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Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peanut Noodles

February 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful peanut noodle dish is not only packed with plant protein, but veggies and enticing aromatic herbs, too. This recipe comes to us from our friends at Pondicheri and is featured as a Meatless Monday special in the restaurant’s New York and Houston locations. Serves 4 - 4 cups /­­ 225 g Chinese thin rice noodles - 3 Tbsp sesame oil - 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped - 2 small carrots, julienned - 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced - 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced on the bias - 1 small red onion, thinly sliced - 2 in /­­ 5 cm piece ginger, julienned - 2 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp salt - 4 Tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine or rice wine vinegar - Zest & juice from 1 orange - 2 Tbsp ketchup manis [Indonesian soy sauce] - 1 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, ground - 2 Tbsp sambhal olek [Indonesian chili sauce] - 2 Tbsp peanut butter - 2 cups /­­ 135 g spinach leaves, sliced - 1 cup /­­ 340 g purple cabbage, sliced - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro - 2 Tbsp toasted & chopped peanuts Pour boiling water over the noodles & let them soak for 3-4 minutes. Drain & set aside. In a large wok or sauté pan, heat up the sesame oil & add the garlic. Almost immediately, add the julienned carrots & cook for 4-5 minutes, frequently stirring. Add the red bell peppers & cook for another minute. Turn up the heat & cook, stirring on high for 2-3 minutes. Add the celery, red onions, ginger, black pepper & salt. Cook for just under another minute & add the cooking wine, orange juice with zest, ketchup manis, peppercorns, sambhal olek & peanut butter. Continue cooking at high heat for 2-3 or until the sauce around the vegetables is bubbly. Add the noodles, spinach, cabbage, cilantro & peanuts. Toss to mix, turn the heat off & serve immediately. The post Peanut Noodles appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cold Sesame-Avocado Soba Noodle Salad

November 30 2015 Meatless Monday 

In this affordable dinner recipe, avocado and Asian seasonings provide a refreshing twist to the fall produce staples of carrots, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. This recipe comes to us from the Natural Gourmet Institute and appears in their free e-cookbook, $5 Dinners. Serves 4 - 1/­­2 cup tahini - 4 tablespoons water - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil - 1 tablespoon shoyu - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - Pinch of black pepper - 10 ounces dry soba noodles - 1/­­2 pound Brussels sprouts, thinly shaved - 1 carrot, peeled, finely chopped - 1 avocado, cubed - 1/­­4 head purple cabbage, shredded - 1/­­2 bunch cilantro, stemmed - 2 tablespoons black sesame seeds In a small bowl, whisk together tahini, water, sesame oil, shoyu, vinegar, salt and pepper. Cook soba noodles according to the package directions until al dente, then immediately plunge them into a bowl of ice water to chill. Drain and set aside. In a large bowl, toss Brussels sprouts, carrots, avocado and cabbage with half of dressing. Add cold noodles and remaining dressing and toss salad together. Serve salad garnished with cilantro and sesame seeds. The post Cold Sesame-Avocado Soba Noodle Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Tempeh Tacos

July 20 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is a whole soybean product that originated in Indonesia. Similar to tofu, tempeh is often a staple in vegetarian diets because of it’s rich protein and fiber content. It has an earthy flavor and readily absorbs flavors when it is marinated or sautéed. This recipe comes to us from Kayli and James of The Plant Eaters’ Manifesto. Serves 8 Quick-pickled Cabbage: 1 cup white vinegar 1 cup water 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon salt 3/­­4 lb. purple cabbage (about 1/­­2 a medium head) Roasted Sweet Potatoes and Tempeh: 2 large sweet potatoes 2 block of tempeh 1 tsp.  olive oil Peanut Sauce: 6 tablespoons peanut butter 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 teaspoon honey 8 corn tortillas For quick-pickled cabbage: Combine all ingredients except cabbage in a saucepan and heat until liquid begins to simmer. Thinly slice cabbage and place in a bowl. Pour hot liquid over shredded cabbage and refrigerate for several hours or overnight. For roasted sweet potatoes and tempeh: Preheat oven to 450F. Dice sweet potatoes and tempeh into bite-sized pieces. Toss with a drizzle of oil. salt and pepper. Roast for 25 minutes or until they begin to brown. For peanut sauce: Combine sauce ingredients and microwave for 30 seconds. Stir mixture until a smooth sauce forms, adding water a tablespoon at a time until it reaches a thin, potable consistency. In a large bowl, toss roasted sweet potatoes and tempeh with the peanut sauce. Pile tempeh-sweet potato mixture into tortillas and top with Quick-pickled Cabbage and other optional ingredients. The post Thai Tempeh Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw / Not Raw Vegetable Barley Bowl

