potassium - vegetarian recipes

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potassium vegetarian recipes

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

How Can You Eat Raw Corn? Simple Tips and Tricks

October 9 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Corn, also known as maize, is one of the main staples of any diet--vegan, vegetarian, or omnivore. This ubiquitous cereal also comes with more than a few nutritional benefits. It is rich in potassium, iron, and contains 3,27g of protein per 100g. On top of that, corn is an excellent source of energy because 100g of kernels have about 86 calories. These characteristics make it an excellent choice for a vegan or vegetarian diet. There are many different ways to consume corn. It can be cooked, grilled, or ground into tasty tortilla flour. However, if youre wondering if you can eat raw corn, here are some things you should know. Can You Eat Raw Corn? The Simple Answer If you grew up in the city, eating raw corn might not have been something you enjoyed as a kid. Yet those who grew up on a farm, especially in the Midwest, know well how tasty corn straight from the cob can be. However, you dont just go out and munch down on any corn that you can find. There are two varieties of corn and one is perfectly suitable for eating raw while the other isnt. Sweet corn is the variety […]

Beets and Mint Tartar

September 19 2018 VegKitchen 

Beets and Mint Tartar Today, the recipe that I propose is a tartar of beetroot with mint. Its an entree that is both pretty and very light. But beware not to use canned, but fresh beet! In fact, this beetroot tartar and mint is more of a salad. What we are going to do is cut the cooked beetroot into small pieces, then season with mint vinaigrette. Beetroots are rich in B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. A diet rich in these things is believed to result in improved blood pressure, improved cognition, and reduce accumulation in your liver. Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 20 to 40 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients 2 lb yellow and red beets (6 or 8) 2 small cloves garlic minced 2 tsp dried mint 1/­­4  tsp salt and pepper 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil Preparation Dip the unpeeled beets in a large pot of salted boiling water and cook until tender--20 to 40 minutes. While still warm, remove them with a cloth or paper towel, remove the stem, and remove the skin by simply sliding. Slice the hot beets into rings and arrange them on a serving platter. Before they cool, sprinkle […] The post Beets and Mint Tartar appeared first on VegKitchen.

Power Ball Energy Bites

January 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. If you dont have protein powder for this recipe, you can just leave it out. If the texture is too moist, add a bit more oats or walnuts to the mixture. Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. - 3/­­4 cup old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup toasted walnuts - 2 tablespoons vegan protein powder (I use Sun Warrior vanilla) - 2 tbsp cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 ripe banana, cut into chunks - 2 tablespoons almond butter - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds - 1 cup shredded toasted coconut, ground - In a food processor, combine oats, walnuts, protein powder, cocoa powder, and cinnamon. Pulse until well mixed. Add the banana, almond butter, and maple syrup. Pulse until combined. Add the cranberries and flaxseeds, and pulse until combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls. If the balls are too soft, refrigerate or freeze them for an hour. Roll the balls in the ground coconut. - Transfer to a platter and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Zsu Dever.      The post Power Ball Energy Bites appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday

September 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless MondaySummer is gradually turning into fall, and that means the summer produce season will soon turn into an autumn harvest! If youre eager to do some cooking with fruits and vegetables that are at their peak right now, it helps to do a little research before hitting the farmers market. Make Meatless Monday your first stop! Here are the fruits and veggies that are in season right now: Apples In addition to being a great source of fiber and Vitamin C, apples are loaded with phytonutrients that regulate blood sugar and pectin, which may slow down colon cancer. Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips Butternut Squash One of several winter squash varieties, butternut squashs thin skin makes it easy to cut and prepare. Butternut Squash Apple Burgers Cranberries Cranberries originated right here in North America and were cultivated by Native Americans for their antibacterial properties, Vitamin C, and ability to fight diseases. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Eggplant The jury is in - salting eggplant does keep it from soaking up too much oil while cooking and becoming spongy. Eggplant Fiesta Ragout Pomegranate When buying the best pomegranate, choose one that seems like its too heavy for its size. Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta Garlic Garlic provides tons of health benefits with its flavor - its a great source of Vitamins B6 and C, potassium, calcium, and anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative sulfuric compounds that have been studied for treating heart disease and the common cold. Red Pepper Pesto Pâté Smartphone users now have a great option on the go for finding seasonal fruits and vegetables in your area. Download the Seasonal Food Guide - the most comprehensive online database of seasonal food on the internet! You can find the app on the App Store or Google Play by searching Seasonal Food Guide. The post Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Coconut Yogurt

April 26 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Making delicious, healthy, dairy-free yogurt is a lot easier than you think! All you need are a few simple ingredients like coconuts (which are rich in iron and potassium) and probiotics. Rawvana created […] The post Vegan Coconut Yogurt appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!

August 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!National Farmers Market Week, August 7-13, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season!   Hungry for more fresh farmers market finds? Tour the Union Square Greenmarket with Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony Restaurant in NYC: The post Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

4 Great Tips for Using Dates

May 10 2016 VegKitchen 

4 Great Tips for Using Dates Are you ready for your hot date tonight? Dont worry, I havent hacked into your social calendar--I am referring to the naturally sweet and energy-dense fruit. Dates are packed with fiber, potassium, copper, manganese, magnesium, and vitamins A, B, C, and K.

