rhubarb - vegetarian recipes

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rhubarb vegetarian recipes

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your Table

July 10 2017 Meatless Monday 

Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your TableKim ODonnel, the very first Meatless Monday blogger, discovered the wealth of vegetables and other produce in the Pacific Northwest region and compiled a new cookbook chock full of vegetarian recipes. As the author of two previously published vegetarian cookbooks, Kim ODonnel became curious about the bounty in her own backyard, the Pacific Northwest. After some digging and searching, ODonnel found more vegetables available than she had bargained for and knew she had to take advantage of her local harvest for her new book. While not a strict vegetarian herself, she was excited to find that it wasnt just easy to eat vegetarian in the land of the geoduck and the Dungeness crab, it was extraordinary. In PNW Veg: 100 Vegetable Recipes Inspired by the Local Bounty of the Pacific Northwest, ODonnel offers up small plates, entrees, and desserts with produce from the Pacific Northwest in starring roles. Photo by Charity Burggraaf ODonnel, a longtime supporter of Meatless Monday, knew that the PNW was mostly well-known for its wild seafood offerings. But when she moved to Seattle and started visiting the local farmers markets, a cornucopia awaited her - several varieties of legumes, fiddlehead ferns, and rhubarb, plus classic late-summer and fall produce that would last through November. Fortunately for the rest of the country, many of these vegetables are available in other regions, so PNW Veg doesnt have to be PNW-exclusive. In a recent interview with The Washington Post, ODonnel says: I learned that what I think is the most esoteric or hard-to-get ingredient in the book actually does appear in other parts of the country. Is everybody going to be able to get their hands on nettles or fiddlehead ferns? No, Im aware of that. But eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, radishes -- sure. I feel like the large majority of the recipes are going to appeal to folks in different parts of the country. Using a few kitchen pantry staples and herbs, the flavor of the Pacific Northwest can easily make its way into your Meatless Monday menu! With over 100 recipes to choose from, your only challenge is settling on one! Start with ODonnels Cherry Tomato Cobbler. The post Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your Table appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches + Video

May 20 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches + Video Luise asked me to write something short and quick today. And to stick to the subject (which I assume is ice cream). That was 12 hours ago. To be fair, I’ve also been carrying a baby (with a new name) and a feverish Isac for a huge chunk of those hours. Excuses aside, I’m not good at quick. I’m not slow. But I’m definitely not quick. I like to let things take time. Explore all possibilities. Thorough. I’m thorough. Not slow. Well maybe a little bit slow. In a good way. Except when facing meaningless everyday decisions (like picking clothes for the kids), then I’m slow in a bad way. I’m apparently not good at sticking to subjects either. Ice cream, here we go. Making homemade ice cream sandwiches is a fun little weekend project. It doesn’t take too much active time but they do need a couple of hours to firm up in the freezer. Unlike normal sandwich bars, ours are made with raw wafers and a rhubarb swirled no-churn ice cream. The raw wafer is simple to make and the rich chocolate hazelnut flavor balances the tanginess from the rhubarb nicely. We are showing how to get the wafer thin and perfectly sized in the video further down. We have tried two different versions of the ice cream and are sharing both here. One is made with mascarpone and quark cheese (so it’s technically a frozen cheesecake) and is super simple and delicious. The other version is vegan and made with coconut milk and soaked cashew nuts. You can use an ice cream maker to get it even creamier but we simply skipped that extra step this time. Unless you’re an ice cream purist, you’ll see that the no-churning method works well for a sandwich bar,  just let them soften a few minutes before digging in. They are super tasty and a real treat to have ready in the freezer. We’ve cut them pretty big here but you could cut them in squares instead and end up with twice as many. You can of course use the wafer recipe with any type of ice cream in between, just make sure the bottom wafer layer is slightly frozen before filling up with ice cream. We fantasized about also dipping these in dark, melted chocolate but decided that we had to draw the line somewhere. But I’m throwing it out there in case anyone is up for it ... We created this little youtube video for a more visual demonstration on how we make these. It takes a little extra time to make these videos but it’s lots of fun and we feel that they really help understanding the cooking process. Please leave a comment letting us know if you like us to continue making more videos. Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Makes 10 Note: We use the Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam on everything from sandwiches to breakfast yogurt and porridge. So make a double batch while you are at it. The sweetness depends on the quality of the fruit so taste and adjust accordingly. Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam 2 cups /­­ 200 g rhubarb, washed and trimmed 1 cup /­­ 150 g strawberries, washed and trimmed 3 tbsp maple syrup 1 tsp freshly grated ginger a pinch vanilla powder Raw Hazelnut Wafer 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g hazelnuts 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g rolled oats or oat flour 3 tbsp cacao powder a pinch sea salt 3 tbsp coconut oil 16 soft dates (7 oz /­­ 200 g), pitted Rhubarb Ice Cream (scroll down for vegan version) 1 cup /­­ 250 g quark cheese (or strained greek yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 250 g mascarpone (or more quark cheese) 2-3 tbsp maple syrup 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Start by making the jam. Slice rhubarb and strawberries thinly and add them to a sauce pan together with the rest of the jam ingredients. Cook on low heat for approx. 20 minutes until soft. Use a hand blender to mix it if you prefer it smooth, or leave it chunky. Let cool entirely. Meanwhile, prepare the raw hazelnut wafer. Add hazelnuts, rolled oats, cacao powder and salt to a food processor and mix thoroughly until the texture resembles sand. Pour into a separate bowl. Add dates and coconut oil to the food processor and mix into a paste. Pour the mixed nuts back and pulse everything until it’s combined into a dough. Roll it into a log and divide into two equal halves. Use a pen to copy the exact size of the baking dish onto a baking paper, then roll out one of the wafer dough halves on the baking sheet until it has the right shape, use a second baking sheet on top to prevent the rolling pin from sticking. Transfer the baking paper with the wafer to the baking dish and place in the freezer while preparing the ice cream (or vegan version further down). Combine quark cheese, mascarpone and 2-3 tbsp maple syrup (depending on how sweet you prefer it) in a mixing bowl. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam. Stir until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Roll out the second half of the wafer dough using the same method as the first. Use a fork to make hole patterns and then turn it upside-down on to a second baking sheet. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and carefully transfer the wafer on top of the ice cream. Put it back in the freezer for 3-4 hours until completely firm. Then take it out, cut into 10 rectangles or 20 squares using a sharp knife dipped in hot water, wrap with baking paper and store in the freezer. *** Vegan Rhubarb Ice Cream  1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g cashew nuts (pre-soaked for 4-6 hours) 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 ml can coconut milk 4 tbsp maple syrup juice of 1 lemon 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Drain the soaked cashew nuts and add them to a high-speed blender together with maple syrup and lemon juice. Mix on high speed until smooth. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam and pulse until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Follow the remaining instructions in the main recipe. Here’s another rhubarb treat I did the other day. I didn’t follow an exact recipe but I kind of based it on this recipe from our archive and replaced the grated apple with lots of rhubarb jam and the apple slices on top with rhubarb and strawberry bits. Skip the cinnamon on top and just add a little cardamom to the batter, in case you feel like trying it.

