protein - vegetarian recipes

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Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup

Karachi halwa recipe | corn flour halwa | bombay karachi halwa recipe

Fresh Corn Soup with Herbed Croutons

Potato lollipop recipe | aloo lollipop | easy kids snack recipe










protein vegetarian recipes

10 Reasons Why You Need To Eat More Plant Proteins

before yesterday Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although veganism is one of the in things right now, there are much better reasons to eat more plant proteins than following a trend. Just ask the vegans who went meat-free out of compassion for animals, or those who did it for health reasons. We can think of 10 great reasons why you should up your intake of plant proteins. Whether youre looking for motivation to embrace a plant-based diet or you want confirmation that youve made the right dietary decision, you will find it below. 1. Plant Protein Is Animal-Friendly One of the best reasons to adopt a plant-based diet is that its the compassionate choice. For many people, the idea of veganism begins and ends with the lack of slaughtering animals, but it really goes much deeper than that. Those same people may picture modern farms as seen in childrens story books - picturesque places filled with smiley daisies, happy cows, and friendly chickens. According to the ASPCA, the sad truth is that 95% of Americas farm animals live on factory farms. They are effectively meat factories, and theyre as depressing as they sound. Those animals live short, miserable lives, often are subjected to cruel treatment, and ultimately […] The post 10 Reasons Why You Need To Eat More Plant Proteins appeared first on HappyCow.

Two-Bean Nachos

June 16 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Two-Bean Nachos In less than two months, The Plant Protein Revolution will be here!  I can’t wait for this book to come out as a response  to that perennial question “Where do you get your protein?” To give you a sneak peek, I’m sharing one of my favorite recipes from the book, Two-Bean Nachos. I love nachos because they are easy to make and fun to eat, not to mention delicious.  This recipe is all that and more — with 17 grams of protein per serving.  Make the cheesy sauce in advance and the nachos will come together in minutes. BONUS! The book is available now for pre-order and if you pre-order before August 11, 2020, my publisher will send you additional bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following e-mail address: plantproteinrev@quarto.com and theyll send you the bonus recipes. Now let’s dig into some nachos…. Two-Bean Nachos - 1 3/­­4 cups Easy Cheesy Sauce (recipe follows), kept warm - 1 (12-ounce [340 g]) bag whole-grain tortilla chips - 11/­­2 cups (355 g) cooked black beans, or 1 (15-ounce [425 g]) can, rinsed and drained - 11/­­2 cups (354 g) cooked dark red kidney beans, or 1 (15-ounce [425 g]) can, rinsed and drained - 1 large ripe tomato, diced - 1/­­2 cup (80 g) chopped red onion or scallions, white and green parts - 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) chopped pickled jalape?os - 1/­­4 cup (15 g) chopped fresh cilantro (optional) - 2 tablespoons (14 g) hulled hemp seeds - 1 ripe Hass avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lime juice - Sea salt Prepare the sauce and keep it warm. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Spread the tortilla chips in a single layer on a large rimmed baking sheet and bake until the chips are crisp and warm, about 5 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven. Sprinkle the black beans evenly over the chips, followed by the red kidney beans, tomato, onion, jalape?os, cilantro, if using, and the hemp seeds. In a small bowl, toss the avocado with the lime juice and season with salt. Top the nachos with the avocado, then drizzle the warmed cheesy sauce over the nachos and serve immediately. This recipe is from The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook by Robin Robertson (c) 2020, The Harvard Common Press.   Easy Cheesy Sauce Makes 1 3/­­4 cups (415 ml) This creamy golden sauce is rich and full of flavorful protein-rich goodness. I use it to drizzle over nachos and as a topping for baked potatoes, roasted vegetables, and enchiladas. -  - 11/­­4 cups (38 g) raw cashews, soaked in hot water for 30 minutes, then well-drained - 1/­­3 cup (21 g) nutritional yeast - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) jarred roasted red pepper, drained and blotted dry - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) rice vinegar - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice - 2 teaspoons white miso paste - 1 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 cup (235 ml) plain unsweetened plant milk, plus more as needed Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender. Process until the mixture is pureed and smooth, scraping down the sides, as needed. The sauce is now ready to use in recipes.  Use as is, or heat gently in a saucepan for a minute or two, stirring in a little more milk, if needed, for a thinner sauce. The post Two-Bean Nachos appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan PB & J Thumbprint Cookies

June 10 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan PB & J Thumbprint CookiesPB & J Thumbprint Cookies are an irresistibly nutty twist on your classic Jam Thumbprints with protein-packed peanut butter in the dough! A must-try for PB&J fanatics. 7 ingredients. Super easy. Gf and Nutfree options. No added oil!.. Jump to Recipe  Peanut Butter & Jelly Fans, gather – you wont be able to resist the nutty and jammy little gems I have in store for you. These yummy Vegan PB & J Thumbprint Cookies turn our favorite childhood sandwich into a tasty lunchbox treat. Perfectly paired with a glass of plant-based milk, these easy vegan cookies are a delight for the kid in every one of us. If you are a regular here on Vegan Richa, you know that Im into vegan peanut butter desserts.  I made these ultimate Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cookies, Ive curbed my ice cream craving with these Peanut Butter Popsicles and dont get me started on this Peanut Butter Cake. Ive also experimented with the peanut butter and jelly flavor combination. Remember this oatmeal bake recipe? So GOOD and pretty easy and straightforward. Just like these Thumbprint Cookies, which are my latest peanut butter foodie crush This cookie dough comes together in minutes and once made, you just have you chill it for 15 minutes only and youre ready to portion it out and bake your cookies. Continue reading: Vegan PB & J Thumbprint CookiesThe post Vegan PB & J Thumbprint Cookies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Za’atar Spiced Chickpea Burger Recipe with Spicy Caramelized Onions

