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Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta

October 22 2018 VegKitchen 

Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta This is my healthy, gluten-free substitute for eggplant parmigiana. Not frying the eggplant saves time and calories, and both of those can be at a premium. Its very saucy and perfect over pasta. Recipe from The Vegan Slow Cooker* by Kathy Hester, reprinted by permission of the author. Photo by Cara Lyons of Cara’s Cravings. Serves: 8 For the Cashew-Tofu Ricotta: 1/­­2 cup cashews 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast (*use gluten-free) 3 cloves garlic 1 package (15 ounces) firm tofu 1/­­2 cup unsweetened nondairy milk 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon salt (to taste) Pepper, to taste Remaining ingredients: 1 large eggplant, thinly sliced 1 jar (25 ounces) marinara sauce, store bought or homemade Cooked pasta (*use gluten-free pasta), for serving The night before: To make the ricotta: In a food processor or blender, combine all the ricotta ingredients. Blend until smooth and creamy. Store the ricotta and the sliced eggplant in separate containers in the fridge. In the morning: Oil the crock of your slow cooker and pour in one-third of the marinara sauce. Top with half of the eggplant, half of the ricotta, and another one-third of the sauce. Repeat the layers once more, then top with the remaining sauce. Cook on […] The post Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta appeared first on VegKitchen.

Eating Clean in Sin City: The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Las Vegas Has to Offer

October 21 2018 VegKitchen 

Eating Clean in Sin City: The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Las Vegas Has to Offer Nestled somewhere amidst the slot machines and all-you-can-eat buffets is a diamond in the rough, a shining beacon of health that is otherwise hidden in this tarnished city. At least thats what you may think if you were a vegan looking for something to eat in Vegas. The reality, however, is quite different. And while Las Vegas is still home to the cheapest steak and lobster deals, you can also find a variety of places to eat green and clean. Vegas has grown up a little, at least culinary-wise. If you dont believe it, check out this list of the 10 best vegan restaurants Las Vegas has to offer. 1. Simply Pure If you find yourself hungry while strolling Container Park in downtown Vegas, you may want to check out Simply Pure. Chef Stacey Dougan strives to create items that appeal to the average picky eater, not just vegans. While youre there, be sure to check out the veggie lasagna stuffed with vegan protein sausage and tofu ricotta. If you want to go light, consider sharing an order of raw jicama chili cheese fries. Even the Clintons felt the need to drop by for a visit during Hilarys 2016 campaign […] The post Eating Clean in Sin City: The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Las Vegas Has to Offer appeared first on VegKitchen.

Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sugar pumpkin is slow roasted with garlic, then seasoned with oregano and sage in this Autumnal lasagna. Roasted garlic, cardamom and nutmeg deepen flavor of the pumpkin ricotta, while dried cranberries and apricots are sprinkled throughout to lend their complimentary fruit flavors. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - 1 package lasagna noodles - 1 2 pound sugar pumpkin - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 6 cloves garlic, peeled - 15 ounces part skin ricotta cheese - 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree* - 1 teaspoon cardamom - 1/­­2 teaspoon nutmeg - 10 green onions, thinly sliced - 1 cup dried, sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup dried apricots, diced - 1 tablespoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon dried sage - 8 ounces lowfat mozzarella cheese, divided - 4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated *please note that canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. When water boils, cook lasagna noodles according to package directions, or until al dente. Scoop the seeds and strings out of the pumpkin. Cut the pumpkin flesh into large chunks. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on a baking sheet, cut size down. Scatter the garlic cloves over the pumpkin pieces. Roast 60-90 minutes, or until the pumpkin begins to brown and is tender when pricked with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Using a fork, smash the garlic cloves together in a medium sized bowl. Add the pumpkin puree, green onions, cardamom and nutmeg to the bowl. Stir together with the fork. When the pumpkin has cooled, remove its skin and cut into smaller cubes. Line a 13 by 11 inch baking dish with a layer of lasagna noodles. Top 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture and another layer of noodles. Top the 2nd layer of noodles with about 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture, then 1/­­3 of the cranberries, 1/­­3 of the diced apricot and 1/­­3 of the roasted pumpkin cubes. Season with 1/­­3 of the oregano and sage. Finish the layer with 1/­­3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat this layering process 2 more times, or until you are out of noodles, pumpkin, dried fruit, spices and cheeses. Bake for 30-45 minutes, or until the lasagnas edges are browned and bubbling. The post Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Golden Pepper & Parmesan Zucchini Pasta