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches

May 20 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Luise asked me to write something short and quick today. And to stick to the subject. She never specified which subject I should stick to but I’m guessing it’s ice cream. That was 12 hours ago. To be fair, I’ve also been carrying around on a baby (with a new name) and a feverish Isac for a huge chunk of those hours. Excuses aside, I’m not good at quick. I’m not slow. But I’m definitely not quick. I like to let things take time. Reading everything through. Testing it one more time. Seeing if there are other possibilities that I haven’t considered yet. Thorough. I’m thorough. Not slow. Well maybe a little bit slow. But in a good way. Except when facing meaningless everyday decisions (like picking clothes for the kids), then I’m slow in a bad way. I’m apparently not good at sticking to subjects either. Ice cream, here we go. Making homemade ice cream sandwiches is a fun little weekend project. It doesn’t take too much active time but they do need a couple of hours to firm up in the freezer. Unlike normal sandwich bars, ours are made with raw wafers and a rhubarb swirled no-churn ice cream. The raw wafer is simple to make and the rich chocolate hazelnut flavor balances the tanginess from the rhubarb nicely. We are showing how to get the wafer thin and even in the video further down. We have tried two different versions of the ice cream and are sharing both here. One is made with mascarpone and quark cheese (so it’s technically a frozen cheesecake) and is super simple and delicious. The other version is vegan and made with coconut milk and soaked cashew nuts. You can use an ice cream maker to get it perfectly creamy but we simply skipped that extra step. Unless you’re an ice cream purist, you’ll see that the no-churning method works perfectly for a sandwich bar,  just let them soften a few minutes before digging in. They are super tasty and a real treat to have ready in the freezer. We’ve cut them pretty big here but you could cut them in squares instead and end up with twice as many. You can of course use the wafer recipe with any type of ice cream in between, just make sure the bottom wafer layer is slightly frozen before filling up with ice cream. We fantasized about also dipping these in dark, melted chocolate but decided that we had to draw the line somewhere. But I’m throwing it out there in case anyone is up for it ... We created this little youtube video for a more visual demonstration on how we make these. It takes a little extra time to make these videos but it’s lots of fun and we feel that they really help understanding the cooking process. Please leave a comment letting us know if you like us to continue making more videos. Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Makes 10 Note: We use the Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam on everything from sandwiches to breakfast yogurt and porridge. So make a double batch while you are at it. The sweetness depends on the quality of the fruit so taste and adjust accordingly. Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam 2 cups /­­ 200 g rhubarb, washed and trimmed 1 cup /­­ 150 g strawberries, washed and trimmed 3 tbsp maple syrup 1 tsp freshly grated ginger a pinch vanilla powder Raw Hazelnut Wafer 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g hazelnuts 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g rolled oats or oat flour 3 tbsp cacao powder a pinch sea salt 3 tbsp coconut oil 16 soft dates (7 oz /­­ 200 g), pitted Rhubarb Ice Cream (scroll down for vegan version) 1 cup /­­ 250 g quark cheese (or strained greek yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 250 g mascarpone (or more quark cheese) 2-3 tbsp maple syrup 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Start by making the jam. Slice rhubarb and strawberries thinly and add them to a sauce pan together with the rest of the jam ingredients. Cook on low heat for approx. 20 minutes until soft. Use a hand blender to mix it if you prefer it smooth, or leave it chunky. Let cool entirely. Meanwhile, prepare the raw hazelnut wafer. Add hazelnuts, rolled oats, cacao powder and salt to a food processor and mix thoroughly until the texture resembles sand. Pour into a separate bowl. Add dates and coconut oil to the food processor and mix into a paste. Pour the mixed nuts back and pulse everything until it’s combined into a dough. Roll it into a log and divide into two equal halves. Use a pen to copy the exact size of the baking dish onto a baking paper, then roll out one of the wafer dough halves on the baking sheet until it has the right shape, use a second baking sheet on top to prevent the rolling pin from sticking. Transfer the baking paper with the wafer to the baking dish and place in the freezer while preparing the ice cream (or vegan version further down). Combine quark cheese, mascarpone and 2-3 tbsp maple syrup (depending on how sweet you prefer it) in a mixing bowl. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam. Stir until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Roll out the second half of the wafer dough using the same method as the first. Use a fork to make hole patterns and then turn it upside-down on to a second baking sheet. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and carefully transfer the wafer on top of the ice cream. Put it back in the freezer for 3-4 hours until completely firm. Then take it out, cut into 10 rectangles or 20 squares using a sharp knife dipped in hot water, wrap with baking paper and store in the freezer. *** Vegan Rhubarb Ice Cream  1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g cashew nuts (pre-soaked for 4-6 hours) 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 ml can coconut milk 4 tbsp maple syrup juice of 1 lemon 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Drain the soaked cashew nuts and add them to a high-speed blender together with maple syrup and lemon juice. Mix on high speed until smooth. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam and pulse until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Follow the remaining instructions in the main recipe. Here’s another rhubarb treat I did the other day. I didn’t follow an exact recipe but I kind of based it on this recipe from our archive and replaced the grated apple with lots of rhubarb jam and the apple slices on top with rhubarb and strawberry bits. Skip the cinnamon on top and just add a little cardamom to the batter, in case you feel like trying it.