March 25 2015 VegKitchen 

Raw / Not Raw Vegetable Barley BowlWeekends are my days for loosening up on what I eat. So on Saturday and Sundays after lunch I enjoy dessert and a big soy latte and a little something sweet post-dinner. By Sunday evening I usually feel ready to get back into full-on healthy mode and a simple bowl filled with good grains and lots of vegetables makes me feel slightly virtuous and ready for the week ahead. Recipe and photo by Ann Oliverio, from Crave, Eat, Heal: Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes to Satisfy Every Appetite* reprinted with permission (C) 2015 Front Table Books. Serves: 4 Total time: 45 minutes Sauce - 3/­­4 cups raw almonds (either with skin off or on), or raw cashew pieces, soaked for 2 to 4 hours, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup+ light coconut milk - 2 to 4 tablespoons fresh lime juice (1 to 2 small limes) - Zest of 1 lime - 1 1/­­4 to 1 1/­­2 teaspoon curry powder - 1 clove garlic - 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup - Pinch sea salt - Pinch ground black pepper - Pinch cayenne Vegetables & Barley - 4 cups cooked barley (about 1 1/­­4 cup uncooked), see Note - 5 ounces baby kale, steamed until tender and drained - 1 cup shredded, spiralized, or chopped zucchini (about 1/­­2 of 1 large) - 1 cup shredded or spiralized carrot (about 2 small) - 1 cup cherry tomatoes, cut in half - 1 cup chopped or shredded green or purple cabbage Suggested toppings - Baked tofu, cubed - Fresh chopped cilantro - Fresh chopped basil - Fresh sprouts - Strips of seaweed snacks Make the sauce: Put the sauce ingredients in a high-speed or regular blender and process until smooth.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding more lime juice if the dressing needs more zing.  Add water or more coconut milk if the sauce is too thick. Set aside. Assemble the bowls: Divide the barley between four big bowls and top with kale, zucchini, carrot, tomatoes, cabbage, and any or all of the suggested toppings. Spoon the curry sauce on top and serve. Note: I use a quick-cooking barley from Trader Joes that takes about 10 minutes, but regular barley is fine, too -- just plan on dinner taking a little longer to prepare. The sauce will thicken as it sits so you may need to loosen it up with water. Variations - Use farro, brown rice, or quinoa in place of the barley. - If you use almonds, you may need additional coconut milk or water. - Here are more raw and almost-raw entrées. * This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Genius Chickpea Tofu

