restaurant - vegetarian recipes

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Chikki recipe | peanut chikki recipe | groundnut chikki or shengdana chikki










restaurant vegetarian recipes

Crispy Sweet & Sour Tofu

September 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

You can’t go wrong with sweet and sour tofu – it’s a classic crowd pleaser! And Hot For Food serves up a fabulous video tutorial for how making your very own crispy sweet and sour tofu any time you want. Guaranteed to be just as good (if not better) than what you get in the restaurants! It’s quick and easy, and your tastebuds will thank you. Check out how it’s made: Read the full recipe here. The post Crispy Sweet & Sour Tofu appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Restaurant Review: Spirit in Rotterdam, Netherlands

September 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Visiting the Rotterdam Markthal was one of the hotspots on my wish list. And I loved the building, especially the very colorful ceiling. Truly beautiful. To make the experience even better, we had a great vegan/­­vegetarian option nearby; Spirit. Located in the Green Passage of Rotterdam, Spirit serves a fully vegetarian (and mostly vegan, I think about 75-80% is vegan) buffet. The concept reminded me of LEtto in Napoli — you compose your own breakfast, lunch or dinner and pay by weight. There is also the option to do take-away. Somebody called it a ‘vegetarian valhalla served in the form of a high end buffet. And I couldnt agree more. Spirit has a huge buffet with a variety of fifty different breakfast, lunch or dinner dishes, juices and patisserie to choose from. There are beautiful bowls filled with salads, hot dishes, soups, all kind of toppings and dips. And there is also a great selection of sweets, cakes and ice-cream. Every dish is accompanied by a card with all the ingredients and there a little signs that tell if a dish is vegan, gluten-free, contains nuts and so on. For me that is a very relaxing way to eat. You […] The post Restaurant Review: Spirit in Rotterdam, Netherlands appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla

September 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla As a citizen of Rochester, artist and educator Michelle Cardulla is an active part of the Meatless Monday cause in Upstate New York. She provides cooking classes and outings for kids as well as recipes for them to take home to their parents, sometimes teaming up with Super Bowl champ Roland Big Ro Williams. We spoke to Michelle about how her efforts are making a difference in Upstate New York and how she hopes to spread even more awareness of Meatless Monday and make Rochester a Meatless Monday city. Meatless Monday: What made you choose the vegetarian lifestyle? Michelle Cardulla: Well, it was actually because of an ex-boyfriend, embarrassing to say. I didn’t eat a lot of meat, but I’m half Colombian, half Italian so there was always meat around, such as chorizo and foods like that. But I love to cook and he was vegan, so I immediately switched. Then I realized that this is better food and the whole concept about Meatless Monday is that it’s good for you, it’s good for the planet and good for the animals. So it happened instantly, and now I’m just hooked and crazy about it. How do you feel about being a vegetarian in upstate New York? We do have several places that offer vegan food that also have meat. But you find out that chefs really love the chance to make vegetarian and vegan dishes if you go a little early or call ahead and request it. There’s one place that we go to with friends, and we call the chef a day in advance and say, “Just cook us whatever you want.” He loves the challenge. All chefs are kind of into it if you give them a little bit of a heads up and aren’t demanding. You also work a lot with kids. How do kids respond to Meatless Monday, or meatless as a rule? We know that kids don’t like rules, but they will do something that might be cool and different and experimental. Is that how you sell it to them? I try to never treat it like a rule. For example, when Im doing an art project with them, instead of Hold the paper the hamburger way I say “the veggie burger way,” and they laugh. So I make it something fun and they ask, “Veggie burger, what do you mean?” I said, “Well I’m a vegetarian so I hold it the veggie burger way.” It’s a win-win, and it’s always positive. Then the food has to taste great. No ones going to say, “I want steamed broccoli.” It’s got to be good. First it has to taste good, then it’s vegetarian or vegan, not the other way around. Otherwise you’ve lost the kids. And involving them in the cooking is probably really fun, because then it’s not just food, it’s a project. Exactly. I did a cooking class a few years ago and we made burritos, which are very easy to make with meatless crumbles and vegan cheese. Everyone got to make their own. Then I told them that there was no meat and no dairy in their burritos and they were shocked. They were quite young, so they’re learning the words Meatless Monday, vegetarian, vegan at an early age and having a great experience. We have a Kinderfarmin event where we take them on a field trip with a picnic and they get to pet animals. I mean, food, animals - you got them! They’ll never forget that. So you just talked about how easy it is to sell kids on Meatless Monday. What about their parents? You know, I don’t really deal with the parents that much. But I try to send them home with little things like a little recipe. Adults are a little bit tougher than the kids because they’re stuck on what they want. You’ve worked with Roland Big Ro Williams, and I think one of the most effective things in the vegetarian scene is having powerful, successful athletes proudly proclaim their vegetarianism or veganism. Has working with athletes such as Big Ro made a difference in this? He’s a hero! He’s a guy who won the Super Bowl. He gets up there and does his speeches, saying “Miss Michelle’s over there cooking up vegan food and I’m a vegan.” That is worth a million dollars. When celebrities say it, when athletes say it, people want to emulate them. They want to be like them. So the more celebrity and sports people saying that they’re vegan, the better. Especially the people with big muscles showing that they’re vegan! What’s your ideal goal for Meatless Monday in Rochester by the end of 2017? First of all, I’d like to make it a Meatless Monday city. I think we can do that because I think I can talk the mayor into supporting it. I also want to get the restaurants involved and continue my programs with kids. Keep on spreading the word and building awareness of Meatless Monday. I want everybody to know what Meatless Monday is. This interview has been edited and condensed. The post Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Best Vegetarian Restaurants: New York