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve

April 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve Have you ever heard of the quick soft serve ice cream technique, where you freeze coconut milk in ice cube trays and then blend the cubes with fruit, sweetener, etc. into into a perfectly spoonable frozen treat? It’s been on my radar for a while, but I have an ice cream maker, which I’m very faithful to, so I’ve been slow to warm up to the idea. I finally gave the whole thing a shot recently, and now I see what the big deal is about. This is entirely different from the typical ice-cream making experience. When I set out to make ice cream, I know that it will be a process, and I’m quite fond of the little bit of fuss that it takes. This soft serve is its own thing – delightfully quick and easy and with little fuss to speak of, especially if you already have the coconut ice cubes ready to go. The rhubarb component is a breeze to put together as well. You just stew the rhubarb with maple syrup until jammy, spread it out onto some parchment paper in a thin layer, and let it freeze before blending it with the frozen coconut milk. All the freezing can be done the night before or in the morning/­­afternoon to have it ready for dessert time in the evening. It’s all perfectly lazy :) There’s so much you can do as far as the flavorings go with this sort of technique, but this particular combination is so so lovely. The slight sourness of the rhubarb is softened by the fattiness of the coconut milk, and the kiss of maple syrup rounds everything out into a mind-blowing treat. And the color! Visual color therapy right there. There are some great links below, have a nice Sunday! Leo Babauta (of Zen Habits) on the Rich Roll Podcast 43 Self-Care Practices for the Highly Sensitive Person – we both happen to be highly sensitive people, so Renee’s post really resonated with us. So many great tips there. The Other Mr. President (This American Life) – what it’s really like to live in Putin’s Russia. While I feel like Russians are constantly misrepresented in the American media, this was a refreshingly multifaceted view at the complexity of our home country. #Vanlife – ‘what began as an attempt at a simpler life quickly became a life-style brand’ Seeded Gluten Free Sourdough Bread – thinking about resurrecting my sourdough baking habit, can’t wait to try out this gluten-free recipe. Green Kitchen at Home – excited for this book, loved the book trailer too. Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons maple syrup, divided about 3 cups chopped rhubarb (1 pieces) splash of vanilla extract poppy seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions In a blender, combine the coconut milk with 2 tablespoons maple syrup. Pour the coconut milk into an ice cube tray and freeze for a few hours or overnight. In a medium saucepan, combine the rhubarb with ¼ cup maple syrup and a splash of vanilla extract. Bring to a boil over medium hight heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 7-10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft and jammy. Spread the stewed rhubarb on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a thin layer and place in the freezer for a few hours or overnight, until completely frozen. Put the coconut ice cubes in the blender and blend on high until just broken down. Remove the frozen rhubarb from the freezer, peel away the baking sheet and break the rhubarb into manageable pieces, then put in the blender with the coconut milk. Blend everything on high to achieve a soft serve consistency. You might have to stop and scrape the walls of the blender periodically, or if you have a Vitamix, the tamper is really helpful here. Enjoy right away, garnished with poppy seeds, if using. If you have leftovers, they will freeze into a solid block in the freezer because this ice cream hasnt been properly aerated. My suggestion is to freeze the leftovers in an ice cube tray and re-blend into soft serve once ready to eat again. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Beet Tahini Snack Bars Barley Tomato Salad Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Santana Apple Cake

September 26 2016 seitan is my motor 

Every year during spring and summer I put myself on an apple fast. I don’t eat them anymore because all of a sudden I think they are the most boring fruit in the whole world. In spring there’s rhubarb that suddenly seems so much more interesting. And then summer starts and brings fantastic berries andRead more The post Santana Apple Cake appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday

May 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday Florida is on its own schedule when it comes to growing seasons, and we usually have our local strawberries in March. This year’s strawberry crop was especially abundant, a field of ruby-red like I’ve never seen it before. We went strawberry picking at the nearby organic farm and ended up gathering way more of the sun-ripened beauties than we initially planned. We took home enough to enjoy fresh for a week and froze the rest. Soon after, Roost Books sent me Emma’s beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme – Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen, and all stars aligned for me to make her Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet. I waited a bit to share this until strawberry season kicked off in northern climates, and when I saw strawberries being sold at the Union Square Greenmarket while visiting NYC last weekend, I knew it was finally time. Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. One of the things I adore about Emma’s cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, it’s a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. It’s also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries – a real show stopper. As the heat approaches, My Darling Lemon Thyme offers a nice collection of easy frozen desserts, like Watermelon, Rose and Mint Icepops, No Churn Banana Berry Ice Cream and dreamy Chocolate Cream Pops. The breakfast chapter includes such gems as Tahini, Orange and Coconut Toasted Muesli, creamy porridges, crepes and pancakes. When I turned the page to the Raspberry, Dark Chocolate and Pistachio Brownies, I knew I had to make them right away and have several times since then – they came out perfect every time. The savory dishes in the book are just as exciting, ranging from flavorful salads and soups to big dinner plates, all influenced by various cuisines and utilizing the most beautiful array of vegetables, grains, legumes, spices and herbs. The whole book is gluten-free and I was especially excited to receive it and study the thorough and detailed instructions for the Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter that is used in the Brown Rice, Millet and Chia Sourdough Bread. The recipe for the Gluten-Free Pizza Crust is also at the top of my list of things to try. My Darling Lemon Thyme is Emma’s debut cookbook, and although the U.S. edition came out a few months ago, Emma already released her second cookbook, A Year in My Whole Food Kitchen, in Australia and New Zealand. It looks nothing short of amazing and I can’t wait for it to be published in our side of the world. Below, some links for the long weekend. Michael Pollan interviewed on the Here’s the Thing Podcast Rene Redzepi is the chef/­­co owner of Noma and his Instagram is full culinary wonders – veggies preserved in beeswax for 5 months, pickling wild roses, crazy peas, or how about stale pumpkin flowers that didn’t come out tasting so good :) Nettle, Raspberry Leaf and Goji Beauty Tonic – I’ve been making this for a few months now and I swear I’ve noticed my nails get stronger in the process. Transcendental/­­Vedic Meditation has been on my mind a lot lately and I enjoyed this interview on the subject between Bob Roth and Jerry Seinfeld. Who would have ever guessed Seinfeld has been meditating since the 70s? States of Undress – a very typically Vice show about global fashion intertwined with cultural and political issues, hosted by girl crush Hailey Benton Gates. GKS Smoothies Cookbook – so excited for this! Blog Love – Shelly’s Chive Blossom Vinegar, Laura’s White Lentil Spring Onion Sauce, Sophie’s Pistachio Ice Cream, Jodi’s Rhubarb Panna Cotta, and this Mango Tahini Sauce! Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet   Print Serves: 8 Ingredients 2 lb/­­1 kg strawberries - hulled and sliced ¾ cup/­­200 g unrefined raw sugar (1 cup in original recipe) 1 cup loosely packed Thai basil leaves - roughly torn ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice Instructions Combine strawberries and sugar in a large bowl and set aside for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally until syrupy. Drain syrup from the berries into a small saucepan, add basil and bring to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, remove from heat and let infuse while cooling down to a room temperature. Puree strawberries in a blender until smooth and strain through a fine sieve. Discard the seeds. Strain basil syrup over the strawberry puree, squeezing basil leaves with your hands to get the most flavor out of them. Add lemon juice, stir to combine and chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours - I prefer overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20-25 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Transfer to a container and freeze for another 2 hours. Notes If you dont have an ice cream machine, pour the mixture into a shallow, freezer-proof container, freeze for 1 hour until the edges are starting to freeze, and then beat with a whisk to break down ice crystals, until smooth. Return to the freezer and repeat this 2-3 times before leaving to freeze for 2 hours. Or make popsicles - pour the final mixture into a popsicle mold and freeze. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Spiced Apple and Blackberry Kuchen Ice Cream Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summer Aubergine Rolls

