rose - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Ceviche

Vegan Ravioli with Pink Beans

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

Chikki recipe | peanut chikki recipe | groundnut chikki or shengdana chikki



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rose vegetarian recipes

paan kulfi recipe | instant paan ice cream | no cook kulfi recipe

September 7 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

paan kulfi recipe | instant paan ice cream | no cook kulfi recipepaan kulfi recipe | instant paan ice cream | no cook kulfi recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. typically paan kulfi is prepared with meetha paan ingredients like paan leaves and gulkand mixture, however i did not had gulkand or dries rose essence. hence i have used dried dates which should serve the same purpose. i would not recommend to prepare with paan kulfi with the tobacco version of paan and it is meant to be prepared only with meetha paan. Continue reading paan kulfi recipe | instant paan ice cream | no cook kulfi recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Growing Your Own Herbs Indoors

August 27 2017 VegKitchen 

Growing Your Own Herbs Indoors Have you ever thought about growing your own herbs? I dont just mean the usual candidates like rosemary and thyme – though you should definitely find a spot for them – but also more unusual plants like lovage, dill and yarrow. Herb growing, no matter how much or how little space you have, is simple, […] The post Growing Your Own Herbs Indoors appeared first on VegKitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Peanut Butter Mousse Cake

June 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

It’s common knowledge now that vegan desserts are every bit as good (if not better) than their non-vegan counterparts — and they are just as easy to make! You can even make a super delicious single serving cake just by microwaving it in a mug for a minute! There’s always a way to calm that vegan sweet tooth craving. But every once in a while, life calls for something a little larger. A little more extravagant. A little more…epic. Sometimes, you just need to make a big fat beautiful cake. Birthdays, baby showers, office parties…whatever the reason may be, Gretchen’s Bakery has the absolute perfect cake for you. According to Gretchen, this cake is, “so creamy and light with a brownie base and ganache icing, globs of peanut butter cookie dough and fudge rosettes!” We are totally sold and we know you will be too when you watch the recipe video below: Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Peanut Butter Mousse Cake appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe

May 17 2017 Vegan Richa 

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeIndian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Chaas Recipe. Masala chaas. Savory Non Dairy Yogurt Drink with Mint, cumin and ice cubes. Indian Summer Beverage. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe We’ve all had some or the other type of lassi which is a sweet yogurt drink, where yogurt is blended with flavors (mango, rose, plain) and sugar/­­sweetener and some chilled water or ice. Lassis are a perfect summer drink. Chaas/­­ chaach /­­Mattha is an equally loved Indian Beverage for summer. Chaas is a savory spiced drink which is made with thin buttermilk. Chaas is great for the summer to hydrate as well as helps digestion.  Traditionally chaas is either made with the leftover water after making butter from cream, or from sour yogurt. This version uses almond milk yogurt to make a savory summer drink. A bit of lemon and kala namak adds some sourness. Refreshing and Summery. You can make your own non dairy yogurt at home. See Recipe notes.  South Indian version of Chaas called Neer Mor and it has cilantro, curry leaves, green chile that gets blended into the yogurt mixture. The serving is then garnished with a tempering of mustard seeds.  Try this Chaach with your favorite plain non dairy yogurt and let me know how it turned out!Continue reading: Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeThe post Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix

April 25 2017 Vegie Head 

I’ve wanted to make my own spice mix for a long time – using more than just dried spices. I have been growing my own organic vegies and herbs for over a year now in my two Healthy Patches, and had an abundance of celery, chillies, oregano, rosemary and spring onions… and nothing to... The post Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix appeared first on Vegie Head.