April 1 2014 My New Roots 

Genius Chickpea Tofu As someone who eats a predominantly plant-based diet, you can imagine that Ive enjoyed a long history of consuming soy-based foods. When I became a vegetarian at 16 and vegan thereafter, there wasnt the variety of plant-based protein foods readily available as there are these days, nor was I educated about alternatives to meat back then. Soy became my answer and my replacement for everything from dairy to eggs to chicken nuggets (eew). Before I knew it, I was eating some form of soy up to three or four times a day, when things started to get weird. Without going into too much detail Ill just say that my PMS and menstrual issues became incredibly, ahem, challenging. I didnt even like being around me. Period. Ha. Once I started studying holistic nutrition, I began to think that perhaps my issues lay in the hands of the health food industrys little darling. Yes, soy. Seeing as I was really grooving on being a human guinea pig while studying, I decided to give up the soy for other foods, such as hemp, chia, nuts, seeds, leafy green, other legumes just to see what would happen. Call it a coincidence, but after a couple months, my symptoms started to clear up and I returned to my regular, only slightly neurotic self, every 28 days. Did I miss tofu? Actually, yes. And I still do from time to time, which is why Im pretty darn excited to share this recipe with you today. A recipe for tofu, made from chickpeas. But first, lets discuss soy. Ive gotten a lot of emails and inquiries from many of you regarding this topic, because soy and soy foods are drowning in controversy these days. What is all the fuss about? Well, there are two schools of thought: one being that soy is a highly valuable source of plant-based protein because it is complete (meaning that it contains all essential amino acids). The other school of thought is that soy is bad, or even harmful for you if it is not fermented. This brings up a good point, and its great to hear that more people are turning toward fermented foods, especially legumes and grains. But the idea that unfermented soy is downright dangerous to eat is blowing things a little out of proportion if you ask me. If we are going down that road, then we also have to say that all legumes, grains, nuts and seeds are harmful if not fermented. The process of fermentation neutralizes some of the naturally occurring phytic acid (a compound that binds to minerals in the digestive tract making them difficult to absorb), while breaking down some the hard-to-digest proteins. Soy actually contains less phytic acid than some of its vegetable counterparts, like flax, sesame, Brazil nuts, and pinto beans. This is why soaking legumes, grains, nuts and seeds before eating them is important for better digestion, nutrient assimilation, and therefore overall health. That is a statement I can get behind. Fermented soy foods include tempeh, miso, and naturally brewed soy sauces, like tamari. I for one have been eating fermented soy foods exclusively for the past few years just because I feel better eating that way. I also choose non-GMO and organic soy because I support those agricultural practices. In conclusion, I will say that eating any food in balance is okay, as long as it is minimally processed. That definitely excludes tofu chicken nuggets, soy cheese, soy eggs, and even most soymilk (always check the ingredient list - some brands are good and some contain a laundry list of un-pronounceables). My rule of thumb with any food, is that if you cant make it at home, dont eat it. Although tofu and tempeh are bit of an ordeal to make yourself, Ive done it and it is possible. Tofu chicken nuggets? Good luck with that one. Okay, onto the Chickpea Tofu! Although this stuff is pretty genius, I am not the genius who came up with it. Its a traditional food originally from Burma, and often referred to as Burmese tofu or Shan tofu (here’s the original recipe I followed). It is easy to make with just a few basic ingredients and is a tasty, soy-free alternative to regular tofu that I think will be on the regular rotation in my kitchen. I think the really surprising thing about Chickpea Tofu is its texture. It is lusciously creamy and silky, not unlike silken tofu in fact. It is delicate yet firm, and kind of melts in your mouth. Ive found it works really well fresh in salads (a traditional way of serving it), and in soups. This way you can really enjoy its unique consistency. I liked