May 24 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Aubergine Rolls Hi friends, today we are sharing a dinner recipe that we prepared over the weekend. Some of you might recognize these aubergine rolls as they are a summery version of our Involtini di Melanzane recipe. It has always been one of our favorites and there is also a winter version of it in our Green Kitchen Travels cookbook. This one has a brighter and tangier filling than the original and is baked without the tomato sauce. The filling is made with a mix of asparagus, rhubarb, pesto, pistachios, feta cheese, raisins and cooked quinoa. It is a really delicious filling that could also be served on its own (but it looks so much more impressive tucked inside the aubergine rolls). We served the rolls with a green salad drizzled with a little yogurt dressing. It was totally delicious and would be quite an impressive dish to do if you have friends coming over for dinner. I know we always say this, but do save some time (and effort) and let everybody get involved and help roll. Cooking and eating is so much more fun when the experience is shared. We also have some news about upcoming events. - First of all, we are going to Lisbon this coming Sunday (29 May) to promote the Portuguese edition of our first book. We will be doing some interviews and a talk and book signing in the Praça Leya at the Lisbon book fair. The talk is at 7 pm. Wed love to meet some of our Portuguese readers there, so please come by and chat with us! - We also wanted to share some more dates for our exciting launch of Green Kitchen Smoothies in London. We will be doing a supper club and Q&A with Mae Deli x Deliciously Ella on Tuesday 7th June and tickets can be booked here (only a few left!). We will also be talking at the Good Roots Festival on Saturday 11th June but unfortunately that is already sold out. There will be one or two more opportunities to get your books signed and have a chat and we will announce those as soon as we have more info. Summer Aubergine Rolls stuffed with Quinoa, Rhubarb & Asparagus 2 large aubergines, thinly sliced (approx. 24 slices in total) olive oil, to brush sea salt 2 rhubarb stalks, thinly sliced 10 asparagus spears, thinly sliced 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100 g uncooked quinoa or 2 cups cooked quinoa (any color) 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 1 large pinch sea salt 1 cup pesto dressing (see end note) 50 g shelled unsalted pistachio nuts, coarsely chopped 150 g feta cheese, crumbled 1 handful raisins Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Arrange the aubergine slices (not overlapping) on two baking trays lined with baking paper. Use a pastry brush to brush each slice with a thin layer of olive oil on both sides. Sprinkle with sea salt and bake in the oven for 13-15 minutes or until very soft and golden. Thinly slice the rhubarb and asparagus and spread out on another baking tray lined with baking paper, drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Place in the oven and bake for 5-8-minutes, or until soft and juicy. Meanwhile cook the quinoa. Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 15 minutes, set aside. When slightly cooled, stir through 3/­­4 of the pesto dressing, 3/­­4 of the chopped pistachios nuts, 1/­­2 of the feta cheese and raisins. Then carefully fold in the baked rhubarb and asparagus. Roll the aubergine: Place the grilled aubergine, one by one, in front of you. Add a large spoonful of the quinoa mixture at the bottom of it and roll up lengthwise away from you. Place the rolls on a baking tray with baking paper. Scatter over the remaining feta cheese, a drizzle of the pesto dressing and sprinkle with the chopped pistachio nuts. Bake for 10 minutes at 200°C/­­400°F. Ready to serve. Serve with a simple green salad of choice and drizzle with yogurt. Enjoy! Note about the pesto dressing: If you make a batch of homemade pesto, simply add more olive oil and lemon juice to make it thinner. Alternatively buy a store-bought pesto and thin it out with more olive oil and lemon juice.

Spring into Meatless Monday at Your Local Farmer’s Market

May 9 2016 Meatless Monday 

Smell the strawberries and taste the sugar snap peas! Spring is prime time to visit your local farmers market. Not only will you support your local growers by buying from them, youll also have access to the freshest and ripest produce available in your region. As well, youll enjoy the opportunity to develop a relationship with your farmers and ask questions like: How did you grow this? Is it organic? How do you cook it best? When all is said and purchased, theres nothing like cooking a delicious meal with fresh fruits and vegetables grown by people you know. Plus, shopping locally cuts down on the long-distance transportation of conventional agriculture, which often leaves toxic by-products in the environment. How to find a market near you to visit? Check out the Eat Well Guide where theyve hand-picked markets, farms and other sources of local sustainable food. Or, plan a destination trip to visit some of the great farmers markets in the U.S., like Union Squares Greenmarket in New York, or Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San Francisco, or  Sweet Auburn Market in Atlanta. If you dont want to fill your suitcase with greens, you can definitely take home regional goodies like homemade honey or preserves. And for sure, there will be lots of samples to nosh on - from homemade breads to artisanal cheeses. Take a Farmer’s Market Tour with Chef Bryce Shuman   While farmers markets are great for getting the best in-season produce, its important to know whats in season in your region. In general, lettuces, greens, turnip, kale and some root vegetables like onions and fennel are signatures of Spring. You’re also likely to feast your eyes on strawberries, okra, rhubarb and asparagus. Check out this guide for what is ripest in your region. And for your next Meatless Monday lunch or dinner, try our Chilled Asparagus Pea Soup - a perfect nod to Springtime at your local farmers market! The post Spring into Meatless Monday at Your Local Farmer’s Market appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rhubarb Rice Pudding Tartelettes

April 13 2016 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb Rice Pudding Tartelettes At first taking a really long break from blogging was a great idea. The pressure was gone. No more long hours trying to find the perfect angle and the perfect light for the perfect photo. The post Rhubarb Rice Pudding Tartelettes appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Save or Splurge: Waffle Irons + 10 Tasty Waffle Recipes

November 11 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Save or Splurge: Waffle Irons + 10 Tasty Waffle RecipesSave You can make waffles right on your stove top with the Nordic Ware Belgian Waffler, an old-school method that gives you more control over crispness. $40.99; target.com Splurge The dual-sided KitchenAid Waffle Maker churns out two airy-and-consistent Belgian waffles at once, with an automatic shutoff to prevent overcooking. $299.95; surlatable.com Waffle Recipes Double Chocolate Waffles Flax and Walnut Waffles with Cranberry-Cherry Marmalade  Classic Belgian Waffles with Fresh Berries Beer Waffles with Cinnamon-Caramel Apples Cornmeal Waffles with Warm Peach Sauce  Rhubarb Waffles with Rhubarb Sauce  Southwestern Savory Waffles Carrot-Raisin Waffles  Brown Rice Waffle  Oatmeal Apple Waffles