EU Last Law: Ham Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools Hospitals

April 1 2017 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

EU Last Law: Ham Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools HospitalsHam Sandwiches to be Banned in Schools and Hospitals Embargoed until April 1st In an uncharacteristic liberal style move the Govt has been in secret talks to ban ham, burgers, sausages and other processed meats in NHS hospitals and schools by 1st April 2018. In a 9th hour move the EU managed to sneak this new vegan law into the statute books before article 50 was invoked this week by PM Theresa May and thus automatically uploaded into our statute books via The Great Repeal Bill  New EU Vegan Rules on Meal Deals April 1st Until relatively recently ingredients such as testicles, rectum and udder were allowed in school sausages but regulations have been tightened up. A typical recipe for school/­­hospital sausages ("pork product" made "down to a price" to win a local authority contract - Guardian May 2003) now looks something like this; ?         50% "meat", of which 30% is pork fat with a bit of jowl ?         20% mechanically recovered chicken meat ?         17% water ?         30% rusk and soya ?         soya concentrate ?         hydrolysed protein ?         modified flour, dried onion, sugar, dextrose, phosphates, preservative E221 sodium sulphite, flavour enhancer, spices, garlic flavouring, antioxidant E300 (ascorbic acid), colouring E128 (red 2G). Casings: made from collagen from cow hide In the light of the World Health Organisations re categorisation of processed meat products (Risk: Highest -  Processed meat causes cancer IARC. WHO. BBC Oct 2015) and perhaps fearing resultant legal action from parents and school governors, heads of education and health departments have been discussing banning processed meat products. Ham Sandwiches become Vegan Hahm Sandwiches from 1st April The proposed plan is to replace all processed meats with like sounding plant based vegan products reveals junior health minister Ms Simmo Lay Leading Nutritionist Dr Bin MaFoud says In reality most of any beneficial nutrients in typical local authority purchased processed meat products comes from soya anyway so a move to plant based alternatives makes sense The food industry is now awash with very realistic processed meat alternatives that have same or better taste, texture and protein content than existing products. Patients and schoolchildren probably wouldnt even realise they are being given plant based alternatives. Menus would need to be re written with just omitting or adding one letter for trade description reasons so thus sausage becomes sossage, chicken becomes chikken, mince and burgers stays the same as does Hot Dog, ham becomes hahm and chorizo becomes Chorriso Says professor of food psychology Professor Joe King Many sandwich providers are ahead of the game already offering Vegan options School Packed lunches will not escape in case children swap food and schools risk being held responsible for future cancer risk. Ham sandwiches will join the school ban on chocolate and crisps that already exists in schools along with salami, sausages, bacon, beefburgers and hamburgers, chicken nuggets and pepperami. Ofsted will have the policing of new health standards in schools added to their list of responsibilities but it is not yet clear who will police the standards of food in hospitals as currently hospitals dont appear to have many standards for the quality of food. A Daily Mail reader, Ivor Beef, 68, from Barking, Essex said "If the EU thinks my son is going to eat more vegetables then they've go another think coming. Eating sausages and bacon and ham is a basic British human right along with bent bananas and blue passports. If  British citizens want to increase their risk of heart disease, stroke, cancers and diabetes than that's their sovereign right and the Euros can bog off back across the channel with their daft liberal ideas about saving the planet and national health. Karin Ridgers Founder of VeggieVison TV adds, Luckily there is a plant based version of everything nowadays so no one need miss out on taste and texture, the animals and planet will thank you and you could live longer too. http:/­­/­­www.cancerresearchuk.org/­­about-cancer/­­causes-of-cancer/­­diet-and-cancer/­­how-healthy-eating-prevents-cancer