the it in a simple miso-ginger broth with a few rice noodles swirling around too. Ive even seen recipes online for egg salad sandwiches and coconut curries. Yum! The downside of Chickpea Tofu is that it doesnt do all the things that tofu can do. It doesnt fry very well (deep fried however, Im sure would be ah-mazing), nor can you really bake it to crisp up as I had hoped. But, I am pretty new at this game and looking forward to trying out more recipes with it. If anyone out there really knows how else to work with Chickpea Tofu, please clue me in down below in the comments section! I am so curious to learn more. Some thoughts on the recipe... You can purchase chickpea flour at most health food stores, but it is also available (and tends to be much cheaper) at ethnic grocery stores. Chickpea four is also called garbanzo bean flour, gram flour, and cici flour. It also falls under the name besan, an Indian flour made from both chickpeas and yellow split peas. This will work just fine for the recipe. I think making a half batch of this would be a good idea. This made so much tofu that I had to freeze the majority of it, and I have no idea what it will be like after thawing. I used turmeric in my recipe, which is a traditional ingredient for colour. This is optional but gives the tofu a lovely golden hue. I also added garlic powder - a decidedly untraditional ingredient but I am really happy that I did because it gave the tofu a mellow garlicky flavour, which I love. This is also optional.     Print recipe     Genius Chickpea Tofu Makes more tofu than you could ever eat Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 350g chickpea flour (or besan, a yellow split pea + chickpea flour combo) 15 cups /­­ 3 1/­­2 liters water 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground turmeric (optional) 1 tsp. garlic powder (optional) Directions: 1. In a very large stockpot (make sure that is has capacity to hold over 20 cups /­­ 4 1/­­2   liters), combine the chickpea flour and water. Place somewhere to sit where it will not be disturbed. Let sit overnight, for about 12 hours. 2. In the morning, without moving the pot, carefully remove 6 cups of water from the top of the mixture with a ladle, and discard. 3. In a medium stockpot, melt the oil over medium heat. Carefully pour in the remaining liquid, without disturbing the bottom too much (what youll be left with is a thick chickpea sludge, which will be used as the thickening agent). Add the salt, and turmeric if using, and whisk well to combine. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently for 20-30 minutes, until the mixture begins to simmer and thicken. 4. Add the chickpea sludge. Like magic, you will notice almost immediately that the mixture thickens. To avoid the bottom burning, whisk vigorously and continuously for 10 minutes. 5. Line a 7×10 (18x25cm) baking pan with a clean cotton tea towel or cheesecloth (something you dont mind being stained with turmeric!). This is important because the fabric will help absorb excess liquid. Pour the thickened chickpea mixture into the pan and smooth out the top. Fold the edges of the cloth over the top and let sit at room temperature until the evening, when it is ready to eat (about 8 hours). 6. To remove tofu from the pan, place a cutting board on top and flip over, pull cloth away. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to five days. The salad in the top photo was a very quick dish I threw together to enjoy the tofu with, and it turned out so well I thought I should share it with you. I took the dressing from this recipe and combined it with shredded purple cabbage, spring onion, and plenty of cilantro. Later in the evening for dinner, I tossed the leftovers together with brown rice pad thai noodles, and it went over very well with the husband. He said it tasted better than junk food, which, coming from him, is the biggest compliment ever. *   *   *   *   *   * In other news, I am thrilled to mention that Ive been nominated again this year for the Saveur Best Food Blog Awards! Super cool. And congrats to the other nominees in my category of Special Diets - what an honor to be in your company! If youve been enjoying My New Roots in the past year, show some love and vote for me (scroll down to the bottom of the page to the last category). Thank you a ton for your support. Im still wild about writing this blog and it feels good knowing youre wild about reading it. Hugs and Chickpea Tofu, Sarah B.