Don’t Toss The Greens! 6 Ways to Use Stalks & Stems in Meatless Meals

August 10 2015 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Toss The Greens! 6 Ways to Use Stalks & Stems in Meatless MealsGreens, stems, and stalks often get forgotten, but they have immense nutrition and flavor to offer. With a few exceptions (like rhubarb, whose stems are edible but leaves are toxic), most edible plants can be cooked and eaten from root to stem. The next time you prep veggies for your meatless meal, make sure to keep the greens! Kale and Chard Stalks The first step in prepping most kale and chard recipes is to remove the coarse, thick stems. These stems can be sautéed as a side dish or pickled with a brine of spices and vinegar. Cut your stems lengthwise for spear-style pickles or break them down in a food processor to ferment them kimchi-style. Radish Greens Like most tasty root vegetables, radishes have flavorful leafy greens. These greens can be eaten fresh in a salad or sandwich, and are hearty enough to steam or sauté. The flavorful leaves can also be blended into soups or combined with oil, nuts, hard cheese and garlic for a simple, flavorful pesto! Mushroom Stems While the stems of edible mushrooms arent greens per-say, they can be delicious! Most recipes call for the caps of Crimini or Portobello mushrooms, but the stems can be diced and added to stir-fry, stuffing, omlettes, or duxelles. Tougher Shitake stems can add a lot of flavor to vegetable broths. Beet Greens Beet greens can taste a little bitter when eaten fresh, a quality that makes them ideal for blanching, wilting, and steaming. Light cooking helps break down the toughness and offset their bitterness. Dress wilted greens with a dash of vinaigrette, slivered nuts, or shaved hard cheese for texture and taste. Broccoli Stalks Broccoli stalks are firm and thick with a mild flavor, making them perfect ingredients to add body to your favorite recipes. Peel the woody skin away and the remaining stalk can be grated for a fresh and zesty broccoli slaw, sliced into veggie sticks, or copped up and added to stir-fry blends. Carrot Tops Carrot tops can be slightly bitter and add depth of flavor to dips and spreads. These greens shine when mixed with other fresh ingredients in hummus, pesto, and tabbouleh recipes. Finely mince your carrot greens (or run them through a food processor), add them your favorite dip recipe, and enjoy!   Working with an unusual vegetable greens, stems or stalks? Try these tips: - Put your clean greens, stems, roots, or peels into a freezer bag. When you have several cups of scraps saved up, add them to a pot of boiling water to build a delicious vegetable stock. - Scraps blend well into juices and smoothies. Want to keep that smoothie sweet? Add extra fruit. Adding bitter veggie scraps? Balance it with a little dairy. - Sturdy vegetable peelings can be deep fried and sprinkled with salt for satisfying chips. - When in doubt, toss your unusual food with olive oil and roast until fork-tender. Add salt and pepper to taste and enjoy! The post Don’t Toss The Greens! 6 Ways to Use Stalks & Stems in Meatless Meals appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Simple Rhubarb Crisp

June 14 2015 seitan is my motor 

Simple Rhubarb CrispI am a language nerd. I spent this morning looking up why rhubarb, or rhabarber in German, is written with an h after the r. The latin word for rhubarb is rheum barbarus. Barbarus means foreign. Rheum is derived from the ancient greek rheu, and that’s where the h comes from. It indicates a certain pronunciation of the letter rho at the beginning of a word. Not that interesting? Alright. While I was looking all of this up I found some funny sentences in the book On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee (highly recommended, by the way). On page 317 McGee writes that rhubarb’s “main use in the West is as a tart stand-in for fruit”. On page 367 he adds that rhubarb “often masquerates as fruit”. Both statements sound kind of mean, as if rhubarb stalks would sneak into our kitchens, drag the strawberries out of a pie and take their place only to dupe us. But I guess McGee has a point, because he also explains that rhubarb only became popular in pies and other sweet foods after sugar had become affordable. Since then it has been treated like a fruit and made palatable in desserts with tons of sweetener. But then it’s not the rhubarb that dupes us here. It’s the sugar. (See, sugar is bad.) Last Sunday we were enjoying our last rhubarb stalks, baked into a crisp, which is basically nothing else than a very, very lazy pie. This is a simple and versatile recipe and almost every ingredient could be substituted with something else. I used coconut flour, but oat flour or even whole wheat flour would work. For the almond butter you could use any other nut butter as well. Oh, and if you don’t have rhubarb, use berries or even apples. I used a 22 cm bread pan (9-inch loaf pan) for this recipe, and that makes enough for three people. P complained that the filling wasn’t sweet enough. He’s probably right but it’s no problem to double the amount of sugar mixed with the rhubarb. Print Simple Rhubarb Crisp Ingredients400 g (3 1/­­3 cups) thinly sliced rhubarb 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1/­­4 cup agave nectar or sugar (double for a sweeter version) 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 60 g (1/­­2 cup) old fashioned rolled oats 50 g (1/­­4 cup) brown sugar 30 g (1/­­4 cup) coconut flour (substitute oat or whole wheat flour) 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) oil 2 tablespoons almond butter (any nut butter is fine) 1/­­4 teaspoon salt InstructionsPreheat oven to 200°C (400°F) Place rhubarb, cornstarch, and agave nectar in a 22 cm (9 inch) loaf pan and stir to combine. Combine remaining ingredients and stir well. Sprinkle on top of rhubarb. Bake for 20 minutes or until the rhubarb is soft and the topping crispy. Serve warm or cold. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­simple-rhubarb-crisp/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Simple Rhubarb Crisp is a post from: seitan is my motor

Strawberry Almond Galette

April 29 2017 Veganpassion 

Strawberry Almond Galette I always love to be part of the german television show "Kaffee oder Tee". Showing my vegan creations just makes me happy. The crew is fantastic and I had lots of fun with the anchorman. If you're surrounded by such amazing people the baking becomes accessory. Makes one galette (9,8 inch diameter/­­25cm diameter) for 8 pieces Preparation time: 30 minutes Baking time: 30 minutes Ingredients: 1 2/­­3 cup whole spelt flour 1 tbsp. almonds, grounded 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­4 tsp. baking powder 1/­­4 cup oil 1/­­4 cup + 2 tsp. dairy free drink 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar For the filling: 1 tbsp. almond butter 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla 3 tbsp. dairy free milk 2 stalks of rhubarb 10 oz strawberries 1 tbsp. almond slices In a mixing bowl mix whole spelt flour, almonds, sugar and baking powder. Add oil and vinegar and mix with a spoon. Spread flour on the worktop and knead dough with your hands until it's smooth. Roll out the dough until it reaches a diameter of 11,8 inches. Put the dough on a baking paper. In a small mixing bowl mix almond butter with lemon juice, sugar, vanilla and 3 tbsp. dairy free milk until it's creamy. Spread the cream on the dough and keep a distance of 1,9 inches to the edge. Peel the rhubarb in slices and cut the strawberries in slices.  Arrange the strawberries in a circle and keep a distance of 1,1 inches to the edge. Fold up the edges of the dough over the fruits. Spread some dairy free milk on top of the cake edge and sprinkle almond slices on it. Put the galette with the baking paper on a baking sheet and bake at 356°F (180°C) two sided heat. Bake for 30 minutes and put a wooden spoon between the oven and the door for 10 minutes. This way the excessing water of the fruits can escape. Enjoy warm or cold with some ice cream!

