame sauce; plantain black bean tacos with chimichurri sauce; mango sushi bowls with quick pickled vegetables; lentil taco bowls; and lentil mushroom burgers.

Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try

May 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try It can be fun to make tasty spreads when the mood strikes, but sometimes that mood doesnt. Thats when these delicious ready-to-eat vegan spreads come in handy. Just add fresh bread, whole-grain crackers, or healthy chips. Here, we’re going to sample sesame spreads, artichoke pesto, vegan cream cheese, vegan butter, and guacamole. All of Sesame Kingdoms […] The post Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try appeared first on VegKitchen.

Caramelized Onion Hummus

May 3 2017 VegKitchen 

Caramelized Onion Hummus This caramelized onion hummus recipe was inspired by one in Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi, and the endless hummus plates that I devoured in Israel. Recipe by Gadi Friedman, adapted from Sesame Kingdom, reprinted by permission. Photo by Marc Piscotty. Caramelized onions 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, halved and sliced 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin […] The post Caramelized Onion Hummus appeared first on VegKitchen.

How to Roast Chickpeas in a Skillet, 4 Ways

April 25 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Roast Chickpeas in a Skillet, 4 Ways There are tons of recipes out there for oven roasted chickpeas, but I question the need to turn the oven on for one, or even two cans worth of this tasty legume. Instead, well show you how to roast chickpeas in a skillet, and give them a variety of flavors each time -- spicy, savory, and […] The post How to Roast Chickpeas in a Skillet, 4 Ways appeared first on VegKitchen.

Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry

April 17 2017 VegKitchen 

Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry I could live on Asian-style stir-fries and noodle dishes. Theyre so versatile and simple to make, perfect for busy weeknights. Case in point, Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry. Its inspired by General Tsos Tofu, but dispenses with the cornstarch-battered, deep-fried tofu.This version, with pan-sautéed tofu, plenty of broccoli, and a savory, sweet, and spicy sauce even […] The post Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Southwestern Wraps, Carrot Lentil Soup & Sesame Soba Noodles

April 7 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: southwestern veggie wraps; carrot, ginger and red lentil soup; sesame soba noodle bowls with roasted veggies & baked tofu; barbecue chickpea sweet potato polenta bowls; and General Tsos (not) chicken bowls.


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