Rawkin Rainbow Kale Salad

June 17 2015 VegKitchen 

Rawkin Rainbow Kale SaladI call this a salad for the kale haters because my husband, who isnt fond of kale, asked for seconds on this incredibly lush and dreamy salad. Recipe from The Abundance Diet: The 28-Day Plan to Reinvent Your Health, Lose Weight, and Discover the Power of Plant-Based Foods.  * (C)2015 by Somer McCowan. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Photo by Ann Oliverio. Save Print Rawkin Rainbow Kale Salad Author: Somer McCowan Recipe type: Raw Kale Salad Cuisine: Vegan /­­ Healthy Prep time:  30 mins Total time:  30 mins Serves: 4   Ingredients Creamy Chili Lime Dressing 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 large clove garlic, minced ¼ cup raw cashew pieces (soaked for 4 to 6 hours) 1 tablespoon tamari or Bragg Liquid Aminos Juice of 1 large lime 1 teaspoon chili powder, or more (depending on your heat preference) 1 teaspoon ground cumin Dash of cayenne ½ teaspoon sea salt, or to taste ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper Rainbow Kale Salad 1 large bunch of about16 ounces lacinato (dinosaur) kale, tough stems removed, then cut into ¼-inch shreds ½ cup finely chopped cilantro ¼ head small purple cabbage, cut into ¼-inch ribbons ½ cup red onion, cut into ¼-inch dice or thinly sliced rings 1 large carrot, cut into thin 2-inch long matchsticks 1 large ripe Hass avocado, peeled, pitted, and cut into ½-inch cubes 1 small jicama, cut into 2-inch long matchsticks Salt and ground black pepper, to taste Lime wedges, for serving (optional) Instructions In a high-speed blender or a food processor, combine the red bell pepper, garlic, cashews, tamari, lime juice, chili powder, cumin, cayenne, salt, and pepper. Blend until completely smooth and creamy, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the kale and the cilantro to a large salad bowl and pour on the dressing. Toss until all the kale is thoroughly coated, then massage the kale with your hands for 1 to 2 minutes. (Massaging kale makes it taste better!) Divide the kale salad among four large plates and top with the purple cabbage, red onion, carrot, avocado, and jicama. Season with a bit of salt and pepper and serve with lime wedges, if desired. 3.3.3077 Here are more Raw Kale Salads. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Contest 2014 August Winners

September 8 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

Contest 2014 August WinnersI know it was tough not using any grains for the contest, but despite that, there were many good recipes submitted. I went through all of them and these are the five most complete and best recipes. Below are the winners this month and the top five entries. Congratulations to all participants: 1st Place: Nariyal Mewa Paak (Dry Fruit Delight) by Sonika Maheshwari 2nd Place: Purple Cabbage, Eggplant and Shiitake Mushroom dumplings by Cecilia Congratulations to both of you!! Nariyal Mewa Paak (Dry Fruit Delight) by Sonika Maheshwari Purple cabbage, eggplant and shiitake mushroom dumplings by Cecilia Sweet Potato Laddu by Aarti Sharma Sago Vadas by Nandhini Pineapple Berry Kulfi Duo by Namratha Thank you to everyone else that also participated in the contest: - Nisha Sharma - Sushmasinha - Vanisree - Neha Naithani Raturi - Ramyasri Kapuganti - Jhalak Maratha - Gayathri Vikkraman - Navita Mehra Jassal - Soma Mandal - Mifra Haleem - Anu Kollon - Manjaree Banerjee - Hidemi Walsh - Shruti J - (http:/­­/­­cookingwithsj.com) - AFREEN SAJID - Mahesh Babu Jonnavittula - prince soni - Aishwarya - Jagruti Vyas - Meera Patwari - Urvi Sharma - Radhika Paranjape - Anu Saxena - Melanie Booth - Priyamvada - Supriya - Dimple Mota - Harini - Jessica M. - Ranjani Vijayakumar - Shital - Vidya - Divya Ravindran - Kaleena Soorma - RAZIYA BANU M. LOHANI - Srividhya Gopalakrishnan - Kanu - Nisha - Ankita Agarwal - Manisha Chhabra - Swathi Mudigonda - Tanvi’s Kitchen - Fhami - Kailash nagar - Nidhi Saxena - Priyanka Lodha Patwari - Sindhu Umashankar - Wai Leng Loke (Kelly) - Priya Sayeesh - Sahaana - Adelina Srinivasan - Ritika Tayal - Manju Agarwal - Edward Higgins - Mahima Arampady - Kritika Aggarwal - Asha - Vemala - Shanmugadevi A - Rangadevi - Kiran Randhawa - Saurabh Aggarwal - Nibedita - Meghna Doijode - Sujatha S - Shruti Soumya Panigrahi The post Contest 2014 August Winners appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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