August 30 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Planning to visit New York? Be sure to take advantage of the abundance of vegan and vegetarian fare! Here are some of the best vegetarian restaurants in New York.

Instant Pot Aloo Gobi – Curried Potato Cauliflower

August 24 2017 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Aloo Gobi – Curried Potato CauliflowerInstant Pot Aloo Gobi – Curried Potato Cauliflower. 1 Pot Aloo Gobhi. Gobi Aloo Masala. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Instant Pot Pressure Cooker or Skillet. Aloo Gobi or Gobi Aloo – Spiced Potato and Cauliflower is a favorite side with Indian meals. A simple Spiced Vegetable stir fry that is often served with Dals or curries. My mom’s version is cooked in a skillet over low medium heat until the cauliflower is just about cooked, often with just toasty whole cumin seeds to add the flavor and bit of ginger and garlic.  This version has a tomato onion sauce and is made in the Instant Pot. It takes roughly the same amount of time as on stove top as the IP takes about 8 to 10 minutes to come to pressure. IP works as you can schedule the cooking for later. Cauliflower tends to cook quickly and over cook under pressure, so be careful with the times. I usually cook the potatoes for a few minutes on saute before adding the cauliflower and bringing it to pressure. The extra time allows for the sauce to thicken slightly as well as for the potatoes to start cooking before the cauliflower. If you add them at the same time, the potatoes can tend to be a bit too al dente. 1-2 minutes under pressure for large cauliflower florets is time enough. For a restaurant style aloo gobi, toast some cumin seeds in olive oil or vegan butter and garnish, a good sprinkle of garam masala as well. Also see skillet instructions in the Recipe notes. My Mom’s Gobi Aloo Matar here which is a dryer side with just spices. Continue reading: Instant Pot Aloo Gobi – Curried Potato CauliflowerThe post Instant Pot Aloo Gobi – Curried Potato Cauliflower appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Blossom – New York

August 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Blossom Restaurant has two locations in New York — one in Chelsea and one on the Upper West Side. We have visited the Chelsea twice! It is just around the corner from the beautiful High Line Park, which is truly a beautiful site! After a walk through the park, where I really really enjoyed all the beautiful flowers (very good job done by Piet Oudolf, the Dutch designer of the garden), we stumbled upon Blossom Restaurant by accident. We recognized the name while driving by in a yellow cab. So we asked the driver to stop and we went in for lunch. Not knowing the size of the portions, we ordered an entree. But after seeing the size of the salad we knew that we had ordered way too much! It was a very nice salad and the main course was even better. I had a wonderful portobello burger which I truly enjoyed. There is an easy going vibe at Blossom Restaurant and the menu is entirely vegan. For cautious carnivores, Blossom Restaurant offers one big surprise: all the eggless pastas and mock meats actually taste pretty good! For those who miss the taste of meat (I am not […] The post Blossom – New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home

August 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home Salad bars are often an appealing option for healthy food fans at restaurants, so why not serve one in your own kitchen? Here’s how to put together a delicious and easy salad bar at home. It’s a fantastic way to put together a last-minute company meal or for building a dinner around fresh raw veggies when you’re too […] The post Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home appeared first on VegKitchen.