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard

April 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Mung beans have been my legume of choice as of late. I love them for their versatility, good nutrition record (protein of course, manganese, potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc.), brief cooking time, and a very fair price tag. They work well for falafel, with very similar properties to chickpeas, albeit lighter in every way. Soaking the mung beans overnight and baking the falafel instead of frying makes them easy on the stomach – I say this because even though I love to get traditional fried falafel when out, it always makes me feel unwell. These mung bean falafels are made with my favorite spice mix that goes well with their bright, lemony flavor. When I go to the farmer’s market, I often have the eyes bigger than the stomach problem, especially with greens. Last week, there was lots of beautiful rainbow chard at the stand, and I carried away more bunches than we could ever eat. Pickling was the next best choice and I was pleasantly surprised by the result. The marinade I came up with is very mild and simple, and the pickling only takes a day. It seems that in our little health food community, bowl format has become the default lunch format, and we are right there with everyone, happy to enjoy a veggie loaded and colorful lunch bowl, any time of day really. As usual in spring, I can’t get enough of quickly sautéed, crispy and tender asparagus, which complements any grains or legumes. A base of quinoa, which can be substituted with any grain, tangy tahini sauce, crunchy nuts, herbs, and pickles complete this meal. All these components are, of course, suggestions, and dishes like these are highly customizable. I do very much recommend trying all the parts – the falafel, the pickles and tahini sauce – if not together, then independently, added to sandwiches, salads, and the like – you won’t regret it. Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard serves 4-6 for the mung bean falafel bowl 1 cup rainbow quinoa or other grain of choice – cooked sea salt – to taste 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil about 20 asparagus – tough ends removed freshly ground black pepper – to taste mung bean falafel – recipe below pickled rainbow chard – recipe below large hadful baby spiach/­­other salad greens handful cilantro leaves/­­pea shoots/­­other microgreens tahini sauce – recipe below sesame seeds – for garnish (optional) chopped pistachios/­­other nuts – for garnish (optional) to assemble the falafel bowls Distribute quinoa between bowls. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook, undisturbed, for 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes, until soft and bright green. Divide asparagus between bowls on top of quinoa. Arrange falafels on top, followed by chard pickles, if using. Add spinach or other salad greens, herbs/­­microgreens. Drizzle with tahini sauce, sprinkle with sesame seeds and nuts. Mung Bean Falafel makes about 18 falafels 1 cup mung beans – soaked overnight 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil or olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds – freshly ground 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). 2. Drain and rinse mung beans and cook them in plenty of salted water for about 7 minutes, or until soft but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. 3. Coarsely grind pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Add mung beans and the rest of ingredients. Pulse to combine. 4. Shape about 18 small falafels and arrange them on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side. Keep covered and warm, if using right away. Otherwise, keep refrigerated in an airtight container and reheat in the 350° F (180° C) oven for about 10-15 minutes. Pickled Rainbow Chard 1 large bunch rainbow chard – leaves and stems separated 4 garlic cloves – sliced pinch red pepper flakes roughly chopped dill and cilantro – to taste (optional) Thinly slice chard stems and leaves into bite sized pieces. Place into a large water-proof bowl, and pour purified water over them to just cover. Drain water, reserving it, and measure it, as you will need to prepare the marinade according to these proportions: 5 cups water 1/­­2 cup apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 tablespoons sea salt 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 2 bay leaves 3 whole cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon black peppercorns to pickle Combine measured water with other marinade ingredients in a medium saucepan. If you have more or less water than the recipe calls for, adjust the amount of vinegar, salt and spices accordingly – it doesn’t have to be exact. Bring the marinade to a boil over medium high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes. Meanwhile, add garlic, red pepper flakes and herbs to the chard, mixing to distribute evenly. Pour hot marinade over the chard and place a plate over it to keep all the chard emerged in the marinade. You can use a heavy object to weigh the plate down, such as a jar filled with water. Pickles will be ready the next day. Keep refrigerated. Best within 1 week. Tahini Sauce 1/­­4 cup sesame tahini 1/­­4 cup purified water juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove – chopped sea salt – to taste tiny pinch red pepper flakes (optional) Combine all the ingredients in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein

January 25 2016 Meatless Monday 

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based ProteinGearing up to go meatless on Mondays? Keep your kitchen and pantry stocked with plant-based foods that are rich in protein and flavor! When folks start eating meatless once a week, many wonder where they can get enough protein to stay healthy. The truth is, plants (especially pulses) are full of protein, and with just a little planning you can get all the nutrients you need from plant-based foods! Here are some of the most popular plant-based sources of proteins that Meatless Monday diners love. Lentils Nutrition: 1 cup = 18g protein Lentils are a protein powerhouse: 9 grams of protein in just half a cup! But protein is only part of the picture for lentils; these pulses add a significant serving of fiber, folate, iron, and potassium to your meal. Dried, canned, or pre-cooked, lentils are an essential in any pantry. Lentil Recipes for Meatless Monday: Breakfast Lentils, Lazy Lentil Soup, Lentil Balls with Riata Hemp Seeds Nutrition: 3 tablespoons = roughly 10g protein Far from a simple garnish, hemp seeds add protein to any meal and contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Whether sprinkled on salads, stirred into smoothies or blended in soups, hemp seeds at a mild sweet or nutty flavor to meals. Hemp Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Blueberry Brainiac Smoothie Chia Seeds Nutrition: 2 tablespoons = 4g protein Chia seeds are a sprinkle-able, stir-able, drinkable source of protein with simple instructions: just add water! Soaking your chia seeds allows them to absorb water and produce their iconic soluble-fiber- rich gel. These seeds and the gel they produce also make an excellent thickening agent in cooking. Chia Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Chocolate Banana Smoothie, Blueberry Apple Porridge Quinoa Nutrition: 1/­­2 cup = 7-9g protein A perfect protein-rich replacement for rice, quinoa has recently become a popular meatless main course ingredient and stand-alone side dish. Quinoa is packed with full of fiber, iron, magnesium, and manganese, and makes a very nutritious addition to your menu. Quinoa Recipes for Meatless Monday: Black Quinoa, Farro & Rice Salad with Radishes, Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers, Supreme Crispy Quinoa Vegetable Burgers Quinoa Nuts and Nut Butters Nutrition: 1/­­4 cup = about 7-9g protein Peanuts, almonds, cashews, and more – nut butters are perhaps the easiest way to add a dollop of protein and healthy fats to your diet. Nut butters go way beyond the traditional PB&J; spread it on whole grain toast, add a spoonful to soups or sauces, or just enjoy a spoonful on its own! Nut Recipes for Meatless Monday: Spicy Peanut Chutney, Thai Fresh Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Beans (Like Black Beans, Kidney Beans, and Cannellini Beans) Nutrition: 1 cup = about 15g protein One of the best-known plant-based protein sources, beans are versatile and can be very easy to prepare. In addition to the protein they bring to your plate, beans also offer a heaping helping of fiber and flavor. Bean Recipes for Meatless Monday: Italian White Beans with Kale, Mashed Plantain with Red Beans Seitan Nutrition: 1 cup = 40g protein Nicknamed “wheat meat,” seitan is made of wheat gluten and has a chewy, meaty texture when cooked. It’s know for its ability to soak up the flavors of the other foods, seasonings, and sauces it is cooked with. Seitan Recipes for Meatless Monday: Seitan-Cashew Blanquette, Seitan with Mushroom Gravy, Smoked Spicy Seitan Chili Tempeh Nutrition: 1 cup = 22g protein This meatless protein source is made of fermented soy beans, and has a nutty, sweet flavor on its own. Like tofu and seitan it absorbs flavors well, but tempeh has a firmer consistency that makes grilling and searing ideal cooking options. Tempeh Recipes for Meatless Monday: Sesame Tempeh with Green Beans, Tempeh Fried Brown Rice, Thai Tempeh Tacos Tofu Nutrition: 1 cup = 14g protein Spongy, versatile tofu is one of the most popular meatless protein-rich foods. Made from soybean curds, tofu can be silky soft or extra firm, and can be grilled, fried, baked, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw. Tofu Recipes for Meatless Monday: Curried Tofu Egg Salad With Almonds, Korean BBQ Tofu Tacos, Asian Noodles with Tofu and Almonds The post Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup

November 3 2015 My New Roots 

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup Back in the summer, I was asked to be the guest chef at a restaurant here in Copenhagen for the upcoming fall season. But not just any restaurant: a hyper-local organic restaurant sourcing 95% of their ingredients from within 200 kilometers of their front door, and one that holds classes to educate and inspire city dwellers to eat sustainably all year round. Oh, just kind of up my alley. And it is run by a woman who I clicked with instantaneously, our first conversation touching on everything from mushroom foraging to manifesting ones own reality through the power of positive thinking. I said yes because I was so moved by her ultimate mission, what the restaurant stood for, and not really taking into account that I hadnt cooked in a professional kitchen in many years. But after giving me permission to call the event The Grand Pumpkin Orgy, how could I possibly say no? Fast forward a few months to a couple weeks ago. I am standing at the cutting board preparing vegetables for soup. The soup to be served at the restaurant, which will be full of guests, all there to eat my food. I feel confident and excited, using all of my pumpkin comprehension to develop a menu of stellar proportions, and not letting the true weightiness of the event bog me down. Once cooked, everything goes into the blender. I puree it. I taste it. And its delicious. Without any major adjustments at all, it is exactly what I wanted it to be: clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it is made with, only better. Then the doubt creeps in. Wait a second. That was easy. Is this really good enough? How can I serve such a simple dish to all these people with undoubtedly high expectations of what this dinner is supposed to be? Why did I ever think I could do this in the first