potato - vegetarian recipes

potato vegetarian recipes

Anja Schwartz Rothe

yesterday 15:30 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole

December 11 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu cholealoo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole with step by step photo and video recipe. chickpeas or potato based curries are very common and popular choice for day to day use. more commonly the recipes are either made with just one of them as key ingredient in a spicy and tangy tomato and onion based sauce. yet there are other variations like aloo chole ki sabji where potato and chickpeas are used together to make a curry. The post aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday SeasonTis the season to incorporate more meatless dishes into your recipe collection. Weve made a list -- and weve checked it twice -- of some of our favorite holiday appetizers, mains, side, and desserts, almost all of which are plant-based! Craving chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Try our roasted chestnut soup. Jack Frost nipping at your nose? Nothing will keep you more snug than our warming carrot cauliflower stew. Grandma got ran over by a reindeer? Well, um, weve got a great recipe for honey-vanilla poached pears. Check out our Meatless Monday holiday menu below and see how you can wow your guests with some festive and flavorful meatless meals. Appetizers Set the proper tone for the meal with these seasonal holiday appetizers: Roasted Chestnut Soup Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip Sides On this holiday dinner table, let the side dishes take center stage: Maple Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts Rosemarys Beets with Hazelnuts and Basil Roasted Potatoes with Orange Couscous Baked Polenta Basil Fries Mains Plant-based mains can be just as hardy and comforting as their animal-based counterparts: Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Italian White Beans with Kale Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta Chickpea Burgers with Spicy Harissa  Desserts End with something sweet (but not too sweet): Honey Vanilla Poached Pears Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread Baked Apple Donuts   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post 14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes

December 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes   Meatless Monday has created our dream-team celebrity chef meatless holiday menu, featuring a plant-based take on traditional recipes created by Bobby Flay, Gordon Ramsay, Giada de Laurentiis, Martha Stewart, Rachael Ray, Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and Carla Hall. From our kitchen to yours, please click the links below to enjoy these delicious, decadent, jaw dropping, and, of course, festive plant-based holiday recipes.   Appetizers Artichoke Arancini Wild Mushroom & Pomegranate Salad Cannellini & Kale Soup Sides Lemon Smashed Potatoes Persimmons & Roasted Chicories  Grilled Brussels Sprouts & Hazelnut Vinaigrette Entrees Epic Veg Lasagne Beet Wellington Stuffed Squash  Desserts  Sumptuous Chocolate Cake Deconstructed Vegan Pecan Pie Vegan Apple Pie   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

