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Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

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polenta vegetarian recipes

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

yesterday 09:00 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Eggplant Curry, Sweet Potato Pizza & Sage Polenta Bowls

October 13 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: eggplant lentil curry, sweet potato pizza, and sage falafel bowls with Brussels sprouts & wild mushrooms.

17 Delicious Vegetarian Dinners You Can Make with a Tube of Polenta

October 9 2017 Oh My Veggies 

An easy vegetarian dinner is never far when theres tube of polenta on hand. Here are 17 of our favorite polenta recipes.

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday

September 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless MondaySummer is gradually turning into fall, and that means the summer produce season will soon turn into an autumn harvest! If youre eager to do some cooking with fruits and vegetables that are at their peak right now, it helps to do a little research before hitting the farmers market. Make Meatless Monday your first stop! Here are the fruits and veggies that are in season right now: Apples In addition to being a great source of fiber and Vitamin C, apples are loaded with phytonutrients that regulate blood sugar and pectin, which may slow down colon cancer. Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips Butternut Squash One of several winter squash varieties, butternut squashs thin skin makes it easy to cut and prepare. Butternut Squash Apple Burgers Cranberries Cranberries originated right here in North America and were cultivated by Native Americans for their antibacterial properties, Vitamin C, and ability to fight diseases. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Eggplant The jury is in - salting eggplant does keep it from soaking up too much oil while cooking and becoming spongy. Eggplant Fiesta Ragout Pomegranate When buying the best pomegranate, choose one that seems like its too heavy for its size. Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta Garlic Garlic provides tons of health benefits with its flavor - its a great source of Vitamins B6 and C, potassium, calcium, and anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative sulfuric compounds that have been studied for treating heart disease and the common cold. Red Pepper Pesto Pâté Smartphone users now have a great option on the go for finding seasonal fruits and vegetables in your area. Download the Seasonal Food Guide - the most comprehensive online database of seasonal food on the internet! You can find the app on the App Store or Google Play by searching Seasonal Food Guide. The post Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Polenta Kabobs, Chickpea Salad & Ratatouille Crepes

August 4 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: polenta, veggie and halloumi kabobs; Mediterranean pesto chickpea salad sandwiches; ratatouille crepes; kale and white bean tortilla; and socca with sautéed chard and Parmesan.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Ratatouille Polenta Stacks

June 19 2017 Oh My Veggies 

With layers of grilled eggplant and polenta served over chunky veggie-packed stew, these ratatouille polenta stacks make for a light and fresh summer meal.

Vegan Menu: BLT Wraps & Polenta Fries

June 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Menu: BLT Wraps & Polenta Fries This fun vegan menu offers up easy BLT wraps -- Tempeh Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Wraps, to be more exact. And would you like fries with that? Sure you do. You’ll love our fuss-free polenta fries, with a fraction of the grease and guilt of ordinary fries. If youd like to make your own tempeh bacon […] The post Vegan Menu: BLT Wraps & Polenta Fries appeared first on VegKitchen.

Baked Polenta Casserole with Zucchini & Spinach

May 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Baked Polenta Casserole with Zucchini & Spinach This easy baked polenta casserole uses prepared polenta (the kind that comes in a tube) layered with zucchini and spinach. Smothered in marinara sauce and topped with melty vegan cheese, it’s almost so embarrassingly easy to make, but such a crowd-pleaser. Use a really flavorful prepared marinara--roasted tomato, garlic, mushroom, or chunky vegetable. Adapted from Vegan Express […] The post Baked Polenta Casserole with Zucchini & Spinach appeared first on VegKitchen.