kaju masala recipe | kaju curry recipe | cashew nut masala curry

August 3 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

kaju masala recipe | kaju curry recipe | cashew nut masala currykaju masala recipe | kaju curry recipe | cashew masala curry recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. perhaps one of the favorite punjabi cuisine or north indian cuisine creamy curry recipe with all age groups. the combination of crunchy roasted cashew nuts and spicy sauce is just lips smacking. typically it is served with naan or butter roti in restaurants, but it can also be enjoyed with puri, chapathi or even bhatura. Continue reading kaju masala recipe | kaju curry recipe | cashew nut masala curry at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup

July 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Restaurant RoundupThis Monday, were putting the spotlight on five restaurants around the United States that are participating in Meatless Monday! Every week, they offer discounts and vegetarian specials to their customers, giving them delicious meat-free options at their favorite places. The list of restaurants that have joined Meatless Monday continues to grow, and here are five to keep an eye on! 1. Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Multiple Locations: With its focus on local, sustainable cuisine, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar has a plentiful selection of healthy meal choices including several vegetarian choices. For Meatless Monday, CEO Dave Magrogan has one recommendation in particular: “I love the Spicy Tofu Stir Fry. The sweet flavors of the pineapple and coconut jasmine rice combine with spicy flavors, peppers, baby bok choy, snow peas and eggplant to create a great flavor profile. This dish is satisfying and filling without a high calorie count. The tofu gives a nice protein boost. Overall its a very well-rounded vegetarian dish for someone looking for bold flavors and solid protein content.” 2. Tattooed Mom, Philadelphia, PA: This Philly food joint can bring townies of all stripes together for cocktails and sandwiches. On Meatless Monday, the vegetarian sammies get the spotlight: “Our world famous Vegan Pickle Fried Chickn Sammy is a Meatless Monday favorite at Tattooed Mom. Our house brined vegan chicken is topped with fried pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion and crystal hot sauce mayo, all on a brioche bun. You’ll find it here, along with our full line up of 10 vegetarian and vegan delights, on special for half price EVERY Meatless Monday from noon – 10pm.” 3. Burrito San, Miami, FL: Burrito San has become famous for its sushi burrito, making it a great destination for pescatarians and sushi lovers alike. Their Meatless Monday features $10 lunch specials including vegetarian sushi options. Marketing manager Mitzi Napoles has a favorite: “The Buddhas Belly Burrito roll is the perfect Meatless Monday choice. It has a satisfying heft from the portobello mushrooms and a great contrast of flavors and textures. We also have it available as a Salad or Poke option if Giant Sushi rolls are not your thing!” 4. Forage, Cambridge, MA: Forage works with local farmers, foragers, and fisherman to bring sustainable, healthy cuisine to its Cambridge customers. But on Meatless Monday, seasonal veggies get a starring role. From owner and manager Stan Hilbert: “We love our veggies and the farmers that grow them. Meatless Monday is one way for us to support our farmer friends while highlighting seasonal and local produce and offering something different every week. We feature veggies in savory and sweet courses. We have a $39 four-course vegetarian or vegan tasting menu available every day of the week, but on Mondays we throw in another two courses for the same price!” 5. BeWiched, Minneapolis, MN: A believer in old-world culinary traditions, BeWiched certainly doesnt shy away from meat on their menu of deli sandwiches. However on Mondays, they offer up something different for their Meatless Monday specials. From Ally Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Catering & Sales: “Every Monday, we offer a new seasonal plant-based sandwich as an ode to #meatlessmonday. This is Farmer Bob (pictured above). He comes in at least once a week and sells us fresh produce picked from his farm. He recently harvested some tomatoes that we used for a Fried Green Tomato sandwich special. It doesn’t get any more farm-to-table than that!” Honorable Mentions: We cant leave out restaurants that go meat-free every day! Here are two vegan food joints that cater to everyone who loves great, sustainable, healthy meals! Choices Café, Florida (multiple locations): Choices goes meat-free every day of the week, in case you forget to stop in on Monday! Their mission statement: “Our mission is to inspire compassionate choices by serving delicious, healthy, and organic plant-based food prepared with love for people, animals and the planet.” VO2 Vegan Café, Cambridge, MA: Another spot with all vegan offerings is VO2 Vegan Café, which welcomes diners of all preferences who just want to treat themselves to something healthy and delicious. From VO2 manager Stephanie Kirkpatrick: All our food is 100% vegan, so everything is meatless and we celebrate Meatless Monday every day! It’s so wonderful when vegans and vegetarians come in and are so excited that they don’t have to ask about ingredients because they already know everything is vegan. Many meat-eaters also love our food and look at it as an awesome and easy way to enjoy delicious food knowing they are eating healthier, for themselves and our planet. Does your favorite restaurant participate in Meatless Monday? Wed love to feature them on our site! If you own a restaurant and are considering taking part in Meatless Monday, let us know! Send us an email: info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast!