July 31 2017 Meatless Monday 

This unique spin on pasta uses thinly sliced zucchini for noodles and switches up the sauce by featuring golden peppers rather than the traditional tomatoes. The result is a burst of summery flavor in a bowl. This recipe comes to us from Maria of Bean a Foodie. Serves 2 - 2 yellow peppers - 1 clove garlic - 1/­­2 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus more for serving - 1/­­3 cup ricotta cheese - 1/­­2 tsp salt and pepper - 1/­­4 cup fresh basil, roughly chopped - 2 medium zucchini Using a spiralizer or julienne peeler, slice/­­cut your zucchini into spaghetti like strands. Set aside. Pre heat broiled to high and place oven rack on the top most notch. Place both peppers in the oven underneath the broiled. Cook until skins are just blackened and blistered - about 2-3 minutes per side. This happens quickly, so dont leave the kitchen while you broil the peppers. Remove peppers from oven and allow to cool. Once cool enough to handle, peel away the blackened skin (though you can eat this if youd like a charred flavor). Remove stem and seeds and roughly chop. Place the peppers, garlic, parmesan cheese, ricotta cheese, salt and pepper into the bowl of a food processor. Process for about 30 seconds. Taste and adjust for seasonings. Process a few seconds more or until sauce is completely pureed. Heat a large sauté pan over medium high heat. Add in the pepper sauce and cook for about 7 minutes or until thickened slightly (water will be release from the zucchini when its cooked so sauce should be thick to prevent it from getting to watery). Add in the zucchini and cook for about 1-2 minutes or until zucchini is just barely tender. Toss with chopped basil and any extra parmesan cheese desired. Serve immediately! The post Golden Pepper & Parmesan Zucchini Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars

June 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars This post was created in partnership with Nuts.com Wow, am I excited to finally be sharing these bars here today! They are sort of like a much healthier, more colorful and plant-based version of Twix bars, they’re also no-bake and easy to make at home. The recipe was born out of a collaboration with Nuts.com, our favorite online bulk foods supplier that carries pretty much every magical whole food ingredient, from nuts to dried fruit, spices to superfood powders and snacks. They sent me a mystery ‘Pantry in a Box,’ and I had the fun challenge of coming up with a recipe using the ingredients in the box. The stand-outs were plump pumpkin seeds, the freshest coconut flour, electric pink beet powder, and flaky sea salt. It took me a while to simmer on the recipe. First, I wanted to go savory and tested out a few dishes in that direction, but I ended up arriving at these bars, and I’m so glad I did. The bottom, ‘shortbread’ layer is made with coconut flour and colored pink with beet powder, which is totally optional, but contributes to the bars’ stunning appearance (and nutrition!). No baking required there. The green ‘caramel’ layer is made with sweetened, homemade pumpkinseed butter, but you can pretty much use any nut or seed butter in its place. Everything is covered with chocolate and generously sprinkled with flaky salt. So good! The recipe looks long because I give directions for making your own seed butter and chocolate coating, but those two can easily be store-bought for a quicker prep time. We made a step-by-step video to show the fun of the process, too :) Pumpkinseed Caramel Twix Bars   Print Serves: 16 Ingredients for the shortbread cookie layer ½ cup coconut flour small pinch of sea salt (optional) 2 teaspoons beet powder (optional, you can also use any colorful berry powder) ½ cup coconut butter/­­manna (not oil) ¼ cup maple syrup for the pumpkinseed caramel layer 1½ cups pumpkin seed butter (recipe follows) or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ⅓ cup toasted pumpkin seeds (optional) 1-2 tablespoons bee pollen (optional) for the raw chocolate coating 100 g (about 1 cup) shredded raw cacao butter 2 tablespoons maple syrup ½ cup raw cacao powder ¼ cup mesquite powder (optional) 2 tablespoons maca powder (optional) flaky sea salt - for sprinkling (optional) for the homemade pumpkinseed butter 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds 1 tablespoons neutral coconut oil, melted ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons moringa or matcha powder - for color, (optional) about ¼ cup olive oil Instructions to make the shortbread cookie layer Line an 8 x 8-inch rimmed pan with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the coconut flour, salt and beet powder, if using, in a medium bowl. Set aside. Combine the coconut butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and melt over low heat, stirring until mixed thoroughly. Add the coconut butter mixture to the bowl with the coconut flour and mix until combined, using your hands towards the end. Transfer the mixture into the prepared pan and press against the bottom into an even layer. Set aside while making the caramel layer. to make the pumpkinseed caramel layer Combine the pumpkinseed butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and warm it over low heat, stirring, until thoroughly mixed. If your butter is quite soft and creamy, you can mix in the maple syrup without heating it up. Evenly spread the pumpkinseed butter mixture over the cookie layer. Sprinkle with the toasted pumpkin seeds and bee pollen, if using, slightly pressing them into the caramel. Place the pan into the freezer until firm to the touch, for about 2 hours. to make the raw chocolate coating Gently melt the cacao butter in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Whisk in the maple syrup, sift in all the powders, if using, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Allternatively, melt about 1½ cups chopped dark chocolate or chocolate chips in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Add 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil and whisk to combine until smooth. to make the bars Remove the pan from the freezer. Pull the bar cookie out of the pan onto a cutting board by the sides of the parchment paper. Slice in half lengthwise and crosswise and continue slicing each piece in half until you have 16 slim bars. Working with one bar at a time, dip them into the melted chocolate using two forks. Turn to coat evenly, remove from the coating and gently shake over the bowl to let most of the chocolate excess drip back into the bowl. Place the coated bars on a drying rack over a piece of parchment paper. Optionally, drizzle with more chocolate and sprinkle with flaky salt. Transfer the coated bars into the freezer for about 10 minutes, until the chocolate is set. From here, you can enjoy them right away or store in an airtight container in the freezer. Remove 5 minutes prior to enjoying. to make the pumpkinseed butter Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment paper. Combine the pumpkin seeds with the oil and salt and toss to coat. Toast for 7 minutes, until slightly golden. Transfer the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, add the moringa/­­matcha powder, if using, and grind into a fine meal. With the motor still running, add the olive oil, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a smooth, slightly runny butter forms. Stop the processor and scrape the sides periodically during the process. Keep refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ricotta Fig Tart with Chocolate and Roasted Grapes Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna

