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Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake

October 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake I know what you are thinking. Where is the cake and what is that red sauce? In most other countries this would be called a trifle or a parfait, but in Denmark we call this an old-fashioned apple cake (although our version is modernized). I have the fondest memories leaning over a huge bowl of Gammeldags aeblekage at my grandmother’s kitchen table. It’s made of smooth apple sauce (our version is red) topped with crushed cookie crumbles and whipped cream and it was my favorite dessert in the world. Me and my twin brother spent every other weekend and school holiday at my grandmother’s house. She was the warmest and calmest person we knew, always smiling. My memories are fading but whenever I think of her I can smell the cigarillos she loved to smoke and the hair spray she always wore. And I remember her huge black & white marble coffee table that we often sat around and her warm hugs. She had a big house and rented out one room in the basement, one on the top floor and one in the garden to various tenants. On weekends she baked for everyone in the house. Large batches of spiced pound cake, chocolate cake or her famous (in my world) old-fashioned apple cake. I never thought of it back then but - damn! - she must have been the best landlord. When my twin brother and I were 10 years old she sadly passed away, two days after Christmas, and she left a big hole of emptiness in me. I have been thinking about her so much lately as I have been making this recipe for our kids and telling them stories about her. So this cake and this video is for you grandma. /­­Luise We have actually changed quite a few things from my grandmother’s recipe. We ditched the sugar in the apple sauce (because it’s really not needed if you use sweet apples), replaced cookie crumble with a simple nut and date crumble and used whipped coconut cream on top to make it vegan. But it still tastes a lot like the ones she made. And the texture is ace! It’s sweet and tangy and soft and rich and crunchy. And it’s pretty easy to make as well. 1) Cook apple sauce (or use readymade). 2) Chop toasted nuts and mix with sticky dates. 3) Whip cream. 4) Layer. 5) Dive in. While testing the first version of the recipe, David’s main concern was that it didn’t look pretty enough (typically him). I peeled the apples and didn’t blend the sauce so it did look rather yellow/­­brownish. But he figured out that by using the most deep red apples we could find, kept the peel on, cooked on low heat and then blended the sauce, it got a beautiful pink/­­red color. I’ve never seen an apple sauce looking radiant like that before. Make sure to cook a double batch of the sauce. It’s crazy good on top of yogurt and porridge bowls. We are definitely not experts on whipped coconut cream. We have failed at making it numerous times as different brands behave differently and some simply don’t work at all. Key is keeping it chilled to get the cream to separate from the liquid and the chilling is also essential when whipping. Usually, the cream solidifies so you scoop it out with a spoon, but when making the video above, we used a brand that separated without solidifying so we could simply pour the cream into the bowl while the rest of the liquid stayed at the bottom of the can. If you want to learn more about Whipped Coconut Cream (and which US brands that work best), go read Ashlae’s post on Coconut Whipped Cream. I should also mention that if you are not vegan or too fond of coconut cream, regular whipped cream is just as delicious. Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake Serves 4 If you cant find red apples like ours, you can add a little pomegranate juice or grated beetroot to the apple sauce while mixing to make it more red. Red Apple Sauce 1 kg /­­ 2 lb red apples (use local produce if available) 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon (or cardamom) 1 tbsp lemon juice Date & Nut Crumble 180 g /­­ 1 cup almonds 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 8 dates Whipped Coconut Cream (or regular cream) 1 can coconut milk, placed in the fridge for a few hours (or coconut cream or heavy cream) Rinse the apples and chop them in bite size pieces, discarding the core. Place in a large sauce pan along with water, fresh ginger, vanilla powder and cinnamon. Let simmer on low heat for approx 20 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile, place the nuts on a tray and roast at 150°C /­­ 300°F for approx 15 minutes. Remove the stone from the dates and use a knife to chop them or a fork to mash them. Chop the nuts medium fine, reserve a handful a nuts for topping and mix the rest with the date paste into a crumble. Set aside. When the apples are done, use a hand (immersion) blender to mix into a smooth apple sauce. Stir lemon juice into the sauce,  leave to cool or scoop into a large jar and place in the fridge. Scoop out the solid cream from 1 can of chilled coconut milk. Use a hand mixer to whip the coconut cream until it’s fluffy and forms soft peaks. If it feels too runny, place the bowl in the freezer for 10-15 minutes and then try whipping again. If you like it sweetened, you can fold in some maple syrup or vanilla into the cream after it is whipped. If using regular cream, simply whip it until soft peaks form. Place apple sauce as bottom layer in 4 glasses or jars (or use 1 big glass bowl). Top evenly with nut and date crumble and then scoop over whipped cream. Sprinkle chopped nuts on top. Enjoy! They sit quite well in the fridge so they can be prepared a few hours ahead. PS! Yesterday also happened to be Noah’s first birthday! Happy day little man! David usually post a little letter to the kids here on their first birthday but he’s been a little busy lately but promises that he will write it in a later post. Oh, one more thing! The Dutch edition of Green Kitchen At Home has been nominated for Cookbook of the Year in Holland. There are two awards, one is decided by a jury and the other is people’s choice. We’d be super happy if our Dutch readers (or anyone) would like to vote for us. It only takes 30 seconds. Here is the link!