July 17 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast!   We are excited to announce that one more community has joined the Meatless Monday bandwagon! Last month, the District of Sechelt issued a proclamation to announce its commitment to the Meatless Monday campaign in recognition of the positive impact on the environment and our health. With the help of Sunshine Coasters for Meatless Mondays, a local volunteer group, Sechelt will now offer up their vegetarian best! With Mayor Bruce Milnes announcement, Sechelt joins Vancouver, North Vancouver, Port Moody and New Westminster in the growing Canadian Meatless Monday community. Citing the three most important reasons to go meatless - improved health, environmental concerns, and the humane treatment of animals - the proclamation is a call to action for local offices, restaurants, and schools to offer meatless meals on Mondays. It states: [R]educing our consumption of animal products and increasing our intake of fruits, vegetables, and legumes have been linked to a host of health benefits and may reduce the risk of chronic preventable conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. Sunshine Coasters for Meatless Mondays were instrumental in getting Sechelt to adopt the campaign. On their Facebook page, they celebrated the first Monday by listing restaurants participating in Meatless Monday, offering 25 percent discounts on vegetarian and vegan specials. In additional to inviting restaurants, delis, and other local businesses to participate, offices and schools have also been challenged to join the campaign. In order to help Sun Coast citizens go meatless at home, Sunshine Coasters posts recipes and updates on their Facebook page to keep the momentum going. Welcome to Meatless Monday, Sechelt! We cant wait for vegetarian poutine! The post Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Le Botaniste – New York City

July 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

A beauty-salon for you insides. We are a plant-based organic food & natural wine bar. – Le Botaniste The beautiful logo & website caught my attention... So this place was high on my list of places to visit in New York. And the reality was even so much better than I thought. image via Le Botaniste Le Botaniste is a botanical-based, apothecary-inspired restaurant. It is created by Le Pain Quotidiens Founder & Chief Creative Officer, Alain Coumont, and he knows a thing or two about good food and good restaurants. The restaurant looks like a classic apothecary including glass tincture bottles and white lab coats. image via Le Botaniste The menu is 100% organic and entirely botanical, which means there are no animal products used on-site. The seasonally changing menu features chef-designed prescriptions such as the Tibetan Mama: a savory combination of brown rice, peanut curry sauce, steamed greens and spicy kimchi, and the Dirty Noodle Soup: with velvety tofu, steamed leeks, garlic and spicy ginger. Hearty specialty soups and fresh juices rotate daily. image via Le Botaniste The menu also encourages DIY meal-building, allowing guests to design their own hot or cold entree from the many bases, spreads and toppings available. […] The post Le Botaniste – New York City appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

dhaba style dal tadka recipe | dal fry tadka dhaba style recipe

June 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

dhaba style dal tadka recipe | dal fry tadka dhaba style recipedhaba style dal tadka recipe | dal fry tadka dhaba style recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. dal recipe is staple food or curry of india and is often served with rice for lunch and dinner. there are several variation to this simple dal tadka recipe which varies to region to region. one such variation is dhaba style unique to the road side restaurants of punjab cuisine. it is prepared by cooking the pigeon pea lentils and chickpea lentils which is then sautéed with onion and tomato and finally tempering with red chillies. Continue reading dhaba style dal tadka recipe | dal fry tadka dhaba style recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal

August 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal Just checking in quickly today to share a nice little apple breakfast recipe that we have been making a lot lately. We know that August hasnt ended yet and we all want to hold on to summer for as long as we can and pretend that winter isnt coming. But we thought we’d provide you with a little something for when the first chillier days arrive (which has already happened here btw) and you hear raindrops come knocking on your window sills. For those moments, you can just bust these baked apples out of the oven, let the scent of warm cinnamon spread through your home and immediately feel a little better about the whole situation. We have been making variations of this both as breakfast and dessert - filling them with oatmeal topped with yogurt for breakfast, and a date and almond paste topped with whipped cream for dessert. The idea to pimp regular oatmeal/­­porridge by stuffing it inside baked apples is pretty great in its simplicity. But here we make it a tad more special and extra delicious by cooking the oatmeal with pure apple juice/­­cider, spices, butter or coconut oil and chopped almonds for extra rich flavor and texture. We then top the baked apples with a thick yogurt and drizzle with ginger honey for sweetness. And if you’ve got a little nut butter at home, that’s also good on top. Always use local apples if they are available and in season, they taste way better! Id love to chat more, but it was my birthday yesterday and Luise surprised me with a dinner, sleepover and breakfast at Stedsans in the Woods. It’s a restaurant in the middle of the Swedish forest with great food, beduin tents, outdoor showers and a floating sauna. So we’re pretty eager to experience it. I’ll probably share a few snaps on my Instagram stories later tonight, if you want to check it out. Oh, and if you have the feels for more apple recipes, check out these ones from our blog archive: o Apple, Almond & Buckwheat Muffins o Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake o Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch o Hazelnut, Chocolate & Apple Buns o Apple & Oat Biscuits Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal and Ginger Honey We made this recipe with 10 apples because we wanted to make a large batch, but you can just as well make it for two or four people by reducing the amounts. 10 apples juice from 1/­­2 lemon Apple Oatmeal 1 cup rolled oats 1 cup unfiltered and unsweetened apple juice/­­cider (or milk of choice or water) 1 1/­­2 cup water 2 tbsp almonds, finely chopped 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla 3 tbsp butter (or coconut oil) 10-15 almonds, chopped a large pinch salt Serve 1 cup full-fat greek yogurt (or coconut yogurt) Ginger Honey (simply stir lots of freshly grated ginger into honey over low heat) 10-15 almonds, chopped ground cinnamon Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400 °F. Prepare the apples by cutting off the top and then, using a sharp small knife or apple corer, scoop out the seeds and core in the center of each apple. Use a small spoon to scoop out enough apple flesh to make room for the porridge. (The flesh can be chopped and mixed into the oatmeal before filling the apples). Rub the inside of the apples with a little lemon juice and place them in a baking tray with high sides. Add all the oatmeal ingredients except butter and to a medium sized sauce pan and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and cook until creamy. Stir in the butter (or coconut oil) and almonds towards the end and then fill the apples with the oatmeal, top with a pinch extra cinnamon and put the apple tops back on. Add 2 tbsp water to the bottom of the baking tray and bake for 25-30 minutes or until the apples are soft. Keep an eye on the oven as different apple varieties need different baking time. Serve the apples on a plate, topped with a dollop yogurt, chopped almonds, cinnamon and a drizzle of ginger honey.

FOAM Catering – The Hague

August 21 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

FOAM started as a, surprise surprise...catering company (FOAM stands for “Fresh, Organic, and Meat-Free”). But in 2016, FOAM opened the doors of its brand new ‘Health Food Hotspot’ in one of the hottest neighborhoods in The Hague. The Frederikstraat is a very lively street with all kinds of restaurant and cute little shops. FOAM is a hip white vegan hotspot with a lovely garden where you can enjoy a great organic coffee, fresh juices and a delicious lunch or good breakfast. There is also a terrace in front of the restaurant, if you prefer to enjoy the hustle and bustle from the street. I really liked the way the restaurant is decorated, with crisp white walls and furniture and fresh flowers, vegetables and fruit on display. They also have a wide range of vegan cakes, pies and brownies. During our visit, my sister enjoyed a salad and I had a portobello burger with fresh mint-tea. Portions are not that big but that just left some room for dessert! I had a lovely apricot and orange cake. The whole menu is 100% plant-based and they say on their website that “all their food is prepared with a lot of love.” All […] The post FOAM Catering – The Hague appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Book Roundup

