sage leaves - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Navratri (2018)

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation

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sage leaves vegetarian recipes

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stuffing Scoops

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

No need to cook a whole turkey when a stuffing craving hits. Baking stuffing on its own is easy and delicious. Ice cream scoops make these stuffing servings as adorable as they are flavorful. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - canola oil spray - 4 cups dry bread cubes - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon butter - 1/­­2 onion, diced - 1 stalk celery, diced - 3 sage leaves, minced - 2 sprigs thyme - 2 tablespoons diced parsley - 1/­­2 cup diced dried sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup diced pecans - 1 large egg Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Prepare an ice cream scoop with a light layer of the canola oil spray. Toss the bread cubes with the vegetable broth and set aside in a large mixing bowl. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery to the skillet and cook, stirring intermittently, for 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Transfer to the mixing bowl. Add the sage, thyme, parsley, craisins, pecans and egg to the mixing bowl and mix well, taking care to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Use the prepared ice cream scoop to distribute portions of stuffing onto a baking pan. Transfer the stuffing scoops to the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until lightly browned. The post Stuffing Scoops appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Cauliflower with Crispy Sage and Toasted Pine Nuts

November 26 2016 Vegetarian Times 

1 Preheat oven to 425°F. Line large baking sheet with parchment paper. 2 Toss together cauliflower and oil in large bowl, and season with salt, if desired. Spread on prepared baking sheet, and roast 25 to 28 minutes, or until deeply browned.  3 Meanwhile, melt butter in medium skillet over medium heat. Add sage leaves, and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until darkened, crisp, and slightly curled. Remove from heat, and set aside.  4 Transfer cauliflower to serving dish. Pour sage-butter mixture over top, and sprinkle with pine nuts.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

POLENTA W/ LEMON-TAMARI SAUTÉED BABY SPINACH + SAGE MUSHROOMS

March 2 2015 That's Food Darling 

POLENTA W/ LEMON-TAMARI SAUTÉED BABY SPINACH + SAGE MUSHROOMSHi guys!  Today is all about polenta. I like polenta pretty much but only if it's not to sticky or even stale. Preparing polenta the right way is a little art in itself, so be in for it. You can compare making polenta fairly well with cooking risotto. Polenta needs lots of attention as it has to be stirred all the time and needs to be filled up with more liquid over and over again.  But having said this, I have complete confidence in all of you. No kidding! Each one of you guys can prepare polenta that is both creamy and hearty. Check! I like my polenta best served with dainty baby spinach that is topped off with lemon juice and tamari sauce, on to sage mushrooms, toasted pine nuts and lots of good-quality olive oil. The result is beyond doubt a treat for your taste buds as it tastes tangy in a well-rounded manner. I'd love to hear from your polenta adventures. Preparing and eating polenta is a first for you? Yay, tell me about your experiences. You made it? Do you like polenta, the recipe, ... I'm pretty excited!  Here we go! POLENTA W/­­ LEMON-TAMARI SAUTÉED BABY SPINACH + SAGE MUSHROOMS |serves 2| INGREDIENTS 120 g polenta (cornmeal) 500 ml vegetable broth  2 tbsp butter, ghee or olive oil sea salt to taste 8-10 mushrooms, sliced 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil a small yellow onion, finely diced some sage leaves a pinch of cayenne sea salt & pepper to taste  2 handful of baby spinach, washed + drained 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil a garlic clove, finely diced 2 tsp tamari sauce 2 tsp lemon juice toasted pine nuts olive oil  INSTRUCTIONS For the polenta, in a small (preferably non-stick) pot, bring to the boil vegetable broth. Slowly add the cornmeal, whisking constantly to avoid lumps. The polenta will start to thicken quickly. Continue stirring for 2-3 minutes and let simmer on lowest heat until polenta is cooked, about 15-25 minutes. Stir regularly to prevent burning and add more water, if needed. Stir in butter/­­ghee/­­olive oil until melted. At this stage you can also add cheese of your choice such as Parmesan or Gruy?re - I'm just saying. Season with sea salt to taste. For soft and creamy polenta serve it immediately before it has hardened. While polenta is simmering prepare both mushrooms and baby spinach. In a medium skillet heat ghee/­­coconut oil on medium heat. Add yellow onions and fry for a minute while stirring constantly. Next, add mushrooms and sage leaves and fry until mushrooms are tender and sage leaves are crispy while tossing the skillet now and then, about 5-6 minutes. Add a pinch of cayenne and season to taste with sea salt & pepper. For the baby spinach, heat ghee/­­coconut oil on medium-low heat in a small skillet . Add garlic and baby spinach, sauté until spinach is wilting and deglace with both lemon juice and tamari sauce. Remove from heat. Serve polenta in soup plates or bowls, top with sautéed baby spinach and fried sage mushrooms, sprinkle with toasted pine nuts and a drizzle properly with olive oil for the finishing touch. Enjoy! 

