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Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus

June 26 2017 VegKitchen 

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus Sweet-and-sour soba noodles embellished with with asparagus and fresh tomatoes makes a lovely spring or early summer dinner dish. Serve with a simple tofu dish such as Sweet and Savory Sautéd Tofu, and a platter of raw veggies. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 4 to 6 8-ounce package soba (buckwheat) noodles 1 tablespoon safflower or […] The post Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts

November 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

Brussels sprouts are sautéed with balsamic vinegar, then tossed with pecans in this holiday side dish. Cranberries, brown sugar and orange zest are brewed in Concord grape juice for a gourmet glaze to top these delectable Brussels sprouts. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 6. For the cranberry topping: - 6 ounces whole cranberries, rinsed - 1/­­2 cup Concord grape juice - 1/­­2 cup brown sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon orange zest - pinch of salt - 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar For the Brussels Sprouts: - 1/­­4 cup safflower oil - 16 ounces Brussels sprouts - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, to taste - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­2 cup pecans, chopped - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - salt, to taste To make the cranberry topping: Place the cranberries into a soup pot over high heat. Add the sugar, salt and grape juice to the pot. Stir and bring to a boil. When cranberry grape juice boils, turn heat down to medium low. Simmer for 15 minutes, or until the berries pop. Stir in the orange zest and balsamic vinegar. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside. To make the Brussels sprouts: Place the oil into a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts and balsamic vinegar. Add 2 tablespoons of water and cover with a lid. Cook for 2-4 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts become tender. Remove the lid and season with another splash of balsamic vinegar. Cook for 1-3 minutes more, adding more water if needed. Add the chopped pecans and dried cranberries, tossing to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Season with the pepper and salt to taste. To complete the Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts: Place the Brussels sprouts in a serving bowl in the center of the table. Top with the balsamic cranberry sauce and enjoy! The post Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fresh Chunky Applesauce Cake

October 6 2015 VegKitchen 

Fresh Chunky Applesauce CakeYour own homemade chunky applesauce is the key to this flavorful cake. That way, the cake is just as much (if not more) about the fruit than the batter. Its a healthy cake to snack on and to add to portable lunches, as well as to serve to fall and winter company. Photos by Evan Atlas. Save Print Fresh Chunky Applesauce Cake Author: Nava Recipe type: Apple /­­ dessert /­­ cake Cuisine: Vegan /­­ healthy Prep time:  25 mins Cook time:  45 mins Total time:  1 hour 10 mins Serves: 10 to 12   Your own homemade chunky applesauce is the key to this flavorful cake. That way, the cake is just as much (if not more) about the fruit than the batter. Ingredients 5 cups peeled, cored, and thinly sliced apple (any variety) 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons cinnamon, divided ⅓ cup maple syrup 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ¼ cup safflower or other neutral oil ½ cup chopped walnuts 2 to 4 tablespoons plain or vanilla nondairy milk, as needed Instructions Place the sliced apples in a saucepan with just enough water to keep the bottom of pan moist. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the apples are about half broken down into sauce and the rest tender, leaving the mixture chunky. How long this takes depends very much on the variety of apple, so check frequently. Remove from the heat. This step can be done ahead of time. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon in a large mixing bowl and mix thoroughly. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the syrup, vanilla, and oil. Stir together until the flour mixture is moistened. It will barely hold together as a batter. Stir in the chunky applesauce, walnuts, and the remaining cinnamon and stir briefly, just until evenly distributed in the batter. Add just enough non-dairy milk so that the flour mixture is completely moistened, but let the batter remain very stiff. Scrape the mixture into a lightly oiled deep 9-inch round cake pan or a 9 by 12-inch baking pan. Pat the mixture down lightly with the back of a spatula, as it will be rather lumpy. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden and a knife inserted into the center tests clean, other than any moisture from the apples. Allow to cool, then cut into wedges or squares to serve. 3.3.3077   Variation: To make this gluten-free, simply substitute your favorite GF flour mix, such as Bobs Red Mill. Here are more: - Apple recipes - Fruity Baked Goods - Easy Vegan Cakes and Pies

Gluten-Free Coconut Strawberry Shortcake Cupcakes

August 20 2015 VegKitchen 

These strawberry shortcake cupcakes are not only luscious, but also gluten-free. From The Happy Cow Cookbook, edited by Eric Brent and Glen Merzer. Recipe and photo by Chaco Canyon Organic Café, Seattle, WA. Reprinted by permission of Ben Bella Books (C)2014. Save Print Gluten-Free Coconut Strawberry Shortcake Cupcakes Author: Happy Cow Recipe type: Vegan Cupcakes Cuisine: Vegan baking Prep time:  20 mins Cook time:  35 mins Total time:  55 mins Serves: 20   These strawberry shortcake cupcakes are not only luscious, but also gluten-free. Ingredients 2 cups tapioca flour 1 1/­­3 cups white rice flour 1 cup millet flour 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­3 cups shredded coconut 2 1/­­3 cups sugar 1 cup safflower oil 2 1/­­3 cups coconut milk 1 cup water 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon vanilla extract For the strawberry filling 10 ounces frozen strawberries 3 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon cornstarch 1/­­2 cup sugar 2 teaspoons margarine 4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice For the coconut whipped topping 1 1/­­2 tablespoons agar powder 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1/­­3 cup sugar 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 2 1/­­2 cups coconut milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons coconut oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Using the whisk attachment, whisk together flours and xanthan gum in mixer for about 3 minutes. Add baking soda, salt, shredded coconut, and sugar and mix briefly. Remove and set aside. In another mixing bowl, mix together wet ingredients: oil, coconut milk, water, apple cider vinegar, and vanilla extract. Slowly add flour mixture and mix thoroughly, at least 5 minutes at medium-high speed. (This is needed to get the xanthan gum to work its magic.) Grease muffin pans liberally. If using muffin liners, spray the inside of the paper cups liberally as well! Fill muffin wells only 2/­­3 full. Bake in the oven 30 to 40 minutes, or until a tester comes out clean. Cool completely. For the strawberry filling: In a small pot, cook the frozen berries over medium-low heat. In a separate bowl, combine cornstarch and sugar. When the berries are warm but not hot, add in the cornstarch mixture to the pot. Cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture is thick, bubbly, and translucent. Remove from heat and mix in margarine and lemon juice. Chill in refrigerator. For the coconut whipped topping: In a small saucepan, whisk together the agar, cornstarch, sugar, and salt. Whisk in the coconut milk. Over medium heat, bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Lower heat, continue stirring constantly, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla extract and coconut oil. Immediately pour through a fine mesh strainer to remove any agar bits and place in the refrigerator to chill overnight. Remove from the refrigerator and transfer to a mixer. Whip the mixture until smooth and fluffy. To assemble: Cut a cone-shaped plug out of the top of each cupcake. Pipe coconut whipped topping around the hole. Pipe fill strawberry filling into the well of the hole until its level with the whipped topping. Tip: Use a piping bag with the big round tip for the strawberry filling for an easier assembly. 3.3.3077   - Here are more recipes for Gluten-Free Vegan Baking. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Mango Curry Tofu