Date:  April 1st More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Sizes Up SuperfoodsMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve your health. This is the third article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. For many adults, being time-pressed has become the norm. Theyre driven to pack more into any given moment. With this mind, perhaps its no surprise that theres a recent surge of interest in superfoods - plant foods that pack in more nutrition than other food items. Sure, this food trend is hot right now, but does the reality actually live up to the hype? Turns out the answer is yes, as long as youre consuming the right foods for the right reasons. According to Diana K. Rice, a registered dietitian who works with Meatless Monday, Many plant-based foods pack in more fiber, minerals and fiber than other dietary choices, said Rice. So if youre looking to improve the quality of your diet, its a great idea to rely on these foods over choices like processed carbohydrates and animal products. But dont expect superfoods to deliver a miracle cure for your medical problems, cautions Rice. She explains, No single food is going to help you lose weight, give you clearer skin or achieve whatever other health goal youre after. The main reason to eat superfoods is that they are nutritious and convenient. One easy way to pack more superfoods into yoir diet is to adopt the practice of Meatless Monday. When you choose not to eat meat one day a week, theres a lot of room left in your diet to fill with nutrient-packed superfoods, Rice said. And when you try tasty new dishes containing plant-based superfoods on a Monday, youll be more likely to incorporate them into your diet over the rest of the week, too. To kick off your new Meatless Monday habit, Rice recommends these plant-based superfoods: Peanuts: Not only is this plant-based source of protein highly affordable, its adored by the masses for its appealing flavor. In addition to seven grams of protein per one ounce serving, peanuts are a terrific source of folate and resveratrol - yes, the red wine nutrient! Found in whole peanuts (as well as grape skins), resveratrol is an antioxidant thats linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think outside the peanut butter sandwich with Peanut Noodles or Peanut Butter Chili.   Avocados: This fruit is a super substitute for animal products on Meatless Monday because its healthy fat content satisfies the same craving you might have for a juicy steak. But since the fats found in avocados are mostly heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, theyre doing your body a favor along with your tastebuds. Grill them and top with salsa for a new twist or try them with pasta in this Pea and Avocado Penne.   Kale: Sure, kale isnt as trendy as it once was. Nowadays, foods like collard greens and Brussels sprouts are stealing the spotlight. However, kale rose to popularity for good reason - it scores a perfect 1000 on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index, meaning that it packs in more nutrition per calorie than most other foods. In particular, its a great source of vitamins A, K, C and fiber. Give it a spin in this Forbidden Rice Salad or try a new variation on your lasagna with this kale-packed version.   Mushrooms: Not many foods pack in a hefty dose of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin. But one portabella mushroom can pack in 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D, which is more than half of the recommended daily intake level. Theyre an especially good choice for people who are averse to sun or live in northern climates, plus they offer the crave-able umami flavor found in meat. Try them in Mushroom Tikka Masala or Mushroom Hemp Tartlets.   Tomatoes: No, not the pale pink slice thats suspiciously topping your sandwich. Were talking deep, dark red tomatoes - especially canned tomatoes - that are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant thats linked to heart health and reduced cancer risk. Pump up your lycopene intake with dishes like Shakshouka with Rainbow Chard and Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup. The post Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Valentine’s Day Tomorrow — and Each Monday