Pumpkin speltotto with sage

January 19 2015 The Everyday Vegetarian UK 

Spelt has become quite fashionable. It is probably helpful that the man leading the charge in spelt farming is non other than Roger Saul, the man behind the Mulberry brand. I got a pack of spelt from the wonderful Suma and had a go at making speltotto (risotto using spelt instead of rice) and it worked really well. This recipe is for the suma blogger’s network. For more recipes from vegetarian bloggers, have a look here. Ingredients (serves 4) 300g pumpkin peeled and cubed 2 cloves of garlic 1 white onion Olive oil Handful fresh sage 300g spelt 700ml vegetable stock Salt and pepper Vegetarian parmesan (to serve – optional) Method Start by finely slicing the onion and frying in plenty of oil in a high sided pan. Once the onion has cooked through, add the garlic and fry for a further few minutes before adding the spelt and cubed pumpkin. Season well. Slowly add the vegetable stock. Once you’ve added it all, pop the lid on but keep checking it as the spelt can easily stick to the bottom. The spelt will take a good 20 – 25 minutes to cook. Just before you are ready to serve, finely slice the fresh sage and add it to the speltotto. If you have time, fry a few sage leaves in some oil so they are crispy as a garnish. Serve with a grating of vegetarian parmesan.

SPAGHETTI WITH BAKED PUMPKIN, CRISPY SAGE, ROASTED HAZELNUTS + PECORINO

November 5 2014 That's Food Darling 

SPAGHETTI WITH BAKED PUMPKIN, CRISPY SAGE, ROASTED HAZELNUTS + PECORINO autumn time is pumpkin time, no doubt whatsoever. that's exactly why there's an autumn recipe for spelt spaghetti with oven-baked squash today. squash actually develops an unmatchable aroma being prepared this way, especially if you also combine it with roasted hazelnuts, grated pecorino (italian hard cheese made out of sheep's milk) and herbs such as sage and thyme - a culinary delight no end. that oven-baked pumpkin goes pretty well with spelt spaghetti with its somewhat nutty flavor but if you prefer (whole) wheat spaghetti, take those without worries. today's recipe safe to say is an ideal lunch for braving both rainy and grey autumn days with tasty feel-good food successfully. the pretty cool german label 'kauf dich glücklich' asked me to develop a new recipe under the category 'quick lunch', so if you wanna read the german version for this baked pumpkin pasta with roasted hazelnuts & pecorino click here. i hope you'll like that tasty lunch/­­dinner idea, no matter if you go for the english or german recipe version. SPAGHETTI WITH BAKED PUMPKIN, CRISPY SAGE, ROASTED HAZELNUTS + PECORINO  |serves 2| ingredients 160g spelt spaghetti 1 small or 1/­­2 a medium hokkaido squash, washed, halved, both ends removed, deseeded with a spoon, cut into 1cm( 1/­­2 inch)-thick slices olive oil sea salt 40g hazelnuts sage leaves a few thyme sprigs runny honey (wild honey works best here) a squeeze of fresh lemon juice cayenne pepper 40g pecorino (or parmesan), coarsely shaved instructions let's go. preheat the oven to 200°. place hokkaido squash slices onto a baking tray lined with baking paper. properly drizzle with olive oil and season with sea salt. mix well and then place in the oven, for 20-25 minutes. in the meantime, crack (only if you use fresh ones) and coarsely chop the hazelnuts. remove sage and thyme leaves, wash and drain them, if necessary. also put on salted water for the spaghetti. after 10 minutes of baking remove the tray from the oven. now add chopped hazelnuts, a couple of sage leaves and about a heaped teaspoon thyme leaves to the hokkaido squash. combine everything and bake for further 10-15 minutes. cook spelt pa sta accor ding to packet instructions for 8 -1 0 minutes.  skim about 50ml cooking water and set aside. drain pasta and place back into the cooking pot. in a small bowl, whisk 1 tbsp. olive oil, 1 tbsp. cooking water, 1 tbsp. runny honey, a proper squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a pinch of cayenne pepper. pour that mixture over the baking tray only 2 minutes before the end of the baking time (the pumpkin needs 20-25 minutes to be tender). add 2 tbsp. cooking water to the spaghetti pot, mix together and divide spaghetti onto two soup plates or bowls. remove the hokkaido mix from the oven, coarsely chop it into bite-sized pieces and add (with all liquid on the baking paper included) to spaghetti. now sprinkle pasta plates with shaved pecorino, season to taste with freshly ground black pepper and serve immediately. bon appétit, lisa 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** The giveaway is closed. Big congrats to Sonja from Vancouver for winning a signed copy of the book!!! Thank you to ALL of you who entered the giveaway and shared your favorite cuisine. We loved reading through all of the 1047 comments! Mediterranean food seems to be a favorite among many of you. Big love!!! /­­David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Giveaway!  To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.