kat vada recipe | kat wada recipe | kolhapuri kat vada | vada usal

November 29 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

kat vada recipe | kat wada recipe | kolhapuri kat vada | vada usalkat vada recipe | kat wada recipe | kolhapuri kat vada | vada usal with step by step photo and video recipe. maharashtrian and gujurati cuisine is known for its spicy and tasty snack or street food recipes it has to offer. typically it is either a potato based or pav (bread) based snack recipe. one such hugely popular snack recipe is the kat vada recipe or also known as batata vada sambar where vada is served in a spicy sauce. The post kat vada recipe | kat wada recipe | kolhapuri kat vada | vada usal appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their VeggiesLooking for some culinary inspiration for your next round of Meatless Monday meals? Well, we have some EXCITING news: The first Meatless Monday cookbook is finally here, and with over 100 delicious, better-for-you plant-based recipes youll be able to whip up a meat-free meal for any type of eater -- from experimental flexitarians to new vegans to the staunchest of carnivores. The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook , by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). The book, whose foreword is written by Sid Lerner, founder of the global Meatless Monday initiative and The Monday Campaigns, is based on the Meatless Monday philosophy of cutting out meat one day a week for your health and the health of the planet. And as its title suggest, The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook is designed for the whole family, because when kids are involved in the prepping and cooking process, they develop a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for the food in front of them. The cookbook officially goes on sale November 19, but weve included a few recipe highlights to share with you. And with Thanksgiving right around the corner, these plant-based recipes might just be what you need to round out the holiday dinner table.     Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle This recipe marries the best traits of avocado toast with the enticing aroma and flavor of cannellini beans slowly sautéed with fresh garlic and olive oil. The mixture is spooned on to the avocado-smeared toast and drizzled with a sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce. Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables With butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, youre getting all the best that autumn has to offer. The subtle maple glaze adds a surprisingly subtle sweetness that pairs nicely with the fall vegetables. Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Theres nothing cozier than a hearty stew and some mashed potatoes. This recipe, which uses cremini and shitake mushrooms and a healthy dose of tamari, is an homage to umami. Ladle it over a scoop of mashed potatoes for some pure plant-based bliss. Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Its like a chicken potpie -- minus the chicken and the pie. No animal products are necessary for this smooth and sultry creamy vegetable noodle soup. Vegetable broth, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and a whole lot of seasonings and aromatics make this soup satisfying and delicious. Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. Rice and Bean Pan Grilled Burritos A burrito is engineered to include an entire meals worth of goodies wrapped in one, warm, fluffy package. Chocked full of smoky pinto beans, cilantro rice, lettuce, and an avocado green chile sauce, be prepared for requests for seconds. BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls Channeling the hot smoke of the barbecue pit, this BBQ chickpea veggie bowl is charred, sweet, and tangy with a satisfying crunch. The recipe calls for roasted broccoli, red peppers, onions, and chickpeas, but you can top your brown rice bowl with any variety of vegetables. Just dont forget to drizzle over some homemade sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce The proper blend of sweet and heat, this BBQ sauce uses smoky chipotles, tart apple-cider vinegar, maple syrup, and a blend of spices. Squeeze a little bit any meatless Monday meal to take it to the next level. About the author: Jenn Sebestyen is the creator of VeggieInspired.com. She was inspired to write The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook to help moms and dads get both picky kids and die-hard carnivores to eat more veggies. She offers tips and tricks that have worked for getting her kids on board with a veggie-heavy Meatless Monday plan.   Interested in learning more about Meatless Monday? Click here for more recipes, cooking tips, and ways that you can spread the Meatless Monday message to your community. For a chance to be featured in our next recipe roundup, make sure to tag @MeatlessMonday or use the hashtag #meatlessmonday the next time you post a meatless or plant-based recipe. The post New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce

November 17 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce This post was created in partnership with OXO. Today weve got a festive veggie roast recipe thats made in one oven with a lush cranberry sauce. The savoriness of the caramelized, mustard-miso roasted vegetables pairs so well with the tart, sweet, and juicy character of the cranberry sauce. Plus, the whole thing comes together in a pretty hands-off manner, with the oven doing the bulk of the work. Although Im generally excited and appreciative of any veggie side at the holiday table, I think that roasted vegetables (or any veg-centric sides in general) are often treated as an afterthought, not something that can be just as special as the main event. We are of course here to gently propose that vegetables can themselves be the main event – but even if thats not your thing, this veggie roast will be an exciting addition to your holiday table. Im particular about one thing when it comes to roasted vegetables and thats that they should be nicely cooked through, to the point of beautiful caramelization and crispy edges. Ive had so many instances of ordering roasted vegetables in restaurants, where they arrive looking beautiful, but turn out to be tough and raw on the inside upon the first bite. This is especially true for root veg of all kinds. A half-raw sweet potato or carrot is never a good thing. So its my strong belief that vegetables should be allowed plenty of time to get really, really happy in the oven. Just this little trick alone makes them taste so much better. For special occasions, I also like to roast vegetables in a mustardy sauce of some kind. Its an extra step, but it helps take the flavor to the next level and achieve that A+ caramelization. Thats what we do in this recipe. And since weve already got the oven heated up for the vegetables, we are making the cranberry sauce in the oven all at the same time. Turns out, it works just as well as the stovetop method, so why not go for the simplicity! The sauce features a luxurious mix of cranberries, green apple, and raisins, with orange juice and a kiss of cinnamon, for a beautiful balance of sweet and tart. Were very excited to partner with OXO on this holiday roasting recipe, since they make every kitchen tool youll ever need to prepare the celebratory meal of your dreams (plus much much more for your kitchen). I was so excited to upgrade to their non-stick half sheet baking pans – they are so roomy and sturdy, and perfect for roasting up big batches of vegetables without crowding them. We roast and bake a lot, so we used to go through tons of parchment paper. OXOs Silicone Baking Mat quickly took care of that problem. Its reusable, so easy to clean, and can be stored neatly rolled up in the drawer. Im so happy to replace a single use item like parchment paper with something that will last me years. They also make plenty of quality glass baking dishes, like the one that we used for the cranberry sauce, which comes with a lid so the leftovers are easy to store. OXOs pepper mill is a true dream, it grinds so smoothly and has adjustable settings for the size of your grind (we like it somewhere in the middle). I used to whisk all my sauces and dressings with a fork back in the day, but a whisk really does make the process so much quicker and more pro, and OXOs balloon whisk is a beauty. Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the mustard roasting sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons white miso 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons avocado oil or olive oil 1 teaspoon chili powder sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables 1 small kabocha squash - seeded and sliced into wedges 1 small delicata squash - halved, seeded, and sliced into half-moons 1 lb Brussels sprouts - tough ends removed, halved 1 medium cauliflower - sliced into bite-sized florets 7-8 medium carrots or the equivalent of sweet potato (or both) - sliced into bite-sized pieces handful toasted pecans - for garnishing for the cranberry sauce 2 10 oz bags frozen or fresh cranberries - thawed if frozen 1 Granny Smith apple - peeled, cored, and finely diced 1 shallot - finely chopped 1 cup raisins (preferably golden) 1 1/­­2 cups coconut sugar 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/­­4 cup orange juice (from about 1 medium orange) zest from 1 orange pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the mustard roasting sauce and roast the vegetables Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). In a medium bowl, combine the mustard, miso, maple syrup, oil, chili powder, salt, and pepper, and whisk until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute all the vegetables among two large, lined baking sheets. Pour half of the mustard sauce over one sheet of the vegetables and the rest - over the other sheet. Mix to coat well. Place the baking sheets in the oven, and roast, mixing periodically for 45-50 minutes, or until all the vegetables are tender when pierced with a knife, with caramelized edges. Serve the vegetables right away or reheat later, topped with the cranberry sauce and sprinkled with toasted pecans. to make the cranberry sauce In a 2 quart glass baking dish or a dish if a similar size, combine the cranberries, apple, shallot, raisins, coconut sugar, ginger, cinnamon, orange juice and zest, and salt. Mix well to combine. Place the baking dish in a 400° F (200° C) oven at the same time that you are roasting the vegetables (recipe above). Cook the sauce for about 45 minutes, mixing periodically. The sauce should be simmering while cooking in the oven. Let cool a bit before serving. The sauce will set up more once it cools. Store any leftover sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. Notes - You can easily make this recipe ahead of time. Just reheat the vegetables in the oven at 350° F (175° C) and serve the cranberry sauce right out of the fridge. - The recipe is very versatile, so you can include any of your favorite roasting vegetables in the mix. You can also include any of your favorite spices in the roasting sauce. The possibilities here are endless. 3.5.3226 The post Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rosemary Roasted Carrots

November 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Recipes by me, photos by Rikki Snyder. Even though I have a food blog, I have to confess that I get overwhelmed when cooking a few things at once. Does that happen to you too, or am I just especially weak and easily confused? It seems like the more I have going on in the kitchen, the more likely things are to end up charred and inedible. So when developing recipes for a vegetarian Thanksgiving, I wanted a good mix of dishes that were a little more involved and dishes that required very little time, effort, or thought. These Rosemary Roasted Carrots are one of the latter. I also decided to add some simple roasted vegetable recipes to our Thanksgiving line-up because I wanted to have some lighter, healthier options in the midst of the stuffing and dessert and mashed potatoes. And that brings me to the other topic of this post: World Diabetes Day. When Carolyn from All Day I Dream About Food asked me to be involved in her World Diabetes Day event, I didn’t hesitate to say yes. But then I had a moment of doubt--do I even know how to make a recipe that’s diabetic-friendly? Carolyn […]