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

corn salad recipe | sweet corn salad | corn kosambari recipe

May 18 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

corn salad recipe | sweet corn salad | corn kosambari recipecorn salad recipe | sweet corn salad | corn kosambari recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. kosambari is a favorite south indian salad which is typically prepared with carrots, cucumber, lentil and even pomegranate. sweet corn salad is new entry into this list and is often prepared by mixing it other veggies or by itself. ideally it is consumed just before consuming the rice and dal combination, but not restricted to eat corn salad as a plain salad. Continue reading corn salad recipe | sweet corn salad | corn kosambari recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Lamb Roast With Pomegranate Molasses

April 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

This vegan lamb roast from Awkward In The Kitchen is the perfect addition to your holiday brunch or dinner! She uses wheat gluten to create the fake meat, and marinades […] The post Vegan Lamb Roast With Pomegranate Molasses appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Pomegranate, Berry & Avocado Smoothie

January 17 2017 VegKitchen 

Pomegranate, Berry & Avocado Smoothie January is spring cleaning time for the body. Getting plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet is highly recommended because they bring with them many health benefits. An easy way to consume lots of different plant-based foods in one sitting is to make smoothies.The post Pomegranate, Berry & Avocado Smoothie appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding

January 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Happy New Year! Checking in with a quick breakfast recipe idea that was born out of my struggle to feed my very picky eight year old a nutritious breakfast. Chia pudding used to be a staple breakfast for her, flavored differently depending on the season or what was on hand, and I felt pretty good about her starting the day with a nice portion of the Omega-3 rich seeds. Then, one day she decided that she doesn’t like the texture of chia in her pudding any longer (too crunchy! too chewy!), and getting breakfast into her before leaving for school became a monumental task. I’m sure many parents out there can sympathize with me when I say I would pay money for this picky eating stage to be over. But for now, I deal with it by identifying a food Paloma loves and then trying to mask other nutritious ingredients with it. For example, she’s crazy about tomatoes, so I make a crushed tomato-based stew with other veggies mixed in, and she tends to be ok with eating that. Recently, Paloma’s been obsessed with our tahini hot chocolate, and I figured that blending chia seeds into a similar mixture and letting it sit to solidify into a pudding could work. The chia is still there, but not as noticeable since it’s whipped up with the rest of the ingredients. And it worked – the child is fed, chia is back in business, and I loved the result so much for its simplicity that I decided to share it here. I like to make this pudding the night before and let it chill in the refrigerator overnight for the chia to become its most springy self. I’m also planning on trying this one out with carob powder instead of cacao, just to ease up our cacao consumption. There are some links after the jump, have a peaceful Monday :) Patti Smith on the Here’s The Thing Podcast The Making of the Sqirl Cookbook Cover – one of our favorite cookbook covers of all time The Art of Forecasting Food Trends – a prediction for what’s hot in 2017: ‘Jackfruit! Sorghum! Harissa! And dont ignore horseradish, spirulina and Asian-inspired breakfasts. Authenticity and its cousin transparency are in. So is food inspired by Africa. Or maybe its the Philippines. Even French food has a constituency.’ Destroyer – an LA restaurant’s beautiful instagram Dreaming in French, The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis – currently reading Things to Come – can’t wait to see this movie Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 3-5 Ingredients for the pudding 5-6 prunes 1½ tablespoon raw cacao powder 4 tablespoons chia seeds 2-3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon almond butter ½ tablespoon tahini 2¼ cups water cacao nibs - for garnish hemp hearts - for garnish optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp (or other) protein ½ tablespoon mesquite powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon moringa powder Instructions Comine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until very smooth. Distribute between bowls or pour into a large jar, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour or overnight before eating. Garnish with cacao nibs and hemp hearts. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto

December 21 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto I posted a photo of thinly sliced spuds on instagram a while back, mentioning that we would roast them, add kale, beans, red onion and cherry tomatoes, slather with pesto and call it dinner. The response was unusually loud for such a humble dinner that we decided to recreate and share this simple recipe here. I’m sure you have seen this potato technique before - slicing them thinly but not all the way through, drizzling with fat and baking them until the edges are crispy and the middle is creamy and soft. Hasselback potatoes were apparently invented at a restaurant here in Stockholm in the 1950’s, as a method to shorten the baking time. It was a very popular dish when I was around Elsa’s age (almost 30 years ago!!!). My mom made Hasselback potatoes almost as often as she did her famous baked giant sausage stuffed with pineapple and cheese - yup, that was what we ate back in 1989. I haven’t seen a lot of pineapple stuffed sausage since then, but Hasselback potatoes sure made a comeback and have been increasingly popular during the last couple of years. The original version uses butter and breadcrumbs but we’re simply using oil. I’m sure some almond flour could be tossed on top towards the end of the baking, if you like it with a little crust. We also stuff herbs into the slices to give the spuds more flavour and that also helps the fat to find its way inside the potato. A good trick is to place the potato in a large wooden spoon when you cut it, to prevent from cutting it all the way through. Or placing it between two chopsticks or chopping boards. On the photo above, Luise uses a metal spoon which actually makes it more difficult to slice because the potato isn’t flat and it can also be bad for the knife. So not the best example. What can I tell you, she’s Danish, very stubborn and she doesn’t like to follow my instructions. But she got the job done with that spoon as well. As I mentioned in the intro, we add kale, beans, tomatoes and onion towards the last 15 minutes of the roasting and then serve with pesto on the side. It’s an easy one-tray dinner. It is however also an awesome side dish on the Christmas table. It looks really nice and Christmassy on that bed of kale. While we were at it, we compiled a list of a few other great Christmas related recipes from the archives. Last year’s loaf would make an excellent companion to the potatoes. o Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake o Shaved Brussels Sprouts Christmas Salad o Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf o Pomegranate, Raspberry & Thyme Jam o Saffron Falafels o Quinoa, Kale & Apple Salad o Homemade Nutella Finally, can we just say a massive Merry Christmas /­­ Happy Hanukkah or whatever yo are celebrating! This has been an intense year for us with books, babies and lots more. We haven’t been posting recipes as often as we intended but we want to thank you for your constant support, kindness and cheering comments. We have a lot more planned in the near future so stay tuned. BIG LOVE! /­­David, Luise, Elsa, Isac and baby Gabriel Hasselback Potatoes with Kale, Beans & Pesto The baking time can vary depending on the potato size and variety. Smaller potatoes will need a little less time. Hasselback potatoes 2 kg /­­ 4 lbs (roughly 12) large baking potatoes 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil sea salt black pepper 1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked To serve 3 large handfuls kale, thick stalks removed and leaves roughly chopped 1 small red onion 170 g /­­ 1 cup cooked black beans (1/­­2 can), rinsed 12 cherry tomatoes 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pesto (if you are vegan, choose a pesto without cheese) 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. 2. Wash and scrub the potatoes. 3. Slice each potato thinly. Let each slice cut about two-thirds into the potato, leaving the bottom intact. This is easiest done by placing the potatoes inside a large spoon, the edges of the spoon will then stop the knife from cutting too deep. 4. Tuck some thyme leaves sporadically between the slices of each potato and place them on a baking tray. 5. Use a brush to drizzle the potatoes with about half of the oil and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. 6. Bake for 30 minutes and then brush the potatoes with the remaining olive oil. The potatoes should have started to fan out slightly which will make it easier to get some of the oil down in-between the slices as well. If the slices are still stuck together, you can let them roast a while longer before adding the last oil. 7. Bake for 30 minutes more. Meanwhile, cut the onion in thin slices and place it in a bowl along with the kale, beans and tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine. 8. When the potatoes have been in the oven for about 1 hour in total, arrange the onion, kale, beans and tomatoes on the tray, around the potatoes and bake for 15 minutes more, or until the potato edges are crispy and the centre feels soft when pierced with a toothpick. 9. Drizzle pesto over the potatoes and kale and serve immediately, while still hot. ******************** PS! We have also updated our Green Kitchen app with 6 Christmas recipes. Apart from this Hasselback Potato recipe and some favorites from last year, you’ll also find our simple Sesame & Gingerbread Truffles and this delicious Saffron Overnight Oats recipe there. Enjoy!

Persimmon & baked Cabbage Salad

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Persimmon & baked Cabbage Salad And here we are again, the christmas eating continues. For all the phonys inside us I have baked this super easy and very delicious salad. Yes, you heard it right! The red cabbage gets really aromatic in the oven. The salad gets its tastyness with maple sirup. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 red cabbage (about 600 g) 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper 1 sharon fruit 1 pomegranate 1 handful walnuts 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Slice red cabbage very finely and spread it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup and spice it. Roast at 180°C (356°F) for about 15 minutes until the cabbage is done. Be careful it may not decompose. So keep an eye on your cabbage, because every cabbage is a litte different ;-) Cut sharon fruit into slices and get the pits out of the pomegranate. Take the cabbage out of the oven and put it in a mixing bowl with the sharon fruit, the pomegranate and the walnuts. For the sourness sprikle with some balsamic vinegar or some lemon juice. Serve with love

Curcuma Semolina with Berries

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Curcuma Semolina with Berries Hey guys! While preparing my christmas menus I want to introduce you to this delightful dessert: a curcuma-pumpkin semolina with red berries. The title is a little bit long that's why I call it curcuma semolina with berries. It tastes fantastic and it's suitable for breakfast as well because it ist all natural and without any refinded sugar. It is made out of whole grain semolia. I wish you lots of fun with cooking this dessert and maybe it fits perfect into the choice of your christmas menu. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 250 g hokkaido pumpkin (220 g seedless) 100 ml orange juice 100 ml non-dairy-milk (almond milk) 600 ml non dairy-milk (almond milk) 150 g whole spelt semolina 1 heaped tsp. curcuma latte (spice mixture) 80-100 g maple sirup 2 tbsp. cocoa A pinch of cinnamon, vanilla and salt 200 g mixed red berries 1 pomegranate Remove seeds from hokkaido pumpkin and cut it in small pieces. Let it cook in orange juice with closed lid for about 10 minutes until it is done. Mash it up with 100 ml non-dairy-milk. Then add more milk and semolina and let it cook for 2-5 minutes and stir up meanwhile. Add curcuma, maple sirup and spices. Split semolina pudding in half and add cocoa to one half. Spice and sweeten it some more if you like. Put both semolina pudding halfs in a glass and put in layers on top of the other. Serve with pomegranate and berries.