February 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean LasagnaThis post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. I’ve always thought of lasagna as an intimidating dish in terms of its layered preparation, though I love the flavor and find myself craving it often during the cooler months. I set out to change my outlook with this simple and nourishing spaghetti squash version that tastes every bit as comforting as the original. Spaghetti squash performs impressively well as a lighter and more nutritious substitute for lasagna noodles that’s still hearty and substantial here. The uppermost layer of the squash that tops the lasagna becomes slightly crispy and golden in the oven and reminds me of my lacy, oven-baked latkes, for which I have a major weakness. The core of the lasagna is made up of the flavor-building trio of onions, carrots and celery, as well as affordable, protein-rich mung beans (you can also use lentils), kale and mushrooms. For the cheesy element, I went with my go-to almond ricotta that is a breeze to make, as well as fluffy, slightly tangy and cheesy, much like the real thing. I was very excited to partner with Newman’s Own Organics for this recipe for numerous reasons. Pasta sauce is one of the few things that I don’t mind buying pre-made, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients like I can with Newman’s. Their organic pasta sauce is made with real vegetables and herbs, all of which are organic, and that’s very much reflected in the delicious, classic flavor that works incredibly well in this lasagna. There’s no added sugar, either, the sauce just depends on the natural sweetness of the tomatoes. Another great reason to support the brand is that they donate 100% of their net profits to all kinds of charities around the world, which is an idea that got put into motion by Paul Newman in 1982 and has been carried out gracefully to this very day. This Paul Newman quote is at the core of the company’s mission and basically says it all: I want to acknowledge luck. The benevolence of it in my life and the brutality of it in the lives of others. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna   Print Serves: one 9 x 13 baking dish or two 9 x 9 baking dishes Ingredients for the almond ricotta 2 cups almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 garlic clove - chopped generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice pinch sea salt for the lasagna 1 large or 2 small spaghetti squash 3-4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mung beans or French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water 1 large yellow onion - chopped pinch red pepper flakes dried thyme, oregano, marjoram - to taste (optional) 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 celery ribs - thinly sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced two 24 oz jars marinara sauce or crushed canned tomatoes Instructions to make the almond ricotta Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta, rinse well. Place almonds into the bowl of a food processor along with the rest of the ingredients. Add ¼ cup water and grind to a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. to make the lasagna Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Generously oil the inside of each half with about 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the squash cut side down on a parchment paper-covered baking tray and bake for 30-40 minutes or until tender. Remove from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the squash is roasting, drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils, place them in a medium saucepan and cover with purified water. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Taste for doneness, simmer for 2-5 minutes more if the beans are not yet tender. If using lentils, cook them for 20-30 minutes until done. Drain and set aside. Warm 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add onion, a pinch of salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and thyme/­­oregano/­­marjoram, if using, and saute for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add carrots, celery and another pinch of salt and saute for another 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for about 8 minutes or longer, until the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add mung beans and saute for 2 minutes, until coated and incorporated. Remove pan from the heat and set aside. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish (or 2 smaller square dishes, about 8 x 8 or 9 x 9, as pictured) with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Spread ⅓ of the marinara sauce/­­crushed canned tomatoes over the bottom of the dish. Using a fork, scoop the spaghetti squash strands out of the skin and spread ⅓ of them over the marinara in an even layer. Reserve about 1 cup of the ricotta for garnish, if desired. Crumble ⅓ of the remaining ricotta over the squash. Top with half of the mung bean and vegetable mixture in an even layer. Repeat with ⅓ of the marinara, squash, ricotta and vegetables. Finish with the last layer of marinara and the squash. Cover and bake for 20 minutes. Increase the oven temperature to 400° F (200° C). Uncover the lasagna and bake for another 10 minutes, until the marinara is bubbling through to the surface. Optionally, turn the broiler on high and broil for a couple minutes, until top layer of the lasagna is golden in places. Remove from the oven, garnish with the reserved ricotta, if using, let cool slightly, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Eyed Pea and Sweet Potato Hash