Garlic Scape Ricotta Tart

July 7 2014 Meatless Monday 

Balsamic caramelized onions are balanced by chive spiced ricotta to mellow the onions intensity. Garlic scapes are the above ground part of the plant that grows above the bulb. They can be found in farmers markets in the Spring and Summer. This recipe comes to us from Chris and Amy White of A Couple in the Kitchen. Serves 6 - 1 pie crust, thawed - 2 chives, chopped - 6 ounces fresh ricotta, divided - 4 tablespoons olive oil - 6 sage leaves - 6 garlic scapes, chopped - 2 onions, diced - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­2 teaspoon kosher salt - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1/­­2 cup milk - 3 egg yolks - 2 eggs - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 tablespoon chopped sage Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Press the pie crust into a pie plate and set aside. Lay a bed of paper towels on a plate. Mix the chopped chives with the fresh ricotta in a small bowl and set aside. Place the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sage leaves and cook 2-3 minutes until the leaves are crispy. Carefully remove the sage leaves using a slotted spoon and transfer them to the paper towel lined plate. Set aside. Turn the heat up to medium-high and add the chopped scapes and onion to the pan. Sprinkle with sugar and cook until the onions for about 5-7 minutes, or until the onions are translucent. Add the salt, balsamic vinegar and turn the heat down to medium-low. Cook for about 10-15 minutes more, or until the onion mixture has caramelized. Spread the caramelized onions on the bottom of the pie crust. Crumble half the chive ricotta evenly over the onions. Whisk the milk, egg yolks, eggs, black pepper and chopped sage together in a separate bowl. Pour the milk egg mixture over the ricotta. Top the milk mixture with the remaining chive ricotta. Transfer the tart to the oven. Bake for 35 minutes, or until the center is firm and springy. Garnish each slice with a crispy sage leaf and enjoy! The post Garlic Scape Ricotta Tart appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

