sauce - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Breakfast Cookies (Gluten-free)

Horlicks mysore pak recipe | horlicks burfi | horlicks milk powder barfi

Chickpea Tofu Breakfast Scramble with Smoky Bits

Tofu au Vin










sauce vegetarian recipes

white kurma recipe | white veg kurma saravana bhavana style

yesterday 11:37 hebbar's kitchen 

white kurma recipe | white veg kurma saravana bhavana stylewhite kurma recipe | white veg kurma | white kuruma with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian gravies or curries mainly circle around the usage of coconut or coconut cream. it is widely used to make both spicy and creamy sauce based curry. typically it is served with choice of layered parotta, but can also be served with choice of rice. one such easy and simple creamy curry is white kurma known for its flavour. The post white kurma recipe | white veg kurma saravana bhavana style appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Vegetable Baked Ziti

before yesterday Oh My Veggies 

This January marks the eighth year that I’ve been doing Weight Watchers. While my weight has fluctuated since reaching my goal and I’m now actively trying to lose weight again, I really feel like it was joining Weight Watchers that prompted me to learn how to cook and get creative in the kitchen. Because before Weight Watchers? Our meals were pretty much take out, stir fry, or pasta. Pasta showed up on the menu at least once a week. I’d make a whole box (!!!) and my husband and I would split it. He’d put lots of sauce on his, while I’d put a little bit of sauce and a mountain of grated Parmesan on mine. I was under the impression that a ginormous bowl of pasta was a typical serving–after all, that’s what most restaurants serve, right? It was a shock to find out that those big boxes of pasta that my husband and I were eating by ourselves are meant to serve eight people. Oops. One of the first changes I made when I joined Weight Watchers was downsizing those pasta portions. But clearly, two ounces of pasta alone just wasn’t going to cut it. So I started […]

Tofu au Vin

before yesterday Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash

January 24 2020 VegKitchen 

Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash With a subtle hint of soy sauce and maple syrup, this is a simple recipe that makes roasted winter squash positively addictive. It’s a nice addition to everyday or holiday winter meals. Serves: The post Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash appeared first on VegKitchen.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Portobello Pizza with Roasted Garlic Sauce and Kale

January 17 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Do I post too many pizza recipes? I hope the answer to this question is no, because I’m about to post another. A portobello pizza with garlic sauce and kale, to be exact. I just couldn’t help myself! I’m feeling pretty jazzed about pizza lately since I made two discoveries: 1) The best whole wheat pizza crust recipe in existence. 2) The magic of pizza stones. So let’s talk about the crust. In all of my previous pizza recipes, I’ve called for pre-made crust. When I’ve tried making my own pizza crust in the past, it never turned out well and it always took so much time to do--I mean, isn’t the point of pizza that it’s supposed to be a quick meal? And you expect me to make my own crust? Psshh. But after overcoming my fear of baking with yeast, I started experimenting with pizza crust. And then I found this recipe: Bookmark it, print it, pin it, whatever you need to do. Because this recipe is awesome. It tastes good, it’s easy (even with the yeast!), and the best part is, Martha Stewart includes instructions for making these crusts ahead and freezing them. So then when you […]

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All TimeYes, you read that correctly. To celebrate the start of 2020, weve made a list of our 20 most popular recipes of all time. This collection represents YOUR favorite Meatless Monday meals, and its a must-read for anyone looking to incorporate more plant-based cooking into their daily diet. From Thai spring rolls and shawarma tofu to Vietnamese mango salad and Mediterranean vegetable noodle soup, weve got something for everyone. Best of all, these recipes are all super simple to make, with many of them taking less than 30 minutes to prepare. Here are our top 20 Meatless Monday recipes of all time: 20) Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles For the Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles, click here. 19) Vietnamese Mango Salad For the Vietnamese Mango Salad, click here. 18) Shawarma Tofu For the Shawarma Tofu, click here. 17) Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers, click here. 16) Banana Date Smoothie For the Banana Date Smoothie, click here. 15) Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles For Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles, click here. 14) Easy Veggie Lo Mein For the Easy Veggie Lo Mein, click here. 13) Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup For the Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup, click here. 12) Grilled Avocado with Salsa For the Grilled Avocado with Salsa, click here. 11) Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal For the Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal, click here. 10) Grilled Vegetable Tacos For the Grilled Vegetable Tacos, click here. 9) The Meatball Shops Veggie Balls For the Meatball Shops Veggie Balls, click here. 8) Vegetable Pancit For the Vegetable Pancit, click here. 7) Zucchini Tomato Curry For the Zucchini Tomato Curry, click here. 6) Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad For the Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad, click here. 5) Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice) For the Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice), click here. 4) Italian White Beans and Kale For the Italian White Beans and Kale, click here. 3) Kale Potato and Carrot Curry For the Kale Potato and Carrot Curry, click here. 2) Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. 1) Jamaican Jerk Tofu For the Jamaican Jerk Tofu, click here.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan General Tso’s Soy Curls