December 31 2016 Vegan Richa 

Black Eyed Pea and Sweet Potato HashBring in the new year with this plentiful 1 Pot Black eyed pea and Sweet Potato Hash with Harissa Spice. Ready in 20 minutes. Serve over toast with a creamy dressing or avocado. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. 2017 will be here in another day and we need some beans esp black eyed, sweet potato and spices! to bring it in. This sweet potato hash is super easy and comes together really quickly. Sweet potatoes are cooked with onion and garlic in a skillet, then simply spiced with harissa and smoked paprika, tossed with greens and cooked black eyed peas. Pretty, hearty and wonderful. Serve the hash as a side or over toast topped with sriracha or avocado, or make a buddha bowl with cooked grains like turmeric lemon rice and a dressing or lemon juice. So many ways to eat this amazing stir fry.  For all the black eyed pea prosperity and happiness, make this Deep Dish Lasagna Pizza with Black eyed Peas and Greens, Some Black Eyed Pea and Lentil soup, a grain-free Black eyed Pea and Potato Masala Pie stuffed with broccoli and cauliflower, or a hearty black eyed pea and Pumpkin Chard Chili. Be safe and happy this New Years eve! Continue reading: Black Eyed Pea and Sweet Potato HashThe post Black Eyed Pea and Sweet Potato Hash appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Deep Dish Pizza Recipe – 20 min Crust!

September 19 2016 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Deep Dish Pizza Recipe – 20 min Crust!Vegan Deep Dish Pizza Recipe. Easy Deep Dish Pizza with from scratch Crust, red pepper, spinach, vegan mozzarella and basil. Vegan Pizza Recipe with homemade 20 Minute Deep Dish Pizza Crust, almost no knead. Pin it for later. Most recipes that end up on the blog usually start as simple meals and then evolve into the fusion or creative versions of themselves. There are various easy vegan pizzas or deep dish pizza recipes on the web, so sometimes the recipe in its simplest form is overlooked. But those simple recipes are the ones that we all turn back to often. I posted this Black Eyed Pea Lasagna Deep dish pizza, and this Jalapeno Popper Mushroom White Sauce Deep dish  long back. Since then I have been making a simple deep dish with pizza sauce, vegan mozzarella, red pepper, greens, garlic, loads of herbs, a few ingredients and variations here and there. I made one again the other day and remembered to photograph and note it. This super easy Deep dish Pizza is saucy, filled with simple ingredients. It comes together quickly and makes for a filling meal. You can fill the pizza with any veggies you like, sauteed mushrooms, sliced veggies, some spiced tempeh crumbles etc. Make a tall Vegan Deep Dish Pizza! Continue reading: Vegan Deep Dish Pizza Recipe – 20 min Crust!The post Vegan Deep Dish Pizza Recipe – 20 min Crust! appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Saturday Six | Lemon Ricotta Pancakes, Quinoa Fried Rice & Mint Nice Cream

April 30 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including fluffy lemon ricotta pancakes, healthy quinoa fried rice and creamy mint chocolate chunk nice cream.