February 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day Tomorrow — and Each Monday Tomorrow is Valentines Day, a windfall for cards, roses and chocolates. And on this special day, wed like to suggest another way to express your love - Meatless Monday. By choosing not to eat or serve meat just one day a week, youre giving you and your loved ones a valentine 52 times a year. This one simple gesture can have profound health benefits. For instance, eating less meat lowers your risk of heart disease, which is the leading cause of death among women. In addition, diets with less meat also help prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer. All of which can help you and your loved ones live longer.   So tomorrow, enjoy plenty of hugs and kisses. And dont forget to show some love each and every week with Meatless Monday - for your family, yourself and the planet. The post Celebrate Valentine’s Day Tomorrow — and Each Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese

January 23 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese Pavarotti’s “Nessun Dorma” (none shall sleep) is blasting on repeat in my headphones. But it’s the opposite case over here. All the children are finally asleep and while Luise is taking care of the dishes, I’m trying to channel my inner Italian so we can publish this recipe before another year has passed. We wrote our last blog post in Copenhagen and this one is brought to you from a house we are borrowing, on the slope of the Table Mountains in Cape Town, South Africa. If we keep this trend of travelling south for every new blog post, we will be writing the next one from Antarctica. It feels a little weird writing about these comforting and wintery pasta bowls from here, but I’m trusting that Pavarotti will help me channelling my inner Italian and get me in the right mood. It’s summer in South Africa, we’ve got lemon trees growing in the garden, there is a small pool, a cute kitchen and Elsa and Isac are keeping occupied by throwing grapes at each other in some kind of never-ending grape war. In short, we are very happy and grateful to spend a month here. Apart from the children’s fights, the scene is vastly different from two weeks ago when we shot this recipe. Isac had pneumonia, Elsa and Gabriel were snoring with colds and we were all cozied up (or more like stuck) in our Stockholm apartment - pale, tired and gloomy, surrounded by cold winter. The only thing we craved then were simple and comforting pasta dishes like this. Vegetarian bolognese is perhaps not one of our most unique recipe ideas but it is January food at its best, so we thought it might be something you’d also be interested in maning. We often make a kids pasta sauce that contains tomatoes, grated carrot, grated zucchini and red lentils. As it simmers, the lentils dissolve into the tomato sauce and it all becomes quite sweet and smoothly textured. It’s a simple way to sneak extra nutrients in a meal that our kids always are happy to eat. This is a slightly more adult approach on that dish. The sauce has more texture and chunks and a deeper flavour from herbs and red wine. We use black lentils as they stay intact in the sauce. The lentils work as replacement for the meat in the classic bolognese ragu - they both add protein and have a nice and soft, chewy consistency. We combine chopped and grated carrots to get a mix of textures. You can of course add more veggies if you prefer. We kept it simple and used what we had at home because of sick kids and cold weather, but also because it is what Italians do. “Pochi ingredienti, tanto tempo” (few ingredients, long cooking time) is an Italian expression - that I just invented, but I’m pretty sure Pavarotti would agree. Simple cooking with great ingredients is key in the Italian kitchen. However, if you have some mushrooms or an eggplant/­­aubergine at home, either of them would work excellent in this recipe as well as they add meaty texture to the dish and make it even more vegetable packed. Enjoy! That’s it, blog post number two of the year. And no babies were neglected this time. I even managed to mention Pavarotti three times, talk about grape wars and make up my own Italian food expression. If that doesn’t qualify me as a full-blooded Italian, I don’t know what does. You can call me Davide from now on.  Vegetarian Bolognese Serves 4-6 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2 large carrots, peeled 2 sticks celery, rinsed 4 tbsp green olives, stones removed and slightly bruised 1 tbsp fresh basil (or 1 tsp dried) 1 tbsp fresh oregano, rosemary or marjoram (or 1 tsp dried) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup red wine 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked beluga lentils (or puy), rinsed 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock (or water) 2 bay leaves 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins crushed tomatoes sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve pasta of choice (we used a lentil flour spaghetti) vegetarian parmesan style cheese fresh parsley olive oil Heat the oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for a few minutes. Meanwhile, chop one of the carrots and the celery into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch chunks and add them to the pan along with olives and dried herbs (if using). Let soften for a couple of minutes, add the red wine and let cook until the alcohol evaporates. Add lentils, half of the vegetable stock, bay leaves, tinned tomatoes, fresh herbs (if using) salt and pepper. Grate the remaining carrot and add it as well. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are cooked, stirring from time to time as not to burn the base of the sauce. Add the remaining stock or water, little by little, to loosen the sauce whenever it is looking dry. Cook your pasta of choice. Serve the sauce stirred through the pasta, topped with a sprinkling of grated cheese, fresh parsley or other herbs and a drizzle of oil. PS. We actually prepared one more blog post before we left and we will try to share it soon,  along with some photos and tips from Cape Town. Meanwhile you can see some snapshots from out trip on instagram.