January 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan General Tso’s Soy CurlsGeneral Tso’s Soy Curls! Easy weeknight stir fry with soy curls and veggies. Vegan General Tso’s Chicken. Gluten-free, Nut-free Recipe Jump to Recipe This general tso’s Sauce + Soy Curls makes for an amazing weeknight meal. Soy curls are marinated in the from scratch homemade general tsos sauce mixture, then stir fried to crisp. Veggies added in along, and the rest of the marinade is then cooked down to thicken. Serve this easy stir fry with rice or noodles! Soy curls absorb moisture differently and sauce amount preference also varies, so make another full or half back of the sauce and add more if needed.Continue reading: Vegan General Tso’s Soy CurlsThe post Vegan General Tso’s Soy Curls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

shahi paneer recipe | shahi paneer masala | shahi paneer ki sabji

January 3 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

shahi paneer recipe | shahi paneer masala | shahi paneer ki sabjishahi paneer recipe | shahi paneer masala | shahi paneer ki sabji with step by step photo and video recipe. paneer based curries are one of the popular choice for both meat and non meat eaters in india. it can be made with wide variety of options which incldues spicy gravy, dry variant and a creamy sauce based curry. one such easy, simple and rich creamy based sauce curry is the shahi paneer masala known for its mild and sweet taste. The post shahi paneer recipe | shahi paneer masala | shahi paneer ki sabji appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Happy New Year Hoppin John

January 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Happy New Year Hoppin John If it’s January 1st, it must be time for Hoppin’ John.  I love the tradition of making black-eyed peas with rice and collards so much!  I first discovered it when we moved to Charleston SC from Pennsylvania in 1983.  It’s been a New Year’s Day tradition ever since.  Most people serve the collards on the side, but I love to combine them. I sometimes add diced tomatoes just because. My favorite way to serve them is topped with vegan sour cream, Tabasco, sliced jalapenos, with cornbread on the side. I like to cook the collards and black-eyed peas a day in advance and then add them to the rice on New Year’s Day. Here is my basic recipe (and more photos of Hoppin’ John variations from previous years).  Happy New Year to all my friends. I wish you all the best in 2020! Hoppin John with Collards 1 tablespoon olive oil or 3 tablespoons water 1 sweet yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup long-grain brown rice 2 cups  vegetable broth or water Salt 3 cups cooked or 2 (16-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 3 cups chopped cooked fresh or frozen collard greens, well drained 1 (14-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained (optional) 1 teaspoon Liquid Smoke 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, plus more to serve 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Vegan sour cream, to serve Sliced pickled jalapenos (optional)   Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and broth or water and bring to a boil. Add salt to taste (the amount of salt needed depends on the saltiness of your broth or if you use water). Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 30 minutes.  About 10 minutes before the rice is tender, stir in the cooked black-eyed peas, the cooked chopped collards, tomatoes (if using), Liquid Smoke, Tabasco, and black pepper. Add more salt, if needed. To serve, spoon into bowls and accompany with vegan sour cream, jalapenos (if using) and Tabasco at the table. Here are pics of two other favorites from my Hoppin’ John gallery: Made in a slow cooker with a cornbread topping…. and Hoppin’ John Collard Rolls…. (serve with Tabasco-Sour Cream)… The post Happy New Year Hoppin’ John appeared first on Robin Robertson.

