protein - vegetarian recipes

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Paneer butter masala recipe | butter paneer recipe | cheese butter masala

Laccha salad recipe – 2 ways | lacha pyaz recipe | onion laccha salad | onion salad

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Ice tea recipe | iced tea recipe | homemade iced tea – 4 ways



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protein vegetarian recipes

Green Chili Enchilada Soup

yesterday 14:01 Vegan Richa 

Green Chili Enchilada SoupThis one-pot Vegan Green Chile Enchilada Soup is vegan Mexican comfort food at its best! A hearty stew loaded with soy curls, corn and rice, then topped with all your favorite toppings for tons of flavor! This green chile enchilada soup recipe has everything you love about green enchiladas – the smoky heat of the green chiles, the Mexican spices, the creaminess and obviously the cheese. As this is a chicken-less enchilada soup, we add some soy curls in lieu of chicken as our protein. Otherwise, we rely on staple Mexican ingredients, such as rice, corn! I love the comforting creaminess the white beans add to this stew. Nutritional yeast adds the cheesy taste, but we also add some shredded cheese on top to finish this off. The secret to the creaminess of this vegan enchilada soup is a quick cashew cream which adds a nice richness to the soup and thickens it along with the rice. However, for those of you who are allergic, I listed a nut-free version in the tips section. I like finishing this Vegan Mexican soup off with some shredded cheese and some thinly sliced green chiles. Other great additions would be a fresh squeeze of lime, some sliced avocado, more vegan cheese shreds, and how about crushed tortilla chips? It will be hard to just have one bowl of this delicious vegan soup. More Vegan Soup recipes - Turkish lentil soup, - Turmeric Laksa Curry Soup - Indian Spiced tomato Soup, - Broccoli Slaw Soup, - Minestrone - Mushroom chickpea greens soup. Continue reading: Green Chili Enchilada SoupThe post Green Chili Enchilada Soup appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Satisfying Plant-Based Protein Swaps

April 9 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Satisfying Plant-Based Protein Swaps Whether youre looking to fuel a training regimen or to simply get more plants into your diet, this quick course has you covered. The post Satisfying Plant-Based Protein Swaps appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

paneer butter masala recipe | butter paneer recipe | cheese butter masala

April 3 2021 hebbar's kitchen 

paneer butter masala recipe | butter paneer recipe | cheese butter masalapaneer butter masala recipe | butter paneer recipe | cheese butter masala with step by step photo and video recipe. paneer based meals and curries are one of the essential dishes to many vegetarians for their protein offerings. it can be added to rice, bread, pizza, sandwich and even deep-fried snacks, but curries are the popular choice. out of these paneer curries, the paneer butter masala recipe or also known as paneer makhani is a popular choice for its sweet and spicy curry taste. The post paneer butter masala recipe | butter paneer recipe | cheese butter masala appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Lentil Meatloaf with Tomato Glaze

March 21 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Lentil Meatloaf with Tomato Glaze Serve up this Vegan Lentil Meatloaf with Tomato Glaze for your main entree tonight. This meatloaf is made with plant-based protein, loaded with spices and seasonings, and tastes incredible.  The homemade tomato glaze in this recipe is the perfect compliment to this lentil loaf dish. Pair this vegan meatloaf with your favorite sides and ring that dinner bell.  This Vegan Lentil Meatloaf is… Vegan  Vegetarian  Easy to make  Loaded with flavor  Great for weeknight dinner  Great for leftovers How to Make Lentil Meatloaf  Line your loaf pan with parchment or baking paper and set it aside.  Cut the onions, carrots, and garlic into small pieces.  In a pan on the stove, add oil and garlic; cook until fragrant. Then add in the onions and carrots, and cook until onions are translucent.  Toss in shallots and cook a couple more minutes.  In a bowl, add lentils and veggies, and blend it up for a paste. Add in walnuts and mix again.  Toss in spices, breadcrumbs, rest of lentils, etc. Stir to mix.  Press mixture into the loaf pan, and mix up the glaze and pour over the lentil meatloaf.  Bake as directed.  Full directions for the recipe, along with measurements, are […] The post Vegan Lentil Meatloaf with Tomato Glaze appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Spring Dinner Recipes

