rice - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

Chikki recipe | peanut chikki recipe | groundnut chikki or shengdana chikki

49 Savory Vegan Breakfast Recipes to Start Your Day Right

Masala Paratha (Besan Ka Masala Paratha)










rice vegetarian recipes

Sweet Potato Burritos

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

This burrito might surprise you with its sweetness, but the onion and garlic powders offer a savory balance to the cinnamon. Using whole wheat tortillas can complete the wrap the healthy way by keeping you fuller, longer. This recipe comes to us from Lindsay of The Happy Herbivore. Serves 4 - 4-6 soft taco shells, tortillas or wraps - 1 medium sweet potato, boiled until tender and drained - 1 cup brown rice or quinoa, cooked to desired tenderness - 10 oz frozen spinach - 1 cup black beans -  1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon -  1/­­4 teaspoon cumin -  1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - hot sauce, to taste Cook spinach according to package directions, pressing out any excess water once the spinach is fully cooked. Put the spinach in a bowl, sprinkle with garlic powder and salt and set aside. Sprinkle cumin, onion powder and garlic powder over black beans, stirring to evenly coat beans with spices and set aside. Peel cooked sweet potato and mash with a potato masher or fork. Sprinkle with cinnamon and stir to combine. Combine sweet potato, spinach, grains and black beans in a large bowl, stirring to evenly combine, and scoop mixture into the center of the wrap. Drizzle with hot sauce to taste. The post Sweet Potato Burritos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

PRE-ORDER Bonus Bundle is Here!

September 9 2017 Vegan Richa 

PRE-ORDER Bonus Bundle is Here! OMG!! THE Book is here!! See me flip through it on my Instagram Stories! First, Thank you to everyone who Pre-ordered! Now, let’s get the ball rolling in terms of marketing and buzz to spread the love to more people, and even more people cooking amazing and flavorful food! I’ve been working on the book for a while now(1.5 years) and I cannot wait for you to get it!   If you already pre-ordered your copy (find the order number in your order email or on amazon.com or other retailer), you can pick up this bundle today by filling up this form. Or Pre Order Now to snag it before it expires.  The Book page has links for all retailers in various countries(UK, Canada, Germany, Spain, India, Africa, Asia, Europe etc).  Why Pre-order? - Get a discount. Pre-order prices are often lower than the price of the book post release, and you can lock in that low price.  - As with my first book, we are donating 40% of the book sales from this year to amazing rescues and charities around the world. If you’d like to support my work, you can buy my books or directly donate to these charities.  >>>> Get your Bonus Bundle here 

corn pakoda recipe | sweet corn pakora | corn bhajiya recipe

September 8 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

corn pakoda recipe | sweet corn pakora | corn bhajiya recipecorn pakoda recipe | sweet corn pakora | corn bhajiya recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe of sweet corn pakora is very similar to any other pakoda or fritters recipe. it follows the same besan and rice flour batter spiced with dry spice powders. later the corn kernels are dipped into batter and deep fried in small portions until crisp. Continue reading corn pakoda recipe | sweet corn pakora | corn bhajiya recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Beginner’s Guide to Asian Noodles

September 8 2017 VegKitchen 

Beginner’s Guide to Asian Noodles Here’s a beginner’s guide to Asian noodles, which are easy to find these days. Ten years ago, soba, udon, bean-thread and rice stick noodles, among others, were rare finds. Now, many well-stocked supermarkets carry these authentic noodles. Here’s a brief lexicon of the most commonly used varieties. Shown above, Udon Noodle Soup with Crisp Vegetables. Buckwheat […] The post Beginner’s Guide to Asian Noodles appeared first on VegKitchen.

poha cutlet recipe | vegetable poha cutlets | veg poha patties

September 6 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

poha cutlet recipe | vegetable poha cutlets | veg poha pattiespoha cutlet recipe | vegetable poha cutlets | veg poha patties with step by step photo and video recipe. there are several variation to simple vegetable cutlet recipe and it can be prepared with bread, corn, mixed vegetables and paneer. in this recipe post, poha or beaten rice is used as main ingredient which later pan fried till golden crisp. it can be great appetizer for your next potluck and can also be extended as burger patties too. Continue reading poha cutlet recipe | vegetable poha cutlets | veg poha patties at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney

August 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyBhel Recipe – Indian Street Food style Snack Salad with Sweet Potato, Mint and Tamarind Chutney in 20 Mins. Puffed Rice tossed with cooked sweet potato, nuts, onion, cucumber and tomato and dressed in chopped mint and 5 minute Tamarind Chutney. Vegan Bhel Puri Recipe. Can be glutenfree and nutfree.    Bhel /­­Bhel Puri is a popular Indian street snack which has a combination of puffed rice, bhel mix, chopped up tomato, onion, cubed cooked potato, mint and cilantro or mint cilantro chutney, tamarind chutney. Bhel mix is usually some crispy chickpea flour noodles + crackers + toasted nuts mixture that you can find at an indian store. Depending on the area, Bhel can have other veggies, sprouts, or some oil and othr names like Churmuri, Jhalmudi. For this version, I use puffed brown rice. You can use any other puffed or krispie grains such as quinoa, wheat, kamut or millet. Instead of regular potato I use cooked sweet potato in today’s recipe. Sweet Potatoes amazingly well with the sweet sour 5 minute Tamarind chutney and minty flavor profile. Try it! Add sprouted or cooked Mung beans, chickpeas or lentils to the mix to make it a filling snack. Also see video below. Continue reading: Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyThe post Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

sabudana dosa recipe | sabakki dose recipe | sago dosa recipe

August 27 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

sabudana dosa recipe | sabakki dose recipe | sago dosa recipesabudana dosa recipe | sabakki dose recipe | sago dosa recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the sago dosa is very similar texture and taste as compared to the traditional or rice and urad dal based dosa. or to be precisely, it has a lot of characteristics of set dosa or poha dosa. it is typically enjoyed with coconut chutney or peanut chutney and can also be served with choice of sambar recipe. Continue reading sabudana dosa recipe | sabakki dose recipe | sago dosa recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

masale bhat recipe | masala bhaat | maharashtrian masala bhaath

August 8 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

masale bhat recipe | masala bhaat | maharashtrian masala bhaathmasale bhat recipe | masala bhaat rice | maharashtrian masala bhaath with step by step photo and video recipe. a traditional and spicy maharashtrian rice recipe which is typically prepared with combination of tendli or eggplant/­­brinjal vegetables. however it is even prepared with mixed vegetables like, potatoes, carrot, peas and even cauliflower. further it can be served without any accompaniment, yet it tastes great with simple raita or curd/­­yoghurt. Continue reading masale bhat recipe | masala bhaat | maharashtrian masala bhaath at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Instant Pot Eggplant Sambar Recipe – Indian Yellow Lentil Tamarind Dal

August 2 2017 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Eggplant Sambar Recipe – Indian Yellow Lentil Tamarind DalEggplant Sambar Recipe – Indian Yellow Lentil Tamarind Dal. Toor Dal Sambar with Eggplant or other seasonal veggies. Instant Pot or Saucepan Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe         Print Recipe Sambar is a tangy tamarind based dal with its own spice blend called sambar powder. It has many versions based on the region and family recipes from states in Southern India. This flavorful soup has a different flavor profile from the usual North Indian Dals. Serve it over rice or cooked grains or as a soup. Toor dal (split pigeon peas) are usually the pulse of choice to make sambar.  Toor Dal or split pigeon pea can be labelled as yellow lentils or yellow split peas. These split peas are slightly smaller and duller than yellow split peas and also cook a bit faster. Get the non shiny version if you get them from the Indian store. You can also make this sambar with Moong dal or Red lentils or yellow split peas. Cooking time will be less with those lentils.  Tamarind makes things look brown but believe you me that sambar is amazingly tasty meal. It is sour, savory, mildly sweet, well spiced and great as a soup or as a side with steamed rice cakes (Idli), or flatbread or rice. Both Instant Pot and saucepan instructions below. Continue reading: Instant Pot Eggplant Sambar Recipe – Indian Yellow Lentil Tamarind DalThe post Instant Pot Eggplant Sambar Recipe – Indian Yellow Lentil Tamarind Dal appeared first on Vegan Richa.