May 17 2015 VegKitchen 

Mango Curry TofuMangoes are abundant in India, where they are always juicy and sweet. In the United States, mangoes can be a bit tart. For desserts or curries like this one, I prefer mango pulp or puree in canned or bottled form. You can use a ripe mango, if you prefer, but be sure to puree it well before using. This is a simple recipe but the resulting dish is very alluring with its sweet and spicy sauce. It can easily be made soy-free. Recipe and photos from Vegan Richas Indian Kitchen    (C) 2015 by Richa Hingle.  Vegan Heritage Press, LLC. reprinted by permission. Serves: 4 Prep: Active: 25 minutes | Inactive: 20 minutes Tofu - 14-ounce tub firm tofu - 2 teaspoons safflower or other neutral oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon Garam Masala - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Curry - 3/­­4 cup chopped red onion - 1-inch knob of ginger - 3 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons water - 1 teaspoon safflower or other neutral oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon cumin seeds - 2 bay leaves - 4 cloves - 1 1/­­4 cups canned or culinary coconut milk - 3/­­4 cup ripe mango pulp or puree (unsweetened or lightly sweetened canned) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar - Generous pinch of black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon Garam Masala, for garnish - 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro, for garnish Tofu: Cut the tofu slab into 1/­­2-inch slices. Place them on a clean kitchen towel. Cover with another kitchen towel. Place a 10-pound (approximate) weight on top and let sit for 10 minutes. Alternatively, you can use pressed tofu. Cut the tofu slices into 1/­­2-inch cubes. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot, tilt the skillet so the oil coats it evenly. Add the tofu and cook until lightly brown on some sides, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes. Add the cayenne, cinnamon, garam masala, and salt and mix well to coat. Cook for another 2 minutes and set aside. Curry: In a blender, combine the onion, ginger, and garlic and blend into a smooth puree with 2 tablespoons of water. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the cumin seeds, bay leaves, and cloves. Cook for 1 minute. Add the pureed onion and cook until the onion mixture is dry and does not smell raw. Stir occasionally to avoid sticking, 13 to 15 minutes. Add the coconut milk, mango pulp, salt, and vinegar and mix well. Add the tofu and all the spices from the tofu skillet to the sauce skillet. Add a dash of black pepper. Mix, cover and cook until the sauce comes to a boil, 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and cook uncovered until the sauce thickens and desired consistency is achieved, about 15 minutes. Taste and adjust the salt and tang. Add 1/­­2 teaspoon or more sugar if the mango pulp was not sweet. Garnish with cilantro and a dash of garam masala and serve hot. - Visit Richa at Vegan Richa: Eating plants until we photosynthesize!

Green Bean Fries

March 18 2015 VegKitchen 

Green Bean FriesGreen bean fries are a less starchy but equally fun and tasty alternative to potato fries. Using fresh slender green beans in season is the way to go, even though trimming them is a bit of work. Off season, use partially thawed whole baby green beans. These are tasty with our dairy-free ranch dressing, but theyre good on their own, too. Use as a snack, appetizer, or side dish. Photos by Evan Atlas. Serves: 3 to 4 - 8 to 10 ounces fresh slender green beans, trimmed, or frozen whole baby green beans, partially thawed - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons safflower or other high-heat oil, plus more for the pan - 2 tablespoons garbanzo flour, very fine cornmeal, or other whole-grain flour - 1 teaspoon salt-free seasoning blend (such as Frontier or Mrs. Dash) - Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste - Vegan Ranch Dressing or Dip, optional Put the green beans in a mixing bowl. Drizzle in the oil, and stir until the green beans are lightly and evenly coated. Sprinkle the garbanzo flour (or other flour of your choice) onto the green beans and stir well once again to distribute. Heat as little oil as you can get away with for to coat your particular skillet. Youll need a wide skillet for this. When the skillet is nice and hot, add the green beans.  Turn the heat up to almost high, and cook the green beans until lightly browned all over and slightly seared here and there, stirring frequently. Drizzle a little more oil into the pan only if the green beans start to stick.  When the green beans are done to your liking, remove the pan from the heat and season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a serving dish and serve at once, on their own or with Vegan Ranch Dressing or Dip (make the dip version in this case).     - Here are more recipes for Green Beans. - Enjoy other Tasty Vegan Appetizers.