place?! BAH! I brought my recipes in for the chef to review, sheepishly handing them over as if there was something wrong with them; not impressive enough, flashy or complex – just what I believed to be delicious. After a raised eyebrow, he said that he wasnt sure apple and butternut squash would go together. I gulped, but told him as confidently as I could that I believe in the intelligence of the season, and trust that whatever grows together, goes together. Right? The soup was a hit. Clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it was made with, only better. Not only was the chef impressed (and later excused himself for judging my soup before making it himself), but the guests as well. As I went around to the tables asking everyone how it was, they all reaffirmed my belief that my instincts are not completely out of whack, and that, quite simply, good ingredients make great food. After several years eating locally-grown, seasonal produce Ive learned that you can pretty much step back and let the ingredients do the work for you, since true deliciousness needs little intervention. Cooking like a pro, to me, means respecting the ingredients and doing as little as possible to bring out their tastiness. So, this soup is that soup. The one I served at the restaurant to all of those people that scared me, but also reminded me that simple is best. It is a deep and delicious love song to autumn. The ingredients are inexpensive, widely available and the process is foolproof. Its an oven soup! Thats right: everything cooked together right on a baking sheet so there isnt even a pot to wash. Me likey. Butternut Squsah: the Nutrient Storage Facility Winter squash rocks because it is a virtual storehouse of nutrients. Unlike summer squash (re: zucchini, crooknecks, pattypans), winter squash has had a lot more time to develop and pump itself full of vitamins and minerals throughout its lengthy life on the stem. Were talking oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and even some extra dietary fiber thrown in. This combination of nutrients spells good news for asthma sufferers, those with heart disease, elevated cholesterol, or inflammatory conditions such a rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Nature designed summer squash to be rather delicate, with a high water content for those hot summer days when we need a cool down. Naturally, their shelf life is rather short during our abundant harvest season when produce is plentiful. On the flip side, winter squash has a tough outer skin and lower water content, which allows it to be stored for a very long time - some varieties up to six months. This means that we can keep these vitamin bombs around for a long time after the first frost to provide our bodies with the nutrition we need to see us through the long months of winter when there is nothing fresh in sight. Put that in your oven and roast it! The Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons, although an additional element to create, are the crowning glory of the dish, and really make it special. If youre not into bread, try toasting some pumpkin seeds for the top, or something else crunchy to add contrast to the silky smooth soup. It begs mentioning that the apple cider vinegar in this recipe is not optional. Why? Because it adds acidity. Acidity is the one thing missing in almost every home cooks food because, well, we are never really taught about its importance. If you read the introduction in my cookbook, I have a section called The Holy Trinity of Flavour explaining that salt, sugar and acid are the three foundation flavours of any successful dish. Adding just a touch of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to almost anything you make (no kidding!) heightens and brightens the other flavours and creates a surprising balance of tastes. Try it and see for yourself.     Print recipe     Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup with Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Makes at least 2 quarts /­­ 2 liters, Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. melted coconut oil (or ghee) 3 leeks 1 medium onion 5 cloves garlic 1 large butternut squash (mine was about 2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg) 1 large, tart apple 4 - 6 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­2 liters vegetable broth, as needed 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground star anise apple cider vinegar to taste (start with 1/­­2 tsp. up to 1 Tbsp.) 1 batch Garlicky Rye Bread Crouton (recipe to follow) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Prepare all vegetables: chop leeks and onions, peel garlic (but leave it whole), peel butternut and cut into cubes, chop apple. 3. Place all vegetables on a baking sheet with the coconut oil, toss to coat, and set in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender. 4. Transfer roasted vegetables to a blender and add the spices and hot vegetable stock (you may need to work in batches). Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste, then add salt and apple cider vinegar, blend and taste again. Adjust seasoning to your taste, and add stock until the desired consistency is reached: I like mine quite thin so I use the full 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liters of stock. 5. Transfer soup to a large cooking pot over medium heat to warm, if necessary. Divide soup equally among bowls and serve with the Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons and freshly cracked black pepper. Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, add the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 15-20 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. You guys. I’m making app! It’s almost ready! I can’t wait! The My New Roots iOS app will include your favourites from the blog, plus 5 exclusive app-only holiday recipes, perfect for the upcoming season. Click the link below to go to the App site where you can sign up to be notified when the app is out (soon, I promise!) and receive my brand-new recipe for Crispy Sweet Potato Shoe String Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, like right now. Thank you for all for encouraging me to do this, and your ongoing support. I like you very much. xo, Sarah B  