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust

November 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust Way back in the day when I was first getting interested in vegetarian cooking, I came across Mollie Katzen’s recipe for a Cauliflower Cheese Pie, which completely blew my mind. Maybe you know the one I’m talking about? It’s such a classic. I even developed a little tribute recipe to that pie for our first cookbook. This vegan cauliflower and leek version is not as directly inspired by Katzen’s pie, but I still fondly kept it in mind while working on this recipe. Cooked cauliflower itself already tastes kind of cheesy to me, and when baked in a ‘cheesy’ but also totally plant-based sauce like in this recipe, it’s complete heaven. This pie also features caramelized leeks and an addictive, gluten-free onion-pecan crust that’s packed with flavor. It’s definitely a special enough savory pie for a holiday table, and we can’t wait to make it again for ours. Hope you’ll consider it as well! If you’ve been cooking plant-based for a while, you’ve probably heard that boiled potatoes and carrots make for a surprisingly cheesy sauce, when blended smooth with a bunch of aromatic pantry staples like nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and miso. In this recipe, we also add sun-dried tomatoes and smoked paprika to that kind of sauce, for an extra hint of umami and smokiness. We cut a whole head of cauliflower into florets and brown it, then cook it until soft on the stovetop, where we also caramelize some leeks. The cauliflower, leeks and the sauce then get cozied up into the quickly pre-baked onion pie crust and baked all together. The crust is just 5 ingredients, which is a true achievement for gluten-free baking :) This pie is delicious the day of baking, but the leftovers are also amazing (if not better), so you could definitely make it a day ahead and reheat. We will be making the whole thing on our instagram stories this afternoon, if you’d like to see the whole step-by-step process. Happy November! Wishing you all the warmth and coziness. Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust   Print Serves: one 9-10 pie Ingredients for the crust neutral oil for oiling the pie dish 1¼ cup ground pecans (grinding directions in the recipe) ½ cup tapioca starch pinch sea salt 1 medium onion - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds for the cheese sauce 1 large or 2 small white potatoes 1 medium carrot 2-3 sun dried tomato halves (soaked in hot water if not oil-packed/­­if very dry) or 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon miso 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika pinch of sea salt for the cauliflower and leeks avocado oil or olive oil 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only - thinly sliced sea salt red pepper flakes - to taste 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into florets Instructions to make the crust Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie dish by oiling it well. Place a generous 1 cup of pecans in a food processor and grind into a flour, taking care not to over-grind. Measure out 1¼ cups of the ground pecans and transfer that amount to a large mixing bowl. Save the rest of the ground pecans for a future recipe, or see note. Add the tapioca starch and salt to the bowl, mix to combine. Add the onion to the food processor and puree it. Its okay to have some small onion chunks, but the puree should be pretty uniform. Transfer the onions to a medium bowl, add the ground flax and mix to combine. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, letting the flax bloom. Add the mixture to the bowl with the pecan flour and mix well to combine. Transfer the crust dough into the prepared pie dish and form an even pie crust, using a spoon and your hands. Place the crust in a freezer for 15 minutes to set. Cover the crust with parchment paper and baking beans, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the cover and bake for an additional 5 minutes, until the base of the crust is dry to the touch. to make the cheese sauce Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Take care not to over-blend, so that the starch in the potatoes doesnt give the sauce a gluey texture. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. to prepare the vegetables and bake the pie Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes and cook the leeks for 8-10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks for another 10 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the heat back up to medium and cook for another 5 minutes, until the leeks are very soft and somewhat caramelized. Transfer the leeks to a bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and heat another tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the cauliflower florets along with a pinch of salt and mix to coat. Distribute the cauliflower in a single layer and let sear, undisturbed, for about 3 minutes, or until the undersides are nicely browned. Mix and keep cooking the cauliflower until soft throughout, for about 15 minutes. If your cauliflower is not softening, cover the pan with a lid and turn the heat down to medium-low, letting it steam until soft. Add the caramelized leeks and half of the cheese sauce to the pan and mix to combine. Transfer the cauliflower mixture to the pre-baked crust, carefully evening it out with a spoon. Add the rest of the sauce on top, evening it out. Cover the pie with parchment paper, foil, or a lid and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 5-10 minutes, until slightly browned on top. Let cool well before slicing. Notes If you have any leftover ground pecans, you can make a quick cheesy sprinkle by mixing them with nutritional yeast, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle over this pie, pasta dishes, avocado toast, etc. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

sweet potato paratha recipe | sweet potato thepla | sweet potato roti

October 29 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

sweet potato paratha recipe | sweet potato thepla | sweet potato rotisweet potato paratha recipe | sweet potato thepla | sweet potato roti with step by step photo and video recipe. paratha recipes are very common across india and are served for both lunch and dinner. typically the stuffed flat bread are made to solve the problem of making the roti and curry separately. one such simple and easy paratha recipe is the sweet potato paratha recipe which is also known as thepla as the potato is added directly to dough. The post sweet potato paratha recipe | sweet potato thepla | sweet potato roti appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Brussel Sprout, Tempeh & Soba Noodle Skillet