June 4 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Za’atar Spiced Chickpea Burger Recipe with Spicy Caramelized OnionsA Chickpea Burger recipe that is crispy, packed with plant-based protein, fragrantly spiced with Zaatar. Pair this winning veggie pattie with your favorite burger bun, spicy caramelized onions, and Tahini Dill Sauce! Nutfree Jump to Recipe Chickpeas. They are perfect in so many ways - high in protein and fiber, soft yet starchy in texture and incredibly versatile! Throw them in hummus, roast them until crispy and pile them on top of a salad, stir them into a pilaf or bake them into brownies – or make these zaatar spiced chickpea burgers. Fragrantly spiced, perfectly nutty and deliciously savory. Their deliciousness alone is a good reason to make these vegan burger patties but I also would like to point out that these are wonderfully filling and protein-packed to boot.Continue reading: Vegan Za’atar Spiced Chickpea Burger Recipe with Spicy Caramelized OnionsThe post Vegan Za’atar Spiced Chickpea Burger Recipe with Spicy Caramelized Onions appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples

May 25 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry StaplesYour pantry is full of forgotten treasures: the can of kidney beans hiding behind the rigatoni; the unopened pouch of quinoa tucked off in the corner; the lonely tin of canned corn... But these ingredients, along with other overlooked pantry staples, can be used to make some pretty marvelous meals -- if you know how to prepare them. As more people are cooking at home, the Meatless Monday team set out to ask our followers which of their pantry items theyve found to be the trickiest to cook. Our surveys have revealed that people arent quite sure what to do with canned corn, quinoa and canned kidney beans. We sought the assistance from some of our favorite chefs, bloggers, and Instagram influencers to help us compile a list of superb plant-based recipes featuring popular, yet underutilized, pantry staples. Check out the list below and get cooking! Corn Recipes   TexMex Chickpea Corn Fritters from Kevin Curry - Fit Men Cook When it comes to plant-based patties, fritters always have more fun. These Tex-Mex chickpea corn fritters from Fit Men Cook become nice and crisp after a quick spin in the air fryer (or oven). Canned or frozen corn work for this one, but the big spice blend -- smoked paprika, chili powder, cumin, oregano -- is definitely a must. Source: Fit Men Cook Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad from Rachel Paul - The College Nutritionist Want something a little lighter for the summer season? Try this corn, avocado and tomato salad from the College Nutritionist . Source: College Nutritionist Garlicky Corn and Tuna Pasta from Lenny Wu - Vegamelon This isnt you moms tuna casserole. Pairing a vegan protein with sweet corn and spices makes this garlicky corn & tuna pasta from Vegamelon a must try. Source: Vegamelon Easy Vegan Jalape?o Cornbread from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired This recipe for vegan jalape?o cornbread from Veggie Inspired uses canned corn and jalape?o for a sweet punch of heat. Source: Veggie Inspired Crockpot Chili from Makenna Hale Corn and chili were meant for each other. This crockpot chili from Makenna Hale is vegan and free of both soy and gluten. Source: Makenna Hale   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie from Naturally Zuzu Hearty and delicious, this vegan lentil shepherds pie from Naturally Zuzu will keep your taste buds craving more. Source: Naturally Zuzu Pro tip from Karla Dumas and the Humane Society Culinary Team: Roast canned corn to naturally caramelize it and bring out the sweetness. Season with salt, pepper and lime juice; add beans and cilantro for a quick side dish. Quinoa Recipes   Instant Pot Vegan White Bean Quinoa from Nisha Vora - Rainbow Plant Life You can never have enough chili recipes. This recipe for instant pot vegan white bean quinoa chili from Rainbow Plant Life uses coconut milk and cannellini beans, making it extra creamy and delicious. Source: Rainbow Plant Life Sweet Potato Quinoa Latkes from Joy Bauer Holidays, brunch, late-night snack, doesnt matter; these savory sweet potato latkes from Joy Bauer are the perfect place to put that quinoa. The original recipe calls for egg whites, but to make these latkes completely plant-based, use one of these vegan egg replacements . Source: Joy Bauer Fig and Raisin Quinoa Couscous from My Organic Diary Completely gluten free, this recipe from My Organic Diary marries the flavors of North Africa with protein-packed quinoa. Golden raisins, cinnamon, and figs makes this flavorful side dish perfect for pool-side dining. Source: My Organic Diary Cherry Mint Quinoa Salad from Lisa Drayer In addition to her cherry mint quinoa salad , Lisa Drayer covered the Meatless Monday pantry challenge in her recent CNN article, How to eat less meat and more plants , that also featured Chef Adam Kenworthy s quinoa recipe suggestion and physician and chef Dr. Robert Grahams advice on the health benefits of plant-based eating. Source: Lisa Drayer Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies from DJ Blatner These peanut butter quinoa cookies from DJ Blatner are seriously inventive and delicious. By using a combination of quinoa, oats, and flax seeds, youre getting a solid helping of fiber packaged in a sweet, nutty cookie. Source: Dawn Jackson Blatner Teriyaki Fried Quinoa from The Foodie Takes Flights Skip the takeout and sauté your own version of fried rice, or, in this case, teriyaki fried quinoa . Throw in a colorful collection of vegetables: corn, carrots, peas, purple cabbage, and youve got yourself a rainbow of a meal courtesy of The Foodie Takes Flight . Source: The Foodie Takes Flight Kidney Bean Recipes   Easy Pantry Pasta Bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya Clean out the pantry while making a filling family dinner. Use kidney beans (but any can of beans will do), spinach, tomato sauce, and a spice racks-worth of seasonings for this better-for-you easy pantry pasta bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya . Source: Delicious and Healthy by Maya Comforting Black and Kidney Bean Chili from James - Healthy Living with James Cocoa powder? Cinnamon? Coriander? The unique blend of spices makes this comforting black and kidney bean chili  from Healthy Living with James a unique spin on the classic. Source: Healthy Living with James Zucchini Oat Veggie Patties from Sharon Palmer With a base of kidney beans, shredded zucchini, oats, and seeds, no two bites of these spicy zucchini oat veggie patties from Sharon Palmer will be the same. Source: Sharon Palmer Best Vegan Chili from Hannah - Two Spoons CA Is it really the best vegan chili ? Try this recipe from Two Spoons CA and decide for yourself! Source: Two Spoons CA BBQ Kidney Bean Kale Burgers from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired These kidney bean kale burgers from our friend Jenn Sebestyen at Veggie Inspired develop a nice crunchy crust after 40 minutes in the oven. A mixture of tahini, apple cider vinegar, molasses, and liquid smoke give these patties that beloved barbecue flavor without the grill. Source: Veggie Inspired Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes

May 18 2020 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food DishesAnimal products -- whether beef, pork, chicken, dairy or seafood -- are often thought to be necessary for a balanced diet, and, as a result, these ingredients have typically played a prominent role in home cooking.  But meat is not required for good health or good food, and the characteristics that make our favorite meals special -- the texture, the flavor, the spice -- can all be easily replicated with plant-based ingredients. Swapping out meat for plant-based protein enables you to find the essence of a dish and really consider why that BLT is so refreshing and tasty or how that peanut satay finds the right balance of spicy, nutty, and sweet. Because its usually not the animal protein that makes a dish unique or exquisite, but rather the harmony of ingredients and specific techniques that make for the best eating. Below is a list of classic comfort meals that have had their meaty ingredients swapped out for plant-based alternatives. Try a few this Monday, and gain a new appreciation for your favorite foods. Cauliflower Buffalo Wings Capture the spicy kick of Buffalo wings without the bones (and the chicken). This super simple recipe for cauliflower Buffalo wings is a definite crowd pleaser. No need to wait for gameday, whip up a batch this Monday.   Chickpea Meatloaf Meatloaf is the iconic comfort food, a centerpiece of many family meals. But you can easily recreate the tang and texture of meatloaf sans the meat. This recipe for vegan meatloaf from Nora Cooks uses a base of chickpeas to mimic the density and richness of traditional meatloaf. Photo & Recipe: Nora Cooks Grilled Portobello Mushroom Burgers with Garlic Mayo You wont be missing ground beef after tasting this grilled portobello burger . The mushrooms are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender. When served, they are loaded up with sweet grilled red onions and savory garlic and chive mayonnaise. Lentil Bolognese Everyone loves one-pot cooking. Swap out ground beef for lentils in this hearty recipe for lentil Bolognese from Tasty. Serve over pasta or zucchini noodles. Photo & Recipe: Tasty     Mushroom Stroganoff Impress an Eastern European mother-in-law or stubborn eater with this cozy and comforting (and completely plant-based) version of beef stroganoff. Mimic the flavor, texture, and creaminess of beef stroganoff by using succulent baby portobello mushrooms, soy sauce, and your favorite brand of plant-based sour cream. Try this mouth-watering recipe for mushroom stroganoff from Vegan Huggs . Photo & Recipe: Vegan Huggs Quinoa Chili Fries Sometimes youve just got to cave to what you crave, but this recipe for quinoa chili fries doesnt have to be a guilty pleasure. By baking your own French fries and making your own chunky vegetarian quinoa chili, youll still feel light as air even after eating second helping.   Seitan Peanut Satay The perfect balance between nutty, spicy, and sweet: enter the seitan satay with spicy peanut sauce. Swap out traditional chicken breast for oven-roasted seitan; you wont be able to tell the difference. Follow this yummy recipe from seitan peanut satay from Sunnyside Hanne . Photo & Recipe: Sunnyside Hanne   Tempeh BLT Crisp, clean, and classic, who doesnt love a BLT? Marinating the tempeh overnight in a mixture of apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, liquid smoke, maple syrup, and spices gives it the flavor of bacon, while baking it in a hot oven recreates its crisp-yet-chewy texture. Check out this recipe for a tempeh BLT from The Curious Chickpea and get ready for next weekends brunch. Photo & Recipe: The Curious Chickpea Vegetable Paella Paella is known for its copious amounts of seafood, chicken, and chunks of chorizo, but you can replicate the delicate flavors of Spanish paella with roasted red peppers, artichokes, kalamata olives, and a variety of spices. Try this tasty vegetable paella from Cookie and Kate . Photo & Recipe: Cookie and Kate   Veggie Meatballs You wont miss regular meatballs after youve tried these better-for-you veggie meatballs . Featuring hearty lentils, mushrooms and walnuts, this recipe is sure to hit the spot next time a meatball craving hits. Serve with your favorite pesto or marinara sauce with some sautéed broccoli rabe, pasta, or polenta with spiraled greens.     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce

May 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThis easy cauliflower chickpea and spinach sauté features a fragrant Mustard seed & Curry Leaf Sauce – an easy vegan meal that is ready in under 45 minutes. Packed with healthy cauliflower, creamy chickpeas, and superfood spinach in every bite.  Grain-free and gluten-free! Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a dish that is as simple as it is delicious! Could I possibly interest you in some cauliflower, chickpeas and spinach? And South Indian flavors! In my book, these ingredients are just about the greatest things ever. Toss them in a pan with a delicious mustard seed and curry leaf sauce and serve with quinoa, rice, or have it as-is and youve got yourself a simple dish that is sure to please. Toasted mustard seeds, Urad dal lentils, crisp curry leaves, and Sambhar masala add a fabulous complex flavor. An unexpected, sensational combination of simple ingredients that makes for a well-rounded recipe that is a must-try! You got your iron, you got your protein, you got your vitamins. Check, check, check.Continue reading: Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThe post Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this MondayOur daily food choices have a direct impact on the health of the planet. And while its true that all foods need resources to produce, research shows that meat and dairy have the greatest impacts on the environment. This isnt too hard to picture; raising animals to feed billions of people requires huge inputs of land, feed, water, and energy to be processed, stored, and transported. While the environmental impacts of food production can seem daunting, thankfully there are easy and delicious ways to reduce our individual and collective foodprints through eating a more plant-based diet and reducing food waste . But you dont need to go vegan to make a difference; starting small, like going Meatless Monday, is meaningful and can also lead to eating more plant-based foods throughout the week. Meatless Monday Tips for Plant-based Eating Add more fruits and vegetables to your meals Make meals from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery Stock your pantry with plant-based staples for quick and easy meals Enjoy a wide variety of plant-based proteins Load up your spice cabinet for flavorful meatless meals Reduce food waste with inexpensive foods that wont go bad Get the whole family involved with The Kids Cook Monday meatless recipes Just how much of a difference does it make replacing animal products with plant-based foods? To help quantify the power of plant-based eating, weve collaborated with our academic partners at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to gather the facts and figures behind plant-based foods and the environment. According to calculations from Johns Hopkins, if sixty percent of Americans ate plant-based just one day, it would save the equivalent of 104,000 Olympic swimming pools of water and the land area of the California Redwood Forests. Hungry for more reasons to go Meatless Monday? Check out the facts below to see the impact that livestock production as on the environment, and how you can help minimize those effects by reducing meat and adding more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and grains into your diet. Water Animal agriculture is responsible for about 70 percent of the worlds freshwater use. By 2050, water demand for livestock production is expected to leave half the worlds population living in water-stressed environments. Research shows that eating a more plant-based diet can decrease agricultural water use by 50 percent. Deforestation The meat industry is the most significant driver of deforestation, clearing approximately 50 million square miles of forest for agricultural purposes each year. Combining pasture and land used for feed crops, 80 percent of the worlds farmlands are used for livestock production. Soil Health Animal agriculture damages soil quality and compromises the health of the ecosystem. Industrial livestock production, through its intensive land management practices, reduces soil fertility and leaves previously fertile regions barren and more prone to natural disaster such as wildfires, flooding, and dust storms. Wide-scale shifts toward more plant-based diets would carry tremendous benefits for soil health and biodiversity. Biodiversity Livestock production has led to over 60% decline in species populations since 1970. Animal agriculture disrupts delicate eco-systems, making it one of the greatest human contributors to species decline. Global Emissions Meat and dairy production remain the most significant contributors of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and of these sources, livestock production is the largest, accounting for an estimated 14.5 percent of global GHG emissions from human activities, according to the United Nations. Interested in learning more about the connection between the food system and the health of the environment? Click here for more facts and figures from our academic partners at Johns Hopkins University. The post Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Peanut Stew with Kidney Beans & Coconut Milk – Vegan

April 12 2020 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Stew with Kidney Beans & Coconut Milk – VeganThis deliciously creamy and rich Vegan Peanut Stew makes for a warm and comforting weeknight meal thats super easy to make using just One Pot. Gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, oil-free option and plant-based!  Today we are gonna stir some peanut butter into a kidney bean stew and trust me, you will love it! Enter – Vegan Peanut Stew! I know peanut butter and kidney beans might sound like a strange combination but you have to trust me when I say its amazing. If this is the first time you ever make a peanut-based stew or curry, you’re in for a delicious treat. This unique peanut, tomato, and coconut milk-based stew is so incredibly flavorful, super comforting, and is truly a hug in a bowl. The nutty peanut flavor lends itself beautifully to the creamy sweet kidney beans and served over some rice, this hearty vegan stew surely makes for a nutritious meal perfect for weeknights.Continue reading: Peanut Stew with Kidney Beans & Coconut Milk – VeganThe post Peanut Stew with Kidney Beans & Coconut Milk – Vegan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Singapore Mei Fun

April 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Singapore Mei FunQuarantine cooking can be fun — as in mei fun!  Mei fun noodles are very thin Chinese rice noodles (also called rice vermicelli). It is a popular street food in Singapore. Basic mei fun can be somewhat bland, usually stir-fried with shiitake mushrooms, soy sauce, and a few other ingredients, with additional condiments served on the side. Singapore mei fun, on the other hand, is distinctive for its addition of curry powder. It usually features a number of vegetables, and some type of protein food — my version calls for tofu, but you can substitute seitan, tempeh, or soy curls. If rice vermicelli noodles are unavailable, you can make this with angel hair pasta instead (cooked al dente before adding to the skillet). Also feel free to change up the vegetables used (zucchini instead of broccoli, or green peas instead of snow peas, for example). The seasoning can also be adjusted to your taste, add more red pepper flakes (or a drizzle of Sriracha) for more heat, or use more or less curry powder. Here is the recipe for Singapore Mei Fun.  Since I.m limiting my trips to the supermarket, I was out of bell pepper, snow peas, broccoli, and cilantro, so I just used cabbage, carrots, and frozen green peas - and it was still super-delicious.  Use what you got!  This is what my quarantine version looked like last night: This recipe is from my most beautiful cookbook, Vegan Without Borders.  If you don’t have this book, now is a great time to get it — it’s like taking a culinary tour around the world, right in your own home! Singapore Mei Fun - 8 ounces rice vermicelli (mei fun noodles) - 4 teaspoons vegetable oil, divided - 8 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cut into 1/­­2-inch dice - 1/­­4 cup soy sauce, divided - 1 to 2 tablespoons good-quality Madras curry powder (I used 2 tablespoons  S&B curry powder blended with water) - 1 medium-size yellow onion, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into thin matchstick strips (or shredded cabbage) - 1 carrot, coarsely shredded - 2 ounces snow peas, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces (or frozen green pea) - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 to 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (omit if you dont want it spicy) - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 cups small broccoli florets, lightly steamed (or steamed green beans cut into 1-inch pieces) - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional) Soak the rice noodles according to the package directions until softened. Drain well and set aside. Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until nicely browned, adding 2 tablespoons of the soy sauce and a sprinkling of curry powder while cooking. Remove from the skillet and set aside on a plate. Reheat the skillet with the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the onion, bell pepper, carrot, and snow peas, and stir-fry 2 to 3 minutes to soften. Stir in the remaining curry powder and stir-fry 10 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of soy sauce, along with the sugar, salt, and red pepper flakes, stirring to mix well. Stir in the broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the drained rice noodles and return to a boil, stirring to coat the noodles in the sauce. Add the steamed broccoli and reserved tofu, and cook, stirring, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed by the noodles. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot sprinkled with cilantro. Serves 4 Recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (c) 2014 by Robin Robertson The post Singapore Mei Fun appeared first on Robin Robertson.