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

November 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Here is a dinner suggestion in case you are looking for a new recipe to try over the weekend. We first made this stew for lunch a few days ago. I’ll admit that it was slightly over-ambitious as a lunch project, but it did tick all the right boxes for a late november meal and we are pretty sure it is something you will appreciate as well. Both Luise and I are obsessed with Moroccan flavors. Our approach is rarely strictly traditional, we usually just throw a whole bunch of Moroccan-ish ingredients, like mint + cinnamon + cumin + raisins + pomegranate seeds + lemon + almonds into the same dish and then blindly call it Moroccan. That is also what we have done with this Aubergine & Chickpea Stew. It is a little bit like a winter version of our (favorite) Moroccan salad recipe from Green Kitchen Travels. It’s warm and comfy with large chunks of slow-cooked aubergine, super flavorful with sweetness from cinnamon, saffron and raisins, has crunchy toasted almonds on top and freshness from mint, yogurt and pomegranate seeds. If you skip the yogurt on top, it’s also entirely vegan. We have had it for lunch and dinner three times this week and we are still not tired of it. Ok, maybe just a tiny bit. Especially Elsa. She always tells us that “we are the worst parents ever” whenever we serve repeat-meals and photo shoot leftovers for dinner. Saffron is actually used as a Christmas spice in Sweden, so in case you are looking for an untraditional Christmas dinner, I think this would be a pretty great option. Especially with those pretty jewel-like pomegranate seeds on top. Our recipe is perfect for 4 persons but it can easily be doubled if you are cooking for a crowd, just use a large saucepan. In case you haven’t cooked with millet before, it is time to add it to your repertoire. It is a gluten free seed that is soft and flavourful and works perfectly as an alternative to couscous or bulgur. It also has a comfortably short cooking time. Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Serves 4  2 tbsp coconut oil or olive oil 2 onions, peeled 3 garlic cloves, peeled 1 large chunk fresh ginger 1 aubergine 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp sea salt 3 tbsp tomato paste 1  x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin crushed tomatoes 3 cups vegetable stock 1/­­4 tsp /­­ 0,5 g crushed saffron or approx. 6 saffron threads 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans (or 200 g cooked chickpeas) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100 g yellow or brown raisins 1 lemon, zest (save the rest of the lemon for the salad)  Cooked Millet 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked millet 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Lemon, Avocado & Herb Salad 2 large ripe avocados, cut in half, destoned and flesh scooped out 1 large handful flat-leaf parsley (or coriander/­­cilantro), coarsely chopped 1 large handful mint leaves, coarsely chopped 1 lemon, juice 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt & ground pepper To Serve 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted almonds*, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 pomegranate, seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml Turkish yogurt (optional) Add oil to a large saucepan on medium heat. Cut the first onion in large chunks and the second one finely along with the garlic and ginger. Add them all to the saucepan and let sauté for about 10 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile cut the aubergine into bite-size chunks. Add it to the pan along with all the spices and tomato paste. Let fry for 5-6 minutes, stirring frequently. Add a splash of water or oil in case the spices begin to burn against the bottom of the pan. Then add the crushed tomatoes, 2 cups of the vegetable stock and the saffron, stir around until it boils and then lower the heat. Put a lid on the sauce pan and let slowly simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas, 1/­­2 cup of the raisins and the last of the stock (if it looks like it’s needed) and let simmer for 15 minutes more or until the aubergines are soft and tender, stir in the lemon zest right at the end of the cooking. Meanwhile, add the millet to a medium-sized sauce pan and dry-toast on low heat for 2-3 minutes, then add water and salt, increase the heat and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer for about 8-9 minutes. Take it off the heat and let sit for a few minutes to absorb all the water. Add the remaining raisins and use a fork to integrate the raisins and fluff the millet. Prepare the salad by cutting the avocado into chunks, coarsely chopping the herbs and placing them in a bowl along with the pomegranate seeds. Whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper, add it to the bowl and toss. Serve in bowls with the stew scooped on top of the millet, the salad on the side and almonds, pomegranate seeds and yogurt on top. Enjoy! * We toast almonds by soaking raw almonds in heavily salted water for 20 minutes and then draining the water and roasting/­­toasting them in the oven on 300°F /­­ 150°C for 20 minutes. But you can also toast them in a pan. Or simply use store-bought dry-roasted almonds.