March 14 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Spring Dinner RecipesAdd a healthy punch to your plate with these veggie-centric vegan spring dinner recipes! A recipe collection chock-full of lovely spring produce like leeks, spinach, asparagus or carrots! Make the most of spring’s abundance with these Vegan Spring Dinner Recipe Ideas! Let’s bring on spring produce! After a long winter, I simply cant wait to hit the farmer’s market and come home with a big wicker basket filled with spring’s best produce. Crisp green stalks of asparagus and bunches of fresh spinach, young potatoes, leeks, carrots – more than I can probably handle on my own, but I’m up for the challenge and I know my friends will love to try some of these spring dinner recipes, I already have on my to-make list! Want to join in? Let’s get our hands on those spring greens and get cooking! Here are some of my favorite veggie-tastic spring dinner recipes that are colorful, wholesome, and simply feel and taste like spring. Most of these are very easy to make and you will find both light spring cuisine as well as comforting recipes for those colder days. Artichokes Vegan Spinach Artichoke Pasta Bake You will love this delicious vegan spinach and artichoke pasta bake recipe. It's like having spinach and artichoke dip, but for dinner! TRY THIS RECIPE Artichoke Spinach Cauliflower Bean Burgers. Grill-able Vegan Veggie Burger Recipe. These Grill-able Aritchoke Spinach burgers are easy and great for summer. Use any favorite dressings or toppings. TRY THIS RECIPE Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe Easy 1 Pot Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe. Ready in 30 Minutes. This Creamy Cheesy artichoke dip is perfect for parties, picnics, game day. No Cream cheese or vegan cheese subs. Can be glutenfree, nutfree. Use a 9 inch skillet or stoneware dish to bake TRY THIS RECIPE   Asparagus Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta - 30 mins! Creamy Lemon Alfredo style sauce with tofu with fettuccine and pan roasted garlic asparagus and more lemon. Vegan Nutfree Recipe. Can be Glutenfree. 17 gm of protein TRY THIS RECIPE Fettuccine with Tomato Cream Sauce and Asparagus Fettuccine with Tomato Cream Sauce and Asparagus. Easy tomato Cream sauce with pasta and garlic roasted Asparagus. Use other veggies of choice. Add some chickpea chorizo or smoked coconut for variation. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free with gf pasta. TRY THIS RECIPE Roasted Asparagus Basil Soup. Vegan Glutenfree Recipe This Roasted Asparagus Basil Soup is a simple soup with fresh asparagus, basil, dill, onions and cashews. Creamy, Vegan and Gluten-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE Chickpea Tofu Asparagus Curry Easy Asparagus Curry with Chickpea Tofu, Spinach, Indian Spices and tomato curry. Indian Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Serve with Rice or flat-bread. Asparagus Ki Geeli subzi TRY THIS RECIPE Bulgogi Roasted Spring Veggie Bowl Bulgogi Roasted Spring Veggie Bowl. Spicy, sweet Korean Gochugaru blend roasted Cauliflower Mushroom Asparagus Bowl. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE   Carrots Carrot Zucchini Chickpea Fritters Vegan Recipe Carrot Zucchini Chickpea Fritters Vegan Recipe. Eggless, nut-free, yeast-free. Can be made gluten-free. Cooked Chickpeas, shredded veggies and turkish spices. Makes 7 to 8 patties TRY THIS RECIPE Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice - Carrot Pilaf Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice with Indian spices. Carrot Veggie Brown Rice Pilaf. Colorful flavorful side for Easter or Holidays. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe. Add more Peas or chickpeas to make this a full meal. TRY THIS RECIPE Peanut Butter Roasted Cauliflower and Carrot Salad Bowl Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots. Cauliflower tossed in peanut butter sauce and roasted, carrots tossed in hot sauce and roasted. Vegan Recipe, Gluten-free option.   TRY THIS RECIPE   Radishes Fusilli with Broccoli and Basil pesto and Red radish Fusilli with Broccoli and Basil pesto is an easy and quick meat free meal, a great recipe after a long day at work TRY THIS RECIPE Roasted Cauliflower and Radish with Mustard, Nigella, and Fennel Seeds This recipe is super-easy and addictive. Fennel and nigella seeds give the vegetables an Indian pickle flavor profile. Roasted cauliflower is always a hit, and here you can try roasted radish as well. I like to use baby red radishes because they make the dish look so colorful. Serve this with Northeastern dals such as odia dal or cholar dal, and with spicy curries that use fennel seeds. (Recipe from http:/­­/­­www.amazon.com/­­gp/­­product/­­1941252095/­­vegric-20 Copyright (C) 2015 by Richa Hingle. TRY THIS RECIPE   Spring Cabbage Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi) Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas! Patta Gobi Ki Subzi This Cabbage Curry is made in a pressure cooker. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Braised Cabbage Recipe. Stove top option in notes TRY THIS RECIPE Vegan Okonomiyaki - Cabbage Carrot Pancakes Vegan Okonomiyaki - Cabbage Carrot Pancakes. Japanese Okonomiyaki made vegan. Served with home made tonkatsu sauce.Makes 5 to 6 pancakes TRY THIS RECIPE   Avocado Avocado Pasta with Smoky Pecans Avocado Pasta with Smoky Pecans. This 20 Minute Creamy Avocado Basil Sauce is great over spaghetti or zoodles. Serve with smoky spicy pecans for amazing flavor.  Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be nutfree.  TRY THIS RECIPE Mediterranean Quinoa Salad with Arugula, Avocado Mediterranean Quinoa Salad with Arugula, Avocado and Lemon Oregano Olive oil dressing. The Mediterranean Lemon Garlic Dressing brightens up this Summery Quinoa Salad. Perfect to make ahead and serve at Picnics. Vegan Gluten-free, Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. TRY THIS RECIPE Spicy Avocado Chickpea Salad Sandwich Easy Smashed Avocado Chickpea Salad sandwich spiced with cumin and cayenne. Serve over soft fresh bread layered with greens and juicy tomatoes. TRY THIS RECIPE   Spinach Vegan Palak Tofu Paneer - Tofu in Spinach Sauce This Vegan Palak Tofu Paneer is the easiest and the tastiest dairy-free, gluten-free Saag Tofu. Tofu in Spinach Sauce. Can be made soy-free with chickpea tofu. Ready in 20 Minutes! TRY THIS RECIPE Cauliflower Chickpeas and Spinach in Mustard seed Curry Leaf Sauce This easy cauliflower chickpea and spinach saute features a fragrant Mustard Seed & Curry Leaf Sauce - an easy vegan meal that is ready in 30 minutes. Packed with healthy cauliflower, creamy chickpeas, and super food spinach in every bite TRY THIS RECIPE Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry ( Lasooni Aloo Palak) Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry - Lasooni Aloo Palak. Potato Spinach curry with garlic and Indian spices. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Soy-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE   Potatoes Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds - Bateta Nu Shaak Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds. Indian Spiced Potatoes with sesame seed and peanuts. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Indian Gujarati Recipe. Bateta Nu Shaak. TRY THIS RECIPE Potato Pesto Pizza - Vegan Pesto Pizza Easy Potato Pesto Pizza with Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza base topping with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. TRY THIS RECIPE   I hope you found your favorite amongst my vegan spring dinner recipes! If you want to keep on browsing, here are more spring recipe round-ups that also include sweet treats: - Spring Recipes  - Vegan Easter Dinners - Mother’s Day Brunch Ideas    The post Vegan Spring Dinner Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Almond Butter Protein Balls