20 Vegan Instant Pot Recipes

July 24 2017 Vegan Richa 

20 Vegan Instant Pot Recipes20 Vegan Instant Pot Recipes with no fake meats, no soy, no dairy. Instant Pot Vegetarian Recipes to cook up as meals. Vegan Gluten-free Soyfree.  Instant Pot  is a 1 pot cooking appliance that can cook by pressure cooking, slow cooking, warming (yogurt or other fermentation), sauteing, steaming. It is programmable and has been getting popular in the last few years. I use Instant Pot whenever I need to pressure cook. I have been pressure cooking for many years as Indian food uses Pressure cooking for cooking the variety of beans and lentils used in the cuisine. Stive top cookers have been used in India for decades. Some of the old posts on the blog use a pressure cooker and are getting updated IP instructions over the next few months.  Instant Pot works out well to make 1 pot meals, set it and forget it and the meal is ready when needed, and works well for summer as it doesnt heat up the entire kitchen. Here are a few of the popular IP recipes from the blog. Almost all also have Saucepan cooking options. For more Recipes see the Instant Pot Category. What are your favorite Instant Pot meals for Summer?Continue reading: 20 Vegan Instant Pot RecipesThe post 20 Vegan Instant Pot Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup

July 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Restaurant RoundupThis Monday, were putting the spotlight on five restaurants around the United States that are participating in Meatless Monday! Every week, they offer discounts and vegetarian specials to their customers, giving them delicious meat-free options at their favorite places. The list of restaurants that have joined Meatless Monday continues to grow, and here are five to keep an eye on! 1. Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Multiple Locations: With its focus on local, sustainable cuisine, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar has a plentiful selection of healthy meal choices including several vegetarian choices. For Meatless Monday, CEO Dave Magrogan has one recommendation in particular: “I love the Spicy Tofu Stir Fry. The sweet flavors of the pineapple and coconut jasmine rice combine with spicy flavors, peppers, baby bok choy, snow peas and eggplant to create a great flavor profile. This dish is satisfying and filling without a high calorie count. The tofu gives a nice protein boost. Overall its a very well-rounded vegetarian dish for someone looking for bold flavors and solid protein content.” 2. Tattooed Mom, Philadelphia, PA: This Philly food joint can bring townies of all stripes together for cocktails and sandwiches. On Meatless Monday, the vegetarian sammies get the spotlight: “Our world famous Vegan Pickle Fried Chickn Sammy is a Meatless Monday favorite at Tattooed Mom. Our house brined vegan chicken is topped with fried pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion and crystal hot sauce mayo, all on a brioche bun. You’ll find it here, along with our full line up of 10 vegetarian and vegan delights, on special for half price EVERY Meatless Monday from noon – 10pm.” 3. Burrito San, Miami, FL: Burrito San has become famous for its sushi burrito, making it a great destination for pescatarians and sushi lovers alike. Their Meatless Monday features $10 lunch specials including vegetarian sushi options. Marketing manager Mitzi Napoles has a favorite: “The Buddhas Belly Burrito roll is the perfect Meatless Monday choice. It has a satisfying heft from the portobello mushrooms and a great contrast of flavors and textures. We also have it available as a Salad or Poke option if Giant Sushi rolls are not your thing!” 4. Forage, Cambridge, MA: Forage works with local farmers, foragers, and fisherman to bring sustainable, healthy cuisine to its Cambridge customers. But on Meatless Monday, seasonal veggies get a starring role. From owner and manager Stan Hilbert: “We love our veggies and the farmers that grow them. Meatless Monday is one way for us to support our farmer friends while highlighting seasonal and local produce and offering something different every week. We feature veggies in savory and sweet courses. We have a $39 four-course vegetarian or vegan tasting menu available every day of the week, but on Mondays we throw in another two courses for the same price!” 5. BeWiched, Minneapolis, MN: A believer in old-world culinary traditions, BeWiched certainly doesnt shy away from meat on their menu of deli sandwiches. However on Mondays, they offer up something different for their Meatless Monday specials. From Ally Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Catering & Sales: “Every Monday, we offer a new seasonal plant-based sandwich as an ode to #meatlessmonday. This is Farmer Bob (pictured above). He comes in at least once a week and sells us fresh produce picked from his farm. He recently harvested some tomatoes that we used for a Fried Green Tomato sandwich special. It doesn’t get any more farm-to-table than that!” Honorable Mentions: We cant leave out restaurants that go meat-free every day! Here are two vegan food joints that cater to everyone who loves great, sustainable, healthy meals! Choices Café, Florida (multiple locations): Choices goes meat-free every day of the week, in case you forget to stop in on Monday! Their mission statement: “Our mission is to inspire compassionate choices by serving delicious, healthy, and organic plant-based food prepared with love for people, animals and the planet.” VO2 Vegan Café, Cambridge, MA: Another spot with all vegan offerings is VO2 Vegan Café, which welcomes diners of all preferences who just want to treat themselves to something healthy and delicious. From VO2 manager Stephanie Kirkpatrick: All our food is 100% vegan, so everything is meatless and we celebrate Meatless Monday every day! It’s so wonderful when vegans and vegetarians come in and are so excited that they don’t have to ask about ingredients because they already know everything is vegan. Many meat-eaters also love our food and look at it as an awesome and easy way to enjoy delicious food knowing they are eating healthier, for themselves and our planet. Does your favorite restaurant participate in Meatless Monday? Wed love to feature them on our site! If you own a restaurant and are considering taking part in Meatless Monday, let us know! Send us an email: info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and Peas

