risotto - vegetarian recipes

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risotto vegetarian recipes

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pumpkin Cinnamon Oatmeal

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This simple recipe is easy to adapt, so feel free to toss in some dried fruits or nuts at the end. Please note that pumpkin puree is not the same as pumpkin pie filling. Canned pumpkin puree is available in most supermarkets; stir remaining canned pumpkin into risotto or use in place of pizza sauce for a unique twist. This recipe comes to us from Kristi Arnold of Veggie Converter 365. Serves 2 - 2 cups water - 6 tablespoons canned pumpkin puree - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg - 1 cup rolled oats - Pure maple syrup, to taste In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine water, pumpkin puree, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg; bring to a boil. Stir in the oats, reduce heat to medium-low and cook about 15 minutes, or until oats are tender. Drizzle with maple syrup to taste. The post Pumpkin Cinnamon Oatmeal appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

You can add just about anything you fancy to risotto, which makes it a creative cooks dream. This recipe relies on four different kinds of mushroom (you could use different mushrooms or only cook two or three types as long as the amounts stay the same) and if you forget about the risotto part of the recipe, youre left with an exotic mushroom dish. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 8 tablespoons butter, divided in half - 1 large onion, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup torn cremini mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup torn oyster mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup torn shiitake mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup sliced button mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup Arborio rice - 1 cup dry white wine - 5 cups vegetable stock -  1/­­2 cup grated Grana Padano - 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar -  1/­­4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes -  1/­­2 cup Italian parsley leaves - Salt and pepper  Melt the butter in 2 heavy saucepans on medium high. Gently saute the oinons in one until softened, about 3 minutes. In the other, cook the mushrooms until caramelized, about 6-8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Turn off mushroom pan. Stir in the rice to the onions and cook, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes until the mix becomes translucent. Add the wine and cook for around 6-7 minutes until the wine is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups of the stock to the pan and simmer gently until the stock is absorbed, stirring every minute or so to prevent sticking! Gradually add more stock, a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender, about 15-18 minutes. Adjust seasoning in the risotto with salt and pepper and add the mushrooms. Turn heat to low and stir in cheese. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes and parsley. Use this as a garnish on top of risotto when served. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 114-115. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Squash Risotto, Eggplant Bacon & Crispy Sage

September 8 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Avant Garde Vegan has done it again! His recipe for squash risotto, eggplant bacon and crispy sage has got us feeling so hungry right now! Eggplant bacon?? We are so excited about that. The whole dish sounds AND looks amazing. And as Avant Garde Vegan explains, you don’t have to limit yourself to these ingredients. The best part about risotto is that you can get creative and add your favorite ingredients. We are sure this video recipe will be a total inspiration for your kitchen creation. Check out how to make it: The post Squash Risotto, Eggplant Bacon & Crispy Sage appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan

March 7 2017 Veganpassion 

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan Spring seems a long time coming and I thought to get it a little cozy inside we're going to make a whole week full of comfort foods ? ? ?. Pasta, risotto, waffles and pancakes make an appearance. Make sure to check Instagram and Facebook for more inspiration. Let's begin with a well known classic: spaghetti bolognese. Always a good idea. With sweet lupines from Germany or Austria it's going to be regional. Have a wonderful week and enjoy the nasty weather with some good food ?. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup sweet lupine shred 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. vegetable broth 1 onion 1/­­2 can (340 g) sieved tomatoes 1 carrot 1 tsp. Italian herbs salt, pepper olive oil 1/­­2 tbsp. almond butter 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 14 oz spaghetti Cook the pasta as the package says and drop them off. Cook sweet lupines in vegetable broth with closed lid for 5 minutes. Put it aside and allow it to infuse another 10 minutes. Cut carrot and onion into cubes and roast them with olive oil. Add sweet lupines and roast until golden. Mix with sieved tomatoes and Italian herbs, salt and pepper. Stir in almond butter and yeast flakes. For the vegan parmesan: 1/­­4 cup cashews 1/­­4 cup almonds, blanched 2 tbsp. yeast flakes 1/­­4 tsp. ground garlic salt, pepper Mix all ingredients in a mixer. Serve with the Bolognese. Enjoy

Vegan Risotto Recipes

February 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Risotto Recipes Vegan risotto can be tough to make. Traditional risotto recipes call for a lot of dairy, which makes creating a good vegan version a challenge. But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy this classic Italian dish senza formaggio.The post Vegan Risotto Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Saturday Six | Farro Risotto, Tomato Cobbler & Vegan Fruit Snacks

January 7 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including creamy sundried tomato farro risotto, cozy vegan tomato cobbler, and sweet homemade fruit snacks that are totally gelatin-free.