February 7 2021 VegKitchen 

Almond Butter Protein Balls Six ingredients are all you need to make these Almond Butter Protein Balls. These are great pick-me-up snack to fuel your body and curb your sweet tooth cravings. Cocoa, shredded coconut, almond butter, and more make the most incredible bite-size vegan protein balls.  Prep these on Sunday and have these protein balls all week to pack for your lunch, to combat the 2 pm slump, or as an after school treat for the kids. These protein almond balls are even freezer friendly! These Almond Butter Protein Balls Are… Vegan  Vegetarian  Gluten-Free  Dairy-Free  Great for meal prepping snacks  Freezer Friendly  How to Make Almond Butter Protein Balls  Add your activated chia seeds, cocoa powder, almond butter, maple syrup, almond meal, and coconut in a bowl.   Mix until well combined. Roll into balls.  Coat each protein ball with the leftover coconut flakes. Tips and Tricks Activate chia seeds To activate chia seeds, they need to be soaked in almond milk. Once they swell up they will resemble tapioca pudding. Combining 2-3 tablespoons of milk with the chia seeds will work. Let them soak for 15-20 minutes. If you find they run out of liquid, add a splash more in.  Texture  You will […] The post Almond Butter Protein Balls appeared first on VegKitchen.

10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks

February 2 2021 Vegetarian Times 

10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks Check out these 10 portable vegetarian snacks that will satisfy and satiate every craving! From prebiotics and probiotics, to single-ingredient whole foods, and protein-packed goodness, weve got something for everyone in this roundup... no assembly required! The post 10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Everyday Pull-Apart Chick’n Seitan