August 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Book RoundupMeatless Monday is always happy to provide new tips and recipes on going meat-free. But were also happy to give great chefs and experts the chance to share their recipes and opinions! This week, Meatless Monday is putting five authors in the spotlight with new books that will help to make vegetarian cooking even more delicious and easy. Love Thy Legumes by Sonali Suratkar Legumes are known to be a great source of protein for people who want to replace meat in their meals, but there are even more benefits to eating them. Nutritionist and Johns Hopkins graduate Sonali Suratkar is using her first cookbook to celebrate legumes and educate people on how they may improve blood sugar, assist in weight loss, and ease the digestive system. She also describes how to prepare dried legumes so people can make the switch from the canned and processed versions. With tons of recipes and beautiful pictures, Suratkar is sure to entice any reader curious about one of the healthiest plant-based food varieties! 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot by Jessica Jones, MS, RD, CDE and Wendy Lopez, MS, RD If youre thinking about giving your diet an overhaul, then the 28-Day Planet-Powered Health Reboot might be the cookbook for you! Written by Registered Dieticians Jessica Jones and Wendy Lopez of the blog Food Heaven Made Easy, this new cookbook has four weeks of breakfasts, lunches, and dinners that are all purely plant-based. Made with health - and not dieting - in mind, Jones and Lopez outline a completely customizable menu of meals that put the focus on rebooting the body with balanced meals without animal proteins. They even have a few sweets! Vegan: The Cookbook by Jean-Christian Jury We love this cookbook by Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury so much that were giving it an encore! After a health scare, Jury was inspired to share what he learned during his recovery - how to change his diet to include more plant-based, healthy foods. As the owner of several restaurants around the world, Jury knows global cuisine better than most. Vegan: The Cookbook includes 450 vegan recipes from several different countries such as France, Italy, India, and Papua New Guinea. Read more about it in our feature article from May! Bowls of Goodness: Vibrant Vegetarian Recipes Full of Nourishment by Nina Olsson Available (in the US) September 2017 Food blogger Nina Olsson is already well-known for her popular blog Nourish Atelier. Earlier this year, she released Bowls of Goodness in her native UK and this September it will arrive on our side of the pond! The book is a celebration of simple, delicious, and undeniably healthy meals in bowls, all of which are vegetarian. In addition to giving bowls a boost, Bowls of Goodness acknowledges the history of bowls tracing back to our most ancient human ancestors. And what better food to put in bowls than the healthiest, prettiest produce and grains? If youre an author of a new vegetarian-focused book or you just found a great roundup of meat-free recipes, contact Meatless Monday at info@meatlessmonday.com - we love to showcase new books on our site! The post Meatless Monday Book Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Butchers Daughter – New York

August 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

The Butchers Daughter is a cozy, crisp concept with lots of fresh food, good music and a very friendly staff. There is an easy going vibe for people enjoying their good, fresh food. We were happy to see that a new location for The Butcher’s Daughter was added since the last time we were in NY. So there is one in Nolita and one in the West Village. On their website they say: The Butchers Daughter is a plant-based restaurant, cafe, juice bar and vegetable slaughterhouse.”  We treat fruits and vegetables as a butcher would meat: We chop, fillet and carve fresh produce into healthy vegetarian dishes and press them into pretty juices.   Our three locations serve breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. We take pride in our daily changing menu, which is 100% vegetarian, and mostly vegan and gluten-free. We can always prepare substitutions for most dietary restrictions. (photo via The Butcher’s Daughter Facebook) And it is true–they are more than willing to tell you about all the vegan options that are available. And what we saw around us was lots of large bowls with fresh green salads, avocado toast, and all kinds of beautiful greenery. Unfortunately we were […] The post The Butchers Daughter – New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Soleterra Bottega Naturale & Bistro

July 26 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Fasano is a village in the beautiful region of Puglia. Its close to sea, and there are olive groves everywhere. There are lots of places with good food in Italy (hey its Italy!), but if you want something besides a great pasta pomodoro or a pizza without cheese, please stop by Soleterra. You will be pleasantly surprised. Soleterra is a cosy health-shop with a restaurant. Its organic but not completely vegan. That being said, they are more than willing to help you with vegan options. The owners were ever so nice and we had a great meal with lots of veggies, very well seasoned and surprising combinations. We had a tapas style lunch here–we had all kind of dishes that we shared. It is not cheap (Puglia is overall a cheaper place to go out for lunch of dinner) but it is good, organic and fresh (and vegan)! There is a very friendly ambiance at Soleterra, and there were several locals who stopped by for lunch (always a good sign!). So when planning a trip to Puglia, make sure Soleterra is on you list of places to go! PS I had a vegan chocolate muffin for dessert…yummy!   About the author: […] The post Soleterra Bottega Naturale & Bistro appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Restaurant Highlight – The Beet, Byron Bay