September 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars. Having recently finished a cookbook manuscript with the backbone of seasonality, I turn to seasons more than ever when coming up with recipes. It’s hard not to sound like a broken record when talking about the topic, but I find just as much romance as I do practicality in eating what grows at any given time of the year. I grew up in a place, where the season completely dictated what we ate, which at times led to scarcity and deprivation, but made the periods of abundance that much sweeter. Nowadays, I fall back on that feeling, having made peace with waiting a year for the sweetest summer tomato or the plumpest fig. Of course, I will also buy boxed tomatoes for stews and roast up well-traveled California cherry tomatoes when a craving hits out of season – frankly I’m grateful for such options, having experienced what it’s like to have no options during my Soviet childhood. But I also know that the wait for the real deal will be well worth it in the end, so why not embrace it? Another thing I’m constantly encouraged by, when it comes to cooking with nature’s rhythms, is how well a lot of a given season’s ingredients fit together. Let’s take this bowl as an example. I started with the fig – the ultimate fruit of indulgence in the late summer and early fall. Figs are jammy and sweet, especially when broiled, and make easy friends with dense sweet potato and buttery eggplant. Sturdy-leafed kale, known to do well in the cold, together with a hearty grain and lentils make a nice bed for the vegetables. Sage is an evergreen and can be harvested well into the fall months, and coincidentally has that intoxicating, deep, piney flavor that pairs so well with autumn produce. It’s all quite seamless and effortless – the ingredients fit together as if they have been sharing a place under the sun, which, theoretically speaking, is true. This bowl is the opposite of boring, full of those complementary flavors and a variety of textures, from chewy kale and grains, velvety eggplant and sweet potato, to juicy figs and crunchy hazelnuts. It’s a complete meal, and, like any bowl is highly customizable. The hazelnut vinaigrette here is quite special – an interesting twist on a classic dressing, with the addition of well-toasted hazelnuts and sage. It keeps well in the refrigerator, and will improve any one of your bowls or salads. I would very much like to hear your thoughts on cooking with the seasons – do you follow them? do you find it helpful to have them as a guide? or do you find it overwhelming? Whatever it is, I would love to open a conversation. Infinity Jars sent me a variety of their airtight and lightproof ultraviolet glass jars, and I have nothing but great things to say about them. I’m kind of a stickler for storing ingredients in glass whenever possible, and keep a lot of uncommonly refrigerated things in the fridge, from matcha to tamari, to certain nuts and spices. It makes a lot of sense to me to take care of my ingredients and try to preserve their freshness as log as possible, especially for those pricier items. Infinity Jars go above and beyond when it comes to keeping things in top shape – the glass is thick and pigmented to block any harmful UV light, and the seal is scent-proof and airtight. I’ve transferred my loose leaf teas and a few spice mixes, along with some homemade lotions and oils to their screw-top jars. I’ve also been using their oil bottle for basil oil and dressings like the vinaigrette here, all to impressive results. The jars are so pretty too, I love having the uniform black glass on my shelves. Infinity Jars is offering GK readers 15% off all orders, just use code GOLUBKAKITCHEN at checkout until October 28th, 2016 :) Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the salad 1 medium sweet potato - cubed 1 medium eggplant - sliced into ½-inch rounds, halved if large 2 tablespoons neutral coconut or untoasted sesame oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 8-12 fresh figs - cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped sage leaves 1 bunch kale - stems removed, leaves chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 1½ cup cooked faro, freekeh or other grain of choice 1½ cup cooked puy lentils or other legumes of choice ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts for the hazelnut vinaigrette ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts - divided 5 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon maple syrup a few sage leaves (optional) ⅓ cup olive oil Instructions to make the salad Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place cubed sweet potato and sliced eggplant into a large bowl, drizzle with oil, add salt, pepper and paprika. Toss to coat and arrange on one or two baking trays - the trays shouldnt be too crowded. Roast for 20 minutes, then mix and roast for another 15 minutes, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn on the broiler to high. Broil figs for 4-5 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped sage. Broil for another 1-2 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown at edges. Remove from the oven and set aside. Place chopped kale into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt, and massage until darkened and wilted. Add cooked farro and lentils to the bowl with kale, top with roasted sweet potato and eggplant. Distribute between bowls, top with figs, drizzle with hazelnut vinaigrette, and garnish with toasted hazelnuts. to make the hazelnut vinaigrette Combine hazelnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and sage leaves, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Slowly pour olive oil into the mixture, with the motor running on slow, to emulsify. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Garden Juice Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Frittata Two Ways + New Zealand