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better

March 23 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste BetterPeanut butter is everything: savory and sweet, fatty and salty, crunchy and creamy. Its uses are truly endless, serving as the basis of stews, sauces, chilis, chutneys, and, of course, desserts. Peanuts, also known as goobers, ground nuts, or monkey nuts, are nutritionally dense, rich in both healthy fats and plant-based protein. Peanuts and peanut butter have long shelf lives, are inexpensive, and can add a tasty new dimension to any number of recipes. Sure, you can eat peanuts by the handful (or spoonful), but then youd be missing out on the peanuts wildly diverse culinary applications. This Monday, branch out and do some experimenting by making any one of these novel peanut recipes. Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal A dollop of peanut butter transforms a bowl of oatmeal from meh to mmmmm. This oatmeal is packed with protein and fiber, making it a perfect was to start your morning. For the Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal, click here. Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans The secret to this smooth, salty, dreamy chili is a cup of creamy peanut butter. Try it and taste the magic for yourself. For the Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans recipe, click here. Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes The best of breakfast collides with a lunch box staple. A great meal for kids, adults, and adults who act like kids. For the Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes recipe, click here. Peanut Noodles Packed with plant protein, this flavorful noodle dish incorporates unique Southeast Asian ingredients like sambhal olek (Indoenisan chile sauce) and Sichuan peppercorns. Give it a try if you want to put your taste buds on an adventure. For the Peanut Noodles recipe, click here. Spicy Peanut Chutney Top soups, pastas, stews, or sandwiches with this delightful blend of roasted peanuts, garlic, sesame seeds, coconut, and chile flake. Its the perfect blend of sweet, nutty, and spicy. For the Spicy Peanut Chutney recipe, click here. Sweet Potato Peanut Stew Creamy and decadent, you can whip up this West African stew in under 30 minutes. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. For the Sweet Potato Peanut Stew recipe, click here. Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Light and refreshing, serve these Thai spring rolls as an appetizer or in place of a salad. The peanut dipping sauce adds a tangy punch of flavor. For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep

June 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better SleepSometimes its just impossible to fall asleep; and, sure, it could be due to excitement or stress, but many restless nights might be a result of the food we had for dinner (or dessert). What we eat plays an important role in how we sleep, because fruits, vegetables, legumes, and even spices contain a complex array of nutrients that all have different effects on our bodies. And while some ingredients can help quell restless nights, others may have the opposite effect, keeping you wired and jittery for hours. So, the next time youre planning your weekly dinner menu, be sure to keep your sleep schedule in mind. Check out our list of plant-based foods to eat (and avoid) before bed for a better sleep. What to Eat:   Almonds A welcomed addition to a strawberry kale salad , trail mix, or Asian noodle bowl , almonds are packed with all the nutrients necessary for healthy eating. But almonds also contain certain minerals that make them useful sleep aids , specifically high amounts of magnesium, which has been found to reduce inflammation and levels of cortisol, a stress-hormone attributed to disrupting sleep.   Bananas Universally beloved for its convenience and mellow flavor, the banana is also a good source of tryptophan, an amino acid associated with sleep. Have breakfast for dinner with a plate of banana buckwheat pancakes or a bowl of banana maple oatmeal , and set yourself up for a sound snooze. Chamomile Tea Its well known, and well documented, that herbal teas can help you relax, but chamomile tea is particularly capable of improving your sleep . Chamomile contains apigenin, an antioxidant that binds to certain receptors in the brain that may promote sleepiness and reduce insomnia.   Kiwi Who wouldve thought this odd, little, green fruit could be the answer to your restless nights? Okay, maybe thats an overstatement, but research does show that kiwis contain high of serotonin, a brain chemical that helps regulate the sleep cycle. Kiwis can be tricky to eat, so we recommend throwing them into the blender for a late-night kiwi-basil smoothie .   Oatmeal Complex carbohydrates, like oats, have the power to induce drowsiness before sleep. Oats -- one of our favorite inexpensive Meatless Monday pantry staples -- contain melatonin, making them a potentially useful sleep aid if consumed before bed.   What to Avoid:   Beans The humble legume is packed with a bounty of nutritional benefits -- protein, fiber, minerals -- but beans may not be the best things to eat right before bed. Eating a bowl of chili or rice and beans before sleep, although delicious, is asking for a night of indigestion and gas pains.   Broccoli Broccoli is a great addition to any diet, but it shouldnt be consumed close to bed time. Fibrous foods, like broccoli, take the body longer to digest, which may keep you awake at night.   Candy An evening full of candy or other sugary treats will have you tossing and turning in bed. Candy is typically composed straight sugar, which can cause wild swings in blood-sugar levels. The initial sugar crash may help you fall asleep, but afterward youll be stuck wide awake.   Cured Meats Preserved meats contain high concentrations of the amino acid tyramine, which signals the brain to release norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that readies the body for action. Levels of norepinephrine are lowest during sleep and highest during dangerous or stressful situations. Not an ideal combination for night time. Thankfully, there are plenty of plant-based swaps to satisfy your cravings for salty, fatty foods. Spicy Food Finishing off a spicy bowl of curry or cauliflower Buffalo wings will awaken your taste buds, but it will also keep you awake. Chile peppers can be good for you, but eating them before bedtime can lead to indigestion, heart burn, and elevated body temperature -- physical qualities that impair sleep.   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook

May 19 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook Im very happy to announce that my new cookbook, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook, launches in less than three months. And the timing couldn’t be better as more people than ever are moving away from eating animals. If you’re new to a plant-based diet (or even if you’re not) chances are you’ll be asked the same question I’ve been asked since going vegan over thirty years ago: Where do you get your protein? The short answer, of course, is From plants! A longer answer (along with 85 delicious protein-packed recipes) can be found in The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook.  The recipes in this book provide maximum plant-based protein, along with all the other nutrients that plant foods contain. The book also contains lots of helpful information and charts along with stunning photos by Jackie Sobon. THere are recipes for everything from appetizers to desserts, including: - Two Bean Nachos - Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing - Bean and Beet Burgers - Plant-Powered Club Sandwiches - Tacos with Creamy Sriracha-Lime Slaw - Tofu Ramen Bowls - Super Shepherds Pie - Pasta and White Beans with Spinach-Walnut Pesto - Chickpea Piccata with Mushrooms - Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh - Super Frittata - Everything Avocado Toast with White Beans and Roasted Tomatoes - Blueberry Chia Pudding - Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie BONUS! The book is available not for pre-order and if you pre-order before August 11, 2020, my publisher will send you additional bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following e-mail address: plantproteinrev@quarto.com and theyll send you the bonus recipes. Soon, when someone asks how I get my protein, I can give them a copy of The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook and say, I get my protein from plants. Dont you? The post The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook appeared first on Robin Robertson.

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg AlternativesAs most bakers will tell you, baking makes you feel good. It can even be a meditative activity that helps to reduce stress and brings us positive feelings of doing something for others; in this case, creating delicious baked goods for the ones we love. When whipping up plant-based desserts and baked goods, using the right substitute for eggs is critical as it is a key ingredient that gives structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. Dont panic. Some clever cooks have come up with easy to use animal-free alternatives; flax and chia seeds, apple sauce, and aquafaba can all be used in some capacity to replace eggs. But remember that not every egg alternative is equal: aquafaba is used for egg whites, chia seeds are better for browning and color, and silken tofu adds texture and protein. Below is a list of our favorite egg alternatives complete with drool-worthy recipes from a few of our favorite plant-based bloggers. So start experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker , and try making her recipe for easy macaroons . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. If youre a fan of banana, try these heavenly peanut butter banana brownies from Bucket List Tummy . Please note that the recipe also calls for a flax egg (see recipe for flax egg below). Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies, but they can also add a nice texture to this sweet chia cornbread from The Simple Veganista . Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5-10 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Try using them to make these vegan coffee cake streusel muffins by Choosing Chia . Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Silken tofu is best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda, but its also wonderfully decadent in this vegan strawberry cheesecake by Exceedingly Vegan . Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST (theyve got a great recipe for crispy waffles). Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs. Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some more #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery .   The post “Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons

May 5 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons Serves 4 Caesar is the mother of all salads, vegan or not. But especially vegan! Who can deny a briny, lemony, creamy, garlicky dressing? I think the reason that Kale Caesars in particular are so popular (besides the fact that it sounds like hail, Caesar I suppose), is that the acidic dressing really breaks down the kales mask of toughness, revealing its true, velvetty nature. It still retains its crunch and heartiness but after the massage its, well, relaxed a bit! This dressing uses nori as a seasoning, adding that ocean flavor to the mix. I love roasted Brussels instead as croutons, for their toasty crunch. If youd like to add protein, toss in some chickpeas or top with tempeh or tofu, a chickpea cutlet or even some storebought fake chickn sliced up. Avocado, of course, never hurts either.  This is originally from I Can Cook Vegan. If you buy that book I promise to do only good things with the money. Recipes Notes ~ Lacinato kale is my fave for salads because its at once crunchy and a little more delicate than other kale varieties. But use what you got! ~ And yeah you can totally just use this dressing on romaine, too. Like, duh, why not. Just skip the massaging part ~ If you dont have a highspeed blender like viamix or blendtec, you can make this using a regular blender. Soak cashews them overnight first, or, if you dont have that kind of time, boil in water for 30 min and drain. You will have to scrape down the sides with a rubber spatula and give your blender a rest from time to time, and it could take like 5 minutes to get it totally smooth. Just be patient. Ingredients For the brussels: 1 lb brussels, quartered 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the dressing: 3 cloves garlic 1 cup whole unroasted cashews 1/­­2 sheet nori, torn to pieces 1/­­4 cup tablespoons nutritional yeast 3/­­4 cup water 1/­­4 cup fresh lemon juice 1 tsp whole grain dijon mustard 3/­­4 teaspoon salt Several dashes fresh black pepper For the salad: 1 lb lacinato kale, rough stems removed, torn into 2 inch pieces or so Optional: Roasted pepitas or sunflower kernels for garnish Sliced lemon for squeezing Directions 1 – Preheat the oven to 425 F for the brussels. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.  2 – Toss the quartered brussel sprouts with olive oil and a dash of salt. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned. No need to flip them, just let em roast. 3 – Make the dressing. Place garlic in a high-speed blender and pulse to chop up. Add remaining ingredients and blend until completely smooth, about a minute, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula every now and again.  4 – Pour about 3/­­4 of the dressing into a large mixing bowl. Add the kale and massage it into the dressing for about a minute. Dont be afraid to really get in there like youre kneading dough.  5 – Top with roasted brussels and drizzle on more dressing. Finish with seeds, a little extra black pepper and serve with a lemon!