Roasting Veggies With Aluminum Foil Vs. Parchment

December 24 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Roasting Veggies With Aluminum Foil Vs. Parchment Should you line the pan with aluminum foil, or would it be healthier to switch to parchment paper? Yes, when roasting vegetables, parchment paper is better than foil. Recent research in the International Journal of Electrochemical Science suggests that when we use aluminum foil during cooking, some aluminum leaches into food. Leaching increases with higher heat (roasting and broiling) and acidity (tomatoes, vinegar, vitamin C-rich produce). Is aluminum leaching into food bad? Maybe. The average person consumes between 7 and 9 milligrams of aluminum each day through diet. The Food and Drug Administration considers such levels generally safe, and the Alzheimers Association concludes that this normal exposure to aluminum is not a significant risk factor in Alzheimers disease. However, the Center for Disease Controls Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry suggests that consuming higher levels of aluminum than average may be linked to nervous system, brain, and bone diseases. People who cook often with aluminum foil (and aluminum pots and pans) risk more exposure than normal to the metal. So, although some aluminum in the diet is inevitable, keep exposure minimal with simple changes such as switching to parchment paper over foil when roasting. Parchment paper can tolerate temperatures up to 420°F. But note: dont confuse parchment paper with waxed paper, which cant withstand high temperatures and will smoke in the oven. Tip: When roasting, choose oils with higher smoke points (such as canola, sunflower, safflower, grapeseed, and refined coconut oil) to avoid an “off” flavor. Health-food junkie Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, is creator of the weekly e-newsletter Nutrition WOW.

Sesame-Ginger Tofu and Broccoli Stir-Fry

October 31 2014 VegKitchen 

Sesame-Ginger Tofu and Broccoli Stir-FryThis stir-fry is inspired by General Tsos Tofu, but dispenses with the cornstarch-battered, deep-fried tofu. Ive tried it that way and find this version, with pan-sautéed tofu, plenty of broccoli, and a savory, sweet, and spicy sauce even more appealing. Its easy and fast, too.  Serves: 3 to 4 For the tofu: - 14- to 16-ounce tub tofu, drained and well blotted or pressed - 2 tablespoons safflower oil Sauce: - 1 tablespoon arrowroot or cornstarch - 3/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 1 1/­­2 T chili oil, or 1 tablespoon sesame oil plus sriracha sauce to taste - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger, or more, to taste - 2 tablespoons natural granulated sugar - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar or other mild vinegar - - 2-3 cloves garlic, minced - Large broccoli crown, cut into bite-sized florets - Sesame seeds - Dried red chili pods or red pepper flakes, optional - Cooked brown rice for serving, optional Cut the tofu into 6 slabs crosswise. Blot well on paper towels or clean tea towels (or use the a tofu press ahead of time for making the tofu nice and firm), then cut into dice. Heat the oil in a large skillet or steep-sided stir-fry pan. Add the tofu and and sauté over medium-high heat until golden and crisp on most sides, stirring often. This will take from 8 to 10 minutes or so. Remove the tofu to a plate and set aside. Meanwhile, combine the arrowroot or cornstarch with 1/­­4 cup of the water in a small mixing bowl. Stir until dissolved, then add the remaining sauce ingredients. Stir together and set aside. Wipe out the pan in which you sautéed the tofu. Add the garlic and just a little water, and cook over low heat for 2 minutes. Add the broccoli and just enough additional wanter to keep the pan moist; cover and cook over medium-high heat until bright green and tender-crisp, about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir the tofu and sauce in with the broccoli and cook until the sauce thickens. Taste to see if youd like more soy sauce. Garnish with sesame seeds and the optional chili pods or chili flakes, and serve at once on its own or over hot cooked rice. - Here are lots more  easy tofu recipes.

Classic Tofu Loaf

October 3 2014 VegKitchen 

This meal is perfect for those times you open up the fridge and the selection looks sparse. All youve got is a package of tofu and an abundance of condiments. The recipe may seem simple, but thats exactly why its here. Every now and then you have to hit the easy button, and for a simple staple like this, you shouldnt try and over-think it. If you have a package of tofu and you dont want it to go bad, this will solve that problem and give you leftovers. (From The Lusty Vegan* (C) 2014 by Ayinde Howell and Zoe Eisenberg. Used by permission, Vegan Heritage Press.) Serves: 4 to 6 - 1 tablespoon grapeseed or safflower oil - 1 (14-ounce) package firm tofu, well-drained - 1 1/­­2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­2 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley - 1/­­2 cup chopped onion - 1 teaspoon minced garlic - 1/­­2 cup ketchup - 1/­­4 cup Dijon mustard - 1/­­4 cup barbecue sauce - 1/­­4 cup low-sodium wheat-free tamari - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Garnishes - Ketchup - Chopped fresh parsley Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan with the oil and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, crumble the tofu into bite-size pieces. Add the oats and mix well. Stir in the parsley, onion, and garlic. Add the ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauce, tamari, and salt. Mix well, until all ingredients are incorporated.  Press the mixture evenly into the prepared pan. Bake for 30 minutes. Serve garnished with ketchup and fresh parsley.  Note: Try cooking this recipe in muffin cups for individual serving sizes, ideal for brown-bagging your lunches during the work week. - Here are more  easy, versatile tofu recipes. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Strawberry Lemon Lavender Muffins