January 18 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Everyday Pull-Apart Chick’n Seitan Makes 4 pounds This is the layery, flaky textured vegan chicken of your dinnertime dreams! I wanted something comparable to store-bought vegan chickn, but like, better? Its just the thing to simmer away on a Sunday then store and use throughout the week. The recipe is not difficult but it does require a few items, such as cheeseclotch and twine, which will only make you feel more cheffy than you already do. The cheesecloth also gives the outer layer a nice pin-prick texture that sears beautifully. The gist of the recipe is that the seitan dough is processed into a soft dough that is somehow clumpy yet totally holds together. Its then gathered pulled, twisted, bundled and simmered, creating a pull-apart texture that is reminiscent of the finest fakest meat. But it tastes so much better when it comes from your kitchen! The flavoring is subtle and versatile enough for everything from a South Asian stir-fry to an Italian parmesan. Theres just a touch of turmeric to lend luster and brighten up the color, pea protein gives it a good nice meatiness and texture. Would it work with something besides pea protein? I dont know! I didnt try it! But I really think the pea is key. For the simmering broth, use a diluted bullion. Just something lightly flavored to keep the flavors mellow. I’ll post more recipes for how to use it. It takes to marinades well and browns beautifully! Grilled, fried, shredded for soups, it’s so fantastically versatile and soaks up flavor like a champ. PS Thanks to Avocado & Ales, the inventor of Chickwheat, which is the shreddiest of shreddy seitan chickn! I used her method of food processing the seitan to give it a bit of that shreddy texture. If you are looking for realllllly shreddy chickn, check that one out. But Im sure you already have. This one is more chunky and pull apart. Like the title says.  Creating Perfect Simmered Seitan Bundles: A romance era novella ~ This recipe is not difficult. But often when people say something “isn’t difficult”, are they just talking you off the ledge? If it isnt difficult why would you have to even say that? Thus, in short, what I mean is that its not difficult IF you pay attention and read the directions, because every step counts. So read this in bed, the night before you make it, and then dream of perfect little seitan bundles. ~ Part 1: Cheesecloth. First of all, make sure you have cheesecloth and twine. Cut the cheesecloth into the proper sizes before beginning and set it aside. When wrapping, dont go too tight or it will make the chickn denser than intended. It will still be good! But this isnt a boustier. Leave some slack, because the seitan soaks in moisture and plumps up, leading to the layery, light shreds we are going for. If that sounds vague, hows this: make sure you can pull the cheesecloth about 1/­­2 an inch away from the seitan once its wrapped. So, snug and secure, with a little room to breath. ~ Part 2: Mind your broth temp. If the broth is too hot you can water log the seitan, but this is very easy to prevent. Before adding the seitan, bring the broth up to a low boil, then lower the heat so that its not boiling at all, just very hot. Then add the seitan bundles. When you add the seitan, the broth temperature will drop even more. Bring the heat up slightly. During this time, the seitan will be developing a skin which will protect it from becoming, as they say, seitan brains. Once it is on this low heat for about 20 minutes, you can raise the heat to a low boil. Now its really cooking! Cook this way for about 45 more minutes, with the lid ajar, using tongs to rotate the bundles every 15 minutes or so. ~Part 3: Cool it now. The cooling off stage is crucial, as if your seitan is heading from a hot spring to a spa at a ski resort. Turn the heat off and let the seitan cool in the broth. This can take an hour or so, but its worth it for perfectly cooked fake chicken. If you have a cool place to put it, thats great. An open porch? A safe fire escape? OK, now that you have attended the Ladys School For Seitan, you should be well prepared to strike out on your own. Have fun and remember: you were made for this! Ingredients For the Chick’n Seitan: 2 cups water 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon white pepper 1/­­8 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes 1/­­2 cup pea protein flour 1 1/­­2 cups vital wheat gluten For the broth: 10 cups chickeny vegetable broth 8 bay leaves Directions Have ready 4 nine-inch double layered cheesecloth squares and twine. In a food processor fit with a metal blade, whiz together water, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, white pepper and turmeric. Add nutritional yeast and pea protein and process until smooth, about 30 seconds.  Now add the vital wheat gluten and pulse in. Once it is all incorporated, process on low for about 5 minutes. It will be very stretchy, stringy and pliable. Give the motor a break once in awhile if your processor cant handle it.  Divide the dough into 4 even-ish pieces. From this point, be careful not to overhandle the seitan because you want it to retain its texture, which will allow it to separate nicely once cooked.  Gently roll a glob of gluten into an 8 inch roll. Fold in half, give a twist and pull again so its about 6 inches long. This creates the layers. Wrap in cheesecloth, snugly but not tightly, it will expand. Tie with each end with twine. Proceed with the remaining pieces and let rest while you prepare the broth. In a large (8-quart) pot bring broth to a boil. Lower heat. Add the seitan bundles. Let stew very gently without boiling for about 15 minutes. When skin is set, place the lid ajar for steam to escape and low boil for about 45 more minutes.  Cool completely in broth. Pull apart and use how ever you want! It tastes best if browned in some olive oil first.