Celeriac, Mushroom & Tomato Lasagna

December 9 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Lets take a moment to admire the ugly celeriac. Such an awesome root. Really affordable to buy, filled with flavour and so versatile to use. Plus, its thick, wrinkly, handle cold temperatures well and can therefor be harvested all through the winter. We had some celeriac left in the fridge after we had made this dish and used some of those leftovers to make thin and crispy celeriac chips and chopped the rest into a carrot & celeriac soup that, with a dash of white wine, was right on point. But we are not here for the leftovers, are we? We are here because of this little vegan lasagna made on thinly shaved celeriac and parsnip “noodles” that are layered with a tomato & lentil sauce, mushrooms and spinach and then covered with cherry tomatoes and baked until soft. For a long time we refused to call it lasagna, as we know that people can be a little cranky with words. The recipe is made entirely without lasagna noodles and béchamel sauce which probably is what technically makes a lasagna. But in the end we just thought lasagna sounded more appealing than casserole and it also gives a more visual description of how this dish is layered. Our little gif animation further down in this post, also helps with that. Regardless of its name, this is damn tasty and perfect winter food. The roots don’t soak up liquid like lasagna so it stays juicy without the need to add a creamy sauce. However, if you feel like throwing some dairy into it, we can recommend whisking a good ricotta with some lemon juice and spreading it out as an extra layer in the middle. Replacing lasagna noodles with thinly sliced celeriac is a great little trick that unfortunately was not invented by us. There are a bunch of recipes out there, from Gordon Ramsey’s double cream version to Sarah Britton’s with butternut squash. On another note, yesterday we put a major deadline behind us (which is why we have been so slow with new blog recipes). It feels great and we will tell you all about that project soon. Now we are actually off to Asia to sip coconuts, sleep for a hundred years and hug or kids, but we have prepared a whole array of Christmas recipes that we will post next week. And a really beautiful and tasty breakfast that we’ll post after Christmas - just when you are looking for something fresh again. So check back soon! Celeriac Lasagna AKA Shaved Roots & Mushroom Casserole Serves 6-8 Tomato & Lentil Sauce 1 tbsp coconut oil, butter, ghee or olive oil 1 onion 3 garlic cloves 1/­­4 tsp chili flakes 4 cans (6 cups /­­ 1560 g) chopped tomatoes 1/­­2 cup (125 ml) puy lentils (or lentils of choice), rinsed 1 cup (250 ml) water 2 sprigs thyme, chopped 20 leaves basil, chopped sea salt and pepper Shaved roots 1 small celeriac root 3 parsnip roots 1 tbsp coconut oil, butter, ghee or olive oil 2 clove garlic 20 brown mushrooms 250 g frozen spinach, thawed (fresh is fine too) 20 cherry tomatoes (or 4 regular tomatoes), sliced Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Preparing the tomato & lentil sauce: Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion, garlic and chili flakes and sauté for a couple of minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to combine. Cover with a lid and let simmer for about 45 minutes, until the lentils are soft and the sauce is quite ‘dry’. Preparing the celeriac and parsnip lasagna noodles: Rinse the roots well, then peel, you might want to use a knife instead of a peeler. Cut the roots in halves (or quarters if it’s large). Slice it in very thin slices, best and easiest done with a mandolin slicer (3 mm slices). Alternatively use a sharp knife, but be careful, and slice as thin as possible. Preparing the mushrooms: Clean the mushrooms with a soft brush (baking brush or toothbrush), if they are very dirty wash them with a little water and dry well. Slice the stem and the cap lengthwise into large pieces. Heat oil and garlic in a skillet on medium-high heat, add mushrooms and for a couple of minutes until browned on one side, then stir. Fry for a couple more minutes and pour into a bowl. Now add the thawed spinach to the same skillet with out rinsing. When heated, set aside. Assembling the lasagna: In an oven proof dish, start with a thin layer of oil, cover with a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of half of the tomato sauce and cover with a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of mushrooms + spinach and a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of the remaining tomato sauce and arrange the sliced tomatoes on top to cover the tomato sauce. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 45-50 minutes.

Butternut Squash and Parsnip Tart

November 9 2015 Oh My Veggies 

A puff pastry crust is topped with creamy ricotta and roasted fall vegetables in this easy main dish option for Thanksgiving.

How to Make Zucchini Rolls with Basil Ricotta

October 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Zucchini noodles are one of Executive Chef Rachel Bests favorite things to make. Watch how easy they are as she prepares a recipe for Zucchini Rolls with Basil Ricotta which she serves at Leaf Restaurant in Boulder, Colorado.