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese

November 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese To those who shared a little about someone special in your life in our last post, thank you. Reading every single one of your notes was an amazing experience, and we are so happy to have created a small space for nurturing a little love and appreciation. Chances are, most of us don’t express our gratitude enough – I know I don’t – yet it’s so important to our individual and collective wellbeing, not to mention it just feels so good and so right. I’m going to start doing that more, right now, by thanking you for coming to this page and cooking from it, you are awesome. And there’s still a chance for you to enter that copper mug giveaway and talk about someone, anyone who makes a positive difference in your life here. This salad is another idea for you to consider for brightening up your holiday table with some seasonal vegetables. It’s easy and parts of it can be prepared ahead of time, and there’s almond cheese! Lentils and beets do so well with marination – both are quite neutral and earthy in taste, and make an excellent canvas for whatever flavors you choose to infuse them with. In this case, they are marinated in a number of warming and piquant spices, along with garlic, parsley and oil. The marinade is transformative, taking the beets and lentils to the territory of being completely irresistible. They are great served on a bed of massaged kale or any other greens you fancy. I steamed the beets here, because of the healthfulness of the method and for that velvety texture that steaming creates, but you can also roast or boil them for this salad. You can easily prepare the marinated beets and lentils the night before, giving the flavors a chance to develop overnight, and having the major component of the salad ready for assembly. Same goes for the almond cheese. I took all the recipes for almond cheese that I’ve experimented with throughout the years and put them together to create the simplest, quickest version that still tastes cheesy and amazing, and that’s the recipe you see here. Its creaminess definitely adds to this salad, as does the sprinkling of bright, bursting pomegranate kernels. And if you are able to eat regular cheese and aren’t up to making this almond one, some nice sheep’s feta or many other crumbly cheeses of your choice would work well here, too. This salad has a nice balance of the qualities I aim to check off in my recipes – easy but sophisticated, interesting in flavor, nutritious and visually stunning, and I hope you’ll consider it :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the salad 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sweet or smoked paprika 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 garlic cloves - minced 1 lemon - juice 6-8 small beets - quartered, steamed, roasted or boiled until silky soft and peeled 1 cup cooked French lentils about 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil small pinch of sea salt kernels from ½ pomegranate almond cheese (recipe below) for the almond cheese 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight, skins optionally removed for a whiter color 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 teaspoon raw honey 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the salad Toss cumin and coriander seeds in a small frying pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine ground spices, salt, paprika, olive oil, garlic and juice of 1 lemon. Place cooked beets and lentils into a bowl and sprinkle with parsley. Pour the marinade over and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours or overnight. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. Place torn kale into a large bowl, add olive oil and a small pinch of salt and massage with your hands until tender. Add marinated beets/­­lentils to the bowl, along with pomegranate kernels and toss. Serve garnished with almond cheese. to make the almond cheese Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Raw Kale Chips Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday

September 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless MondaySummer is gradually turning into fall, and that means the summer produce season will soon turn into an autumn harvest! If youre eager to do some cooking with fruits and vegetables that are at their peak right now, it helps to do a little research before hitting the farmers market. Make Meatless Monday your first stop! Here are the fruits and veggies that are in season right now: Apples In addition to being a great source of fiber and Vitamin C, apples are loaded with phytonutrients that regulate blood sugar and pectin, which may slow down colon cancer. Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips Butternut Squash One of several winter squash varieties, butternut squashs thin skin makes it easy to cut and prepare. Butternut Squash Apple Burgers Cranberries Cranberries originated right here in North America and were cultivated by Native Americans for their antibacterial properties, Vitamin C, and ability to fight diseases. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Eggplant The jury is in - salting eggplant does keep it from soaking up too much oil while cooking and becoming spongy. Eggplant Fiesta Ragout Pomegranate When buying the best pomegranate, choose one that seems like its too heavy for its size. Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta Garlic Garlic provides tons of health benefits with its flavor - its a great source of Vitamins B6 and C, potassium, calcium, and anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative sulfuric compounds that have been studied for treating heart disease and the common cold. Red Pepper Pesto Pâté Smartphone users now have a great option on the go for finding seasonal fruits and vegetables in your area. Download the Seasonal Food Guide - the most comprehensive online database of seasonal food on the internet! You can find the app on the App Store or Google Play by searching Seasonal Food Guide. The post Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Superfood Tie Dye Pops