Lentil Curry Casserole

January 7 2021 Vegan Richa 

Lentil Curry CasseroleMake this easy Vegan Curry Lentil Casserole whenever that craving for restaurant-style creamy lentil dishes hits. Brown lentils simmered in a fragrant coconut curry broth served over rice! So easy, so delicious. Gluten-free, too. We all have that bag of dried lentils somewhere in the back of our pantry, just waiting for us to find them, add some spices and simple pantry staple ingredients to them, and create an unexpectedly delicious and healthy dish that everyone will LOVE! This recipe for vegan Lentil Curry Casserole is one of those unexpectedly AWESOME lentil recipes that has to potential to become a family favorite! Especially if you are a fan of rich and creamy curries! It is one of my family’s favorite weeknight dinners – packed with plant-based protein, nutrients, and spicy goodness! A simple and nourishing curry casserole the whole family will enjoy tucking into. Just look at that thick and creamy gravy – all those amazing coconut and curry flavors are layered deeply into the lentils as they slowly bake. The perfect one-pot /­­ one-casserole meal and the perfect comfort food dish for the cold season! Think of this lentil casserole as an easy westernized version of restaurant-style Indian daal, with plenty of warming spices, creamy coconut milk and some nut butter for extra richness. You might have most ingredients at home already. Let’s get cooking! MORE INDIAN DISHES TO TRY - Butter Tofu GF - IP Tikka Masala Simmer Sauce , with Cauliflower. GF - Tofu Amritsari Masala.GF - Instant Pot Vegan Butter Chickin(soycurls). GF - Creamy, Delicious - Mushroom Matar Masala GF - Bombay Potato and Peas GF - Tofu in Spinach Curry - Palak Tofu GF This is a simple one pot meal baked into a casserole instead of on the stove top. Baking allows for amazing roasted flavor and also hands off cooking. You can easily convert it to stove top. This is a generic curry inspired from Indian flavors. You can change up the spices and flavors to preference. Lets make it!Continue reading: Lentil Curry CasseroleThe post Lentil Curry Casserole appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Protein from Plants?

December 22 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Protein from Plants? Scientific research has unequivocally proven that daily protein supplementation builds muscle, increases strength and supports fat loss. For decades, we have heard about the pros and cons of egg, whey and casein protein supplements, and it is apparent that milk proteins (whey and casein) monopolize the protein-powder market. As anyone who supplements with protein powder … Continued The post Protein from Plants? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3

December 15 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3 I’m happy to announce the third winner of my Holiday Cookbook Giveaway.  As a reminder, three winners have been chosen (one in the last three weeks) to win copies of four of my recent cookbooks: The Plant-Based Slow Cooker The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook Vegan Mac & Cheese One-Dish Vegan The third and final winner has been chosen using the Random Number Generator on Random.org and the winner is: Connie Faivre. To claim your cookbooks, Connie, please send me an email or DM me on Messenger and let me know where to send your cookbooks! If I dont hear from you by next week, another winner will be chosen. I wan to that everyone who participated in my giveaway.  Thank you for your support and for your kind words. I wish the very best to all of you this holiday season and in the coming year. The post Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3 appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2

December 8 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2 It’s time to announce the second winner of my Holiday Cookbook Giveaway.  As a reminder, three winners are being chosen (one each week) to win copies of four of my recent cookbooks: The Plant-Based Slow Cooker, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook, Vegan Mac & Cheese, and One-Dish Vegan. The second winner has been chosen using the Random Number Generator on Random.org and the winner is: Sandra Lee Childs . To claim your cookbooks, Sandra, please send me an email or DM me on Messenger and let me know where to send your cookbooks! If I dont hear from you by next week, another winner will be chosen (along with a winner for the third and final giveaway). Everyone else, thanks for entering and if you didnt win this time, you’ll have another chance to win next Tuesday.  And keep those new entries coming in (on the original Holiday Cookbook Giveaway post from November 27). The post Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2 appeared first on Robin Robertson.

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder

November 18 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powderprotein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder with step by step photo and video recipe. weight loss recipes are one of the trending and a must recipe for most of us. most of these are generally a protein-based recipe and skipping carbs in our daily diet. however, these protein sources are chemical compounds and ignore natural source assuming it is impossible to prepare at home. this post is to negate that belief and shows how to make all-purpose homemade weight loss protein powder. The post protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Heres How to Prep Black Beans So Youll Have a Go-To Vegetarian Protein Source

March 18 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Heres How to Prep Black Beans So Youll Have a Go-To Vegetarian Protein Source Pressure-cooked beans are ready in less than hour. The post Heres How to Prep Black Beans So Youll Have a Go-To Vegetarian Protein Source appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Matcha Steel Cut Oatmeal

February 18 2021 Oh My Veggies 

Matcha Steel Cut Oatmeal The matcha and coconut combine for a creamy, earthy oatmeal that is packed with antioxidants, protein, and fibers while detoxifying the body and boosting the metabolism. Then, to make it even better, I top the oats with some of my favorite super foods such as cacao nibs, goji berries, pistachios, and coconut. Recipe and photos contributed to Oh My Veggies Potluck by My Darling Vegan.