Superfood Tie Dye Pops

August 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood Tie Dye Pops Paloma’s been taking an active interest in cooking and working on fun food projects with me in the kitchen. This newfound fascination may have something to do with the fact that she’s on summer break and cannot stand being at home with nothing to do for more than a few hours at a time. Instead, she’ll wake up with wild ideas about what she’d like to cook that day. I try to carve out time for those little projects whenever possible, since I obviously support this type of hobby :) In all seriousness though, cooking with kids creates such a great awareness about the importance and power of ingredients, and teaches them all about our connection to food and nourishment. So we’ll cook colorful things like berry-filled ravioli with a green, spirulina-dyed dough and our raw chocolate with a ton of different flavorings, and the kid’s always happy to partake in the fruits of her labor. Paloma recently learned how to tie dye at a summer art camp, and got the idea to ‘make tie dye food.’ At first, I dismissed it as something too difficult and time-consuming, but then realized that it would be pretty easy to make tie dye popsicles with some fruit and all the different, colorful superfood powders I have lying around. All you have to do is make a few coconut milk mixtures of various colors, layer them in a popsicle mold, and freeze. The whole layering process is not unlike a fun art project, and the result doesn’t just turn out pretty, but surprisingly delicious as well. Our layers, all coconut milk-based and sweetened with maple syrup, included mango-turmeric, mango-beet, plain beet, spirulina, moringa and white chia. The contrast between the fruity, creamy and icy layers, plus a bit of crunch from chia seeds and bee pollen is truly heavenly. I know these aren’t your everyday popsicles, but they might be a fun thing to try with a couple of little ones. Adults love them, too :) Superfood Tie Dye Pops   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 2 13.5 oz cans unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 small ripe mango - peeled, pitted and chopped 1 teaspoon turmeric 2 teaspoons beet powder or more to taste - divided 1 tablespoon moringa or matcha powder, or to taste 1 tablespoon spirulina powder to taste bee pollen (optional, not vegan) Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for at least 1 hour. Blend the coconut milk with maple syrup in an upright blender. Pour ⅓ cup of the mixture into a small bowl, glass or jar. Add the chia seeds to the bowl, mix thoroughly and set aside to gel. This will be your white chia layer. Pour more of the coconut milk mixture into a different vessel until you have 1 cup of it left in the blender, set the vessel with the coconut milk aside for later. Add the mango to the blender and blend until smooth. Pour half of the mango mixture into a separate bowl, jar or glass. Add the turmeric to the remaining half of the mango mixture in the blender and blend to combine. Pour the turmeric mango mixture into another bowl, jar or glass. This will be your yellow turmeric-mango layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add the reserved half of the just mango mixture back into the blender and add 1 teaspoon of the beet powder. Blend until combined. Pour the beet-mango mixture back into the same bowl, glass or jar that it was in. This will be your red, mango-beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add a third of the reserved sweetened coconut milk into the blender, along with the rest of the beet powder. Blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your pink beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender once again and add another third of the reserved sweet coconut milk. Add the moringa/­­matcha powder and blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your green moringa layer. Add the remaining sweetened coconut milk to the blender (no need to rinse the blender here), add the spirulina and blend untill combined. Transfer to a bowl, glass or jar. This will be your aqua spirulina layer. You should end up with 6 different coconut mixtures to work with, providing that you use all the specified ingredients. Start pouring the mixtures into the popsicle molds in layers, alternating between colors. To make the layers bleed into each other a bit, insert a chopstick or skewer into the mold a couple of times, but make sure to not overdo it. Once filled, sprinkle the bottoms of the pops with bee pollen, if using. Cover the molds and place in the freezer for about 1 hour. Install the soaked wooden sticks, place the mold back into the freezer and let freeze completely before unmolding, preferably overnight. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood Tie Dye Pops appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Contest 2017 April Winners