August 18 2014 Meatless Monday 

These gluten free muffins contrast sweet strawberries with sour lemon juice and herbal lavender. Try pressing a quartered strawberry on top of the muffins before baking to give this breakfast bread a refreshingly sweet finish. This recipe comes to us from Christy, The Blissful Chef. Serves 12 - 1 cup brown rice flour*1/­­2 cup cornmeal - 1/­­2 cup coconut flour* - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons arrowroot - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1 cup unsweetened almond milk - 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup safflower oil - 1/­­3 cup maple syrup - 2 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 tablespoon lemon zest - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 1/­­3 cup sugar - 2 tablespoon fresh lavender, minced - 1/­­2 cup strawberries, finely chopped - 3 strawberries, greens removed & quartered *Found in health food stores of the flour section of some grocery stores. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a muffin tin with liners or spray lightly with nonstick cooking spray. Whisk the brown rice flour, cornmeal, coconut flour, baking powder, baking soda, arrowroot and salt together in a large bowl. Whisk the almond milk and vinegar together in a smaller bowl until they begin to bubble. Add the safflower oil, maple syrup, vanilla, lemon zest and juice and sugar. Whisk together with the almond milk vinegar mixture until well combined. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, stirring, until well combined. Fold the minced lavender and finely chopped strawberries into the batter. Spoon the batter equal amounts into the muffin tin cups. Top each muffin liner with one strawberry quarter, pressing down lightly. Bake for 22-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out dry. Enjoy! The post Strawberry Lemon Lavender Muffins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Veggie Lo Mein

July 13 2014 VegKitchen 

Veggie Lo MeinIts so easy to make vegetable lo mien, a Chinese take-out favorite, at home--and its lighter and less heavy on the oil than its restaurant counterpart. Serve this with a simple combo of corn and edamame as shown in the photo; or with a tofu dish. Either way, round out the meal a simple crisp salad.   Recipe from   Plant Power: Transform Your Kitchen, Plate, and Life with More Than 150 Fresh and Flavorful Vegan Recipes  by Nava Atlas. (C)2014, published by HarperOne, reprinted by permission. Photos by  Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 4 to 6 - 8 ounces udon or soba, preferably whole-grain - 1 tablespoon safflower or other high-heat oil, or 3 tablespoons vegetable broth or water - 2 teaspoons dark sesame oil (optional but highly recommended) - 1/­­2 small head green or napa cabbage, cut into long, narrow ribbons (see Note) - 2 cups small broccoli florets - 2 cups fresh green beans, trimmed and cut in half (see Note) - 1 cup sliced mushrooms (optional) - 3 to 4 scallions, white and green parts cut into 1-inch-long segments - Vegetable broth or water for moistening - Reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari to taste - Freshly ground pepper to taste Cook the noodles according to package directions in plenty of rapidly simmering water until al dente, then drain. Meanwhile, heat the safflower oil, broth, or water and 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil (if desired) in a stir-fry pan. Add the cabbage, broccoli, and green beans. Cover and cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms, if desired, and scallions and stir-fry over medium-high heat for 5 minutes or until the vegetables are just tender-crisp. Add a small amount of vegetable broth or water, just enough to keep the pan moist. Add the cooked noodles to the stir-fry pan and toss together. Add the remaining teaspoon of sesame oil, if using, then season with soy sauce and pepper to taste. Serve at once. Note: When youre in a hurry, you can substitute 8 ounces of preshredded coleslaw (preferably with carrots included) for the green or napa cabbage. And fresh, slender green beans are hard to come by for much of the year, so I give you my full blessing to use frozen organic whole baby green beans, which are consistently excellent--and also save you the time and trouble of trimming the ends. Nutrition information Per serving: Calories: 264 with oil, 234 without oil; Total fat: 4g with oil, 1g without oil; Protein: 11g; Carbohydrates: 52g; Fiber: 3g; Sodium: 473mg Variations Use whatever youve got in the fridge in place of or in addition to some of the veggies called for in the recipe--romaine lettuce, mung bean sprouts, and/­­or bok choy in place of cabbage; broccoli rabe or Chinese broccoli instead of regular broccoli--its all good! Turn this into a heartier dish by adding 8 ounces seitan, cut into narrow strips, along with the cabbage, broccoli, and green beans. - Find more of VegKitchens Vegan Dinner Recipes . - Here are more recipes using Asian noodles.

Sunrise Citrus Salad

April 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

Who says you cant have salad for breakfast? Tofu cubes are marinated in orange juice, maple syrup and cinnamon, then seared crisp on the stove. A macadamia vinaigrette dresses baby lettuces, while dried cranberries and pistachios provide a delicious flavor contrast in this satisfying citrus salad. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 3 For the citrus seared tofu cubes: - 2 cups firm or extra firm tofu, cubed - 1 tablespoon orange juice - 1/­­8 teaspoon orange zest - 1 tablespoon maple syrup - 1 1/­­2 teaspoon low sodium soy sauce - a few dashes cinnamon - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons safflower oil - pepper, to taste For the macadamia vinaigrette: - 2 tablespoons macadamia nut oil - 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar - 2 teaspoons agave nectar, to taste - black pepper, to taste To complete the Sunrise Citrus Salad: - 1/­­3 cup avocado, diced - 1 tablespoon lime juice - salt, to taste - 2 cups spring mix lettuce or baby spinach - 1 tablespoon dried cranberries - 1/­­2 grapefruit, peeled, deseeded and sliced - 1/­­3 cup orange slices - 1 cup short grained brown rice, cooked - 1 tablespoon pistachios To make the citrus seared tofu cubes: Squeeze the excess water out of the tofu cubes using your hands or a heavy book lined with paper towels. Place the orange juice, orange zest, maple syrup and soy sauce together in a medium bowl. Season with the cinnamon and salt and pepper to taste. Soak the tofu cubes in the orange maple marinade for at least 1 hour. Place the oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the marinated tofu cubes and cook for 2 minutes, or until 1 side is seared. Reserve the marinade. Flip the tofu cubes over using a spatula, add 2 tablespoons of the orange maple marinade to the pan and cook for more 2-3 minutes. Add the remaining orange maple marinade and cook another 1-2 minutes, or until the marinade reduces slightly. Transfer the tofu to a plate and sprinkle pepper over the top, if desired. Pour the reduced marinade over the tofu. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside. To make the macadamia vinaigrette: Whisk the macadamia nut oil, apple cider vinegar and agave nectar together in a small bowl. Season with pepper to taste, adding more agave nectar if desired. Set aside. To complete the Sunrise Citrus Salad: Place the avocado in a small bowl and toss with the lime juice. Season with salt to taste. Divide the salad greens, cranberries, grapefruit, orange slices and cooked brown rice between 3 bowls. Dress each with the macadamia vinaigrette to taste. Top each with the lime avocado mixture, tofu cubes and pistachios. Enjoy! The post Sunrise Citrus Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