Vegan Bolognese Sauce

February 7 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Bolognese Sauce This Vegan Bolognese Sauce is the perfect Italian-inspired sauce to eat atop your favorite noodles. And because this recipe is vegan, compared to regular Bolognese sauce, it takes a fraction of the time to make. This vegan Bolognese recipe is packed with flavor! Its tomato sauce and red wine base are perfectly complemented by garlic, paprika, and oregano--a quintessential Italian spice combo. And it definitely pays to be vegan with this recipe because it only takes 30 minutes to make! Regular Bolognese sauce can take hours, but this vegan recipe uses textured soy protein, which is ready in a jiffy! This vegan Bolognese recipe is…  vegan vegetarian plant-based gluten-free ready in 30 minutes a quick tomato sauce recipe How to Make Vegan Bolognese Sauce Heat olive oil in a large pot on the stove.  Chop the onion, carrot, garlic, and green pepper. Make sure to remove the seeds from the green pepper and discard.  Add the chopped vegetables and garlic to the pot and sauté. Stir occasionally so that nothing sticks to the bottom of the pan.  Once the onions are translucent, add the paprika and oregano along with the vegan red wine.  Stir the ingredients, bring them to a […] The post Vegan Bolognese Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach

January 19 2021 VegKitchen 

Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach This homey brown rice pilaf is loaded with nutritious flavor from white beans, shiitake mushrooms, and fresh spinach. This simple dish makes a delicious vegan dinner or hearty lunch. This brown rice pilaf is: A hearty vegan meal – comfort food at its best! Packed with protein and fiber Ready in under an hour Easy to make ahead, so it’s perfect for meal prep. Variations This recipe is infinitely versatile. Instead of rice, you can swap in your own favorite grains like quinoa, wheat berries, or bulgur. You can also swap out the white beans for cooked lentils, black-eyed peas, or chopped seitan to add an extra dose of protein. Or add some heat with a minced jalape?o chile! One-Dish Vegan This recipe is from the amazing vegan cookbook, One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson. You can find it listed in the book as Brown Rice with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach. It has been shared with permission of The Harvard Common Press. For more ways to use brown rice, explore these Classic Rice Dishes. This article was first published in 2013. It has since been updated. The post Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds

January 11 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds Everybody loves a great vegan green smoothie. They’re full of things like antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, and of course, they taste amazing. And that’s before we talk about add-ins, whether they’re for flavor or for an extra boost of nutrients. Chia seeds are my favorite thing to add to a green smoothie. And for good reason! Chia Seeds Chia seeds are an excellent add-in for smoothies. They pack a protein punch, they’re full of antioxidants and are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids. Chia seeds also contain vitamins A, B1 (Thiamin), B2 (Riboflavin), C (ascorbic acid), E, choline, and Folate (folic acid). Chia also contains vitamins B3, B5, B6, B15, B17, D, K, inositol, and PABA. The main Minerals are Boron, calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, sulfur, and zinc. It also has amylose and plenty of electrolytes. And they also contain 18 of the 22 amino acids, including all nine essential amino acids. You can literally never have too much chia. This recipe and photo below are from Chia: The Complete Guide to the Ultimate Superfood*by Wayne Coates, PhD. Used with permission. This article was first published on October 5, 2001. It has since […] The post Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions

December 30 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions Serves 2 to 4 If youre from Brooklyn — and youre probably not even though you say you are — then you celebrate with steak. Everyone knows this from every movie. Cavernous steakhouses that date back to the last, last century lurking all over the city, tucked under bridges or beside a forgotten waterway, with their historical plaques, creaky wood floors, and signed Frank Sinatra portraits on the wall.  Well, 2020 is over and its time to celebrate Brooklyn style. Whether its a night of somber reflection or one of dancing and drinking (in your own home with only your household members and/­­or just your cat) this recipe works. Its a visceral activity unto itself, injected with whatever meaning you need it to have.  Basically, youll work a pliable ball of gluten until its goth red and gristle-y. Then you roll and pound it. Throw it into a hissing cast iron pan to sear. Smoke. Fire. Sizzles. Who needs fireworks? I was striving for something that could come together in one pot. I like baking seitan, but it does tend to dry things out and I wanted this to be juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Enter sear/­­braise. The steaks are cooked, removed from the pan then you create a rich au jus with onions, garlic and red wine. Some miso for that savory je ne sais quoi. And the seared steaks are placed back in to cook through. The end result is some of the best seitan I have ever had! Seared and smoky, firm but tender. And totally juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Plus it comes with its own sauce, perfect for slathering. Serve with mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Or anything starchy and awesome. Happy New Year.  Recipes Notes ~ I tested this recipe using tamari, but something was missing. The Braggs Liquid Aminos really upped the flavor game here, adding nuance and just kind of this steak sauce flavor that really popped. I recommend it! Not only because you get a bottle with Patricia Braggs floral hat printed on it, but its a nice ingredient to have around for when youre like This rice needs to taste more hippy. ~ Beet powder is another fabulous ingredient. It honestly doesnt have much flavor in small quantities but adds so much color! You can try to use whole beets or whatever you are going to do but I didnt try that and any adjustments to liquid and dry ingredients in this recipe will change the texture dramatically. Ive found it in stores but Amazon is evil and the most reliable place to get it.  ~ If you dont have a cast iron pan, then….wait, why dont you? Get one. You need that hot sizzle when it hits the pan and nothing else will give you that.  ~ The broth you use will affect the outcome. Make sure it isnt too salty because the sauce reduces a lot. If youre using a concentrated bullion mixed with water, that is fine, but go light with it and taste as you go to see if it needs more. ~ I used Bobs Vital Wheat Gluten. If you use a different one, results may vary. Why? Protein content, probably. Not all VWG has the same amount. They should standardize this for our vegan future. ~ I really cant see one person eating a full steak like this, so I dont know, prove me wrong. Aesthetically I wanted it to be this big, but realistically, it serves four. Ingredients For the Steaks 1 1/­­4 cups vital wheat gluten 2 tablespoon nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons beet powder 2 teaspoons lemon pepper (salt free) 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon mild mustard powder 2/­­3 cup water at room temp 3 tablespoons Braggs liquid aminos 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar Everything else: Olive oil for cooking 1 medium onion, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons red miso 3 bay leaves Fresh black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon dried thyme 4 cups veggie broth Fresh parsley for garnish To serve: Mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Instagram seems to go gaga over crinkle cut fries. Or any potatoes, really. A baked potato would be just fine! Also a green veggie. Nothing with too much flavor because this has a lot! Directions In a large mixing bowl, combine wheat gluten flour, nutritional yeast, lemon pepper, onion powder and mustard powder. Make a well in the center. In a small bowl, mix together water, aminos, tomato paste, olive oil and vinegar until the tomato paste is incorporated.  Add wet ingredients to the well and mix until a lumpy ball forms. It will appear a bit dry. Now, use your hands (with gloves if you have them) to knead the mixture until all ingredients are incorporated and there are no dry spots. If its very cold in the kitchen, you may have a harder time kneading. Moisten your hands with warm water and keep going, it should take about 3 minutes and appear very stretchy.  Divide the ball in half with a knife. Again, if its cold, the seitan might spring back more so this process will take a big longer. On a large cutting board, flatten the dough into a kidney shape that is roughly 3/­­4 inch thick and 8 inches in length. Use a rolling pin to roll, flatten and form. Let the first one rest while you do the second one.  Let both doughs rest about 10 minutes, for the gluten to relax a bit, then repeat the rolling process. Again, its more resistant if your kitchen is very cold so you might need to let it rest one more time.  As the steaks rest the surfaces will get a little smoother, which if what you want for the sear and appearance.  Preheat the cast iron grill over medium high. It should be very hot and water should immediately evaporate. This is important because you want the steak to hiss immediately so that is sears and does not stick.  Pour in a thin layer of olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the steaks and sear until dark brown, but not burnt, about a minute and a half per side. Use a thin metal spatula to flip steaks. Once they are seared, lower the heat to medium and let them cook until somewhat firm, about 10 more minutes, flipping and pressing down on them with the spatula.  Now we are going to remove the steaks and cook the sauce in that same pan. Place steaks on a plate.  Turn heat up to medium high. Drizzle about 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the pan. Add onions and a small pinch of salt and sear the onions for about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and a little more oil if needed and cook for about 2 more minutes, stirring often.   Add the wine and stir to deglaze and reduce, about 3 minutes. Mix in the miso to dissolve. Add bay leaves, a healthy dose of fresh black pepper (1/­­2 teaspoon or so), thyme and veggie broth. Let the broth warm, reduce heat to medium. Once warm, return the steaks to the brothy pan and submerge, spooning broth and onions over. Cover the pan and let cook for about 30 minutes. The broth should be simmering this whole time, but not boiling too rapidly.  OK were almost done! Remove the cover and flip the steaks. Turn the heat up and let sauce reduce for about 15 minutes uncovered. The broth will get really boily and active. Spoon sauce over the steaks while they cook. The steaks should no longer appear submerged and the sauce should be thickened a bit and really flavorful. Taste for salt.  Let sit for 10 minutes or so before serving. Remove bay leaves and garnish with parsley.