Gluten free Yeast free Vegan Pizza Crust Recipe

September 10 2015 Vegan Richa 

Gluten free Yeast free Vegan Pizza Crust Recipe We’ve been eating a lot of chickpea flour lately. My parents are in town and Dad prefers all Indian food, every single day. So breakfast is always savory, chickpea flour pancakes, savory oats and such. Snacks are chivda (savory Indian spiced trail mix), handvo (savory split pea zucchini cakes from the book) or baked fritters of some sort, lunch yesterday was Kadhi Pakora with homemade almond cashew yogurt (recipe in my cookbook) with baked onion fritters. Mom was amazed at how good the non dairy yogurt turned out with simple steps. Most of these posts were planned and scheduled in August, and I try to add some to them before they get posted. A simple yeast-free gluten-free Pizza crust topped with sauce of choice, vegan cheese or tofu ricotta, and fresh basil today. This pizza crust is easy and has No gluten, no yeast, no gum, no nuts and has chickpea flour. You can make it grain-free by using more chickpea flour. Use white chia seeds instead of black for a lighter crust color. The black chia seeds also make it look a bit grey-ish. Add your favorite sauces and toppings. See my Pizza collection for options! Continue reading: Gluten free Yeast free Vegan Pizza Crust RecipeThe post Gluten free Yeast free Vegan Pizza Crust Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chickpea Spinach Pie with Berbere Spice

October 3 2017 Vegan Richa 

Chickpea Spinach Pie with Berbere SpiceChickpea Spinach Pie with Berbere Spice. Easy Chickpea Spinach Pastry for holidays and company with vegan puff pastry. Use spices or blends of choice. Use lentils for variation. Vegan Soy-free Nut-free Recipe.  I told you I was going through a Berbere and Cajun obsession at the moment. So here goes another one. This ridiculously tasty pie is a breeze to put together. Use up those canned or cooked chickpeas or lentils, cook them up with the spices, onion and spinach. Fill up a thawed puff pastry sheets (many are accidentally vegan), seal and bake!  The idea for this came about when I was thinking about making something like a Spanakopita but simpler. Chickpeas are a easy filling if you already have some cooked. Loads of onion, spinach and spices and the crisp puff pastry make this pie very pleasing for the crowd. You can make one whole pie or small hand pies. Always a hit! Use any spices of choice or use the spice blends from my book (baharat, shawarma, garam masala etc). Or use just herbs, a combination of thyme, sage and oregano + nooch. Add some tofu or almond ricotta for variation.  Easy Holiday Appetizer or Side to impress. The chickpea spinach filling is also great in sandwiches or as a dip! Continue reading: Chickpea Spinach Pie with Berbere SpiceThe post Chickpea Spinach Pie with Berbere Spice appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Crustless Asparagus Quiche

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Asparagus is sautéed until tender and flavored with young green garlic, which is milder and sweeter than it after reaching maturity. This ricotta quiche is great for groups and healthier without the crust. This recipe comes to us from Colleen of Foodie Tots. Serves 6 - a little oil or cooking spray, for the baking dish and skillet - 2 cups asparagus, chopped bite size 2 stalks green garlic, chopped - or - 2 cloves garlic and 2 scallion, chopped & mixed - salt and pepper, to taste 4 large eggs - 1 cup nonfat milk - 1 cup low fat ricotta cheese Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Prepare an 8-inch square baking dish with a light coating of oil or cooking spray. Prepare a skillet with another light coating of oil or cooking spray. Place the prepared skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the asparagus, stirring once or twice, for 5-7 minutes, or until the asparagus has just started to brown. Add the green garlic or garlic and scallion to the skillet and cook 2-3 minutes more, or until asparagus is partially browned. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Whisk together the eggs and milk in a mixing bowl. Fold in the ricotta and stir to combine. Fold in the sautéed veggies and pour into the prepared baking dish. Cook for 25-30 minutes, or until the eggs are set and puffy. Let cool slightly before serving. The post Crustless Asparagus Quiche appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Veganize It!