August 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood Tie Dye Pops Paloma’s been taking an active interest in cooking and working on fun food projects with me in the kitchen. This newfound fascination may have something to do with the fact that she’s on summer break and cannot stand being at home with nothing to do for more than a few hours at a time. Instead, she’ll wake up with wild ideas about what she’d like to cook that day. I try to carve out time for those little projects whenever possible, since I obviously support this type of hobby :) In all seriousness though, cooking with kids creates such a great awareness about the importance and power of ingredients, and teaches them all about our connection to food and nourishment. So we’ll cook colorful things like berry-filled ravioli with a green, spirulina-dyed dough and our raw chocolate with a ton of different flavorings, and the kid’s always happy to partake in the fruits of her labor. Paloma recently learned how to tie dye at a summer art camp, and got the idea to ‘make tie dye food.’ At first, I dismissed it as something too difficult and time-consuming, but then realized that it would be pretty easy to make tie dye popsicles with some fruit and all the different, colorful superfood powders I have lying around. All you have to do is make a few coconut milk mixtures of various colors, layer them in a popsicle mold, and freeze. The whole layering process is not unlike a fun art project, and the result doesn’t just turn out pretty, but surprisingly delicious as well. Our layers, all coconut milk-based and sweetened with maple syrup, included mango-turmeric, mango-beet, plain beet, spirulina, moringa and white chia. The contrast between the fruity, creamy and icy layers, plus a bit of crunch from chia seeds and bee pollen is truly heavenly. I know these aren’t your everyday popsicles, but they might be a fun thing to try with a couple of little ones. Adults love them, too :) Superfood Tie Dye Pops   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 2 13.5 oz cans unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 small ripe mango - peeled, pitted and chopped 1 teaspoon turmeric 2 teaspoons beet powder or more to taste - divided 1 tablespoon moringa or matcha powder, or to taste 1 tablespoon spirulina powder to taste bee pollen (optional, not vegan) Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for at least 1 hour. Blend the coconut milk with maple syrup in an upright blender. Pour ⅓ cup of the mixture into a small bowl, glass or jar. Add the chia seeds to the bowl, mix thoroughly and set aside to gel. This will be your white chia layer. Pour more of the coconut milk mixture into a different vessel until you have 1 cup of it left in the blender, set the vessel with the coconut milk aside for later. Add the mango to the blender and blend until smooth. Pour half of the mango mixture into a separate bowl, jar or glass. Add the turmeric to the remaining half of the mango mixture in the blender and blend to combine. Pour the turmeric mango mixture into another bowl, jar or glass. This will be your yellow turmeric-mango layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add the reserved half of the just mango mixture back into the blender and add 1 teaspoon of the beet powder. Blend until combined. Pour the beet-mango mixture back into the same bowl, glass or jar that it was in. This will be your red, mango-beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add a third of the reserved sweetened coconut milk into the blender, along with the rest of the beet powder. Blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your pink beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender once again and add another third of the reserved sweet coconut milk. Add the moringa/­­matcha powder and blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your green moringa layer. Add the remaining sweetened coconut milk to the blender (no need to rinse the blender here), add the spirulina and blend untill combined. Transfer to a bowl, glass or jar. This will be your aqua spirulina layer. You should end up with 6 different coconut mixtures to work with, providing that you use all the specified ingredients. Start pouring the mixtures into the popsicle molds in layers, alternating between colors. To make the layers bleed into each other a bit, insert a chopstick or skewer into the mold a couple of times, but make sure to not overdo it. Once filled, sprinkle the bottoms of the pops with bee pollen, if using. Cover the molds and place in the freezer for about 1 hour. Install the soaked wooden sticks, place the mold back into the freezer and let freeze completely before unmolding, preferably overnight. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood Tie Dye Pops appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Scallops And Spaghetti

March 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Did you know that king oyster mushrooms make a great replacement for scallops? Hot For Food has created a great recipe that puts these vegan scallops, along with crispy kale and pomegranates […] The post Vegan Scallops And Spaghetti appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Tex-Mex Potato Skins with Pomegranate Salsa

January 11 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These delicious vegan potato skins are packed with Tex-Mex flavor and are perfect for a party snack or appetizer.

Aquafaba-Gingerbread Mousse with Pomegranate

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Aquafaba-Gingerbread Mousse with Pomegranate Let's be honest: the dessert is the best thing about christmas dinner. I always don't eat too much of the main dishes so there is still room for the wicked dessert. It's just so divine this heavenly sweet mousse that melts in one's mouth and awakens the sweetest dreams. I'm floating on my christmas cloud out of mousse and pomegranate... Makes 4 portions. For the gingerbread mousse: 1 can chickpea water 1 good pinch of salt 120 g couverture chocolate, bittersweet 2 tbsp. coconut blossom sirup (or any other sweetener) 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla, grounded 1/­­2 tsp. gingerbread spice 200 g vegan whipping cream 1/­­2 pomegranate Let the chickpeas drip off and collect the water. Keep the chickpeas for a curry or any other deliciousness. In this recipe we will only need the chickpea water. Whip chickpea water (aquafaba) with a pinch of salt. This process is going to take about 5-10 minutes until the foam is stiff. Meanwhile chop the chocolate and melt it in a bain-marie (the water may not boil). Put it aside and wait until the chocolate has cooled off and got a little thicker. Fold chocolate, sirup, vanilla and gingerbread spice in the mousse. Put the mousse in glasses and put them in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. Serve mousse with whipped cream and pomegranate.