25+ Healthy Foods Vegetarians and Vegans Should Eat with Kale

October 1 2015 Vegetarian Times 

25+ Healthy Foods Vegetarians and Vegans Should Eat with KaleChef Jennifer Iserloh, author of 50 Shades of Kale and one of the founders of National Kale Day, offers great suggestions on how vegetarians and vegans can maximize this green ingredient for good health. The Skinny Chef and healthy cooking expert features kale in our latest online course, Gentle Cleanse 7 Day Detox, with delicious, sustainable meal plans designed to get you looking and feeling your best. Use code KALE25 to get 25% off for a limited time. Making Kale Healthier for Vegetarians and Vegans Plant-based diets are definitely in vogue, and for good reason. Plants provide a wide range of nutrients with few calories.  But if youre limiting your diet, make sure you maintain nutritional balance so that you feel your most energized, sharpest self! Vegetarian Kale combines well with many foods for a variety of dishes. If you are vegetarian, you have plenty of kale combo choices that will help aid in nutrient absorption, improve digestion, and provide crucial nutrients that a lot of vegans and vegetarians miss. Check out this list below to find out how to pair kale with ingredients that will provide balanced nutrition. B12 Eggs (Try: Sweet Potato and Kale Frittata with Goat Cheese) Swiss Cheese Manchego Cheese Parmesan Cheese (Try: Kale-Pecan Pesto) Iron Lentils Spinach Navy beans Sesame Seeds Gut Health/­­Fermented Foods Kefir, dairy or coconut Pickles Olives (Try: Tuscan-Style Spaghetti with Kale and Cannellinis)  Sauerkraut For Vegans B12 Nutritional yeast (Try: Garlicky Cheezy Kale & Crispy Chick’n Salad) Fortified plant milk Fortified Tofu (Try: Asian Kale, Green Bean, and Tofu Salad) Vegan Mayonnaise Iron Lentils Spinach Navy beans Sesame Seeds (Try: Sesame Noodles with Kale) Gut Health/­­Fermented Foods Pickles Olives Sauerkraut Coconut Kefir Fats Antioxidant-rich fats like those found in nuts, coconut, olive oil, sesame oil and safflower oil are useful to cook with kale since this green vegetable is high in fat soluble vitamins such as A and B. Healthy fats are important for proper brain function and maintaining glowing skin. Mix kale with foods that are high in  fats, such as avocado for a tasty kale guacamole, or use coconut oil to cook up amazing shishito peppers with kale.

Masala Lentils (Sabut Masoor)

May 18 2015 VegKitchen 

Masala Lentils (Sabut Masoor)If you want to impress someone with a dal, make it this one. Dont be afraid of the number of spices--it is quite simple to make. The spices and garlic are blended to a paste and fried in the oil. A hot sauce (chiles, garlic, and vinegar) in the tadka is another secret to getting the right flavor profile. Serve this as a part of a meal, or with rice or naan or other flatbread. Recipe and photos from Vegan Richas Indian Kitchen   (C) 2015 by Richa Hingle. Vegan Heritage Press, LLC. reprinted by permission. Serves: 4 Prep: Active: 25 minutes | Inactive: 20 minutes  - 3/­­4 cup brown lentils, washed and drained - 2 cups water - 2 to 3 teaspoons safflower or other neutral oil - 1/­­2 cup finely chopped red or white onion - 6 cloves garlic, chopped - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 2 teaspoons ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cardamom - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon fenugreek leaves or 1/­­8 teaspoon fenugreek seeds - 1 teaspoon sweet or hot paprika - 1/­­8 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sriracha or other hot sauce, to taste - 2 tablespoons water - 1 1/­­2 cups chopped tomato - 3/­­4 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro, for garnish - 1 tablespoon vegan butter (optional) Combine the lentils with 2 cups of water in a saucepan. Partially cover and cook over medium heat until the lentils are tender, 25 to 30 minutes. While the lentils are cooking, make the tempering. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. In a blender, combine the garlic, cumin, coriander, cardamom, cinnamon, fenugreek, paprika, nutmeg, black pepper, sriracha, and 2 tablespoons of water. Blend to combine well. Add this paste to the onions in the skillet. Cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and salt, and cook until the tomatoes are tender, about 8 minutes. Mash the larger tomato pieces. Add the tempering to the lentils. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for another 5 minutes. Taste and adjust salt and spice. Garnish with cilantro and vegan butter, if using, and serve hot. Visit Richa at Vegan Richa: Eating plants until we photosynthesize!