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them

September 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy ThemChances are youve seen some delicious recipes that call for some interesting ingredients that might be a bit unusual. Foods like tempeh, tofu, seitan, and jackfruit, are rapidly taking the spotlight in dishes that are perfect for Meatless Monday meals. These foods add the texture and protein we often crave without using any meat at all - but what are they made of, and whats the difference between them? Tempeh Tempeh is growing in popularity in the US, and has begun showing up on restaurant menus and grocery store shelves. Originally from Indonesia, tempeh is made of soy that has been fermented with natural cultures. The fermentation process turns the raw soy into a fairly firm cake-like consistency. Tempeh is known for providing over 18 grams of protein per serving, and easily-digestible B12 vitamins. The food as an innate nutty flavor, but takes on the taste of spices an marinades well (just like its cousin, tofu). Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas, Meatless Monday Tofu Tofu is one of the most popular meat substitutes, and is an essential ingredients in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine. Tofu is made by coagulating fresh soy milk (made from raw or sprouted soy beans) until curds form, pressing the curds to release the remaining liquid, and cooling the resulting blocks of curd. Differences in how the tofu is pressed account for the differences in texture between silken/­­soft tofu and regular/­­firm tofu. Tofu is known for its ability to soak up flavors of spices and marinades, and is popular in healthy recipes as a robust source of protein and minerals that is entirely cholesterol free. Honey Glazed Tofu and Plum Summer Rolls, Robin Asbell Seitan Seitan (pronounced say-tan) is made of protein-rich wheat gluten, and boasts an impressively meat-like texture. Because of this texture and its ability to pick up flavors in cooking, seitan is frequently used in restaurants as meat substitutes like faux-duck. Seitan can be purchased seasoned and prepared, and is made by combining vital wheat gluten with water and any desired spices. Seitan is known for its texture, but it is also a prominent source of protein with up to 36 grams of protein per serving (more than tofu or tempeh) and has a high concentration of carbohydrates per serving. Seitan Cheeseburger Pizza, Upton’s Naturals Jackfruit Jackfruit is a tree fruit indigenous to tropical regions, and has recently been making waves in western meatless cooking. The flesh of the fruit is highly versatile and is perfectly healthy to consume raw or cooked in a recipe to mimic or replace meat. Jackfruits are high in protein and potassium, and are a rare example of fruits that are high in essential B-complex vitamins including B-6 (pyridoxine), niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. BBQ Jackfruit Sandwiches with Avocado Slaw, Minimalist Baker To learn more about tasty ways to make Meatless Monday meals, join our Twitter chat with Upton’s Naturals tonight at 9pm. The post Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Jackfruit Curry