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug

December 21 2016 My New Roots 

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, youll be familiar with my obsession with Middle Eastern cuisine. Ingredients like tahini, lemon, pomegranate, sumac, zaatar, cardamom, thyme, and sesame have big, bold flavours, and act as strong backbones for plant-based recipes, so I enjoy them on a regular basis and rely on them heavily in my recipe development. And if I am out and about in the world, I seek out restaurants serving this style of food, knowing that theyll have a solid selection of vegetarian options with satisfying flavours. Speaking of which, whenever I am back home in Toronto, I love going to a restaurant called Fat Pasha. Its an Israeli place that serves the most decadent, delicious, over-the-top versions of all my favourites: falafel, hummus, fattoush, pickles, salatim, shakshuka...but the menu show-stopper is their whole roasted cauliflower. Brought to the table like a holiday roast, a giant knife sticking out of the top, ready to be carved, I love the ceremony of the entire thing, and the myriad of flavours and textures that it delivers. Slathered in tahini sauce, topped with glistening pomegranate jewels and golden toasted pine nuts, it is savoury, salty, sweet, herby, spicy, crunchy, creamy, nutty, BAM. Stunningly beautiful and deliciously satisfying. At Fat Pasha, they also serve the whole roasted cauliflower with an incredibly spicy, tasty concoction called skhug. Skhug is a Yemeni hot sauce made from chilies, spices and fresh herbs, mainly cilantro. It ranges from wicked hot to warmly herbaceous, with cumin, coriander, cloves, and black pepper providing added depth and complexity. I friggin love this stuff (*pours skhug over entire life*). Its delicious with hummus and pita, but also yummy folded into a grain salad, stirred into soups and stews, and drizzled over roast veggies, and to whisked into dressings and sauces. Skhug comes in two varieties, red (skhug adom) and green (skhug yarok). Both are delicious, but I chose green for my version since it tends to me more common, and I was trying to get into the festive spirit and looking for a contrast to the pommies, which were so assertively red. Use the kinds of chilies you can get your hands on, and add them to suit your taste. I (embarrassingly) only used one green Thai chili for my sauce, but I also wanted to enjoy the other flavours coming through (and also because I am a wuss). It was still very spicy, but not so much so that I couldnt generously dollop it on my cauliflower. Trying to recreate the whole roasted cauliflower dish at home is all too easy and the results are extraordinary. First, the cauliflower is doused in a spice-infused coconut oil before being roasted to golden perfection (this on its own is waaaay delish). But taking it to the next level is easy with a simple tahini sauce and the skhug, followed by a generous topping of toasted pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. This thing becomes unreasonably beautiful, just a warning, and if youre looking for something truly special to serve at a holiday meal this year - whether youre vegetarian or not - this recipe will impress the pants off anyone.     Print recipe     Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 large head cauliflower 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­4 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g pine nuts 1 small pomegranate, seeds removed Skhug: 2 bunches cilantro (about 3 cups chopped) 1 clove garlic, minced 1-2 green chilies, minced (add more to taste) 1/­­2 tsp. cumin 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom Pinch ground cloves a couple grinds black pepper 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt, to taste 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 Tbsp. water, or more as needed Simple Tahini Sauce: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tahini 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, minced pinch salt 1 tsp. honey or other liquid sweetener 4-6 Tbsp. water, as needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil and add spices and salt. Stir to combine and remove from heat. 3. Remove any outer leaves from the cauliflower and wash it well. Pat dry with a clean towel, then pour the coconut oil and spice mixture over the top and rub it in to all the nooks and crannies, making sure to coat the bottom as well. Place on a baking sheet and in the oven to roast for about 45 minutes. If it is getting too much colour before it is cooked, place a piece of foil over the top to prevent it from burning. The cauliflower is finished when it is tender. 4. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauces. Start by washing the cilantro well and spinning it dry. In a food processor or blender, add all the skhug ingredients and blend on high to make a smooth sauce, or pulse to make a chunkier one. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 5. To make the tahini sauce, combine all ingredients together in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, stirring often, until they are slightly golden. Remove immediately from the heat and set aside. 7. When the cauliflower is cooked through, remove it from the oven and place on a serving plate. Top with the various sauces, and sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately and enjoy. This will be my last post before 2017, so I want to wish all of you out there a warm, happy, healthy holiday and an abundant new year! Thank you for all for your love and support with all of my projects this year: the My New Roots app, Naturally Nourished, the Gourmet Print Shop and the blog too. You will never know how much you all mean to me! For real. In health and happiness, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * Exciting announcement! The Gourmet Print Shop is officially open! My vision of creating affordable and beautiful art for your walls is now a reality. After so many of you have requested high-res images of my food photography to print, Ive answered the call with larger-than-life photo files that you can download and print yourself. Its a fast, easy, and inexpensive solution to fill that blank space above the sofa, add some colour to the desk at your office, and keep you inspired in the kitchen. Did I mention it makes the most perfect holiday or hostess gift? Obviously. Check out the Gourmet Print Shop today and get printing! The post Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug appeared first on My New Roots.