The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide

December 31 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

All these establishments are 100% pure vegan eateries which have at least seven or more five star dining reviews on HappyCow. From a list that’s updated daily based on reviews and ratings by HappyCow users worldwide, here are the top-rated restaurants around the globe! Shift Eatery – in Surry Hills, Australia (NSW) With house-made meats, cheeses, and sauces – all vegan – you’ll find all of your deli needs here. Additionally, you have your pick from coffee, smoothies, toasties, and more; so be sure to swing by Shift. Saido – in Tokyo, Japan Saido’s website states:  “Please enjoy the world of ‘junk’ vegan Japanese food based on the concept of gastronomic origin, which you will meet for the first time in Nanado.” With noodles, bowls, snacks and fried foods that you’re sure to love, it’s worth the trip in to Tokyo. Vegan Beat – in Athens, Greece How do you make a visit to Greece even better? Stop for lunch at a vegan restaurant! Vegan Beat offers wraps, burgers, salads, juices, among other items – so you can fill up but maintain a lightness necessary to continue your days of tourist traipesing. AtayaCaffe – in Berlin, Germany Blending traditional, bold Senegalese cuisine “with the depth and elegance of Italian gastronomy.” Ataya […] The post The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide appeared first on HappyCow.

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce

December 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceTofu and Cauliflower in Indian Kolhapuri Sauce. Creamy Spicy Pepper Coconut Sesame Sauce with baked veggies and Tofu. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe.  Soy-free option. Jump to Recipe Kolhapuri cuisine is a regional cuisine from a town in the state of Maharashtra in India. The region has its own cuisine, various chilies and is know for hot, deep colored, spicy dishes and sauces. The cuisine has its own spice blend called kolhapuri masala which uses spices, coconut, fenugreek and chilies. I make a simplified version of the masala blend and the sauce and use it with Baked Tofu and Cauliflower here. I’ve made a version of this cooked with various veggies here (instant pot recipe). The sauce use whole spices and ingredients such as sesame and coconut that add a unique flavor. Try this sauce with baked veggies, chickpeas or chickpea tofu for variation.Continue reading: Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceThe post Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup

January 24 2020 Oh My Veggies 

And Soup Week continues! It also ends with this delicious creamy mushroom rice soup. I guess since I only post 2-3 recipes each week, theme weeks are not very epic around here, huh? Theme months would be way too much I think, but maybe I’ll start doing theme fortnights in the future. (Yes, I said fortnight. I’m fancy like that.) Having grown up in the midwest, I can tell you this: Midwesterners like their food creamy. We love cheesy casseroles, anything made with canned soup, and all kinds of concoctions made with sour cream, mayo, and/­­or cheese sauce (usually and, not or). Being sick last week, I was craving comfort food and to me, comfort food is creamy food. So I set out to make a vegetarian version of the classic Creamy Wild Rice & Chicken Soup. And then, because it’s the New Year and I’m trying to watch what I eat, I set out to make a lighter version. Behold, Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup. The biggest obstacle was figuring out what to replace the chicken with. I’m always hesitant to cook with seitan on my blog because I don’t know if that’s readily available everywhere. And tofu in […]

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

pudina paneer tikka recipe | mint paneer tikka | green paneer tikka

January 10 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

pudina paneer tikka recipe | mint paneer tikka | green paneer tikkapudina paneer tikka recipe | mint paneer tikka | green paneer tikka with step by step photo and video recipe. tikka recipes are pretty common across india and are made with vegetable, paneer and even with meat variants. even with individual ingredients there are many variations to the tikka sauce applied on these hero ingredients. one such green and flavoured tikka recipe with paneer is pudina paneer tikka recipe. The post pudina paneer tikka recipe | mint paneer tikka | green paneer tikka appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Tofu Almond Stir-Fry