1 Christmas - 4 menus

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

1 Christmas - 4 menus It's that time of the year again. Christmas has come. Time to relax, enjoy the peace and family time while baking cookies. With the warmth of a chimny spreading through the room. It's a time to introspect and value the quiet. Sense of wholeomness that each day brings. I always get excited for Christmas. Not only because of the iceflowers on the windows, the sugar frosted trees and the gleaming leaves in the morningdew. I love the family time spent at the dinner table that the season brings. Even if you cant always tell with me, food is there to be enjoyed and what better way to do it than to do it at an oaktable surrounded by the people you love. It's because of that reason, that I created four whole menus for you this year. From easy and fast meals to gourmet cooking; these meals will hopefully contain something for everyone, because there's no better time to enjoy a happy wholesome vegan meal than now. What are you guys planning in eating on Christmas? I'm so excited to hear which ideas you guys bring to the table whether is be an exravagant classic meal or something quick and easy. Who's swinging the cooking spoon in your kitchen on Christmas eve? Menu 1: Easy Peasy Quick and easy. Making a meal for the whole family in the blink of an eye. Soup and tart are easy to prepare and the one pot pasta basically cooks itself. Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas One Pot Pumpkin Pasta Banana Choc Tarte Menu 2: Around the world To Asia and back please. This menu seduces everyone with its colorful flavours and ingredients. An eating experience for everyone set up in a"selfserve" manner.  Quinoa Rolls with Butternut Green Thai Curry Curcuma Pumpkin Semolina  with Berries Menu 3: Jolly xmas Christmas happy and healthy. Not in the mood to be stuffed, but rather enjoy a nutritient rich meal? This Menu is rich in proteins and packed full with healthy ingredients. Raw Cheese Green Bowl Açai Cheesecake Menu 4: Christmas Gourmet For really enjoying a meal and showing the vegan delicousness off to the whole family. This meal will certainly allow you to impress everyone. Hobbycooks and homemakers will thrive with joy while cooking this meal Baked Persimmon Red Cabbage Salad Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls Aquafaba Gingerbread Mousse I hope you guys have lots of fun preparing these meals, which hopefully include something for everyone. If you guys have requests or ideas for new recipes, let me know in the comments. Hugs and love to all of you and have a happy fourth Advent.

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche

December 16 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche We’ve been developing some recipes for Nuts.com, our favorite online one-stop-shop for bulk foods, using their amazing ingredients. This Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche is one of those recipes, and there will be more to come, since they are all too good not to share here. This quiche recipe is definitely of the lazy kind, since it comes together quite magically and quickly and requires no crust-making. Chickpea flour (protein, fiber and iron-rich) is the perfect ingredient for making vegan quiche, since it performs similarly to the egg/­­cream foundation of traditional quiche when mixed with water and oil, solidifying into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. So you basically place a pie pan full of batter and veggies into the oven and end up with a soufflé-like pie, all through a quick and satisfying process. This quiche is studded with roasted winter roots for some seasonal vitamins, and made delicious with flavor-building spices like turmeric, smoked paprika and black pepper. And if you love socca/­­farinata, this recipe is most definitely for you, as the quiche is reminiscent of a plumper, more substantial version of socca (basically any socca lover’s dream). This quiche would make for an excellent, nutritious addition to your holiday table or any other meal, served alongside soup or a green salad. And a bit of housekeeping – did you know that we have a newsletter that goes out every time a new recipe is posted? We love our newsletter community, so as a little holiday/­­new year gift and sign of gratitude to all our subscribers, we will be sending out one extra recipe a month starting this December and onto the new year. That is one nourishing bonus recipe that won’t be published anywhere else. December’s recipe might involve something along the line of cozy miso steel cut oats, so if that sounds good to you, you can sign up here, or in the signup form in our sidebar ;) Follow this link for the Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche Recipe :) You might also like... Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Banana Toffee Tart Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Video: Farro Veggie Risotto

May 13 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Top this veggie risotto with dill for the perfect spring touch.