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based RecipesCooking is a joy, but making every meal from scratch can get tedious, not to mention time consuming. And thats where big-batch cooking comes in. Weve created a list of plant-based recipes that are well suited for families (and leftovers). To do this, we looked through our Meatless Monday recipe database to find dishes that dont require a lot of preparation, are easy to scale up, and are hearty, nutritious, and filling. Although not all the recipes listed below are main dishes, they can still be prepared in large quantities and can be used to accompany other meals as side dishes or mid-day snacks. From Moroccan split pea soup and roasted chimichurri vegetables to Thai pumpkin curry and green tea pesto pasta the options for bulk cooking are only limited by your imagination -- and maybe the size of your stock pot. This Monday, do yourself a favor and cook a batch thats big enough for leftovers.  Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash This recipe is an opportunity to get creative. Add whatever vegetables you have on hand and cook them up in your biggest skillet with some soy sauce, scallions, garlic, and chile oil. For the Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash recipe, click here .   Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables Pungent and flavorful, these roasted vegetables can be prepared in bulk. The aromatic parsley-based chimichurri sauce is easy to scale up as well. For the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables recipe, click here .         Freekeh Pilaf Swapping out rice for freekeh -- an ancient grain made from roasted green durum wheat -- makes for a healthier and more textured version of this classic dish. As with any pilaf, the flavor is only as good as the broth you use to cook it in, so make sure to use a nice, flavorful vegetable stock when cooking. For the Freekeh Pilaf recipe, click here . Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad Chunks of butternut squash and Brussels sprouts makes this fragrant and flavorful ginger orzo more of a main meal than a side dish. The recipe serves eight, so expect leftovers, which is a plus because the flavors become more pronounced after they spend a night in the refrigerator. For the Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad, click here . Green Tea Pesto Pasta An exceptionally unique recipe, this green tea pesto pasta is perfect to make in big batches. You can also make extra sauce and keep it in a plastic container for when pasta cravings hit. Add any variety of vegetables -- cherry tomatoes, zucchini, broccoli -- to add some oomph to the meal. For the Green Tea Pesto Pasta recipe, click here . Lemon Ginger Peas Frozen peas are humble ingredients, but they can be wonderfully delicious. This dish is simple to prepare and can be made in large batches, depending on how many bags of frozen peas youre willing to store in your freezer. Experiment with different seasoning combinations to keep your taste buds guessing. For the Lemon Ginger Peas recipe, click here . Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya This meat-free jambalaya is packed with smoke, heat, and creole flavor. The recipe feeds six and doesnt require much in terms of prep -- just sauté the aromatics, pour in the stock, beans and rice, bring to a boil, and simmer away until the rice is fluffy and tender. For the Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya recipe, click here .     Moroccan Split Pea Soup No matter the season, a hearty cauldron of split pea soup can feed an army. Besides being incredibly affordable, split peas are easy to prepare and packed with protein and fiber. Moroccan-inspired seasonings add a refreshing punch of flavor to each spoonful. For the Moroccan Split Pea Soup recipe, click here . Quick and Easy Hummus Making your own hummus is so much more affordable than buying it prepackaged at the store. Double or triple this recipe (depending on the size of your food processor), and have delicious, creamy hummus available all week. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here . Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie Hello leftovers. Making a platter of this shepherds pie will feed a large family. Prep the platter the day before cooking and store in the refrigerator if you want an easy weeknight meal. For the Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie recipe, click here . Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry This recipe can easily be doubled if you want an extra few servings the following day. Although it calls for pumpkin, feel free to incorporate eggplant, extra tofu, or a bag of frozen spinach to add more heft to the dish. For the Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry recipe, click here . Vegetarian Gumbo Gumbo gets its color and flavor from its roux -- a paste-like mixture of flour and fat. This recipe is rich, decadent, packed with vegetables, and easy to scale up. For the Vegetarian Gumbo recipe, click here . Zucchini Scallion Cakes As simple as making pancakes, you can whip up a few dozen of these lemony zucchini cakes in no time. For the Zucchini Scallion Cakes recipe, click here . Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Ginger, Pear, and Spinach Shake

April 13 2020 VegKitchen 

Ginger, Pear, and Spinach Shake You can substitute 1 cup of freshly squeezed orange juice for some of the water or throw in a handful of cashews for more texture and protein. Try chilling the shake in the refrigerator for 20 minutes before serving if you want a more cooling effect. Contributed by Alexandra Jamieson, from Vegan Cooking for Dummies. The post Ginger, Pear, and Spinach Shake appeared first on VegKitchen.

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes

April 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes Beans are the pillars of the pantry; theyre easy to prepare, packed with plant-based protein and a host of other vitamins and minerals, versatile, flavorful, and adaptable. We love adding them to stews, transforming them into burgers, or serving them cold and dressed for a bright and hearty salad. With so many varieties available, from pinto beans and black-eye peas to navy beans and chickpeas, your recipe options are truly endless. Depending on how you cook them, beans can be creamy and elegant or toothsome and refreshing, which is why its important to have a stock of both canned beans and dried beans in your pantry. This Monday, grab a can of beans and experiment with one of our top 10 favorite bean recipes. Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup All the flavors of your favorite Italian restaurant -- roasted garlic, crushed tomatoes, dry white wine -- packed into one hearty, comforting bowl of soup. For the Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup recipe, click here .     Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad Tahini is made from pulverized sesame seeds; its creamy nuttiness is magic when used as a dressing for this colorful quinoa bean salad. For the Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad recipe, click here .     Navy Bean Bruschetta  Sure, traditional bruschetta is made with diced fresh tomatoes, but this version boasts a bit more protein thanks to a base of navy beans. For the Navy Bean Bruschetta recipe, click here .     New Orleans Red Beans and Rice For authentic red beans and rice, youve got to start with dry beans. Soak overnight and boil with some aromatics for a bean dish that is unlike anything youve ever tasted before. For the New Orleans Red Beans and Rice recipe, click here .     Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger Although the recipe calls for a handful of ingredients, you can make the base of these burgers using just farro (a yummy, toothsome grain) and white beans. Add any other additional vegetables, seasonings, or bread crumbs to round out the flavor and texture. For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger recipe, click here .       Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili This chili is rich and smoky thanks to the liberal use of chipotle and ancho chili powder, cumin, and, of course, lots and lots of black beans. For the Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili recipe, click here .       Quick and Easy Hummus To make hummus requires four ingredients -- chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, salt -- and a food processor. Yep, thats it. Enjoy. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here .       Vegetarian Hoppin John Though traditionally made with ham or bacon, this vegetarian version of Hoppin John doesnt lack for flavor thanks to hot sauce, liquid smoke, and yummy black-eyed peas. For the Vegetarian Hoppin John recipe, click here .     Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs Meatless meatballs made with roasted red peppers and kidney beans mimic beautifully the meat versions. The flavor is all there, too, with onion and garlic, herbs, and non-dairy Parmesan cheese. For the Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs recipe, click here .   Pinto Bean Falafel Most falafel recipes call for chickpeas, but this version using pinto beans is creamier than traditional versions, but with all the same flavor. For the Pinto Bean Falafel recipe, click here .     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lasagna Without Cheese? Yup, It’s Possible! [Video]