October 25 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Every fall I seem to latch onto a different seasonal ingredient to obsess over. Two years ago, it was sweet potatoes. Last year, it was winter squash. I think this fall, it’s going to be Brussels sprouts. I have so many ideas for them and I want to post them all. Brussels sprouts! Everyday! Every hour! Every minute! While everyone else is enjoying pumpkin and apples, I’ll be over in my corner with a bowl of delicious Brussels sprouts. And I won’t share them either! I wanted to do some kind of Brussels sprout stir fry and I remembered a recipe I pinned a while back from In Pursuit of More–a 15 Minute Brussels Sprout & Tempeh Stir Fry. I built upon that combination, adapting the stir fry sauce (which doubles as a marinade for the tempeh) and adding soba noodles at the end. It’s a one-bowl meal, which is always my favorite kinds of meal because who really wants to cook 2-3 things for dinner?! Roasting will always be my favorite way of cooking Brussels sprouts, but making them in a skillet is a close second. They’ll still get a little bit caramelized and the bitterness that so many […]

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday Options

October 21 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday OptionsFast-food and quick-service restaurants all across the country have recognized that customers want to incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet. And were thrilled! Today, it is easier than ever to join the Meatless Monday movement. Last week, McDonalds announced their plan to test their own version of a meatless burger in collaboration with Beyond Meat. They join a growing list of chains offering some sort of plant-based alternative to their menu. And while plant-based burgers are getting all of the media attention, many national chain restaurants are serving a variety of meatless veg-forward options that deliver that same fast-food flavor using grains, legumes and fresh vegetables. For all of you looking to go meatless on Monday , weve compiled a list of the most popular national chain restaurants that are offering plant-based options on their menus.   Bareburger    View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Bareburger (@bareburger) on Oct 3, 2019 at 3:10pm PDT Bareburger  has your favorite, whether its the Beyond Burger, the Impossible Burger or a veggie packed black bean or sweet potato burger, they serve them all. The restaurant chain also serves plant-based eggs, tempeh bacon and the Beyond Bratwurst. Its pretty much plant-based heaven here.   Burger King   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Burger King (@burgerking) on Aug 22, 2019 at 7:34am PDT When the news first dropped that Burger King  launched its very own Impossible-Burger-Based Whopper , it became the largest chain to embrace plant-based meat - over 7,000 locations nationwide. And, at least according to this video taste test , self-proclaimed carnivores are just as wild about the plant-based option. The Impossible Whopper is served with tomatoes, lettuce, mayo, ketchup, pickles, and onions on a sesame seed bun.   Cheesecake Factory   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by The Cheesecake Factory (@cheesecakefactory) on Jun 18, 2019 at 12:00pm PDT Who would have thought that the Cheesecake Factory would be a pioneer in meatless dining ? Well, the chain has quite the selection of non-meat alternatives -- vegan Cobb salad, avocado toast, roasted artichokes, falafel salad, super antioxidant salad, and their version of the Impossible Burger (note: this one is not vegan because of the cheese and brioche bun, the latter is typically made with egg and butter).   Chopt Creative Salad Co.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Chopt Creative Salad Co. (@choptsalad) on Mar 3, 2019 at 9:08am PST Although the chain is more-or-less confined to the East Coast, Chopt has wooed diners looking for a more diverse array of meatless options . They offer a long list of preconceived salad concepts, but they also give you the ability to customize your own. Choose from one of their classic salad and grain bowl combinations, or just let your inner chef guide lead the way.   Del Taco   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Del Taco (@deltaco) on Sep 2, 2019 at 11:03am PDT An early adopter of Beyond Meats plant-based crumbles , Del Taco offers a comprehensive list of meatless options that includes burritos, tacos, bowls and even a crunchy tostada. Looking for something a little more traditional? Try a bean burrito or black bean bowl.   Dunkin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Dunkin (@dunkin) on Jul 24, 2019 at 11:21am PDT Besides their newly launched Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich , Dunkin’ offers a number of vegetarian options including a veggie egg white wrap and an egg and cheese sandwich on an English muffin.   