February 8 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Veganize It! My new cookbook is called VEGANIZE IT! Easy DIY Recipes for a Plant-Based Kitchen.  It officially hits the shelves on March 7, so I wanted to give you a sneak peek of whats inside. My goal in writing this book was to provide the ultimate guide for making homemade vegan foods from everyday ingredients — and share great ways to use those ingredients.  Like all my cookbooks, the recipes are geared to busy home cooks who want to get a great dinner on the table but dont want to spend all day in the kitchen.  With VEGANIZE IT, you can be as DIY as you want to be, or not.  For example, if you want to make lasagna completely from scratch, there are recipes for homemade ricotta, a melty mozzarella-like cheese, homemade pasta, and a wonderful baked tomato sauce.  If you dont have time to make all the components, you can simply pick and choose what you want to make from scratch and what you prefer to buy ready-made - such as making homemade ricotta and tomato sauce, but using storebought lasagna noodles and vegan mozzarella. In that sense, VEGANIZE IT is really two cookbooks in one:  all the DIY vegan basics such as dairy-free sour cream, mayonnaise, butter, and plant-based meats and seafood made from wheat, soy, beans, and vegetables.  But what makes this book really special is that each chapter goes one step further to include recipes that incorporate one or more of those basic recipes, all made inexpensively, using simple cooking methods and easy-to-find ingredients — so, for example, you can use the cashew cream cheese to make Spinach-Artichoke Dip or Chocolate Cheesecake.  Make the andouille sausage, and youre just one step away from a great jambalaya. Im really excited about VEGANIZE IT and I hope you will be too.  Sample recipes (and a blog tour!) are coming soon.  For now, though, Id like to give you a brief tour around the recipe chapters with a list of just some of the recipes youll find inside along with a few of the gorgeous photos by William and Susan Brinson. DIY DAIRY-FREE AND EGGLESS... Cheesy Broccoli Soup Spinach and Mushroom-Bacon Quiche Chickpea Flour Omelets Breakfast Nachos with Smoky Queso Sauce Bacon-Topped Mac UnCheese  PLANT-BASED MEATS... BBQ Seitan Ribs Burmese Tofu Iron Kettle Chili Better Made Tacos with Avocado Crema Seitan Oscar with Béarnaise Sauce       FLOUR POWER... Cheesy Crackers Handcrafted Lasagna Perfect Pot Pie Cheesy Sausage Biscuits Benedict Pizza VEGAN CHARCUTERIE... Maple Breakfast Sausage DIY Jerky Banh Mi Sandwich Haute Dogs Wellington Join the Club Sandwich       INSTEAD OF SEAFOOD... Lobster Mushroom Bisque Clam-Free Chowder Vegan Crab Louis Fish-Free Tacos Tof-ish and Chips with Tartar Sauce       SWEETS FROM SCRATCH... Luscious Lava Cakes Strawberry Shortcake Lemon Meringue Pie Tiramisu Bellini Trifle         VEGANIZE IT is available for pre-order now…. The post Veganize It! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Walnut & Butternut Squash Stuffed Shells

December 11 2016 Oh My Veggies 

These vegan stuffed shells are filled with a blend of cashew ricotta, butternut squash, and crunchy walnuts, baked up and served with creamy butternut squash sauce.

Vegan Eggplant Involtini with Harissa Sauce

August 25 2016 Oh My Veggies 

This vegan eggplant involtini is made with tender baked (not fried!) eggplant slices that are stuffed with cashew-based vegan ricotta filling and baked up in spicy harissa tomato sauce.

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters

April 19 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters Elsa planted a few pea seeds in pots that we placed in our kitchen window a couple of weeks ago. It has turned out to be a fun little project as they have been growing rapidly and she has been measuring them every morning. Isac was very intrigued by the part where you water the seeds and has been a keen helper in that area. He has also started experimenting with watering a few other things in our apartment, like the pestle and mortar, my shoes and our living room sofa. We’re still waiting to see if any of them will start growing. It would be a great story if I could tell you that we’ve been harvesting the peas from Elsa’s plants and used in this pea fritter recipe but her little hobby project will probably only leave us with a handful of tiny peas. So the peas in this recipe came from a different source. I am not sure if fritters actually is the correct word as we don’t use any flour in this recipe and they are aren’t deep-fried either. Perhaps pea pancakes would describe them better? We however rarely get the chance to use the word fritters so that’s what we’re sticking with. These are fresh and light with distinct tones of mint and spring. We enjoyed them for lunch but they could make for a nice breakfast as well. Apart from peas and herbs, we use cooked millet, eggs and ricotta cheese in the batter. They are quite delicate and need a gentle hand when flipped, but the easiest trick is to keep them quite small in size. You could of course serve this with a number of different options but here we have simply wilted spinach with chili flakes for a bit of a punch, added a soft boiled egg and topped it with a dollop of yogurt, sprouts, radishes and lemon zest. Pea, Millet & Mint Pancakes Serves 4 We have listed the amount of uncooked millet that you need for this recipe but we recommend cooking a larger batch while you are at it. We always keep cooked millet or quinoa in the fridge so we easily can create patties like these or to make our soups more filling. 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 225 g fresh green peas (or frozen and thawed) 1 packed cup /­­ 160 g cooked millet (1/­­3 cup /­­ 70 g uncooked) (cooked quinoa or rice should work too) 1 spring onion, chopped 2 eggs 1 handful fresh mint and parsley leaves (6 sprigs, picked) 4 tbsp ricotta cheese (or cottage cheese) salt and pepper coconut oil, for frying Wilted spinach coconut oil a few handfuls wild spinach 1-2 tsp chili flakes salt and pepper Serve with Yogurt Soft or medium boiled egg (ours were cooked for 7 minutes) Beetroot sprouts Radishes Lemon zest Add 1 cup /­­ 150 g of the peas to a food processor along with millet, spring onion, eggs, herbs, ricotta cheese, salt and pepper. Pulse a few times on high speed until mixed but still slightly chunky. Mash the remaining peas roughly with a fork and stir into the batter. Let sit for 20 minutes to let the ingredients come together (which will make them easier to fry). Add a teaspoon of coconut oil to a non-stick frying pan on medium heat, wait until it’s hot and then use a large spoon to dollop the fritters into the pan and flat them out into rounds (depending on the size of the pan, you should be able to fit between three and five of them each time). Cook until they begin to set, roughly about 3 minutes and then carefully flip them with a spatula. If the batter feels too soft and runny, you can add some extra millet to it. Fry all the fritters and place on a tray to cool off just slightly while wilting the spinach. Using the same frying pan, simply add the spinach to a little oil and chili flakes on a medium heat and let sauté for a few minutes until it has wilted down. Place the spinach on plates, top with a few sweet pea fritters, yogurt, sprouts, radishes and a generous amount of lemon zest and soft boiled eggs on the side. Enjoy! ****************** PS! We have released an update for our Green Kitchen app which includes a search bar (finally, right!?) where you can search on recipe names and ingredients. We have also added more recipes, Quick Actions with 3D Touch and a whole lot of backend fixes that will make it run even smoother. All the recipes in the app are available in English, German, Spanish, Italian and French, with more languages coming. All this comes for free if you already have the app, just hit update in App Store!