February 8 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Frittata Two Ways + New Zealand After a month of winding roads, lush mountains, unbelievably turquoise lakes and sheep covered hills we are now in Melbourne. Our little campervan adventure on New Zealand sure was pretty unreal. We had the most beautiful and magical nature experiences combined with all the crazy shit that happens when you cram two adults, a 4-year old and a baby inside a minivan (why didn’t anyone warn us that there is no storage space in those vans…). But it was all fun! And right there, in between two car seats, a bag of dirty laundry, a floor covered in spilled out chia seeds and a fire larm that constantly was playing tricks on us, this happened! (PS. forget everything I might have said previously about getting married.) We also had two breakfast events at Little Bird Organics in  Auckland. We had so much fun, thank you to everyone that came! One of our favourite things with the trip was to stop at the small farm shops with honesty boxes along the road and pick up homegrown boysenberries, vegetables, manuka honey and eggs. It was really fun and challenging to cook in our mini campervan kitchen. We basically only had one frying pan, one pot, one mixing bowl and a knife. Most mornings and evenings on the south island were pretty cold so we started the day with warm oat porridge and ended it with warm turmeric milk and star watching. On our dinner repertoire was improvised curries, farmer’s frittatas, bean & quinoa salads and simple rye bread sandwiches. This is a little video we did on the road. We cooked a frittata only using produce that we got from the local farmers. Even the sheep’s feta cheese was handmade by one of the farmers. Click here to read the full recipe on our youtube channel. We are in such a good mood today that we wanted to give you two recipes for the price of one! So we are also sharing our Root & Spinach Frittata Muffins here below. These frittata muffins are pretty useful and really uncomplicated to make. You just fill up muffin cups with whatever vegetables and cheese you prefer, top them with beaten eggs and bake. Here we have made them using roasted roots, got’s cheese and spinach. Sure, it’s an extra step to roast the roots but it is definitely worth it, as they add a delicately sweet flavour and nice texture. The proportions in these frittatas are heavy on the vegetables because that is how we roll. If you are in a rush you can also just add some raw tomatoes, spinach and broccoli instead of the roots. Root & Spinach Frittata Muffins makes 12 muffins We usually don’t measure any exact amounts when we roast roots. Just fill two baking sheets with diced roots and if you are lucky to get any leftovers, use them in a salad or on top of a sandwich. Next time I might also try adding a spoonful of mustard to the egg mixture, as it usually goes really well with roots. 1 small/­­medium sweet potato 4 small parsnips (350 g) 1/­­2 small butternut pumpkin 1-2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil or coconut oil 10 free-range eggs 3 sage leaves, finely chopped (+ more for garnish) 100 g goats cheese, crumbled 6 large spinach leaves, torn in pieces sea salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 175°C/­­350°F. Wash and peel all the vegetables, cut into cubes and place on a baking tray. Drizzle with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to cover. Roast in the the oven for about 15-20 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, prepare the egg mixture. Remove the vegetables from the oven when done and leave the oven on. Line a muffin pan with paper liners or grease the pan with olive oil or coconut oil. Divide the roasted roots, spinach and cheese into each of the muffin tins. Pour over the egg mixture, let it sit for a minute to let the egg work its way into the tin. Brush a few sage leaves with a little oil and garnish each muffins with one leave. Bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes or until the egg mixture is just set. Ready to serve. ******************* PS. We are having a few events in Melbourne and we’d love to see you there. 1. We will be selling and signing books at Pressed Juices in South Yarra on 14 Feb between 12-2 pm. This is a free event so you can just show up, have a cold-pressed juice and a chat with us. 2. We are also doing a similar cooking event as we did in Auckland. This time we are having it at the the awesome cafe Combi in Elwood on 23 & 24 Feb between 6.30-8.30 pm (same event on both days). We will talk about our approach to food and demonstrate six new and exclusive (and delicious!) breakfast recipes. There will be lots of tasting, handouts, Q&A time and information about the ingredients, as well as a delicious goodie bag filled with some of the finished recipes for you to enjoy at home.  Click here to get your tickets!

Curried Butternut Velvet Soup

December 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

This simple soup comes together quickly, but dress it up with garnishes of pomegranate seeds (called arils) and fried sage leaves and you’ve got a dish worthy of company! To fry sage leaves, simply heat oil in a pan and cook them for about 5 seconds. This recipe comes to us from Priscilla of She’s Cookin’. Serves 4 - 1 small butternut squash, roasted - 1 medium sweet potato - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 1 leek, sliced - 1/­­2 cup dry white wine - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 3 cups almond milk - 2 teaspoons curry -  1/­­2 teaspoon harissa - 1/­­8 teaspoon white pepper - Garnish: pomegranate arils, fried sage leaves, pistachios - 1 pat butter, optional Preheat oven to 375 degrees Cut the butternut squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and stringy pulp. Put the halves flesh side down in a baking dish, add 1 cup of water. Wrap the sweet potato in aluminum foil. Bake the squash and sweet potato for 30 minutes until you can pierce through the skin easily. While the squash is roasting, heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook leeks until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and spices, stir and cook for another minute. Add wine and cook for another two minutes to meld the flavors. Set aside. Remove the squash and sweet potato from the oven. When the squash to cool enough to handle, scrape the flesh from the skin. Cut the sweet potato into half, no need to peel – it will be totally pureed and you’ll retain all the nutrients in the skin. Add the squash, sweet potato, leek-spice mixture, and almond milk to your blender. Process on until smooth. Place in a saucepan to heat, stir in butter to add a touch of richness, if desired. The post Curried Butternut Velvet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin-Sage Baked Ziti

September 22 2014 Oh My Veggies 

Baked ziti with a creamy pumpkin sauce, topped with a layer of cheese and crispy sage leaves -- this casserole is the perfect way to welcome fall!

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway!

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway! Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** Giveaway! To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.


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