May 16 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

Contest 2017 April WinnersThank you all for your efforts, I truly enjoy reviewing all the entries. There were so many great entries.  I go through the entries many times to choose the winner. I have selected the top three entries based on the ingredients, written instructions, and of course presentation.  I love reading your creative recipes as it gives me ideas for my own! Thank you so much for your efforts! Congratulations to the winners and all participants: 1st Place: Easy Cheesy Paneer Potli by Abirami Easy to prepare, gives you the idea can be prepared with different filling and different shapes. 1st Runner Up: Paneer and Rose Kulfi by Kiran Haldia Easy to make, instead of traditionally creamy texture, more like a grainy and enjoyable texture. 2nd Runner Up: Paneer Broccoli Fritters by Anshu Shah Good combination of ingredients and well explained. Congratulations to all three of you!! Thank you to everyone else that also participated in the contest: - Hanzala - pushpanjali kumari - Samaksh Behl - Farida Kaka - Samta Sharma - sowjanya - Ridhz Modi - Manjula s Shetty - Uma Pandit - 

rava cake recipe | semolina cake recipe | suji cake or sooji cake

April 27 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

rava cake recipe | semolina cake recipe | suji cake or sooji cakerava cake recipe | semolina cake recipe | suji cake or sooji cake with step by step photo and video recipe. there are several variations and flavors to this simple semolina cake recipe. while the cake can be prepared without any flavorings, but occasionally it is topped with orange syrup, coconut milk, rose water or any other flavored sugar syrup. however this recipe is simple sponge rava cake without any flavour. Continue reading rava cake recipe | semolina cake recipe | suji cake or sooji cake at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink

April 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt DrinkTurmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink. Lassi is a yogurt based drink served as a beverage in India. This version uses non dairy yogurt, turmeric, black pepper and ginger for a cooling Lassi. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Lassi is a favorite drink in many Indian (north Indian) homes during the hot months. It is starting to get sunny and warm finally in the Pacific Northwest, and evening tea is getting replaced by various lassis.  Lassi traditionally is made with fresh yogurt and chilled water. Yogurt, water, and sweetener are whisked with a Mathani (Indian whisk which works like an Immersion blender), until the mixture is very frothy. It is served in tall glasses with ice cubes. Flavors such as cardamom, saffron, chai masala, mint, ripe mango puree, rose water etc can be added. Probiotics, cooling and filling.  For this Turmeric Lassi, I use a regular blender and plain non dairy yogurt(I like almond milk yogurt). The yogurt is blended with turmeric, black pepper, ginger and frozen almond milk cubes. The resulting lassi has a texture between a smooth yogurt lassi and crushed ice shake. Add whatever flavors you like or blend with just non dairy milk for variations. Make the golden Lassi!Continue reading: Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt DrinkThe post Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

March 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the Arizona regional winner and comes from Austin Neanover of Glendale High School. Serves 6 - For the Spicy Tomato Sauce: - 1 Small onion, minced - 28 oz crushed San Marzano tomatoes - 1 Tbsp red pepper flake - 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp basil - 1 Tbsp - 1 Tbsp Honey - 4 cloves garlic - To Taste - salt - To Taste - pepper - For the Spaghetti: - 1 pound spaghetti of your choosing - Roasted Vegetables - 2 Zucchini, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes - 2 Yellow squash, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes 2 I Red bell peppers, cored and cut into 1-inch strips - 1 Red onion, peeled and cut into 1-inch strips - 10 Cremini mushrooms, quartered -  1/­­4 Extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp ground black pepper - 1 tsp basil - 1 tsp oregano -  1/­­2 tsp thyme -  1/­­2 tsp marjoram -  1/­­4 tsp rosemary - 3 cloves garlic - To Garnish: - Parsley, minced - Parmesan cheese Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. In a bowl, toss the peppers, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, and onions with olive oil, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of pepper, and dried herbs. Lay on baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes or until Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil over high Add pasta and cook until al dente. Drain in a colander. In a saucepan, pour olive oil and tablespoon of red pepper flake until the chilis get aromatic. Add onion and stir until they begin to sweat or become translucent. Then, pour crushed tomatoes, garlic, honey, and basil, stir. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Lastly, In a large bowl, toss drained pasta, roasted vegetables, and spicy tomato sauce. Use tongs or a spoon to gently mix the ingredients until all the components are incorporated and pasta is covered with sauce. Top with Parmesan cheese and minced parsley. The post Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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