Maple Almond Pecan Scones

April 20 2015 Meatless Monday 

The dough of these breakfast pastries is made from ground pecans, almonds and oats then seasoned with cinnamon and vanilla. These healthy scones are naturally sweetened with maple syrup to give your morning a hearty hello which welcomes autumn. This recipe comes to us from Christy, The Blissful Chef. Serves 8 - 1/­­2 cup pecans - 1/­­2 cup almonds - 1/­­2 cup rolled oats - 2 cups barley flour* - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 3 teaspoons baking powder - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­3 cup unsweetened applesauce - 1/­­3 cup maple syrup - 2 tablespoons safflower oil, melted - 1 tablespoon vanilla extract - 1/­­4 cup pecans, chopped - or - 1/­­4 cup almonds, chopped - 2 tablespoons maple syrup, for glazing the scones - apricot or blueberry jam, for garnish** *found in the flour, baking or health food sections of most grocery stores. Substitute wheat flour if barley flour is unavailable.   **optional. Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper. Sprinkle a little flour on the parchment paper. Place the pecans, almonds and rolled oats in a food processor and pulse until the mixture becomes a fine meal and no chunks of nut or oat remain. Place the oat nut meal in a large mixing bowl. Add the barley flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon to the mixing bowl. Stir until combined. In a separate small bowl, mix together the applesauce, maple syrup, oil and vanilla extract. Stir until combined. Carefully fold in the nuts. Slowly add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Mix together with a spatula and fork or with your hands until the batter forms a firm dough ball. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet. Gently press the dough into an 8-inch circle, then cut it into 8 pieces with a sharp knife. You do not need to separate the wedges. With a pastry brush, glaze the tops of the unbaked scones with the additional maple syrup. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until scones are cooked through. Cool slightly, then transfer to a cooling rack. Spread with fruit jam, if using, and enjoy. The post Maple Almond Pecan Scones appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Southeast Asian-Flavored Noodles with Tempeh Croutons

December 28 2014 VegKitchen 

Southeast Asian-Flavored Noodles with Tempeh CroutonsThis spicy, nutty dish of noodles and vegetables dressed in peanut sauce and topped with tempeh croutons is a fusion of Indonesian and Thai-influences. It’s good served warm or at room temperature. This dish really has it all, so you can finish the meal with a simple soup or a complementary salad like Asian-Flavored Coleslaw. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 6 to 8 Tempeh croutons: - 1 tablespoon safflower or other neutral vegetable oil - 1 tablespoon natural soy sauce or tamari - 8-ounce package tempeh, any variety, diced - Pinch of chili powder Dressing: - 1/­­3 cup natural peanut butter, chunky or smooth - 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice - 1 tablespoon agave nectar - Sriracha sauce or dried hot red pepper flakes, to taste - 2 tablespoons natural soy sauce or tamari - 1/­­4 cup hot water - - 8 ounces soba or udon noodles (or substitute linguine) - 8 ounces fresh slender green beans or thawed frozen organic whole green beans - 2 carrots, cut into thick matchsticks - 3 scallions, sliced - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 2 to 3 tablespoons finely chopped peanuts, optional Slowly heat the oil and soy sauce together in a wide skillet. Add the tempeh and sauté over medium heat, stirring frequently, until nicely browned and crisp. Sprinkle lightly with chili powder, and remove from the heat. Combine the dressing ingredients in a small bowl, and whisk together. Set aside. Cook the noodles in plenty of rapidly simmering water until al dente. Once the noodles are just about done, plunge the green beans and carrots into the water and cook for another minute. Drain well in a colander. Transfer the noodles and veggies to a large serving bowl. Add the tempeh, scallions, cilantro, and peanuts, if desired. Pour in the dressing, toss well, and serve warm or at room temperature. Nutrition Information: Per serving: 375 calories; 14g fat; 240mg sodium; 42g carbs; 4g fiber; 20g protein - Here are more  Asian-style cold noodle dishes. - Explore more recipes using  Asian noodles.

Hearts of Baltimore “Crab Cakes”

November 10 2014 Meatless Monday 

These unique “crab cakes” use chopped hearts of palm instead of crab, but otherwise feature the same flavors of the classic dish. This recipe comes to us from Ayinde Howell and Zoe Eisenberg, authors of The Lusty Vegan: A Cookbook and Relationship Manifesto for Vegans and Those Who Love Them. Serves 2 For the Garlicky Dill Aioli - 1/­­2 cup vegan mayonnaise - 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill - 1 teaspoon minced garlic For the Crab Cakes - 3 tablespoons grapeseed or safflower oil, divided, plus more for frying - 1 (14-ounce) can hearts of palm, (not packed in sugar), roughly chopped to the consistency of crab meat - 1/­­4 cup chopped celery - 1/­­4 cup diced red bell pepper - 1/­­2 cup chopped onion - 2 teaspoons minced garlic - 2 teaspoons seafood seasoning - 1 teaspoon cornstarch - 1/­­4 cup vegan mayonnaise For the Breading - 1/­­2 cup gluten-free bread crumbs, or more - 1 tablespoon seafood seasoning - Lemon wedges, to serve To make the Garlicky Dill A?oli Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl. Mix well and add salt and pepper to taste. Set in the fridge to keep cool. To make the Crab Cakes: Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the hearts of palm and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Cook until golden brown on all sides. Set aside to cool. Add the celery and peppers and mix well. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a skillet over medium-heat heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Remove from the heat, add to the hearts of palm, and mix well. Add the seafood seasoning, cornstarch, and mayo. Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl and mix well. Set aside to cool to room temperature, then shape the mixture into four round patties. Breading: In a shallow bowl, combine the bread crumbs and seafood seasoning, stirring to mix. Coat the patties with the breadcrumb mixture and refrigerate for 20 minutes. Heat about 3 tablespoons oil in a medium skillet over medium- high heat until hot and shimmering. Carefully place the patties in the skillet and cook until golden brown on each side, approximately 2 minutes per side. Watch closely to prevent burning. Transfer the cooked patties to a plate lined with paper towels to drain any excess oil. Serve hot, topped with the a?oli, with lemon wedges on the side. The post Hearts of Baltimore “Crab Cakes” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sriracha Tempeh Sliders with Ranch Dressing