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Hoisin is a Cantonese dipping sauce made from sweet potatoes, vinegar, garlic and chili peppers; you can find it in the Asian ingredients section of most supermarkets. Here, it adds immense flavor to tofu, which gets a pre-soak in vegetable broth for even more flavor. This recipe was created by Trudy Slabosz, who writes the blog veggie.num.num. Serves 4 For the tofu: - 1 package (10.5 ounces) firm tofu, cubed - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 egg white - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon salt For the sauce: - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce To complete the Tofu Almond Stir-Fry: - 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 5 shallots, sliced - 5 ounces button mushrooms, sliced - 1 can (15 ounces) baby corn, drained - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 1 green bell pepper, sliced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 1/­­2 ounces blanched almonds, toasted To prepare the tofu: In a medium bowl, soak the tofu cubes in vegetable broth for 30 minutes. Strain the tofu and reserve the broth. Drain tofu on a bed of paper towels. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg white, corn starch, hoisin sauce and salt. Add the drained tofu and gently toss to coat well. To prepare the sauce: In a medium saucepot over high heat, bring the reserved broth, cornstarch, hoisin and soy sauce to a boil. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes, or until the sauce darkens and thickens slightly. To complete the Stir-Fry: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu ; cook 10, turning occasionally, until crisp and golden on all sides. Transfer to a fresh bed of paper towels to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the same skillet. Add the shallots, mushrooms, baby corn, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes, or until the mushrooms are tender, but the bell peppers are still crisp. Add the tofu; cook 1 minute more, tossing gently, until the tofu is heated through. Pour the sauce over the stir-fry and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the almonds The post Tofu Almond Stir-Fry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps

January 2 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether you’re hitting the slopes or seeking a cozy retreat, we’ve got a list of the best getaways in the Swiss Alps this winter season! And we’ve included a (vegan) food guide to each location. Zermatt What To Do: Zermatt is the place to be in southern Switzerland for skiing, climbing, and hiking. Placed below the famous Matterhorn Peak, you’ll find shops and boutiques galore. Not a ski fan? Try your hand (or feet) at ice skating or curling, instead. A sweet spot for the adventurers and tourists alike, Zermatt’s got activities for all. Where To Eat: You can start with coffee and lovely views at Cup’s Italian Coffee House. A vegan pastry is usually available, along with non-dairy milks, smoothies, and yogurt. Stop skiing long enough for amazing Alps views and lunch at Trockener Steg. They offer a salad and pasta bar that’s sure to be navigated easily for vegan options. If you’re looking for a trendy place for dinner, try Geez – but be sure to ask for no fish sauce and to clarify that the vegetarian offerings be made vegan, if necessary. Bern What To Do: This highly populated Swiss city (over 1 million) is the capital […] The post 7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps appeared first on HappyCow.

The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide – January 2020

December 31 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

All these establishments are 100% pure vegan eateries which have at least seven or more five star dining reviews on HappyCow. From a list that’s updated daily based on reviews and ratings by HappyCow users worldwide, here are the top-rated restaurants around the globe! Shift Eatery – in Surry Hills, Australia (NSW) With house-made meats, cheeses, and sauces – all vegan – you’ll find all of your deli needs here. Additionally, you have your pick from coffee, smoothies, toasties, and more; so be sure to swing by Shift. Saido – in Tokyo, Japan Saido’s website states:  “Please enjoy the world of ‘junk’ vegan Japanese food based on the concept of gastronomic origin, which you will meet for the first time in Nanado.” With noodles, bowls, snacks and fried foods that you’re sure to love, it’s worth the trip in to Tokyo. Vegan Beat – in Athens, Greece How do you make a visit to Greece even better? Stop for lunch at a vegan restaurant! Vegan Beat offers wraps, burgers, salads, juices, among other items – so you can fill up but maintain a lightness necessary to continue your days of tourist traipesing. AtayaCaffe – in Berlin, Germany Blending traditional, bold Senegalese cuisine “with the depth and elegance of Italian gastronomy.” Ataya […] The post The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide – January 2020 appeared first on HappyCow.