Ask The RD: Can I be vegetarian and still gain muscle?

December 22 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Ask The RD: Can I be vegetarian and still gain muscle? If youre vegetarian, you might have to work a little harder in the kitchen, but you can still gain muscle. The post Ask The RD: Can I be vegetarian and still gain muscle? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

How to Get Enough Calcium on a Vegan Diet

December 8 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Calcium is critical for strong bones, and other vital functions in your body--and its harder to get on a vegan diet. The good news: with a little planning, you can meet all your daily calcium needs with whole, unprocessed foods. Plus, research suggests calcium absorption from plant sources is comparable to that from cow’s milk, nutrients found in plants benefit bones, and a carefully selected vegan diet doesn’t increase osteoporosis risk. And plant foods are rich in other nutrients like magnesium, vitamin K, copper, zinc, protein, fiber, antioxidants and other nutrients, all of which play an important role in preventing osteoporosis. You dont have to drink milk; keep bones strong with these 12 plant-based foods: 1. Collard greens One cup cooked = 266 mg Daily value: 27% Milk calcium equivalent: about 3/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, fiber, vitamin C, beta-carotene and other antioxidants. 2. Tofu One-half cup = 250 to 400 mg Daily value: 25-40% Milk calcium equivalent: 3/­­4 to 1 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: protein, magnesium, copper, zinc. Note: firm and extra-firm varieties, made with calcium sulfate, have the highest calcium content. 3. Spinach One cup cooked = 245 mg Daily value: 24% Milk calcium equivalent: about 3/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, vitamin C, beta-carotene and other antioxidants. Related: The Well-Stocked Vegan Pantry 4. Chia seeds Two tablespoons = 177 mg Daily value: 18% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­2 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, copper, zinc, fiber, omega-3 fatty acids. 5. Bok choy One cup cooked = 158 mg Daily value: 15% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­2 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, fiber, vitamin C and other antioxidants. Note: Because it’s a cruciferous vegetable, bok choy is also rich in cancer-preventive compounds. 6. White beans One cup cooked = 131 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein Related: Nutrition Face-Off: Raw vs. Cooked Spinach 7. Tahini Two tablespoons = 126 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Biggest benefits: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber. Note: look for raw, unsalted varieties, with no added oil 8. Navy beans One cup cooked = 126 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein 9. Amaranth One cup cooked = 116 mg Daily value: 12% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein Related: 5 Habits of the Healthiest Vegans 10. Edamame One cup cooked = 98 mg Daily value: 10% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: protein, magnesium, copper, zinc 11. Almond butter One ounce (about 22 nuts) = 86 mg Daily value: 8% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, protein, copper. Note: Look for raw, unsalted varieties, with no added oil. 12. Blackstrap molasses Two tablespoons = 82 mg Daily value: 8% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, copper, zinc. Note: Because it’s high in sugar, use blackstrap molasses as a substitute for other sweeteners, to avoid overdoing your daily sugar grams. * Based on the calcium content of 352 mg in one cup 2% milk The post How to Get Enough Calcium on a Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway

November 27 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway Its time for my first annual Holiday Cookbook Giveaway! I will be giving away a set of four of my recent titles to three lucky winners during the next three weeks. Each book bundle will include a copy of: Vegan Mac & Cheese The Plant-Based Slow Cooker One-Dish Vegan The Plant-Protein Revolution Cookbook The first winner will be announced on Tuesday, December 1st; the second winner will be announced on Tuesday, December 8th; and the third winner will be chosen on Tuesday, December 15th. The winners will be chosen at random. Whether you add the books to your personal cookbook collection, or give them away as gifts, this giveaway is my way of saying thank you and Happy Holidays from me to you. To enter this giveaway, simply leave a comment at the end of this post.  For example: What are you grateful for? What makes you smile?  Why do you want to win these books? What’s your favorite vegetable? TELL ME SOMETHING GOOD! Enter now! Leave your comment at the end of this post and check back on the next three Tuesdays to see if youve won a cookbook bundle! The post Holiday Cookbook Giveaway appeared first on Robin Robertson.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.


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