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-StyleMany people were introduced to Chef Fabio Viviani when he was a contestant on the Emmy-winning Bravo competition series Top Chef. His career began years before he became a Fan Favorite and has only flourished in the years since. This spring, Viviani released his latest cookbook, Fabios 30-Minute Italian: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick and Easy Recipes. As a friend and supporter of Meatless Monday he includes many meat-free recipes that are simple enough to make for the first dinner of the week. Anyone familiar with Viviani knows that he isnt merely a chef. Since gaining popularity on Top Chef, he has capitalized on his entrepreneurial spirit and sense of humor to bring his cuisine to as many people as possible, especially home cooks. While cultivating a successful career as a businessman, frequent television guest, and author, he has always focused on recipes that are attainable for anyone aspiring to cook at home (but perhaps a little intimidated by complicated recipes). In February, he launched his YouTube cooking show, Fabios Kitchen, which features several meat-free recipes that are designed to be easy to make in little time. He says: When my wife and I had our son Gage, our lives became really busy. I needed to learn how to make delicious food at home in a shorter amount of time. I wrote this cookbook to teach others how they can make meals in under 30 minutes. As a chef, I like cooking with meat but I also really like cooking with vegetables - its all about how you season the ingredients! The dishes were using for Meatless Monday are packed with flavor - and best of all theyre meat free! Meatless Monday is happy to bring some of Vivianis delicious vegetarian recipes from Fabios 30-Minute Italian to your table. Here are a few of them: Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa Fabios 30-Minute Italian is available to purchase on Amazon. The post Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Meal Plan | Summer Socca, Cauliflower Scampi & Barbecue Tofu

September 8 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: summer socca with lemon basil yogurt dressing; Thai red curry with peppers and cashews; cauliflower scampi with garlic white wine sauce; barbecue tofu bowls; and cauliflower risotto.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cauliflower Risotto from The Blossom Cookbook

May 17 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This vegan risotto is made from cauliflower rice thats cooked up in creamy cauliflower sauce and served over polenta cakes with sautéed shiitake mushrooms.

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | 01.23.17

January 20 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: slow cooker Thai sweet potato soup; vegetarian pasta carbonara with roasted butternut squash; quinoa risotto with roasted root vegetables; huevos rancheros enchiladas; and Buffalo cauliflower sandwiches with herbed mascarpone dip.

Quinoa Risotto with Roasted Root Vegetables

January 2 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This light yet comforting risotto is made with quinoa, goat cheese and lemon zest! Serve it topped with roasted root vegetables for a complete meal.

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls

December 22 2016 Veganpassion 

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls We're always splitting up the preperation for our christmas dinner. I'm sending the menu ideas to my family first and everyone decides what they would like to eat and what they could imagine to prepare. Mostly it ends with the men sitting on the couch and the women cooking a wunderful menu. But we're working on that. At least they have the will to do something and after the dinner all plates are empty *proud* As an entree for this years phony menu I have chosen a porcini risotto. It's very easy to make alongside. You can draft one of the men to help you stir while you can organize the rest of your menu. With oven baked carrots, beetroot balls and a wonderful sauce your christmas dinner is going to be amazing. Have lots of fun with cooking! Makes 4 portions. For the porcini risotto: 1 onion 2 tbsp. olive oil 300 g risotto rice 2 tbsp. dried porcini or 250 g fresh porcini 1,2 l vegetable broth salt, pepper, nutmeg 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 1 tbsp. almond butter Cut the onion into cubes and sweat them in olive oil, then add risotto rice. Add mushrooms and 200 ml vegetable broth and let it cook while stiring. Flavour it. As soon as the rice absorbed the vegetable broth add some more liquid until the rice is covered. Stiring makes the rice creamy so don't waste your arm power. After 30-40 minutes when all the liquid is gone an the rice is done, add yeast flakes and almond butter. Taste everything. For the beetroot balls: 250 g fresh beetroot 200 g tofu 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 1 onion 2 tbsp. soy curd 3 tbsp. breadcrumbs, whole spelt salt, pepper, nutmeg, sage 1 tbsp. yeast flakes olive oil for the taste Grate beetroot. Crumble tofu and roast it in a pan with lots of olive oil. Cut onions into cubes and add them to the pan. Roast the mixture until it gets brown. Then flavour it and add beetroot. Roast everything a little bit unil the flavours evolve. In a mixing bowl mix together the beetroot mixture, soy curd, breadcrumbs and yeast flakes. Form the mixture into 12 balls and bake them in the pan with some olive oil. For the oven baked carrots: 500 g multicolored carrots 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper Quater the carrots lengthways and put it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup. Roast them in the oven at 190°C (374°F) upper-/­­lower heat 15-20 minutes. For the gourmet sauce: 1 big onion 1 carrot 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. tomato paste salt, pepper, nutmeg, paprika 1 tbsp. starch 1 tbsp. soy sauce 500 ml vegetable broth Cut onion and carrot into very fine cubes. Sweat in olive oil until they get brown and aromatic. Then add tomate paste and let it caramelize a little bit. Flavour it. Stir in the starch and the soy sauce and mix until everything is smooth. Add more and more vegetable sauce and let it boil down. Serve risotto with dark sauce, oven baked carrots and beetroot balls. Feast until santa comes.