March 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Lasagna without meat is easy. Lasagna without cheese? Now that’s a challenge. In this video, Like a Vegan shows you how to replace traditional ricotta with a tofu-based substitute. It’s creamy, packed with plant-based protein, and you’ll never guess it’s made without dairy! [uliveplayersingle id=”8ec057fd-08e2-4d2c-b991-57551a5ae1a1″] Oh My Veggies is partnering with uLive to bring our readers recipes and tutorials from their video library. To view more veg-friendly ideas from uLive, visit our video page.

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort FoodsInexpensive, packed with protein, and easy to store, tofu is an indispensable wonder food that you simply must have in your refrigerator at all times. Tofu is sold in different levels of firmness, which can range from silken (pillowy and custard-like) to extra firm (spongy). The less-firm varieties have higher water content, making them better for cream and dairy replacements. Tofu can also be used to boost the nutritional quality of your favorite dishes; blend a block of silken tofu into your typical roux-based cheese sauce for a plant-based protein boost, and no one will notice the difference. This Monday, experiment with tofu by incorporating this versatile ingredient into some of your favorite classic comfort foods. Our top tofu tips and hacks: o Press your tofu to remove water before cooking or marinating o Freeze and thaw tofu to achieve a texture more similar to meat o Marinate tofu with your favorite sauces, avoid oil-based marinades o Press, cube and air-fry or bake tofu with your favorite seasonings for easy and delicious toss-ins for salads, stir fry, burritos and beyond Alfredo Sauce Traditional Alfredo sauce is heavy, rich, but oh so delicious. Try using tofu for a version thats light, creamy, lower in calories, and higher in protein. Whats the secret? Just blend together silken tofu, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, vegan butter, and a healthy amount of nutritional yeast. Liberally coat some fettuccine and enjoy. Buffalo Wings When battered, breaded, and baked, tofu becomes crisp on the outside, just like your favorite chicken wings. To make tofu wings, simply dredge extra-firm tofu blocks in cornstarch, dip them in a plant-based milk, coat in bread crumbs, seasonings and bake or air-fry until brown. You can create your own Buffalo sauce by mixing together hot sauce (Franks RedHot is the classic), butter or non-dairy butter substitute, and granulated garlic. Drooling for more? Check out this Crispy Tofu Finger recipe. Caesar Dressing No eggs or anchovies required to make this plant-based Caesar dressing . Blend together silken tofu, lemon juice and zest, garlic cloves, capers, Dijon mustard and nutritional yeast. Pour over some grilled romaine lettuce, and your first course it ready to go. Chicken Fried Tofu Chicken fried steak is a southern staple, but the technique, which involves a thinly sliced protein thats been breaded and pan-fried, can be made with tofu to produce the same crispy, comforting outcome. The recipe is straightforward : Simply drain, slice, and press tofu to remove as much moisture as possible; dip slices into a batter (use plant-based milk, flour, and some vinegar or lemon juice); and, finally, cover in your breading. Put the finished steaks on a wire cooling rack and bake, air-fry or sauté until golden and crispy. Jalapeno Poppers Ideal for game days and gatherings, the jalapeno popper has achieved mythical status as one of the ultimate appetizers. For a plant-based version , swap out the cream cheese for a tofu cream cheese -- which you can buy or easily make on your own . To make these plant-based bites, seed the jalapenos, slice down the middle, stuff with your tofu cream cheese and whatever other goodies you have available -- non-dairy cheese, scallions, chile powder -- and give them a quick roast in the oven until nice and charred, and top with some crushed potato chips for a little texture. Jamaican Jerk Tofu This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican jerk seasoning is sure-to-please. Its sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. The recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu is super simple: Just press and slice the tofu, submerge in the jerk marinade, and cook in a hot skillet. Lasagna Food doesnt get more comforting than lasagna. Approach this dish as you would your favorite lasagna recipe , but instead of ricotta cheese, blend together pressed tofu, nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Tofu Parmigiana   Italian night has never been easier. Press, bread, and sauté slices of tofu until their golden brown; add some tomato sauce to the bottom of a baking dish, line it with the lightly-fried tofu, top with remaining sauce, top with traditional or non-dairy mozzarella, and pop into the oven. Check out one of our favorite recipes here .   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for BakingEggs play a crucial role in many of our favorite baked goods, giving structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. But like other forms of intensive livestock farming, egg production also takes a toll on the health of the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, and contamination of soil and water. Plant-based egg replacers are designed to give us all that we love about eggs without the environmental baggage. But, please remember that every plant-based egg alternative wont work in every application, so look for plant-based baking recipes or do some experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies. Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda. Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST . Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs.   Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery . The post The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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