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash

April 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Food magazines and online food publications are all about bright and green spring recipes right now, but I know that a lot of us are still waiting for that first asparagus to pop up, and for rhubarb to show its blush at the stores and markets. I’m checking in with one more transitional meal today, still cozy and hearty, but very vegetable-forward. There’s a step-by-step video, too :) Have you ever tried braising or roasting whole leeks? It’s a revelatory way of preparing the vegetable, since leeks usually play a secondary role, where they get thinly sliced and pretty much disappear into whatever dish they are in. Cooking leeks whole yields surprisingly delicious results, and brings forward their sweet, mildly oniony flavor. The texture becomes incredibly buttery, and the modest vegetable becomes completely transformed. One thing that makes me nervous about cooking with leeks is throwing away the majestic, green tops, since most recipes only call for the more tender, white parts of the leek. I always save the tops to include in homemade vegetable broth, and I suggest making a quick broth out of the tops and cauliflower stems here (although you can of course use store-bought broth as well). The cauliflower and white bean mash is the perfect, hearty pairing to the braised leeks. It’s smooth and peppery, with a studding of fresh herbs throughout. Both components of the dish keep well and make for great leftovers. I can imagine the mash working well served with roasted carrots or grilled asparagus for another quick meal. Enjoy! Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the braised leeks 5-6 large leeks with long white parts 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee sea salt freshly ground black pepper veggie broth - reserved from boiling green parts of the leeks or store bought for the cauliflower white bean mash 1 cup dried white beans - soaked overnight 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves (optional) one 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee pinch red pepper flakes 1 large yellow onion - chopped 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 small head of cauliflower - cut into florets leek broth from above or any veggie broth freshly ground black pepper handful each parsley and dill - chopped (optional) olive oil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions to braise the leeks Cut the dark green parts off the leeks. Wash the green parts thoroughly and place into a large soup pot together with leftover cauliflower core and stems, cover with water. Bring to a boil over the high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. You can also add any vegetable scraps you have on hand to this broth. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. This step could be done the day before. You can of course skip this step entirely and just use store-bought or pre-cooked vegetable broth. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half vertically and place into the sink or a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak a bit and carefully wash all the dirt from between the layers. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the washed and dried leeks to the pan face down in a single layer. Leave to cook undisturbed until golden on one side. Flip, add salt and pepper and let the other side caramelize. Add leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the leeks partially. Establish a strong simmer, cover the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the leeks are tender throughout. Add more broth if too much evaporates. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Serve the leeks on top of the cauliflower white bean mash, below. to make the cauliflower white bean mash While the leek broth and leeks are cooking, drain and rinse the beans and add to a large pot. Cover the beans with plenty of water, add garlic, bay leaves and kombu, if using, and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered. Start checking the beans for doneness after 30 minutes and continue to cook until tender, if necessary. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain the beans and set aside. This step can be done the day before. The cooking liquid from the beans can be reserved and used as vegetable broth in other dishes, as well as frozen for up to 2 months. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat, add red pepper flakes, onion and a pinch of salt and cook for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, until fragrant. Add cauliflower, a large pinch of salt, black pepper and the leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 7-10 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add more liquid if too much evaporates to ensure that the cauliflower is being steamed. Add in cooked beans at the end, toss to warm them through. Add the cauliflower and beans to a food processor, along with a splash of the leek broth/­­any veggie broth. Process until smooth. Test for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add parsley and dill and pulse to incorporate. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your food processor. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with the braised leeks from above. Notes 1. If you dont have time to cook dried beans, you can use 3 cups already cooked/­­canned white beans in this recipe. 2. Although kombu is optional, its a great thing to throw into the pot when cooking beans, as it helps make beans more digestible, as well as contributes its minerals. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’

December 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’ Yes, calling this drink eggnog is a bit of a stretch, but it does have most of eggnog’s better properties – creamy, spiced, slightly sweet, beautiful in color. Most vegan ‘eggnog’ recipes I see out there involve cashews and/­­or frozen banana and rightly so – those things are excellent for creamy texture. That’s why any time I come up with a creamy drink recipe that doesn’t involve either and still tastes good, I feel especially accomplished. This nog gets its creaminess from frozen persimmon and tahini. It’s rich, but much much lighter than the original and definitely not as lethally filling. There are plenty of wintery spices involved and dates yield the subtle sweetness. Most importantly, this eggnog comes together very quickly, so it can easily be made in between festivities or relaxation sessions this weekend, if you are celebrating or have time off, or at any point during the winter. I’ve always been drawn to ‘strange’ fruit like figs, quince, and persimmons. Persimmon season is one of the main events I look forward to in the winter, and I proceed to eat little else for dessert or breakfast when the fruit becomes widely available. If you’ve never tried persimmons before but would like to, navigating the different types out there can be a bit confusing, so I wanted to clear that up here. Hachiya persimmons are the persimmons you see pictured in this post, they are acorn-shaped and have to be completely ripened before consumption (unripe hachiya can cause an unpleasant, astringent feeling in your mouth). My favorite way to enjoy ripe hachiya persimmons is frozen whole and thawed to a scoopable consistency, then eaten with a spoon like sorbet. The freezing also helps get rid of any remaining astringency. When choosing a ripe hachiya, pick out the softest one that’s still orange (avoid any with large brown spots) – it should feel uncomfortably soft, like there is jello inside the skin, that means that the persimmon is truly ripe. Fuyu is other widely available type of persimmon. Fuyus are flatter in shape and lower maintenance than hachiya, but, in my opinion, also less fun. Fuyus can be eaten at pretty much any time once they are orange – you can eat them when they are hard as an apple or a bit softer and richer in color, but they will never get as soft and jammy as a hachiya. Happy Holidays! Wishing you peace and rest :) Quick Persimmon Eggnog   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 1 small or ½ large frozen hachiya persimmon - defrosted for about 5-10 min, chopped 4 large dates 2 heaping tablespoons tahini few slices of whole nutmeg or ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg, plus more for garnish 5 cardamom pods - shelled 1 teaspoon cinnamon plus more for garnish 1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional) 2-2½ cups water (2 for thicker consistency) honey or maple syrup - to taste, if needed Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth. Distribute between cups, garnish with cinnamon and nutmeg and enjoy. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah at The Vanilla Bean Blog Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rhubarb-Lemon Fizz Vegan Macarons

May 24 2016 Happy Cow veggie blog 

WOW! Don’t these rhubarb-lemon fizz vegan macarons look to die for? Floral Frosting is the genius behind this recipe and has created this easy to follow recipe video to show […] The post Rhubarb-Lemon Fizz Vegan Macarons appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Raspberry Rhubarb Muffins

April 28 2016 Oh My Veggies 

These muffins are bursting with juicy raspberries, tangy rhubarb and crunchy walnuts.

