sea buckthorn - vegetarian recipes

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sea buckthorn vegetarian recipes

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl

November 13 2015 My New Roots 

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Hey buddy, hows your blood doing these days? Is it healthy and flowing? Full of oxygen and freshly-made red blood cells? Have you ever even thought about this?! The answer is, not likely. And that is nothing to be ashamed about. We are never really taught to think about our blood, how to nourish and take care of it, how to tell if something is missing. When I studied Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) I learned about blood building, a term to describe nourishing the body with the nutrients required for ample and healthy blood. For some reason, I took a particular interest in this field, and have been a passionate blood builder of my own ever since. If this sounds dorky (it is) and a little confusing, think of your blood almost like a muscle. We are more familiar with the idea of muscle building, in that our muscles require specific macro and micro nutrients to grow and thrive. Same as blood. Pretty simple, except you cant do it at the gym – you gotta get in the kitchen.  The role of blood in our body is to transport nutrients, oxygen, immune cells, and hormones, along with removing toxins and waste, and disperse heat. The components that make up our blood are used and disposed of extremely quickly, so there is a high cell turnover, which also means high nutritional requirements. Iron, folic acid, vitamin B-12, and protein are the major building blocks of blood. All of these things work synergistically to make your blood as potent and healthy as possible. Besides folic acid, you can see from the list that most of these nutrients are found abundantly in animal foods, but not so abundantly in the wonderful plant kingdom. So how do vegetarians build blood anyway? First and foremost eating a wide variety of fruits, veggies, legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and superfoods is a good place to start. Hey wait! That sounds like a balanced diet. So if youre already there, great. If youre just starting out, your blood is about to get real strong. More specifically, the best blood building foods are the darkest of dark leafy greens and their powders, such as spinach, kale, beet greens, wheatgrass, barley grass, spirulina and chlorella, and deeply pigmented red foods such as beets, cherries, raspberries, goji berries, raisins, kidney beans, adzuki beans, and blackstrap molasses. I also find that drinking a cup of nettle tea every day, which contains high amounts of iron, is really effective in helping to tone the blood. This smoothie bowl is a one tasty blood builder. Its got a solid dose of greens (think iron, folic acid, and protein) from the spinach and wheatgrass, with beet, raspberry and prunes (lots of deep, dark, iron-rich goody goodies!) plus lemon for a vitamin C boost – since we cant absorb iron from plants unless we have a little help from vitamin C.  Although you may think that putting raw beetroot in a smoothie is a little odd, I was shocked at how utterly DELICIOUS the combination was with the raspberry. Its altogether earthy, sweet and tart, with a divine vanilla kiss that makes me swoon. Plus can we talk about the colour?! I can practically feel it feeding my blood with all of those juicy pigments and nutrients. Gosh. Isnt life grand? Smoothie bowls are a divine invention because you can eat them with a spoon, and you can top the heck out of them for a real meal situation. Although Im sure its just a psychological thing,  I sometimes feel a bit under-fed after a smoothie in a glass. Plus I like chewing a lot, and chewing a beverage can sometimes be boring without some chunks involved. Dont you agree? Ive topped mine here with raspberries, pomegranate, sea buckthorn, bee pollen and almond butter, but get creative with this on your own! Ive listed some other topping ideas in the recipe. And I will also say that taking just one extra minute to decorate your bowl delivers major self-love points and satisfies the creative genius in us all. There are no wrong answers or unattractive smoothie bowls! Go wild, you strong-blooded creature, you!     Print recipe     The Blood Building Beetroot, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 small beet, peeled and chopped 1 cup raspberries, fresh or frozen (I use frozen) 2 cups packed /­­ 45g spinach 3 prunes, soaked in 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water small wedge organic lemon (including the peel!) 1-2 scoops protein powder (I use sprouted brown rice or pumpkin seed protein powders) 1-2 tsp. wheatgrass powder (or spirulina /­­ chlorella) a generous pinch ground vanilla powder (or 1 tsp. vanilla extract) 1/­­2 cup water or milk of choice Toppings pictured: frozen raspberries pomegranate seeds sea buckthorn berries bee pollen raw almond butter Other topping ideas: sliced fresh fruit fresh berries hemp seeds toasted nuts and /­­ or seeds chia unsweetened coconut granola cacao nibs goji berries Directions: 1. Soak prunes overnight in water, or for a minimum of one hour. 2. Pour the soaked prunes and their liquid into a blender. Add all remaining ingredients and blend on high until completely smooth (if you do not have a high-speed blender, this may take a minute or so). Taste and adjust sweetness /­­ vanilla /­­ lemon as desired. 3. Pour contents into a glass or bowl and garnish with desired toppings. Enjoy!   I hope you guys are fired up to build your blood now. Happily, it involves eating and not donning spandex and running on a treadmill. Although, that is important too. The running part. The spandex I’ll pass on, thank you. Cheers to your blood, Sarah B. Show me your smoothies on Instagram! #MNRbeetsmoothie  

Blackcurrant and Lavender Pie

September 4 2015 seitan is my motor 

Blackcurrant and Lavender PieToday’s Vegan Mofo challenge is called “Tell us about a weird food combination that you love.” Ha, good one. I don’t think I like a single weird food combination. I am very boring when it comes to flavours and sweet and sour is already too much for me. When I think about new recipes for this blog, I usually go for complementing and supporting flavours. Some of these combinations could be labeled as weird. For example, I like tart berries a lot and I like to exaggerate their flavour by pairing them with herbs. Black currants, sea buckthorn, blackthorn (sloe) are rarely sold at stores. They haven’t made it next to the much sweeter varieties such as raspberries, strawberries, and cultivated blueberries. Black currants, sea buckthorn berries, or sloes all have different flavours, but they have one thing in common. If you taste them, their flavour makes you think of Scandianvian forest, of moss and water drops on dark green leaves. You can smell conifers and moldy soil. Or in the case of sea buckthorn you can feel the wind in your face and hear the waves. These berries have a complex flavour, a hint of intractability, that is not pleasant for everyone. Some of their flavour comes from the essential oils and tannins present.  That is why they are not widely popular, I think. But this is what makes them so outstanding. Herbs usually have essential oils, too and that’s why they go so well with tart berries.  My favourite combination used to be berry plus rosemary, but this year I finally made use of the lavender bush in our yard. I used two teaspoons of dried lavender buds, but you can halve the amount, if you don’t trust this flavour combination. But that probably doesn’t count as weird anymore. If you don’t have black currants available you can use blueberries.   Print Black Currant and Lavender Pie IngredientsFor the crust 210 g (1 3/­­4 cups) flour 200 g (2 2/­­3 cups) ground hazelnuts 100 g (1 sifted cup) powdered sugar 100 g (1/­­2 cup) granulated brown sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) vegetable oil 1/­­2 teaspoon ground vanilla 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the topping 450 g blackcurrant jam (storebought or homemade) 2 teaspoons dried lavender buds InstructionsTo make the crust, combine all ingredients except for the oils in a bowl. Add coconut and vegetable oil and knead until a crumbly dough forms. Reserve 1/­­4 of the dough for the topping and form the remaining dough into a disk. Wrap in foil and place in the fridge for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F). Grease a round pie or tart pan with a diameter of 28 cm (11 inches). Roll the dough out between two sheets of plastic foil and press into the bottom and the edges of the pan. For the filling combine jam and lavender buds. (If the jam is very thick you can heat it for easier handling.) Pour into the crust and form the reserved dough into large crumbs. Distribute on top of the cake. Bake for 35 minutes and let cool completely before removing from the pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­blackcurrant-and-lavender-pie/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com


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