August 10 2015 Vegan Richa 

Easy Jackfruit Curry On a Jackfruit roll with this easy Jackfruit Curry. Simple, well spiced and delicious! Young Green Jackfruit is available in canned form in brine in Asian stores and some larger Indian stores. It is also available online on amazon or Indian stores. Jackfruit is called “Kathal” in Hindi which might be the name used in Indian stores. You might also be able to find the whole Green Jackfruit in the grocery section in asian stores or Indian stores depending on the store and season. Call and check before heading to the store as it is much cheaper in the stores than online.   Jackfruit has been used for ages in some cuisines. It is the largest tree borne fruit in the world and is rich in Vitamin C, B6 and potassium. It has a meaty interior with a mild flavor. The seeds of the fruit are edible too.  This Jackfruit curry uses a few spices. Use any that you have and add some garam masala. Cook longer to infuse the Jackfruit with flavor. Serve with rice, quinoa, couscous, flatbread or cooked grains of choice.Continue reading: Easy Jackfruit CurryThe post Easy Jackfruit Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Adaptogenic Date Shake

May 3 2018 My New Roots 

Adaptogenic Date Shake Each year, my now friend Sasha Swerdloff of Tending the Table genius organizes a trip for women in the food world (bloggers, cookbook authors, chefs, nutritionists, photographers etc.) to get together, hang out, share delicious food, and get to know each other beyond a screen (...see? Genius!) This year I actually got to attend - ok truth: I shamelessly invited myself because I wanted to meet this talented troupe of ladies IRL. The group decided to gather in Palm Springs, much to my delight as I needed to escape two kinds of hell: overdue home renovations and Ontario in February. The days were magically sunny, delicious, and life-affirming. We cooked a lot, then let our food get cold taking too many photos of it. We swam, we hiked, we yoga-ed, we laughed, and conspired together. Besides all of the heart-warming togetherness, one of the highlights for me, was visiting a date farm just outside the city limits, to understand where our favourite whole food sweetener comes from (and to gorge ourselves, naturally). I had never seen dates on a tree before, and was moved to learn from the passionate farmer himself just how these sweet miracles grow. Dates grow on palm trees, and they fastidiously follow the calendar – you can practically set your watch to a date palms seasonal cycle. The first day of spring the tree is in full bloom and the hard work begins, as the farmer pollinates each one by hand. The ratio of male to female trees is about 1 to 30, since the male trees are only necessary to produce the pollen, and the female trees are the ones that produce the fruit. Between the first day of spring and the first day of summer, the tree sets up its entire crop for the year. All the work (trimming, feeding, etc.) must take place during this season, since its during this period is when the fruit ripens, turning from green, to yellow, to brown. The dates are ready to eat from the first day of autumn, and then the harvest begins. During this season, the fruit is either left on the tree and protected with cloth bags to prevent rain, birds and insects from spoiling the fruit, or picked when ripe. The farmer told us that the best place for the dates is to remain on the tree for freshness, but if the load is too heavy, it will not bloom as well the following year, thus effecting the trees output. After decades of date farming, he was as wide-eyed and passionate about his fruit as an eager young man, which really made us all swoon. It is truly one of my favourite things in this world, to see how and where food is grown, and to meet and connect with the people who lovingly produce it. We all left with full bellies and hearts, and of course, our bags bulging with dates.    Along the dusty, desert road home we saw so many signs for date shakes, since this is the land where this indulgent treat was invented back in the 1930s. None of us caved and bought one, but my mouth was definitely watering, and I was excited to get back and make one for myself. The original recipe is simple, and calls for dates, vanilla ice cream, milk, and sometimes a dash of cinnamon and nutmeg. I knew this was the perfect makeover opportunity, and high-vibed my date shake with coconut milk instead of dairy, hemp seeds, and adaptogens. So why the adaptogens? Well, I felt like the already-pretty-healthy date shake could use a boost, and what better way to make something more supportive than with a dose of stress-reducing, adrenal-loving, hormone-balancing, potions to get you back into balance? Yahs! I had these four choices on hand, but there are a lot of options once you start to dig around the health food store a little. Here is a little about each one and why I chose them. Ashwaganda: helps the body adapt to stress and bring us back into balance. It encourages deeper sleep, supports the immune system, and energy levels. He Shou Wu: builds the blood, harmonizes adrenal gland function, nourishes hair, skin and nervous system, increases antioxidant activity. Maca: increases stamina, elevates mood, helps to balance hormones in both men and women, supports fertility and healthy libido. Licorice: balances hormones, helps the body adapt to stress, supports the immune response, and aids learning and memory. *Some adaptogens during pregnancy, breastfeeding, and while on medication are not recommended, so check with your natural health care provider before trying any of them. The farm we visited grew seven types of dates, and we loved trying them all. The unanimous favourite was the growers very own variety that he created himself, called Black Gold. He also mentioned that this was the best type of date for a date shake, but considering the fact that you maaaaay not get a chance to visit Palm Springs anytime soon, Ill go ahead and recommend using Medjool dates for the shakes, since they are widely available, and their thin skin blends very easily into a smooth consistency. If you cannot find Medjool, try Deglet Noor instead, or soak your dates in warm water for half an hour before blending. Dates are a great source of energy, and provide a generous amount of filling dietary fibre with very little fat. Dates are mineral rich, delivering potassium, manganese, magnesium and copper, as well as an assortment of B-vitamins. Seek out dates that are plump and juicy-looking (if youre buying from a market, ask to try them first), that their skin is intact, and that they are neither glossy or dusty. I store my dates in an airtight glass jar in the fridge to extend their shelf life, and protect their flavour and nutrients. Kept this way, dates will last up to six months. Outside of the fridge at room temperature, dates will last about a month and a half, or you can freeze them for up to a year. The banana in this blend up is totally optional, and I actually really liked the version without, even though it was less thick and milkshakey. If you want to add more dates for sweetness and flavour, live it up. I found that this amount, about 3 Medjool dates, was just perfect for me, even without the banana. The spices are also optional, but help to disguise any strong flavours from the adaptogens, which admittedly can sometimes taste like the inside of a barn, or everyones favourite: feet? Mmmmm. Right. Lets cover that up. All in all, this is a delicious and filling way to start your morning, or the perfect afternoon pick-me-up. Its creamy, smooth, sweet and totally balanced. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!        Print recipe     Adaptogenic Date Shake Serves 1 (makes 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ ml) Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g pitted Medjool or Deglet Noor Dates 1/­­2 – 1 frozen banana (optional) 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 2 Tbsp. hulled hemp seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. licorice root 1/­­2 tsp. ashwaganda 1/­­2 tsp. maca 1/­­4 tsp. ho shu wu pinch vanilla powder (or 1/­­2 tsp. pure vanilla extract) pinch ground cinnamon pinch ground nutmeg 3-4 ice cubes Directions: 1. Brew the licorice tea by combining 1 cup /­­ 250ml boiling water with 1/­­2 tablespoon of chopped licorice root. Let steep covered for 15-30 minutes. 2. Place all ingredients in the blender. Measure out 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml of licorice tea, add it to the blender, and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness and spice to your liking. Enjoy immediately. I just want to give a huge shout out to Sasha and all the women who attended the retreat – it was truly a beautiful experience. And if anyone out there is looking for some inspiration and general awesomeness, follow these wonderful people, below: Sasha Swerdloff – Tending the Table Renne Byrd – Will Frolic for Food Lily Diamond – Kale and Caramel Kimberly Hasselbrink – Kimberly Hasselbrink Shelley Westerhausen – Vegetarian Ventures Lindsay Kluge – Ginger Botanicals Trisha Hughes – Go Eat Your Beets Carly Diaz – Carly Diaz Eva Kosmes Flores – Adventures in Cooking Sophie MacKenzie – Wholehearted Eats Hope you’re all enjoying the first breaths of Springtime. Sending love, gratitude, and sunshine, Sarah B. Show me your shakes on Instagram: #mnrdateshake *   *   *   *   *   * Hey ya’ll! One more thing before I go: new Wild Heart High Spirit retreats are being planned! I’ll share more news about the retreats soon, but if you want to be the first to know when tickets are available, go to www.goldencircleretreats.com and join the email list. I’m so excited to welcome another group of women to this magical experience! The post Adaptogenic Date Shake appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Spice Chia Pudding