Spring Celebration Salad

March 31 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Celebration Salad There is one thing you have to understand about living in the northern regions of Europe. The darkness during the winter is really, really harsh. Short, cold and grey days with a minimal amount of sunlight. And if you, like me, believe that you were meant to be born in either Italy, Hawaii or India, the darkness feels twice as draining. However on the upside, the Nordics are probably the most sun-appreciating people on this planet. Come the first rays of sunshine and a little bit of warm air and we throw off our clothes and spend hours standing like suricates, gazing at the sun. Well almost anyway. That first day of spring happened earlier this weekend when we visited friends outside the city. We threw together two simple salads in celebration of all the early produce and enjoyed them as a lunch around a table in the garden, with sunshades on! Afterwards we strolled over to the neighbour farm to pet the newly born lambs and calves (Isac was first terrified and then almost impossible to get out of there). It felt like the perfect day and well-worth getting through all those dark months for. Even for an Italian/­­Hawaiian/­­Indian guy like myself. This salad is a version of the one our friends made that day. We have shared a couple of spring salads on this blog throughout the years (asparagus & buckwheat salad - rhubarb & puy lentil salad - egg salad - green bean salad), but what makes this one stand out is the very simple and rich butter vinaigrette that is poured over the cooked new potatoes and steamed asparagus. So delicious. We have added some lentils (you can use ready-cooked if you want to save some time and effort) and sugar peas for extra protein but any type of green beans or string beans could also be delicious. With the lentil addition, this is great as a lunch or light dinner, but it would also be a perfect side salad for a weekend bbq. For our vegan friends, we have also tried this with a few alternative dressings with great results. Either just replace the butter with olive oil. Or try a delicious Dijon dressing by stirring together equal parts Dijon mustard and maple syrup (or honey if you prefer) with a bit of lemon juice and a good glug olive oil. Asparagus & Potato Salad with Butter Vinaigrette Serves 4 The butter dressing makes this salad ideal served straight away, when the vegetables are still slightly warm. 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 800 g new potatoes 2 bunches (1 lb /­­ 500 g) asparagus 1 cup /­­ 100 g sugar peas 1 cup /­­ 175 g cooked whole lentils, rinsed (we used green/­­brown but any color is fine) 1 small handful chives 5 radishes, very thinly sliced Butter vinaigrette 2 oz /­­ 60 g organic butter or ghee (use olive oil for a vegan option and skip the heating part) 2 tbsp organic unfiltered apple cider vinegar 1 spring onion, very finely chopped salt & black pepper Rinse and scrub the potatoes and place them whole in a large saucepan, cover with water and add sea salt. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and let simmer until tender, about 10-15 minutes. Rinse and trim the asparagus by snapping off the dry ends. Place the asparagus in a steaming basket (or use a sieve with a lid) and cover. Remove the lid from the saucepan with the boiling potatoes and place the basket on top, the steam from the boiling potato water is used to steam the asparagus. Steam until the asparagus are tender, 5-10 minutes depending on their thickness. Finely slice the sugar peas and radishes and rinse the cooked lentils. Melt the butter on low heat for the vinaigrette. Finely chop the spring onion and add to the melted butter and stir in apple cider vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Place all salad ingredients in a bowl. Right before serving, add the butter vinaigrette and use your hands to toss until everything is coated in the vinaigrette. Serve immediately.

Does Arsenic in Rice Make it Totally Off Limits?

October 21 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Does Arsenic in Rice Make it Totally Off Limits?     Headlines screaming poisonous rice might have you ixnaying the widely eaten grain from your meals, but it can still be a beneficial part of your dietary repertoire. Arsenic is found naturally in the environment, but it can also enter the air, water, and soil from mining and arsenic-containing pesticides. Plants take up arsenic as they grow, and eventually it works its way into your grocery cart. Long-term exposure to high levels of arsenic has been correlated with greater risk of cancer and heart disease. For most people, food is the primary source of arsenic exposure. Rice seems especially efficient at absorbing arsenic from water and soil, and leaving the bran intact, as with brown rice, increases the grains arsenic content. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation linked higher intakes of rice and rice products, such as rice cakes and rice milk, with increased urinary arsenic levels. Still, there is no federal limit for arsenic in rice, and without hard evidence associating rice intake with poor health, the FDA has yet to recommend that Americans change their consumption habits. In fact, a study involving more than 200,000 people published this year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition failed to find an increased risk for heart disease in those consuming up to five servings of white or brown rice weekly. Additionally, Harvard researchers determined that eating brown rice twice a week can help protect against type 2 diabetes. The benefits of consuming whole-grain rice, such as increased intakes of minerals and fiber, could outweigh the risks of arsenic exposure. Opt for brown basmati rices from California, India, or Pakistan, which a Consumer Reports investigation found have lower arsenic levels than other brown rices. And rinsing rice before cooking and boiling it in a larger volume of water--6 cups water to 1 cup rice--can help slash arsenic levels. Because babies, infants, and toddlers can be more susceptible to arsenic, parents are advised to limit their childrens consumption of rice drinks and also to frequently offer alternatives to rice cereal. Good Grains Rotate these nutrient-packed (and gluten-free!) grains with rice to further limit your potential arsenic exposure. Buckwheat Toast the hulled, crushed kernels of this rhubarb relative in a skillet until golden, and then sprinkle over salads for some nutritious crunch. Check out our Buckwheat recipes. Amaranth These tiny grains cook up into a gelatinous consistency, perfect to try as a porridge. Check out our Amaranth recipes. Millet This type of cereal grass adds a toothsome, nutty flavor to soups and veggie burgers. Check out our Millet recipes. THE REALITY Just how much arsenic-containing rice youd have to eat for it to negatively affect your long-term health remains unknown. The FDA is in the midst of conducting a risk assessment to try to answer that question. Until those numbers are in, theres no compelling reason to banish rice from your diet. But do vary the grains you consume in order to keep your arsenic intake in check. Investigative Nutritionist Canada-based Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos

June 28 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Paloma and I made it to my hometown in the Southwest of Russia, where we are thoroughly enjoying our stay at grandma’s house. Because I don’t get to visit here very often, my days are completely packed with family, friends, daily trips to the market, nature walks, and all sorts of leftover business. This time, we added a kitchen renovation to the mix, along with piano and swimming lessons for Paloma. The days fly by, and I’m always caught by surprise when the night falls and it’s time for bed. As usual, we’re indulging in my mom’s home cooked delicacies and consume the local berry harvest by the kilo. The most abundant crops right now, which we have no access to in Florida, are sour cherries, black, red and white currants, wild strawberries and mulberries. We walk around with berry-stained hands and wouldn’t have it any other way. I prepared this recipe in Florida, right before we left, where a very hot summer was in full swing, making me want to stay away from the oven as much as possible. I craved crunchy raw vegetables like kohlrabi and jicama, along with chilled watermelon and ripe mango, which often replaced my lunch. I came up with this easy salad – a combination of jicama, mango, avocado and grilled corn with loads of cilantro and lime juice. It’s a quick and refreshing dish on its own and even more filling and delicious when served in a taco shell. Lastly, I have a bit of housekeeping to discuss. If you haven’t signed up for our newsletter, you can do so here. We recently changed the format to a better looking one, and along with recipe updates, the newsletters will include seasonal ingredient highlights and any other Golubka Kitchen related news. And for the French readers, the translation for the Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah Kieffer’s guest post is up here. Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos serves 4-6 2 ears of corn – grilled 1 medium jicama – sliced into cubes or small matchsticks 2 ripe, sweet mangos – cut into small cubes ground chipotle – to taste (optional) 1-2 limes 1 bunch cilantro 1-2 ripe but firm avocados – cubed your favorite taco shells hot sauce of choice Cut kernels off grilled corn ears. Combine corn kernels,  jicama and mango in a large bowl, add chipotle, if using. Squeeze lime juice over. Add cilantro leaves and mix gently. Distrribute the salad between taco shells, top with abocado slices, sprinkle with more lime juice, cilantro leaves and your favorite hot sauce. Serve right away.