Just Salad   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Just Salad (@justsalad) on Sep 12, 2019 at 8:00am PDT In September, Just Salad announced a partnership with Beyond Meat that brings Beyond Beef Meatballs to the menus of all 40 of their locations. But Just Salad is taking their meatless commitment one step further by removing all forms of beef from their menu . For Meatless Monday, try their Keto Zoodle Bowl, which contains Beyond Beef Meatballs, zucchini noodles, grape tomatoes, and roasted balsamic mushrooms.   Mellow Mushroom   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Mellow Mushroom (@mellowmushroom) on Dec 10, 2018 at 9:20am PST It’s plant-based pie paradise at Mellow Mushroom . Their meatless pizza options include dairy-free cheese, Follow Your Heart brand, and plant-based proteins, such as tofu and tempeh… plus every veggie topping you could possibly imagine. DIY your pie or opt for one of their curated specialty pizzas.   McDonalds   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by McDonalds Canada (@mcdonaldscanada) on Sep 26, 2019 at 3:29am PDT We bet you never thought youd see McDonalds on this list, but the Golden Arches have finally decided to try their hand at plant-based meat. McDonalds recently announced that they would be testing a P.L.T (plant, lettuce and tomato) in 28 locations in and around London, Ontario starting this week and lasting through the end of the year. Beyond Meat will be supplying the burger, but the sesame seed bun, tomato, lettuce, pickles, onions, mayo-style sauce, ketchup, mustard, and a slice of processed cheddar cheese will be classic McDonalds. As the worlds largest chain and one of the largest buyers of beef globally, the P.L.T. addition has enormous potential to positively impact the environment.   Panera Bread   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Panera Bread (@panerabread) on Oct 26, 2018 at 7:14am PDT Panera Bread has always been ahead of the pack when it comes to vegan and plant-based options, but theyve upped their game in recent years as the call for meatless options has gotten louder. Panera Bread has gone as far as launching an entire plant-based menu that lists a Greek Salad, a Modern Caprese Sandwich, a Mediterranean Veggie Sandwich, a Ten Vegetable Soup, and a variety of smoothies.   QDOBA   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by QDOBA (@qdoba) on May 28, 2019 at 9:07am PDT Following in the footsteps of other major quick-service chains, QDOBA has launched new vegan and fajita bowls in conjunction with Impossible Foods . But even without the plant-based beef, its easy to go meatless at Qdoba; try one of their tacos, burritos, or bowls with black or pinto beans, brown or cilantro-lime rice, and grilled veggies. And you can always add guac or salsa on the side.   Red Robin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Red Robin Gourmet Burgers (@redrobinburgers) on Oct 7, 2019 at 10:34am PDT Red Robin has two options for meatless burger seekers. Their veggie burger is a mixtape of culinary inspiration -- cool avocado, Swiss cheese, roasted garlic aioli, and tomato bruschetta sit atop an ancient-grain veggie patty. If youre looking for a more traditional burger experience, you can swap in the Impossible patty on to any traditional Red Robin burger.   Subway   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Beyond Meat (@beyondmeat) on Sep 5, 2019 at 2:26pm PDT Until recently, Subways plant-based options were limited to a simple veggie sandwich and salad. But theyve seriously upped their veg game with the addition of the Beyond Meat Meatless-Meatball Marinara - which boasts 24g of protein for a 6 sub. Leave off the cheese and pack it with veggies for an even more substantial plant-based lunch or dinner.   TGI Fridays   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by TGI Fridays (@tgifridays) on Oct 1, 2018 at 10:00am PDT At participating TGI Fridays , the Beyond Burger comes grilled and topped with white cheddar, lettuce, tomato, red onion, pickles and Fridays sauce. Of course, you can also order it in place of other burgers. Check out Meatless Mondays visit to TGI Fridays  as they launched their Beyond Burger.   Are you looking for more meatless dining options? Check out our list of best plant-based burgers .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , 

baby potato fry recipe | spicy small potato fry | pan fried baby potatoes

December 5 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

baby potato fry recipe | spicy small potato fry | pan fried baby potatoesbaby potato fry recipe | spicy small potato fry | pan fried baby potatoes with step by step photo and video recipe. indian recipes deals with myriad dry curries which is an essential part of day to day meals. these dry curries are not only easy to make, but also tasty and to the point when it is served with rice or bread. one such simple and easy potato based recipe is the baby potato fry recipe known for its simplicity and taste. The post baby potato fry recipe | spicy small potato fry | pan fried baby potatoes appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”