Recipe | Roasted Tofu with Tangerines & Olives

December 27 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I’m not a huge fan of tofu. Although many people dislike the texture, for me it’s more the taste. The main virtue of tofu, according to tofu lovers, is its lack of flavor. This lack of flavor gives tofu its versatility--you can use it in a variety of dishes, from soups to pastas to desserts. But for me, I definitely do taste tofu. Or, at least, I taste that stanky flavor of the water tofu sits in at the supermarket. Blech! So when I make anything involving tofu, it’s absolutely imperative that I get every last bit of stanky tofu water out. I’ve tried just about every method for doing this, but I’ve finally settled on using a tofu press. While it’s more expensive than the old cast-iron-frying-pan-and-soup-cans method, it’s much more effective. When you press all the tofu water out, the tofu can better absorb the flavors you add to it. And if you don’t get all the water out, the tofu is too saturated to absorb sauces and other ingredients. This recipe is adapted from Everyday Food’s Roasted Chicken with Tangerines and Olives. Although the tangerines and olives have strong flavors, the sauce is much more subtle, making […]

Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is marinated in lime juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano and cayenne pepper. The tempeh is grilled and accompanied by bell peppers and red onions in this Tex-Mex treat, perfect for a quick weeknight meal. This recipe comes to us from Allison of Nourish Network. Serves 5 - 1/­­3 cup and 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided - 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 2 garlic cloves, grated - 2 8-ounce packages soy tempeh - 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - salt and black pepper, to taste - 8 6-inch corn tortillas   Cut the tempeh into 1/­­4 inch by 2 inch strips. Place 1/­­3 cup of the olive oil with the lime juice and soy sauce in an 8 inch dish. Season with the cumin, oregno, cayenne pepper and garlic. Combine 1/­­3 cup oil, juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano, cayenne and garlic in an 8-inch dish. Add tempeh, tossing to coat thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for 2-12 hours, stirring occasionally. Heat a large cast-iron grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush pan with oil. Add half of tempeh to pan. Cook for 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes more. Place in a warm bowl and repeat with the remaining tempeh. Place the onion and bell pepper with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the bell pepper and onion to pan used to cook the tempeh. Cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the bell pepper and onion is tender and fragrant. Heat the tortillas directly over the flame of a gas stove or in a dry nonstick pan. Place 2 tortillas on each plate. Top evenly with tempeh and bell pepper mixture and enjoy. The post Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce

December 16 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce Its no secret. I love tofu.  I use it all the time to make everything from lasagna to cheesecake. Tofu scrambles are a weekly ritual at my house. I even like to dice and bake it to serve it as an appetizer with a flavorful peanut sauce or a zesty sriracha-laced sauce that Ive come to refer to as my 3-2-1 Sauce. The sauce is named after the proportions of its three simple ingredients: 3 parts mayo, 2 parts chili sauce, 1 part sriracha:  3-2-1! If you happen to have some lime juice and cilantro on hand, a bit of each can only improve this flavorful sauce.  I like to serve the dipping sauce on the side, but you can also make extra sauce and toss the tofu in the sauce, then serve it over rice. The nice people at Nasoya were kind enough to send me coupons for their tofu. The tofu I use for this recipe is Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu. Im thrilled that my supermarket now carries it because it saves so much time - no more tofu-pressing needed! Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce For the Tofu: 3 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 pound Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu For the Sauce: 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Thai Sweet Chili Sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce Optional: squeeze of lime juice; minced fresh cilantro For the tofu: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Set aside. Combine the cornstarch and spices in a large plastic zip lock food bag and shake to mix well. Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch cubes and add them to the bag with the seasonings.  Close the bag and shake to coat the tofu. Spread the coated tofu in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet, keeping the tofu pieces separate from each other.  Bake for about 20 minutes, turning once about halfway through. For the sauce: In a small bowl, combine the mayo, chili sauce, sriracha, and a squeeze of lime juice, if using.  Stir to mix well. Sprinkle with a little minced fresh cilantro, if desired. To serve: When the tofu is done baking, transfer it to a plate and serve with the sauce on the side for dipping. The post Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce appeared first on Robin Robertson.


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