Baked Persimmon - Red Cabbage Salad

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Baked Persimmon - Red Cabbage Salad And here we are again, the christmas eating continues. For all the phonys inside us I have baked this super easy and very delicious salad. Yes, you heard it right! The red cabbage gets really aromatic in the oven. The salad gets its tastyness with maple sirup. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 red cabbage (about 600 g) 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper 1 sharon fruit 1 pomegranate 1 handful walnuts 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Slice red cabbage very finely and spread it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup and spice it. Roast at 180°C (356°F) for about 15 minutes until the cabbage is done. Be careful it may not decompose. So keep an eye on your cabbage, because every cabbage is a litte different ;-) Cut sharon fruit into slices and get the pits out of the pomegranate. Take the cabbage out of the oven and put it in a mixing bowl with the sharon fruit, the pomegranate and the walnuts. For the sourness sprikle with some balsamic vinegar or some lemon juice. Serve with love

How to Cut 7 Fruits Like a Pro

December 9 2016 VegKitchen 

How to Cut 7 Fruits Like a Pro With more varieties of fruits becoming available year-round, its tempting to bring them home -- only to have them sit on the table or in the fridge. Rather than ponder how in the world to cut up healthy treats like coconut, pomegranate, passion fruit, pineapple, mango and others, this visual guide will have you prepping them like a pro. And as a bonus, see the end of this graphic for a few more clever hacks that will help you make the most of your fruits.The post How to Cut 7 Fruits Like a Pro appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream

November 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey. Roasting pears is the easy road to a sophisticated dessert. You let the heat of the oven do the work of softening their flesh to a silky, melt-in-your-mouth consistency while tending to other things (perhaps making something creamy to serve the pears with). More specifically, honey-roasting with various spices will always be a winning technique, especially when you use a high-quality honey like the wild thyme blossom honey from Smiley Honey I used here. The honey melts under heat and envelops whatever you are roasting with its soothing, complex sweetness, contributing to those crispy, caramelized edges we all love so much. Serve the warm pears with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or take it one step further and make a nutritious cashew vanilla cream. This is not your ordinary cashew cream, as it’s made lighter with the addition of one of the roasted pears. When whipped up, the pear contributes an airiness to the cream, making it less dense and adding interest to the flavor. There is also a studding of ground chia, for its gelling abilities and amazing nutrition. The cream pairs perfectly with the jammy pears, and the garnish of pomegranate seeds, though optional, adds to that festive look and flavor. The whole thing is easy and quick to whip up, so if you are still looking for a dessert to serve this Thursday and like pears and cream, this might just be the one. Smiley Honey is a raw honey company offering a fine collection of uniquely flavored honeys from around the world, from Spain to Romania, Italy to a number of states in the US. They sent me some samples of their honey, and I was impressed by how distinctly different each of them tasted. There is a tendency to think that honey is honey and that’s that, but there is a world flavor in each kind, depending, of course, on the blossoms the bees forage the nectar from, among other factors. The Smiley Honey shop has a thoughtful flavor profile description for each kind of honey they sell – it almost feels like choosing a wine, and rightly so. I chose to go with the thyme honey from Spain for this dessert – it has a boldness of flavor, along with savory and earthy notes, is very aromatic and absolutely delicious. Other flavors that caught my eye are sage, tulepo, sourwood and acacia. All Smiley Honey is raw, which means it’s rich in health benefits and will help boost your immune system. Together with Smiley Honey, we think that a jar from them would make for a perfect gift or treat to yourself during this time of year. If you’d like to try it out, use code Golubka at checkout in their store to get 10% off any of the honeys. Lastly, it’s the time to give thanks in these parts, so thank you for cooking from this page throughout the years. Wishing a Happy Thanksgiving to all those in the U.S. and a peaceful rest of the week to those elsewhere :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage S O U P Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream   Print Serves: 4-8 Ingredients for the honey roasted pears neutral coconut oil - for oiling the baking dish 5 ripe pears - cut in half and cored ¼ cup filtered water 1 cinnamon stick 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, coarsely crushed in a mortar and pestle 3-5 whole cloves 1-2 star anise (optional) freshly squeezed juice of ½ lemon honey - to taste for the vanilla cashew cream 1½ cups cashews - preferably soaked for 2 hours ¾ cup unsweetened almond milk - preferably homemade ⅓ cup honey 1½ tablespoons chia seeds 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 roasted pear - from above ¼ cup plus 3 tablespoons neutral unrefined coconut oil - melted for serving more honey to drizzle crushed pistachios (optional) pomegranate kernels (optional) Instructions to roast the pears Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Lightly oil the baking dish with coconut oil. Arrange pears inside the dish cut side down. Pour water over the bottom of the dish and place spices in between pear halves. Drizzle with lemon juice and honey. Bake for 40-45 minutes, basting the pears with the liquid every now and then, until soft throughout. Let cool. to make the vanilla cashew cream and serve Drain and rinse cashews. Combine with almond milk, honey, chia seeds, vanilla extract and roasted pear in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Drizzle in the coconut oil with the motor still running and blend to incorporate. If using a regular blender (not a high-speed one such as Vitamix or Blendtec), optionally strain the cream through a fine-mesh sieve for a silky-smooth consistency. Refrigerate for 2-4 hours or overnight, letting the cream set. To serve, whisk cream to fluff it up. Distribute between bowls, top with 1-2 pear halves, drizzle with honey, garnish with crushed pistachios and pomegranate kernels and enjoy. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Raw Chocolate Candy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.


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