Yogurt Pancakes with Pomegranate

November 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

Yogurt stands in for ricotta cheese in these fluffy flapjacks. A sprinkling of pomegranate seeds makes for a slightly tart fruit topping, but for a more traditional take, try them with berries, sautéed apples or banana slices. This recipe comes to us from Cara and Phoebe of Big Girls, Small Kitchen. Serves 1. - 1 egg, separated - 1 egg white - 1/­­2 cup yogurt - 3 tablespoons flour - 1/­­4 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 teaspoon sugar - pinch of salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon butter - 1/­­4 cup pomegranate seeds - 1 tablespoon maple syrup* *optional In a small bowl, whisk together the 1 egg yolk from the separated egg with the yogurt, flour and vanilla extract. In a larger bowl, beat the 2 egg whites, sugar and salt together until they are fluffy and hold a soft peak. Scrape about a third of the egg white mixture into the egg yolk yogurt mixture and stir gently until the mixture is lightened. Very gently, fold in the rest of the egg whites, trying not to deflate them. Melt the butter in a small nonstick pan over medium-low heat. When the pan is heated, add half of the batter. Cook for 3-4 minutes, or until brown, then flip and cook 3-4 minutes on the reverse side. Repeat with the remainder of the batter. Top the pancakes with pomegranate seeds and syrup, if desired, and enjoy. The post Yogurt Pancakes with Pomegranate appeared first on Meatless Monday.

3 Recipe Videos You’ll Love from Leaf Restaurant

October 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

3 Recipe Videos You’ll Love from Leaf Restaurant When VT food editor Mary Margaret Chappell ate at Leaf Restaurant in Boulder, Colorado for the first time at the beginning of 2015, she knew shed happened upon something special. Sure, the restaurant is regularly touted as one of the best vegetarian dining spots in the country, but her meal exceeded her expectations. So began her quest to work with Leaf Restaurants executive chef, Rachel Best. First came a brunch recipe for biscuits and sausage gravy from the restaurant. Then, this video series, which showcases three of the young, talented chefs regular recipe techniques. And the collaboration continues! In June 2016, Rachel will develop a vegetarian wedding menu exclusively for Vegetarian Times. WATCH Rachel Bests videos for How to Make Vegan Zucchini Bread, How to Make Vegan Crab Cakes, and How to Make Zucchini Rolls with Basil Ricotta!

Vegan Baked Manicotti with Kale and Red Wine Tomato Sauce

October 14 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Creamy vegan ricotta makes a dreamy filling for this baked manicotti.

This Week’s Meatless Meal Plan | 09.07.15

September 4 2015 Oh My Veggies 

On the menu this week: Corn and Zucchini Galette; Chipotle Black Bean Quinoa Burgers with Sweet Corn Relish; Grilled Veggie Gyros with Creamy Cucumber Dill Sauce; Cheesy Baked Black Bean and Veggie Taquitos; and Lemon Ricotta Pancakes with Sautéed Peaches.


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