October 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a quick and healthy recipe from Plant-Based Cooking that is just in time for fall! Why? Because it contains everyone’s favorite fall flavor — pumpkin spice. Chia pudding is great for a grab-and-go breakfast, or a light snack. It’s made with chia seeds, which are packed with fiber, omegas, potassium, zinc and magnesium. A superfood that is great for boosting energy and so much more! You can get super creative with what ingredients you put in your chia pudding, which is one of the reasons we love it so much. So for anyone looking for a pumpkin spice version of chia pudding, this recipe will do the trick! Here’s how to make it: Read the full recipe here. The post Pumpkin Spice Chia Pudding appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate

June 11 2017 My New Roots 

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate When I was in high school, the cool thing to do at lunch was eschew the basement cafeteria (obvi), leave the grounds altogether, and go to the local coffee shop. This made us feel like adults or something, sitting on plush velvet sofas, gossiping about so-and-sos new haircut, and whose older brother wed make out with while sipping a beverage that cost at least an hours worth of babysitting. Of course none of us really liked coffee, so we would blow our money on Italian sodas, fruity teas, and smoothies. When the warmer months rolled around, sandwich boards everywhere would announce that our very favourite, coffee-free drink was back in town: the Frozen Hot Chocolate. Now, if you have never lived in North America, the name and entire concept of this beverage Im sure eludes you. Isnt it an oxymoron, frozen hot chocolate? Yes, I suppose it is, but then I also suppose that is the point - to confuse you enough that you want to buy one. There is a famous restaurant in New York City that first came up with this drink, and although Ive never had the original, plenty of franchised cafes have made their own versions of what it essentially, a frothy chocolate milkshake. In the past few weeks the weather here in Copenhagen has warmed up and Ive finally been in the mood for cool, blended drinks again. But instead of using frozen bananas and other blood sugar-spiking fruits, Ive been experimenting more and more with frozen veggies instead. The results are surprisingly delicious and Im thrilled to have a few new veg-centric smoothies on lock. This is just one of them. The surprise ingredient in my frozen hot chocolate is...wait for it...cauliflower. Now this may sound totally weird, but please trust me, its delicious. Not even in a compromising way. The first sips are pure chocolate paradise, followed by a slight cruciferous waft, which then disappears again, conveniently, for those of us who perhaps dont like vegetables at all (Im looking specifically at my three-year-old son right now). All in all, this is one frosty, chocolate-y miracle of a drink for summer and Im making it every morning to celebrate liquid vegetables tasting like candy. Cauliflower Power Did you know that a cauliflower is actually a little head of thousands of compact flowers? Call me a hippie, but I like the idea of mowing down on a meadow. It makes me smile. Cauliflowers are white because they do not contain any carotene, the pigment found in things like carrots and broccoli, but what it lacks in vitamin A, it makes up for in potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. And it may surprise you to learn that cauliflower is 25% protein and among the cancer-fighting cruciferous family that includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage and kale. Since this recipe calls for frozen cauliflower, I know some of you will be wondering if that changes the nutritional content in any way. Im happy to report that a recent study done on the freezing of cauliflower has shown its nutrients to be fairly stable after one-year freezer storage. Cauliflower in the study was blanched in near-boiling water for three minutes prior to freezing for one year. Numerous phytonutrients were evaluated in the study, including cauliflower’s sulfur-containing compounds. While nutrients levels were typically reduced after this year of freezer storage, loss of nutrients averaged about 15-35%. Although I always recommend eating fresh vegetables, there are some (fun!) applications that benefit from using the freezer. And its great to know that it doesnt pose too much a treat to those precious nutrients. Plus, frozen veggies (and fruits) can be lower cost, especially when the fresh version is out of season. If youre on a budget, frozen produce is a respectable way to get your plants in! The important part of this recipe is that you use frozen cauliflower, either purchased that way, or a head of cauliflower prepared ahead of time - washed, chopped into florets and frozen overnight. Similarly to how a frozen banana behaves in a blender, cauliflower too takes on a creamy-frothy consistency that works extremely well in this context. I also like to freeze the milk into cubes since this helps to keep the drink very cold and light. Dates sweeten the mixture, and you can scale these up or down depending on how hardcore you are. The cacao powder Ive used is raw, but you can also use regular cocoa powder in a pinch, or if youre on a budget. This recipe is a mere 4 ingredients, but if you feel like gettin fancy, by all means top that frozen hot chocolate with coconut cream (from a can of coconut milk, chilled in the fridge overnight) and some cacao nibs. You can also add some ingredients to the blend itself, like a handful of soaked cashews for extra richness, a scoop of protein powder (I like sprouted pea, sprouted brown rice or hemp), vanilla, or even fresh greens (spinach is very good at hiding in this too). The point of all this is to have fun and enjoy something that tastes like its pretty indulgent, but secretly good for you. Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate Serves 2-3 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 250g frozen cauliflower florets 1/­­3 cup /­­ 100g pitted dates 6 Tbsp. raw cacao powder approx. 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml plant-based milk (I used oat milk) handful of ice cubes (made from either plant-milk ice or water) Optional ingredients: Pinch of vanilla powder coconut cream (from the top of a can of coconut milk)?cacao nibs handful soaked cashews protein powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Add more liquid if necessary (mixture should be relatively thick). 2. Top with coconut cream and cacao nibs, if desired. Enjoy immediately. *   *   *   *   * You guys!!! I am so pumped to finally announce my upcoming wellness retreats this fall. We are going to two spectacular European locations: Ibiza, Spain and Comporta, Portugal. Both simple and luxurious, we have found the perfect settings to unwind, and press the reset button. Our Wild Heart High Spirit program combines inspiring cooking classes and nutrition workshops (lead by yours truly) with delicious movement classes, yoga, pilates and dance by Living Yolates that will both strengthen your body and open your heart. These seven days will nurture you on all levels of your being, help you realign with your internal guidance system, and ignite you on your journey towards greater health! Join us for this incredibly special, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, with Golden Circle Retreats. The post Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate appeared first on My New Roots.

Chia Lemon Cake

January 17 2017 Veganpassion 

Chia Lemon Cake Chia seeds are my latest discoveries. The small seeds look like tiny pebbles and they have great nutritional values. The superfood contains antioxidants, calcium, potassium, iron, omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids and withal they are very versatile! Today I want to share my Chia Lemon Cake recipe with you. Very delicous and even healthy :-). If you don't want to use any sugar you can bake the cake with any alternative you like. You can use xylit, agave sirup or stevia . Makes a 7 inch (18cm) cake springform pan. For the dough: 1 3/­­4 cup (200 g) spelt flour 7/­­8 cup (100g) raw cane sugar 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking powder 3 tsp. vanilla sugar 1 pinch of salt 1 tbsp. soy flour or arrowroot flour 2 tbsp. chia seeds 1 pinch of curcuma juice and skin of one lemon 1/­­4 cup (50 g) margarine or vegan butter, melted 1/­­8 cup (30 ml) oil  3/­­4 cup (180 ml) water In a bowl mix together flour, sugar, backing powder, vanilla sugar, salt, chia seeds, curcuma and lemon abraison. Grease cake springform pan with margarine and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F (170°C) for about 40 minutes. Let the cake cool off in the pan and sprinkle it with powdered sugar. Enjoy your meal.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

There’s a new milk in town…and it’s delicious

May 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

There’s a new milk in town…and it’s delicious Almond, cashew, coconut, hemp, soy – there is definitely no shortage to the list of non-dairy milks available to us. Well, it’s time to welcome one more ingredient to the plant-based party: yellow peas. Ripple, a new nutritious, dairy-free milk, is processed using yellow peas. And what does this alternative milk taste like, you ask? The VT team recently tasted the all-natural milk and found it’s smooth, creamy, refreshing, and tasty. Flavors include original, unsweetened original, vanilla, and a rich, sweet chocolate. Better yet, there is a whopping 8 grams of protein per serving, half the sugar of dairy milk, and contains calcium, iron, potassium, Omega-3s, and Vitamin D. This vegan, gluten-free milk is also surprisingly eco-friendly. According to Ripple, they have a 93% lower water footprint than dairy milk. Peas require less water than almonds and emit 69% less carbon dioxide than cashews, coconuts, and almonds. Plus, it’s bottled in 100% post-consumer recycled plastic, which can also be recycled. Check out their website for more information and where you can find this milk.