July 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and PeasVegetable Peanut Sweet Potato Curry. 1 Pot 30 Minute Quick and Easy Weekday or Weekend Meal. Serve over rice or quinoa or with toasted pita bread. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Can be nut-free with sunbutter. Its getting pretty hot out here. Baking and standing near the stove for too long is not fun. So what to do with the sweet potatoes if not bake them? Make them into a quick curry. This is a simple Sweet Potato, Veggie, and Pea curry with Peanut butter sauce. Sweet potato works really well with the nut butter and this sweet savory stew is a perfectly satisfying meal as well as satisfies the summer sweet craving. In summer, I prefer less spices in the stews, so I add just a sprinkle of garam masala in the end. Curry powder, Berbere, harissa and cajun spice blend also work well in this curry. Add the spices you prefer towards the end with the peas and adjust to preference. This curry is a great base to build up on with additional vegetables, beans, spices and flavor. For a deeper flavor profile, try the sauce from this very popular Chickpea Turmeric Peanut Butter Curry.  You can also make this into a soup with additional water or broth and serve it hot or cold. Add some chickpeas or lentils to make it hearty. 1 Pot, easy and makes a great dinner. Continue reading: Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and PeasThe post Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and Peas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe

August 31 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipechilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe with detailed photo and video recipe. a popular indo chinese street food of india which is mainly served as a side dish to indo chinese rice recipes. chilli paneer comes with comes with 2 variants i.e gravy and dry version and gravy version can be served as starter recipe or as side dish recipe. chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. Continue reading chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Red Lentil Dal With Spinach (Gluten-Free)

August 30 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Something Vegan has created a super easy recipe for vegan dal. Red lentils, spinach, and delicious spices combined to create this epic meal! Dal is a traditional Indian dish and goes great with basmati rice and roti (flatbread). It’s perfect for making in a big batch and keeping some for leftovers. Check out the video below to learn how to make your very own dal! Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Vegan Red Lentil Dal With Spinach (Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

girmit recipe | masala puffed rice | north karnataka mandakki upkari

August 29 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

girmit recipe | masala puffed rice | north karnataka mandakki upkarigirmit recipe | masala puffed rice | north karnataka mandakki upkari with step by step photo and video recipe. girmit recipe or more popularly known as mandakki is a common road side street food availabe in north karnataka or even in south maharashtra. it is mainly prepared from a spicy chutney or gojju which is prepared from onions and tomatoes. Continue reading girmit recipe | masala puffed rice | north karnataka mandakki upkari at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap

August 22 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Vegetable Cheela Rolls Vegetable Cheela Rolls is a healthy and delicious any-time meal. Cheela Rolls is a treat for people who are vegan and gluten free. Cheela is like a besan dosa, and can be used as a wrap and this cheela wrap with vegetables makes a wholesome meal. Cheela Rolls can be used as a snack and also for good a lunch box meal. For Cheela - 1 cup besan (Gram flour) - 2 Tbsp rice flour - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3/­­4 cup water (to make batter) - 4 tsp oil For Filling - 3 cup cabbage (thinly sliced) - 1/­­2 cup carrots (shredded) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (thinly sliced) - 2 tsp oil (Canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp sugar - 1 tsp lemon juice - Mix all the dry ingredients together, besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, and salt. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter, consistency of Dosa batter. Set aside. - To make the filling: Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds, as the seeds crack. Add cabbage, carrots, and bell pepper. Stir-fry for about one minutes add all the other ingredients, coriander powder, chili powder, salt, sugar and lemon juice. Stir- fry for about three to four minutes, vegetables should be still crisp. Turn off the heat. - To make the Cheele: Use a heavy skillet and place on medium-high heat. Test by sprinkling a few drops of water on it. Water should sizzle right away. - Pour about 1/­­4 cup of the batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a back of spoon. Starting from the center, spiral the batter outward evenly to form a circle. - When batter starts to dry, gently spread one teaspoon of oil over it. Wait about 30 seconds; flip the cheela using a flat spatula. - Press the cheela lightly all around with the spatula to make cheela cook evenly. Turn the cheela and in the center of the cheele put about 1/­­2 cup of stir-fry diagonally and roll it. - Vegetable Cheela Roll is ready to serve. I like to serve this with Mango Pickle or Cilantro Chutney. - Enjoy! In the ingredients, we need about 4 cups total of sliced vegetable (this includes the cabbage, bell pepper, and carrots) Suggestions Use or preferred vegetables and also works good with any leftover vegetables. The post Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

15 Creamy & Dreamy Rice Pudding Recipes

August 3 2017 Oh My Veggies 

With a creamy base, soft rice grains, and just enough sweetness, rice pudding is the ultimate dessert comfort food. Here are 15 of our favorite recipes.

Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine)

August 1 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gatte Ki Sabji Gatte Ki Sabji is a traditional dish from Rajasthan. These steamed gram-flour dumplings are cooked in a spicy gravy. This mouth-watering dish will complement any meal. Enjoy Gatte Ki sabji with roti or plain rice. The recipe is also vegan and gluten free. For Gatte - 2 cups besan (gram flour) - 4 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp red chili powder (adjust to taste) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing, asafetida is gluten free spice, but asafetida powder contains some wheat flour, gluten free asafetida, is available on amazon.) For Gravy - 3 Tbsp oil - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 2 bay leaves (tejpat) - 2 dry red chilies -  1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tablespoon coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp Kasuri Methi - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - Mix all the ingredients for gatte together and make a stiff dough, using water as needed. You will need about 1/­­3 cup of water. Knead the dough well, let it rest for 10 minutes. Divide the dough into 8 parts and roll them in calendar about half inch thick. - Bring about 4 cups of water to boil in a pan on medium high heat. Gently drop the Gatte logs in boiling water. After it comes to boil, cover the pan and reduce the heat to medium low, and cook them cover for about 12-15 minutes gate should be floating on the top and will have bubbles all around. - Take them out from water and save the water, this will be used for making gravy. let them cool for few minutes and cut them in about half inch-thick slices. - Heat the oil in heavy bottom pan over medium heat, add fennel seeds, asafetida, red chilies stir and add Gattes, stir-fry for about 4-5 minutes until they are light golden brown. - Add bay leaves, chili powder, turmeric, coriander powder, and salt, stir-fry for about 2 minutes. - Add the water we saved, and Kasuri Methi boil for about 10 minutes over low medium heat, covered. This is the time add more water to adjust the thickness of the gravy. As Gatte Ki Sabji will cool off it gravy will become thick. - Turn off the heat and add mango powder, and garam masala, Gatte Ki Sabji is ready to serve. The post Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

bhindi rava fry recipe | crispy okra rava fry | ladies finger fry recipe

July 24 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

bhindi rava fry recipe | crispy okra rava fry | ladies finger fry recipebhindi rava fry recipe | cripsy okra rava fry | ladies finger fry recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. essentially, bhindi rava fry is vegetarian option to the most popular rava fish fry from the south canara or udupis coastal cuisine. these okras are coated with the semolina and ground spices which is later shallow fried till crisp. it is an ideal side dish when served rasam + rice or sambar + rice combination. Continue reading bhindi rava fry recipe | crispy okra rava fry | ladies finger fry recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

soya manchurian recipe | soya chunks manchurian | dry soya manchuri

July 22 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

soya manchurian recipe | soya chunks manchurian | dry soya manchurisoya manchurian recipe | soya chunks manchurian | dry soya manchuri with step by step photo and video recipe. similar to any other manchurian recipe, even soya has 2 variants - dry and gravy version. this recipe is dry version without gravy and is mainly prepared as party starters or even as appetiser. however this soya manchurian dry recipe is popularly served as side dish to fried rice or noodles recipe. Continue reading soya manchurian recipe | soya chunks manchurian | dry soya manchuri at Hebbar's Kitchen.

akki roti recipe with cooked rice | rice roti with left over rice | akki rotti

July 20 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

akki roti recipe with cooked rice | rice roti with left over rice | akki rottiakki roti recipe with cooked rice | rice roti with left over rice | akki rotti with step by step photo and video recipe. an authentic and traditional delicacy from karnataka cuisine or kannda cuisine which is mainly prepared for breakfast. commonly it is prepared with fine rice flour stirred with boiling water and which is then rolled to thin flat bread. however this is a shortcut way of preparing the same recipe with left over rice and rice flour combination. Continue reading akki roti recipe with cooked rice | rice roti with left over rice | akki rotti at Hebbar's Kitchen.


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