December 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”Vegan Omelet with Delicious Breakfast Potatoes. Mung Bean egg mixture makes a great soy-free egg substitute. Easy Moong Dal Batter for omelets or savory pancakes. No Chickpea flour! Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free soy-free Recipe Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe  Mung bean is used in Indian cuisine to make pancakes, crepes format snack or breakfast. Moong Dal, which is split and skinned green Mung bean, has a nutty flavor (milder than chickpea flour) and makes for a great option to use to make egg-free omelets. I posted a moong dal omelet way back in 2013. At that time Moong dal was available in Indian stores and some other stores, hence the recipe didn’t get as many remakes. Mung bean dal is much more easily available now and is used in many of my recipes. As with any vegani-zed version of dishes, they are dependent on personal preference. Everyone prefers various textures and format of the egg and omelet. This moong dal batter is very flexible to flavor and texture. Play around with additional flavors and adjusting the consistency and cooking time for your preferred vegan omelet.Continue reading: Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”The post Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg” appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes

November 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes Before we get into these delicious potatoes, we want to thank you for your support on our new desserts ebook! It truly means the world to see you guys enjoying it. And in case you missed it, we just released an ebook, filled with our favorite vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes that are great for the holidays and beyond. You can learn more about it and buy yours here. And these potatoes! There’s no such thing as too many ideas for carby vegetable sides in our book, and this one is so tasty. We layer thinly mandolined potatoes with silky kale and bake them in a miso-pine nut sauce, until golden and crispy on top and soft and creamy inside. The result is pure coziness. Wishing all our American friends a great holiday and a great rest of the week to everyone else

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy photo by Joshua Foo, styling by me Feeds about 10 Let’s face it. The most important thing at the holiday table is going to be mashed potatoes. Hot on its heels is going to be gravy. So why mess around with anything less than the creamiest, fluffiest, lushest most dreamy taters? The secret here is twofold: Fold 1) Ingredients. Lots of cashew cream and buttery coconut oil. And fold 2) Method: whipping it all to high heaven with a hand mixer. You incorporate air, plus remove all the clumps without overmixing. No one will be able to resist these! The gravy I’ve used here is akin to a white pepper gravy. Thick and creamy with a lil’ kick. It starts with a roux (that’s toasted flour and oil to you, bub) for a deep sultry flavor and velvety thickness. It’s a really nice customizable recipe in that if you want to make it a mushroom gravy you can certainly add sautéed mushrooms before or after blending. If you want to make it a sausage gravy chop up some sausages and add them at the end. And so on! These recipes are from Superfun Times. Ingredients For the potatoes: 5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/­­2 inch chunks 3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours (if you have a high speed blender soaking is not necessary) 3/­­4 cups vegetable broth, at room temp 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, at room temp 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt Fresh black pepper Thinly sliced chives for garnish, if desired For the gravy: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 teaspoons dry rubbed sage Several dashes fresh black pepper 3 cups vegetable broth, plus additional for thinning 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 3 cups cooked navy beans (2 15-oz can, rinsed and drained) 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce Salt to taste For the gravy: Directions Place potatoes in a pot and submerge in cold water by about an inch. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt into the water. Cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, drain cashews and place in a blender with vegetable broth and blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. If you have a high speed blender this will take about a minute. In a regular blender it will take around 5 so give your blender a break every now and again. Back to the potatoes, once boiling, lower heat to a simmer, uncover and cook for about 12 minutes, until fork tender. Drain potatoes, then place back in the pot. Do a preliminary mash with a potato masher, just to get them broken up. Add half of cashew mixture, coconut and olive oil, salt and pepper and mash with a potato masher until relatively smooth and no big chunks are left. Now comes the creamiest part. Add the remaining cashew mixture, mix it it, then use a hand blender on high speed to whip the ever loving life out of them. They should become very smooth, fluffy and creamy. Taste for salt and pepper along the way, transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with chives and serve! Preheat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, sage and black pepper (I like a lot of black pepper in this) and cook for about 3 minutes more. While that is cooking, stir the flour into the broth until dissolved. If you have an immersion blender, then add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the saucepan. Blend immediately and lower the heat to medium. Stir the gravy often for about 10 minutes while it thickens. Use broth to thin as necessary.  If you are using a regular blender, add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the onion and the other stuff from the pan to the blender. Puree again until no big chunks of onion are left. Add back to the pot and stir often over medium heat to thicken. Once the gravy thickens, reduce the heat to low. Now you can decide exactly how thick you want it by whisking in extra broth, anywhere from 1/­­2 cup to 3/­­4 cup. Cook for about 10 more minutes to let the flavors deepen, stirring occasionally, adding broth as necessary. Taste for salt. Keep gravy covered and warm until ready to serve.

Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says: “This recipe reminds me a bit of pot roasts from my childhood. Of course, back then, it was beef, not mushrooms, but the flavor profiles are similar and both dishes are warm comfort food that make me want to curl up on the couch with a big bowl.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Garlic Mashed Potatoes: - 2 pounds (900 g) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 g) plant-based butter or (28 ml) extra-virgin olive oil -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) lite coconut milk, plus more as needed -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder, or to taste   - For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 carrots, peeled and diced - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced cremini mushrooms - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced shiitake mushrooms - 1 tablespoon (16 g) tomato paste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) tamari, coconut aminos, or soy sauce (gluten-free, if desired) - 2 teaspoons dried thyme - 2 teaspoons dried sage - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup (130 g) frozen green peas   For the Mashed Potatoes: Add the potatoes to a large pot on the stove. Cover the potatoes with water by 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm). Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the potatoes are tender and easily pierced with a knife. Drain and add the potatoes back to the pot. Add the butter and coconut milk. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth. Add additional milk 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time if you like your mashed potatoes a thinner consistency. Add the garlic powder and additional salt to taste. Switch to a spatula or wooden spoon to stir and incorporate the seasonings well. Set aside.   For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and carrots and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomato paste, tamari, thyme, sage, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Increase the heat to bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 10 minutes. Add the green peas, stir to incorporate, and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes to heat through.   Serve the Meaty Mushroom Stew over the Garlic Mashed Potatoes. The post Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes

November 9 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Scalloped PotatoesYou have to try My Creamy Vegan Scalloped Potatoes Recipe! No Dairy, No Nuts, No nutritional Yeast! in this Potato Gratin. Can be gluten-free and Soy-free. Oil-free option Jump to Recipe Lets make these Classic Scalloped Potatoes to add to the Thanksgiving menu! These Scalloped potatoes are Easy, use just a few ingredients, don’t need nutritional yeast for the cheesyness, have no nuts and are creamy, cheesy and all things delicious. Use herbs of choice for variation. Use a combination of veggies such as cauliflower with the potato. Top with a breadcrumb topping. Many options!Continue reading: Vegan Scalloped PotatoesThe post Vegan Scalloped Potatoes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

November 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes Mashed potatoes laced with smoky-flavored roasted garlic adds a big yum factor to a comforting classic. No worries if you’re a bit shy of garlic--roasting garlic makes it much mellower and sweeter. Save Print Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes Author: The post Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust

October 29 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato CrustVegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust. Easy Mushroom Gravy Pot pie with mushrooms, cannellini or white beans, chard, topped with sliced sweet potato. Vegan Nut-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free, Soy-free and oil-free Jump to Recipe  This pot pie brings together all my favorite flavors. Caramelized onion and mushroom, earthy balsamic vinegar, herbs, and a crisp sweet potato topping! I like to make individual portions, but you can easily make one large dish. The pot pie can be made without gluten or grain and can be made without oil as well. Use other greens of choice and change up the topping for variation. Top with vegan puff pastry for a decadent pie. Or just make the filling and serve over mashed potatoes or veggies. The mushroom bean filling is a mix of savory mushroom gravy and beans and works amazingly with mashed veggies as well.Continue reading: Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato CrustThe post Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Wild Mushroom & Potato Pizza on Whole Grain Naan

October 28 2019 Oh My Veggies 

We love pizza, and we love to experiment. So rather than using a traditional crust, we made this pizza using whole grain naan. Making pizzas with naan is nice when you don’t have the time to mess with the dough--the key is to make sure any veggies you add to your pizza are cooked beforehand because you need to heat your naan at a lower temperature than you’d cook a pizza made with raw dough.

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary

October 21 2019 VegKitchen 

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary Roasted potatoes flavored with tomatoes and rosemary make an appealing side dish for winter and early spring holiday meals or company dinners. Their mellow flavor is always welcome at the table. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary appeared first on VegKitchen.

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.


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