How Do I Cook with Seaweed

April 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Sea vegetables deserve way more attention than they get from sushi bars and maki rolls.  Mineral dense and a great source of iron, magnesium and potassium, seaweed is the unique source of plant-based EPA; an omega-3 fatty acid otherwise only found in animal products.  And theres an entire world of sea vegetables out there.  Here are a few of the most common varieties. Nori: The sushi staple also makes great wraps for veggie rolls.  Dulse: After a quick soak in cold water, the brownish/­­ dark purple seaweed makes a wonderful addition to salads.  Kombu: The fat, dried strips of sea kelp are most often used as flavoring agents. They can be added to vegetable broths as they cook, then thinly sliced to add texture, umami flavor, and richness to soups.

Cinnamon Bun Smoothie

January 13 2016 VegKitchen 

Did somebody say cinnamon bun? Yum! Smooth, sweet, nutty and filling, this smoothie will top off your potassium levels and provide slow-releasing energy to keep hunger at bay for longer.

Vegan Bombay Potatoes and Peas

September 28 2015 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Bombay Potatoes and Peas These Bombay potatoes are super easy and delicious. Potatoes and peas cooked in an easy onion tomato and spice sauce and garnished liberally with cilantro. There are several recipes for Bombay potatoes which are just dry or wet potatoes. I added peas to make them into a substantial meal or side. Serve these with whole grain flatbread or make a bowl with cooked grain of choice, greens, sprouts and saucy potatoes and peas. Make these with sweet potatoes for variation! I usually dont have cooked potatoes stored in the refrigerator. So I cook the potatoes with the sauce. You can use boiled/­­cooked potatoes and cook them with the sauce for 5 minutes to coat and serve. Adjust the water for dryer sauce or more curry to preference. Add cooked chickpeas instead of peas. Potatoes have a bad rap for the high starch/­­carb content. However, they are a great source of potassium, b6 & C vitamins, manganese, and fibre esp if eaten with the skin. As with everything, eat in moderation. I mean this Aloo Matar. Nuff Said. Continue reading: Vegan Bombay Potatoes and PeasThe post Vegan Bombay Potatoes and Peas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Tesss Blueberry Breakfast Tart + Mystical Mango Smoothies

August 13 2015 My New Roots 

Tesss Blueberry Breakfast Tart + Mystical Mango Smoothies Summer finally came to Denmark and I am one happy, happy person. Life just seems easier when the sun is shining and I dont need to wear a snowsuit. In August. I am also in the groove of cooking less, eating more simple, raw foods and whizzing stuff up in a blender. Tess Masterss book, The Blender Girl Smoothies could not have come out at a better time considering Im making smoothies round the clock and looking for some new inspiration. With over 100 gluten-free, vegan recipes her book is kind of like the bible of blended drinks. What I appreciate is that you can look up recipes according to what effects you are after (to detoxify, alkalize, boost immunity, reduce inflammation etc.) and the chapters are divided into types of recipes (clean and green, light and fruity, dessert...). There are tips and tricks, a thorough pantry section and a good resource list for those of us who are new to this blending world. Because Im such a wild cat, I chose to make two recipes from the book and combine them. Oh yea. The Blueberry Breakfast Tart and Mystical Mango both sounded like heaven-in-a-glass to me and the combo, I must say, is over the top. I know it may seem a tad excessive to make two smoothies, but if youre serving these at a brunch or something, its really fun (and beautiful!) to see them swirled together in a glass. The blueberry one is really what it claims to be: liquid breakfast. With cashews, oats and maple syrup (which I didnt use actually) it will wake you up and fuel you through a long morning of summer-ness. The mango smoothie is bright and tropical tasting - I loved the lime, orange and cardamom flavours in there! Whooo-hooo! All I can say is, way to go, Tess! Whether or not youre a smoothie pro or just getting started, this is the book to get your fruit-sticky hands on.     Print recipe     Blueberry Breakfast Tart This tastes like a Pop-Tart, and is great for digestive health. Oats are a wonderful source of fiber, to combat carcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract. And both oats and blueberries become gelatinous in the colon, helping to expel toxins and lower blood pressure and cholesterol. 2 1/­­4 cups (540ml) unsweetened almond milk, hemp milk, or rice milk (strained if homemade) 1/­­3 cup (45g) raw unsalted cashews, soaked 1/­­3 cup (30g) rolled oats, soaked 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup, plus more to taste 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 cups (320g) frozen blueberries Throw the milk, cashews, and oats into your blender and blast on high for 30 to 60 seconds, until creamy. Add the remaining ingredients and blast again on high for about 20 seconds, until smooth. Tweak the maple syrup to taste. Boosters 1 tablespoon maqui powder 1 tablespoon ground flaxseeds 1 teaspoon coconut oil Mystical Mango With a creamy texture and exquisite flavour, this immunity blend is fabulous for collagen formation and glowing skin, hair, and nails. Mangos enzymes and vitamins A, C, and E cleanse the liver and aid digestion, and its potassium and fiber help regulate blood pressure and cholesterol. This one will make your heart happy. 1 1/­­2 cups (360ml) freshly squeezed orange juice 1/­­2 cup (120ml) water, plus more as needed 1/­­2 medium avocado, pitted and peeled 1/­­2 teaspoon finely grated lime zest 1/­­8 teaspoon ground cardamom 2 cups (320g) frozen mango 1/­­2 cup (62g) ice cubes Throw all of the ingredients into your blender and blast on high for 30 to 60 seconds, until smooth and creamy. Add more water as needed to blend. Boosters 1/­­2 teaspoon wheatgrass powder 1 teaspoon chia seeds 1 teaspoon flaxseed oil I hope you guys are having a rad summer. Much love to all! xo, Sarah B  

9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your Plate

August 3 2015 Meatless Monday 

9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your PlateNational Farmers Market Week, August 2-8, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season! The post 9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your Plate appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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