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream}

June 9 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} Last year, when my father visited us in Dresden, he brought a box of strawberries from a grocery store around the corner. “Those aren’t good. You should not buy them,” I said. He tasted a berry and replied that they weren’t too bad. “But they are terrible compared to those we can get at home in our village!” I guess ten kilograms of childhood memories came out with that sentence. When we were children my dad would buy fresh strawberries on Sundays. Sometimes we helped him wash and slice them, sometimes he would even let us whip the cream. Nothing was better than those fresh strawberries. We ate them straight from the plant if we got the chance. For example during our bike rides, when we picked some at the edge of a field. Or when we emptied the patches in our neighbour’s garden. All these memories came back when I told my father that the strawberries here in the city weren’t good. He disagreed. He told me that the fruits back home weren’t that much better anymore. He even thought they were worse. I didn’t believe a word of what he said. That simply couldn’t be true. During this years Pentecost vacation F and I made a trip to my parents’ place. My father picked us up from the main station in Bremen. On our car ride to my parents’ village, we drove by several strawberry fields. I got exited and mentioned something about eating them for breakfast every day. My father said I should probably find something else to eat. They had changed the breed a couple of years ago, he elaborated. Those berries weren’t worth the trouble anymore. Yes, they kept well but most of the flavour was gone. Why would he say that? Some weird berry conspiracy theory? Did he not remember how we all loved to eat strawberries together? That he always would pick them up for us? The next day F and I prepared lunch. Suddenly my father stepped into the kitchen with a box of strawberries in his hand. I smiled. I told F that this would make such a wonderful dessert. Then I looked at the strawberries. They looked vary pale. I  asked my father, “Why did you bring these? Were the good ones sold out?” “No,” he replied. “They do all look like that now. I thought that if you tasted them you would finally believe me.” I was still in denial. I gave one to my daughter. “Taste it! The best strawberries you can get.” She tasted and then looked at me disgusted. I said: “But those are good.” It wasn’t true. I didn’t believe what I just said. I think I just wanted to share an important childhood memory with my daughter. But there was nothing to share. I was disappointed and those strawberries were just pale, sour, and watery. Okay, okay. Maybe this is all in my head. Maybe I am turning into one of these “everything was better in the old days” person now. Or maybe it was just the beginning of the season and I need to give those strawberries some more time to grow. There are other childhood memories to share or to improve. Like my relationship with rhubarb. This vegetable/­­fruit was something I mostly ignored when I was a kid. At least when it came to baked goods.  Our neighbours made tons of rhubarb cakes and many grown ups tried to trick me into liking it. They pretended it was great in desserts. They pretended it was sweet. But it wasn’t. There was never enough sugar in those cakes and a kilogram of whipped cream could not change that. Back then I thought those neighours wanted us to give up our sweet tooth. But that wasn’t true. Nobody tricked us. Rhubarb was something we did not appreciate very much.  We spent our afternoons stuffing our face with strawberries instead. Now that those strawberries are disenchanted I can finally appreciate the tartness of rhubarb. It’s now my daughter who refuses to eat it. But you can make very sugary things from rhubarb, too. Sugar can be used as a preservative, for example in jams. Or syrups.They are very simple to make and they can be kept in the fridge for 1 or 2 weeks. I made a batch for my ice cream recipe, but it’s also a base for refreshing lemonade. (Simply dillute it with (sparkling) water.) If you want something tarter, rhubarb compote is a great choice, depending on how much sugar you add. For my ice cream I didn’t use too much sugar, but if you want to pair the compote with oatmeal or grießpudding, you can double the amount of sugar used. Just adjust it to your taste. There are a couple of wonderful methods to make vegan ice cream, but I like to try something new from time to time. I admit it’s definitely not the easiest and fastest method to make ice cream. But I’ll also talk about a couple of  shortcuts in a minute. This version calls for whipped chickpea brine (called aquafaba), which improves the texture a lot and makes the ice cream light and easy to scoop. In fact, even after over a week in the freezer, this batch still had a consistency similar to soft serve. Since we’re  without an ice cream machine rightn now, I used my blender method for this recipe. That is a bit involved, but it will produce similar results to ice cream from a machine. If you thing this all sounds to complicated, I have a couple of ideas for you: You can leave out the aquafaba and make this into a “regular” coconut based ice cream. You can also use an ice cream machine, if you have one. If you wanto to use a machine and include the whipped aquafaba, churn the coconut milk and syrup mixture  and fold in the whipped chickpea liquid once the machine is done. Then proceed to freeze it, add the compote, and freeze until solid. If you don’t have an ice cream machine or a blender, make a simple semifreddo by combining the coconut milk and syrup mixture and the compote. Pour it into a container and freeze it until solid. Instead of scooping it out, you can slice it for serving. Another tip is to split up the workload and prepare both the syrup and the compote a day in advance. Print Rhubarb Ice Cream Ingredientsrhubarb syrup recipe only very slightly adapted from this recipe - For the syrup 500 g (4 cups) sliced rhubarb 240 ml (2 cups) water 250 g (1 1/­­4 cups) sugar juice from 1/­­2 lemon vanilla seeds scraped from 1 bean For the compote 200 g (1 2/­­3 cups) sliced rhubarb 100 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar For the ice cream 1 400 ml can full-fat coconut milk 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil or canola oil 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 240 ml (1 cup) rhubarb syrup (see above) 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) brine from a can of chickpeas 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar a splash of lemon juice 1/­­2 a batch of rhubarb compote (see above) InstructionsTo make the syrup, combine sliced rhubarb and water in a small pot. Bring to a boil and cook until the rhubarb falls apart, about 5-10 minutes. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve and pour back into the (cleaned!) pot. (Discard the rhubarb pulp left in the sieve.) Add sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla. Boil for 10 minutes and make sure the mixture doesnt boil over. Let cool and pour into a sterilized jar. (Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two weeks.) To make the compote, combine rhubarb and sugar in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cook until the rhubarb falls apart. Set aside and let cool completely. To make the ice cream, combine coconut milk, oil, and sugar in a bowl and whisk. Add syrup and whisk again. Transfer to a shallow container such as a brownie pan and place in the freezer. Freeze for 2-3 hours, or until mostly solid. Once the coconut milk mixture is frozen, combine the chickpea brine and the remaining sugar. Whip the mixture with a hand held mixer or in a stand mixer until very stiff. This may take up to 10 minutes. You can add a splash of lemon juice to speed up the process. Cut the frozen coconut milk mixture into smaller pieces and transfer to a high speed blender. Blend until it has the consistency of soft serve. Pour into the chickpea fluff and fold the fluff into the coconut mixture until everything is smooth. Make sure to do this slowly and carefully. You dont want the chickpea foam to collapse too much. Pour into a container and freeze for another 2-3 hours. Fold in the rhubarb compote and freeze until solid. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­vegan-rhubarb-ice-cream/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} is a post from: seitan is my motor


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