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms

September 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms I’ve found a new favorite weeknight meal that allows me to pack in as many different vegetables as I want, and, after the initial chopping, pretty much cooks itself. I’ve been needing for something like this to come along, since we’ve been having some very busy times around here. Going through house renovations, book edits and a third grader’s school homework all at the same time is no piece if cake, while food easily becomes that much needed escape from daily stress. There have been too many no-food-all-day-then-pizza-at-night days for me, and I knew it had to stop. It goes without saying, I’m very excited to share this lifesaver of a recipe with you today! I’ve been making lots of sweet skillet crumbles this summer, with any and all fruit I’d come across, from cherries and strawberries, to peaches and plums. It’s kind of the perfect lazy man’s dessert – so easy to prepare (chop, mix, bake) and very delicious. It’s really no wonder I’ve gotten hooked on whipping one up almost every week. This is where I got the curiosity to try out a savory crumble – what if the same breezy and flavorful preparation could be applied to vegetables? Well, turns out that it can, and it’s really good. For this particular savory crumble, I used the vegetables that are most abundant right now – zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes, with an addition of mushrooms for their meatiness and substance, and complete with warming curry spice. That being said, this recipe is highly customizable – use any vegetable in season (squash soon!), and any spice mix you prefer, keeping the crumble topping the same. After about an hour of slow-baking in the oven, you will have an amazingly comforting and nourishing meal. The leftovers are really tasty, too. Now you might be wondering what that beautiful wooden appliance gracing some of the photos is. Pleasant Hill Grain, a supplier of high-quality kitchen equipment, sent me one of their grain mills made by KoMo for grinding dry grains and beans, and I am in love! I wrote a lot about the advantages of freshly grinding your own flour in my book – it’s more affordable (whole grains are generally cheaper than flour), more nutritious, and so much more flavorful. It’s an especially great strategy for gluten-free baking, where a mix of various flours is often required. Before this mill, I did all my grinding in my high-speed Belndtec, but the way the KoMo mill is different and better for grinding flours is through its use of stones. Stone grinding is the most ancient form of pulverizing grain, and creates the most nutritious flour, simply because the flour never gets heated up too much while milling, allowing it to retain all the nutrition of the grains. KoMo also uses state of the art stones, made of a combination of corundum and ceramic, which basically never get worn down, and can produce very fine to coarse flour, based on your setting. I can genuinely say that fresh, stone-ground flour is absolutely the best, most flavorful flour you’ll ever cook with. Lastly, can we talk about the minimal design of this mill – is it not the most beautiful appliance you’ve ever seen? It’s designed in Germany and made in the Austrian Alps, and there’s not a single detail that doesn’t have function. The housing is made of Beechwood, and those meticulously crafted finger joints at the corners make me swoon. Once my kitchen is renovated, this guy will be on display, front and center. The most exciting news, though, is that we will be giving away one KoMo mill next week, so a hot tip – stick around for that :) Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1-2 eggplants - cubed 2 zucchini - diced into thick half-rounds ½ lb crimini or baby bella mushrooms 3-5 tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 yellow onion - chopped 3-5 garlic cloves - sliced 1-2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably homemade (I use recipe from this book) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used untoasted, unrefined pure sesame oil, a new discovery, excellent for cooking and oil pulling) or ghee for the crumble topping 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats ½ cup freshly ground barley, or cornmeal/­­polenta ½ cup ground almonds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup ghee or neutral coconut oil - cold and solid (I prefer using ghee for this recipe as it goes really well with the curry spice) ¼ cup unsweetened, cold almond milk or other plant milk Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Combine all the vegetables and mushrooms in a large bowl. Add curry powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss to coat. Transfer the mixture into a 10-inch cast iron pan and set aside. Combine oats, barley flour/­­cornmeal, almonds, salt, pepper and baking powder in the same bowl. Cut the cold ghee or coconut oil into pieces and add to the bowl. Use your hands to mix the ghee/­­oil into the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Scatter the topping over the vegetables in the skillet and place into the oven. Bake for 1 hour. Serve garnished with fresh herbs, if desired. Reheat leftovers in a pan over low medium heat. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Temaki-zushi Broccoli Stem Riceless Risotto Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Butternut Squash and Champagne Risotto

February 1 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Risotto doesnt have to mean standing at your stove and stirring for an hour--this version is baked to creamy perfection in the oven!


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