July 17 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

I live on the east coast of Australia in a coastal town called Byron Bay. We have juice bars and salad bars and most places will be able to veganise a dish by leaving out a few ingredients. The pub down the road from me has vegetarian nachos. When I go there for dinner, I ask them for the vegan version, which means I get the corn chips, salsa, guacamole and beans minus the cheese and sour cream - the chefs usually give me a double serving of corn chips, which I think is really lovely. I recently attended a new restaurant with friends, and before going, I checked if they had vegan options; they said they did, but I wasnt convinced. Sure enough, the vegan options were limited to two - hot chips and roast veggies. I later wrote a very friendly message to the new owners, via their Facebook page, explaining to them that I was very disappointed and that when key ingredients in a dish were omitted and not replaced, the flavour was severely lacking. They replied promptly and were very apologetic, saying that they would try much harder. That would be a win, I would say. […] The post Restaurant Highlight – The Beet, Byron Bay appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy Sauce

July 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy SauceMethi Malai Paneer made vegan with Tofu and Cashews. Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce. Easy Weeknight Restaurant style Indian entree. Serve over Naan or rice. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Soy-free Nut-free option. Methi Malai Matar (Fenugreek/­­Greens and peas in creamy white sauce), Methi malai paneer (fenugreek and Paneer cheese cubes in creamy sauce) are some Mughlai dishes you might find in some Indian restaurants. The dishes use malai or dairy cream and cheese or other dairy ingredients. Its like a spiced up Spinach dip, with lots of complex flavor! But this version is free of all that, tastes amazing, and comes together quickly as well. Fresh fenugreek leaves are a favorite to use in the dish when in season. If you find some then definitely use them fresh, else use dried fenugreek with greens of choice. Serve with hot garlic Naan or rice/­­grains or make a bowl with roasted veggies, add to wraps or on a pizza!. Dried fenugreek (kasuri methi) is available in Indian stores and online on amazon. Definitely get some, as I use it in many recipes, so it will not just get stored and expire :). Fenugreek has an amazing flavor profile, bitter but pleasing. You can use ground mustard + celery seed as a substitute when used in small quantities. Continue reading: Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy SauceThe post Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Avant Garden New York

June 27 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Avant Garden is a wonderful vegan restaurant in East Village, New York. When you walk through the door there is a very nice ambiance. We didnt make any reservations but we were fortunate that we got seating at the bar, so we could see all the chefs work in the open kitchen. Is there anything better than watching people passionately create one wonderful plate after another? Avant Garden is truly upscale, vegan dining. They let vegetables simply be vegetables. They bring out the very best of each ingredient while bringing together various greens, veggies, fruits, grains, nuts, legumes, herbs and spices in a wonderfully creative way. Every plate is like a colorful painting, bursting with colors and flavors. The two of us shared four dishes and each of them was a feast for the eyes. We enjoyed a baby gem salad with smoked tomato, ranch and preserved lemon with avocado as a starter. Next was the toast with cremini mushroom with onion marmalade, grapes, herb de Provence and walnut puree on the side. We topped it off with two great main dishes; roasted carrots with faro, ramp chimmichuri, tzatziki and some pita bread and my favorite parpadelle pomodoro with herbed gremolata. […] The post Avant Garden New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Cajun Cauliflower

June 14 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Cajun CauliflowerVegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Cajun Cauliflower. Cauliflower is tossed in homemade Cajun spice blend and baked, then served over easy creamy Garlic sauce Penne Pasta. Vegan Garlic Pasta Recipe. Can be Nut-free gluten-free. This Easy Pasta comes together quickly and makes an amazing meal. Toss the Cauliflower in Cajun spice blend and put it in the oven to bake. Boil the pasta, simmer the sauce to thicken and fold in the pasta. Put it all together, garnish with parsley or basil. Perfect! This dish came about when I remembered some friends had recommended a dish with Cajun chikin over Creamy pasta (way back when). It was a popular dish at a neighboring restaurant. For a vegan version of that dish, I made this creamy garlicky pasta sauce with roasted and minced garlic, which makes a great pasta by itself or can be used as a garlic mac and cheese sauce. The Cajun spice blend is magic. Rub it all over the cauliflower, bake and try not to eat the entire helping. The baked Cajun Cauliflower is amazing! Make just that and serve it with a cooling dip as a starter or appetizer. The garlic sauce is easy and cheesy. Add elbows to it and make into a mac bake, covered with breadcrumbs mixed with smoked paprika or some of the cajun blend. So much Flavor!Continue reading: Vegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Cajun CauliflowerThe post Vegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Cajun Cauliflower appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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