October 3 2014 VegKitchen 

Tempeh is one obliviously of my favorite proteins to work with, and Ive found it makes the best little sliders. These are great are because you get about 4 per standard package of tempeh. Since living in LA, these lil guys have become a staple in my catering arsenal. Here is a hint: you can replace the sriracha with BBQ sauce if its too hot you! (From The Lusty Vegan* (C) 2014 by Ayinde Howell and Zoe Eisenberg. Used by permission, Vegan Heritage Press.) Serves: 4 to 6 - 1/­­4 cup grapeseed or safflower oil  - 8 ounces tempeh, cut into 4 squares - 1/­­4 cup chopped onion  - 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage - 1 teaspoon chopped garlic  - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sriracha sauce - 8 slider buns, split  - Ranch Dressing, recipe follows - 1/­­2 red onion, sliced, optional - 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced, optional Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium heat until hot and shimmering. Add the tempeh and cook until browned on both sides, about 4 minutes per side. Repeat until all of the tempeh is cooked.  Remove the tempeh to a plate lined with paper towels. Remove half of the oil from the skillet and return the skillet to the heat. Add the onion and sauté for approximately 2 minutes, then add the sage, garlic, basil, and salt and sauté for 1 minute.  In a bowl, combine the water and sriracha, stirring to mix. Pour the sriracha water into the skillet and add the tempeh back into skillet. Cover and simmer on low for 10 minutes.  Lightly toast the slider buns and arrange a tempeh patty on the bottom half of each bun. Top with the dressing and sliced onion and or cucumber, if using. Serve hot. Note: You can find slider buns at Trader Joes or well-stocked supermarkets. If unavailable, cut hoagie rolls into slider-sized sections. ———————————- Ranch Dressing  Ranch dressing is an American favorite. Heres the thing: its a pretty basic cream base, and if youre making your own, you can add anything to make it whatever you want! This is my twist on a traditional ranch. Feel free to throw in fennel or something crazy! Youre the chef now. This recipe is from The Lusty Vegan* by Ayinde Howell and Zoe Eisenberg (C) 2014, Vegan Heritage Press. Used with permission. Serves: 2 to 4 - 1 cup unsweetened soy milk - 1/­­4 cup vegan mayonnaise  - 1/­­4 cup vegan sour cream - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 3 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley - 3 tablespoons minced chives - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh garlic - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 2 tablespoons vegan Worcestershire sauce - Salt and black pepper In a medium bowl, whisk all ingredients thoroughly. Refrigerate until ready to serve. - Here are more of VegKitchens  Vegan burger recipes - See VegKitchens selection of  Classic Salad Dressings. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Sweet Potato Chocolate Chip Cake

September 13 2014 VegKitchen 

Sweet Potato Chocolate Chip CakeJust as the flavors of pumpkin (or other orange winter squash, especially butternut) and chocolate are surprisingly compatible, so are the flavors of sweet potato and chocolate. This moist cake will surprise your taste buds, and once youve got your pureed sweet potato, its super easy to make. Makes: One 9-inch round cake, at least 8 servings - 2 cups light spelt or whole wheat pastry flour - 1/­­2 cup natural granulated sugar - 2 teaspoons ground ginger - 1 teaspoons cinnamon - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda - 1 cup smoothly pureed cooked sweet potato (see Note) - 2 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons safflower oil - 1/­­2 to 3/­­4 cup orange juice, preferably fresh, or as needed - 1 cup vegan chocolate chips or mini-chips - 1/­­3 cup dark or golden raisins, optional Frosting (optional) - 1/­­2 cup vegan chocolate chips - 1 tablespoon nondairy milk - 2 tablespoons natural cashew or peanut butter  - Thinly sliced apple or pear for garnish, optional Preheat the oven to 350? F. Combine the first 6 (dry) ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir together.  In another bowl, combine the sweet potato puree, syrup, oil, and juice, and whisk together until smooth.  Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the wet mixture. Stir together until completely mixed. If the batter is too stiff to mix, add a small amount of additional juice, but it should remain a thick batter. Stir in the chocolate chips. Pour the batter into a 9-inch round cake or springform pan, or an 8- or 9-inch square baking pan. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center tests clean, other than the chocolate. Let cool to room temperature in the pan. If making frosting, combine the ingredients in a heatproof bowl. Set it in a saucepan of gently simmering water and heat until the chips are melted and you can whisk the mixture together. Or, simply microwave for 45 seconds, and whisk together. Frost the cake at once, and then let it stand until the frosting cools. Embellish with thinly sliced apple or pear if youd like, then serve. Note: Use your favorite method for cooking sweet potato -- bake or microwave whole until soft; or peel and dice, then simmer in water until soft. Puree in a food processor, adding just enough water or nondairy milk to help it along until it purees smoothly. Youll need about 1 large sweet potato.  Variations: Make this with pureed pumpkin or butternut squash. To make thise gluten-free, simply substitute your favorite gluten-free flour mix for the other flour. Omit the 2 teaspoons baking powder and substitute 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Sweet tooth still craving? Here are more  Vegan Baking and Sweets . Explore more of VegKitchens  Easy Vegan Cakes and Pies .

Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh

August 11 2014 VegKitchen 

Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh This sweet-and-sour stir-fry, featuring high-protein seitan or tempeh along with colorful vegetables and pineapple, has several steps but can be made easily and at a leisurely pace. Best of all, it results in a delicious and nourishing meal. This is especially good served over bean-thread noodles or Asian brown rice vermicelli, but soba or udon work well, too. Long-grain brown rice and brown basmati rice are good choices as well. Recipe from   Plant Power: Transform Your Kitchen, Plate, and Life with More Than 150 Fresh and Flavorful Vegan Recipes by Nava Atlas. (C)2014, published by HarperOne, reprinted by permission. Photos by  Hannah Kaminsky.    Serves: 4 to 6 Sauce: - 1/­­2 cup fruit juice (pineapple juice works best -- use reserved juice from canned pineapple if using; mango juice or nectar is good, too) - 2 1/­­2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch - 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth or water - 1/­­4 cup rice vinegar - 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari, or to taste - 2 tablespoons agave nectar - 1 to 2 teaspoons grated fresh or jarred ginger - - 1 tablespoon safflower or other high-heat oil, or 1/­­4 cup vegetable broth or water - 1 pound seitan, cut into bite-size chunks, or one 8-ounce package tempeh, diced - 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced - 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 large broccoli crowns, cut into bite-size pieces - 2 medium red bell peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 medium zucchini or yellow squash, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/­­2-inch chunks - 2 medium ripe fresh tomatoes, diced - 2 cups fresh pineapple chunks (about 3/­­4 inch thick) or one 20-ounce can unsweetened pineapple chunks in juice, drained and liquid reserved - Hot cooked rice, quinoa, or noodles Heat half the oil, broth, or water in a stir-fry pan or wok. Add the seitan or tempeh and stir-fry over medium-high heat until lightly browned, stirring frequently, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Heat the remaining oil, broth, or water in the pan. Add the onion and sauté over medium heat until golden. Turn up the heat; add the garlic, broccoli, and bell peppers and stir-fry for 5 minutes. Stir in the zucchini and stir-fry just until everything is tender-crisp, about 2 minutes longer, then stir in the tomatoes and pineapple chunks. Stir in the sauce and cook until it thickens. Taste and adjust the sweet-sour balance with more agave and/­­or vinegar (as called for in the sauce recipe) to your liking. Serve at once over hot cooked grains or noodles. Pass around any of the optional items for topping individual portions. Note: Why a pound of seitan but just 8 ounces of tempeh? Seitan is more moist and less dense; a pound of tempeh would be quite intense in this dish. But if youre a big fan of tempeh and want a higher-protein dish, go for it--use two 8-ounce packages. Nutrition information: Per serving with seitan: ICalories: 264; Total fat: 7g; Protein: 22g; Carbohydrates: 32g; Fiber: 4g; Sodium: 516mg Per serving with tempeh: Calories: 237; Total fat: 9g; Protein: 10g; Carbohydrates: 34g; Fiber: 6g; Sodium: 237mg - Here are more easy vegetable stir-fries.

Teriyaki Tofu Broccolette on Wild Rice

April 28 2014 Meatless Monday 

With homemade teriyaki sauce, pan-fried tofu, sautéed red bell pepper, broccolette, and hearty wild rice, this stir-fry has it all. This recipe makes extra teriyaki sauce, because I love to have this sauce in my fridge to serve over veggies or rice. --Marea Goodman, co-author of Straight from the Earth Serves 4 For the Wild Rice: - 1 cup/­­190 g wild rice, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cumin For the Teriyaki Sauce: - 3/­­4 cup/­­180 ml low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoon/­­75 g packed brown sugar - 2 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar - 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon finely minced, peeled fresh ginger - 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic - 1/­­8 teaspoon red pepper flakes For the Stir-Fry - 14 oz/­­400 g firm tofu, medium dice - 4 tablespoons/­­60 ml high-heat oil, such as safflower - 1 small yellow onion, small dice - 1 medium red bell pepper, small dice - 5 cups/­­350 g medium-dice broccolette - Sesame seeds for garnishing To make the rice: Combine the rice, oil, salt, and cumin with 2 cups/­­480 ml of water in a medium saucepan. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and cook, covered, until the rice is tender and there is no water left in the pot, about 1 hour. If the rice is cooked and there is still liquid left in the pan, drain the rice. Meanwhile, make the teriyaki sauce: Combine the soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, ginger, garlic, red pepper flakes, and 1/­­2 cup/­­120 ml water in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to the start of a boil, and then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, until the sauce thickens slightly, about 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let the sauce sit at room temperature while you prepare the remaining ingredients. To make the stir-fry: Place the tofu cubes on a clean kitchen towel and let them drain, about 5 minutes. Transfer the tofu to a medium mixing bowl and add 1/­­2 cup/­­120 ml of the teriyaki sauce, stirring to thoroughly coat all surfaces. Marinate the tofu at room temperature for at least 15 minutes. Transfer it to a sieve set over a bowl and drain; reserve the marinade. Add 2 tablespoon of the high-heat oil to a large skillet over medium-high heat. Arrange the tofu in a single layer and cook, flipping it gently, until all sides are crispy and brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the tofu to the bowl with the reserved marinade. Cover with a plate and set aside at room temperature. Return the skillet to the stove over medium-high heat. Add the remaining 2 tablespoon of the oil and cook the onion, stirring frequently, until it lightly browns, about 3 minutes. Add the bell pepper and cook until it softens slightly, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the broccolette and cook, stirring frequently, until the stems are crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved tofu and its marinade to the skillet and stir to combine. Cook until the mixture is hot, 1 to 2 minutes, adding additional teriyaki sauce to taste. Place about 3/­­4 cup/­­130 g of wild rice on each plate. Top with 1 1/­­2 cups/­­255 g of the vegetable mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve immediately. The post Teriyaki Tofu Broccolette on Wild Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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