Portobello Nachos

May 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Portobello Nachos This post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. Roasting up a bunch of goodies and serving them up right on the baking sheet together with sauce and toppings is a sure way to a fun dinner or a low-maintenance spread for last minute company. In the winter, I’ll bake an assortment of roots rubbed with plenty of spices, and slather them with herby sauce or tahini/­­cashew cream to go alongside some beans or grains. In the summer, it’s all about the slow-roasted tomatoes, eggplants and peppers served with some sort of bread, herbs, greens and good olive oil. Nachos definitely fall into this throw-together oven meal category, and we tend to crave them often around here, so I’m constantly thinking about ways to freshen up the format. These healthful portobello nachos utilize meaty, roasted portobello caps instead of chips, which then get topped with all kinds of savory and spicy components. There is an addictive, plant-powered ‘queso’ sauce made with roasted sweet potatoes, avocado, a bit of Newman’s Own Organics Mild Salsa, and spices. There’s also a simple, spicy corn and black bean sauté, as well as some extra roasted sweet potato cubes, more of that salsa, and all the fixings. The combination is incredibly flavorful and satisfying enough to pass for a meal. The whole thing can be served up family style, with all the toppings piled on top, and maybe even some extra sauce on the side. We made a step-by-step video for you to see the fun of the process :) I used Newman’s Own delicious organic mild salsa twice in this recipe – as one of the toppings and whirled into the sauce. I suspect that I’m not the only person who has opened a jar of salsa for a meal, only to use a small portion and then proceed to forget about the rest of the jar until it’s too late. This recipe uses more, if not all of the jar. All the ingredients in this salsa are as recognizable and pure as can be, and every single thing inside the jar is organic. It’s mild in spice, but all the other components in this dish compensate with their own spicy kick, and the balance ends up quite perfect. This is the second recipe we’ve made in collaboration with Newman’s Own Organics (the first one involved their tasty marinara sauce), and we love working with this classic brand that donates 100% of their net profits to charities around the world. It’s also so exciting to see them expanding their Organics line and working towards popularizing organic foods with their accessible, quality products for over twenty years now. Enjoy! If you like these nachos, you might like these: - Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings - Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli - Taco Collard Green Rolls Portobello Nachos   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 8 large or 12 small portobello mushrooms 2 large or 4 small sweet potatoes - peeled and cubed 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 yellow onion - chopped 4 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalapeno - seeded and minced kernels from 3 corn ears or about 3 cups frozen corn 1¼ cups cooked or canned black beans 1 ripe but firm avocado 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon chipotle in adobo sauce or ¼ teaspoon ground chipotle, or to taste splash of tamari juice of 1 large lime, plus more to serve 1 16 oz jar prepared tomato salsa, divided vegetable broth or water ¼ cup olive oil ½ cup olives (optional) ½ medium red onion - chopped cilantro - for garnish microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Place the portobello caps and sweet potatoes on two large, parchment paper-covered baking trays, drizzle with 2 tablespoons coconut oil and mix to coat. Spread everything out in a single layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 10 minutes, then remove from the oven, flip the portobellos and stir the potatoes. Roast for another 10 minutes or until golden and soft throughout. Remove from the oven and set aside. In the meantime make the corn and black bean sauté. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add cumin and toast for 1 minute, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and jalapeno and sauté for 2 more minutes, until fragrant. Add corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes. Add black beans and sauté for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. Make the sauce. In an upright blender, combine ⅓ of the amount of the roasted sweet potatoes, ¼ avocado, nutritional yeast, chipotle, a splash of tamari, lime juice, ½ cup salsa, and ¼ cup vegetable broth or water until smooth. Add more vegetable broth/­­water if needed to achieve the consistency of thick but pourable sauce/­­queso. With the blender still running on low add in ¼ cup olive oil. To assemble, arrange the portobellos caps on a tray or a platter, top with the corn and bean sauté, sweet potato cubes, the remaining avocado (sliced), olives, if using, and red onion. Drizzle with the sauce and spoon in some more salsa to taste, top with cilantro and microgreens, if using. Squeeze more lime juice over the nachos and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto

April 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto We enjoyed this pizza the other day, but wanted to hold off one more week before posting it here, until things got truly springy for most of you in the Northern hemisphere. Then some stuff didnt work out with this weeks scheduled recipe, so pizza it is. Im the type of person that has to have everything laid out ahead of time, and get overly stressed when things dont go according to plan. At the same time, I sometimes find it helpful to run into those plan-ruining situations, deal with them, and come out on the other side with the realization that none of it was as bad as I was making it out to be. Might as well exercise that muscle whenever we can, because how often do things in life actually go as planned? Just a note to self here, but thought it could serve as a nice reminder, in case someone out there is also dealing with a minor frustration and having trouble seeing any sort of bright side. To the pizza! One of my favorite weeknight-friendly recipes that weve ever posted is this lemony millet polenta from last spring. Its easy to make, requires some of the most affordable and modest ingredients, and the final result is outright delicious. I worked on a lot of alternative skillet pizza crust ideas for our second cookbook, ones made with vegetables and whole grains instead of flour, and since then, quick skillet pizzas have become a dinner staple in our house. When I was recently making the aforementioned millet polenta, I had the realization that, with some adjustments, the polenta would make for another great gluten-free skillet pizza crust. And it really did! The pizza is topped with a quick kale pesto, but you can use pretty much any pesto here, if you happen to have some on hand. Following the pesto, a mound of everything bright, fresh and springy – asparagus ribbons and tips, a ton of fresh greens and microgreens. Our fam has no problem consuming the whole thing in one sitting, but the leftovers keep well, in case you are more restrained. We also put together a step-by-step video (above), where you can see that the process is pretty quick and very satisfying. Enjoy :) Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto   Print Serves: one 9-10 inch pizza Ingredients for the crust 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon ghee or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the skillet juice of 1 lemon 3 cups warm vegetable broth sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup ground flax seeds for the pesto ½ cup almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 1 garlic clove sea salt about 3 cups roughly chopped kale juice of ½ lemon ½ cup olive oil for the pizza 1 bunch asparagus sea salt freshly ground black pepper neutral coconut oil or olive oil for drizzling topping options fresh salad greens microgreens nutritional yeast hemp hearts Instructions to make the crust Drain and rinse the millet and place it in a food processor. Grind until partially broken down. In a medium saucepan, warm up the ghee/­­oil over medium heat. Add the millet and stir to coat. Add lemon juice and stir until absorbed, for about 30 seconds. Add the broth, salt, garlic powder and black pepper, and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Mix in the flax and simmer for another 10 minutes, until creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Oil a 9-10-inch cast iron skillet or another heavy bottomed oven-proof pan. Evenly spread the millet over the bottom to make the crust. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to let set. to make the pesto Drain and rinse the almonds, optionally slip them out of their skins and rinse again. Add the almonds, garlic and salt to a food processor and grind into rice-sized pieces. Add the kale and lemon, and grind into pesto. With the motor still running, slowly add in the oil through the funnel. to make the pizza Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Bake the millet crust for 20 minutes. Cut the tough ends off the asparagus sprigs and discard them. Shave the sprigs into ribbons with a veggie peeler. Reserve the leftover, unshaved parts and cut them into bite-sized pieces. Remove the crust from the oven and evenly spread the kale pesto over it (you may have some leftovers). Pile the asparagus ribbons and pieces on top of the pesto. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil and place under the broiler, on the low setting, for another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, and let cool slightly before topping with greens and microgreens, if using. Optionally, garnish with nutritional yeast and hemp hearts, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Beet and Mixed Green Salad with Polenta Croutons and Goat Cheese

April 2 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This hearty gluten-free salad includes mixed greens tossed with roasted beets, crispy polenta croutons and crumbled goat cheese.

Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake

March 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Upside Down Citrus Polenta CakeThis post was created in partnership with North Coast. March is tricky. It’ll throw out a few of those luxuriously warm days in a row, which cause collective memory loss about the fact that it’s still winter, and you’ll suddenly see a few dazed people out on the street wearing shorts. And then it gets cold again, and it might even snow soon, and the warm coat you so optimistically tucked away into your closet has to come back out. By this time, you might also be really tired of root vegetables and stews, and all things earthy and hearty. I am. Thankfully, there is citrus. Bright, sweet, lush, like little suns in fruit form. I’m continually amazed by the variety of citrus fruit available at the grocery store this time of year. Based on my last scan of the citrus section, there are at least three types of oranges, the blood variety being the star, about as many kinds of grapefruits (red, pink, white), and don’t even get me started on the numerous hybrids, smooth-skinned, wrinkled and everything in between. I wanted to make a treat that really captures that brightness and abundance, so an upside down cake was in order. It looks involved to those not in the know, but it’s actually the easiest kind of cake to make. For the cake itself, I wanted a batter that would come out of the oven moist and fluffy, and I aimed for gluten-free and vegan, since that is what most of you guys seem to enjoy. There was a large jar of polenta in my pantry – there always is, since my eight year old is a polenta fiend – and I had the idea to go the corncake route. I’m really happy I did, and the cake was gone within a day as proof of its success. It’s sweetened with dates, apple sauce and orange juice, so nothing too sugary here. The mellow sweetness and crumbly texture of the cake combines really well with the fragrant, bright notes of the blanket of citrus on top. I like keeping the skin on the citrus slices, since its oils contribute lovely, complex notes to the overall flavor, but if you or your kids are not fond of a little bitterness, you can cut the skin off the slices. One of the main challenges of vegan baking is coming up with the correct combination of ingredients for a moist batter that doesn’t fall apart, without eggs. I’ve found apple sauce to be the essential ‘secret’ ingredient that makes all of the above possible, while adding a bit of its subtle sweetness to the mix. It also seamlessly integrates into sweet baked goods, so you won’t be tasting apple sauce in the finished product. Plus, it’s a healthy, clean, plant-based ingredient, and we all love those here. I was excited to work with North Coast on this recipe, since their apple sauce is the best I’ve ever tasted and contains no preservatives and no added sugar, all the while being made with real, organic, non-GMO ingredients. Their sauce tastes incredibly fresh and crisp, and they offer well-considered flavor options, like plain, berry, apricot, pumpkin spice and more, made with all U.S. grown fruit. Besides this cake, I’ve been using North Coast apple sauce in so much of my cooking lately, from these brownies, to my morning oats, atop a cup of coconut yogurt and even in smoothies. The brand also offers apple cider vinegar, cider and juice, so there is a definite mastery of wholesome apple products, which I absolutely love. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake   Print Serves: one 9-inch cake Ingredients for the cake 1 cup non-GMO polenta 1 cup brown rice flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder sea salt zest of 2 organic oranges 10-12 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in warm water for 10 minutes, soaking liquid reserved 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2-3 oranges - sliced ½-inch thick (You can use a variety of different kinds for a more colorful presentation. I used navel, cara cara and blood oranges.) Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cut out a parchment paper circle to cover the bottom of a 9-inch spring form or cake pan. Thoroughly oil the sides of the pan with coconut oil. In a large bowl, combine the polenta, brown rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and orange zest, and mix thoroughly. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the date soaking water and add it to an upright blender along with the dates and orange juice, blend until smooth. Add the apple sauce, coconut oil and apple cider vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir to just combine. Arrange the orange slices to cover the parchment paper-lined bottom of your pan and pour the batter over them. Even the batter out with a spoon. Lift and drop the pan gently a couple of times to get rid of any possible air bubbles. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before inverting the cake onto a plate or a cake stand and peeling off the parchment paper. Slice and serve with plain yogurt or coconut yogurt. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Portabella Steaks, Panzanella Salad & Tempeh Tacos

July 28 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: mojo marinated portabella steaks; panzanella salad with roasted garlic; chipotle tempeh tacos with peach salsa; vegan Caprese sandwiches with garlic cashew cheese; and ratatouille polenta stacks.

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables

July 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Here’s a true weeknight dinner scenario. I found some leftover raw broccoli and green beans while cleaning out the fridge the other day, and decided to roast them up to extend their shelf life and work them into salads and bowls throughout the week. I love how roasting transforms both of those vegetables from something quite boring to savory and special. The very next day, they made it into this very easy, creamy green pasta that I spontaneously threw together. It exceeded my expectations and got my eight year old devouring both green beans and broccoli, which is a huge triumph in my book. She was even impressed enough to suggest that I share the recipe on the blog, so here I am :) Paloma is a pretty good eater as far as kids her age go. She eats most leafy salads, loves to munch on raw carrots and apples, and could easily devour a certain teff polenta of mine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. When it comes to things like broccoli and green beans (and mushrooms!) though, she is your typical, picky eight year old. If anything of the sort makes it onto her plate, she begins the meal with diplomatic negotiations about how she will eat this, but not that, and what sort of dessert she will be getting as a reward. We do have a rule that she has to try everything before refusing it, which is what got her with this pasta. In this recipe, the noodles are cooked in a creamy mixture of coconut milk and veggie broth, and jazzed up with some garlic and miso, while the caramelized, roasted vegetables get mixed in and slathered in all that creamy goodness as well. This preparation makes the otherwise tame green veggies into something irresistible, as proven by my kid’s enthusiasm. It’s also just a really great, easily customizable weeknight recipe. The roasted green beans and broccoli can be replaced by any other roasted vegetables, and you can play around with the addition of other types of greens, herbs and spices. I hope you’ll give this one a try :) Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Vegetables   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1 small head of broccoli - cut into florets about 8 oz green beans - strings removed, if present 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or other oil of choice 3 garlic cloves - minced sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the pasta 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk or 1½ cups almond milk 2 cups vegetable broth sea salt freshly ground black pepper pinch of red pepper flakes 10 oz whole grain fettuccine 2 tablespoons miso paste 2 tablespoons vegetable broth or coconut/­­almond milk about 3 cups spinach (optional) 2-3 garlic cloves - minced juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) handful parsley leaves - chopped handful basil leaves - torn (optional) Instructions to roast the vegetables Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a rimmed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and place the broccoli and green beans on the sheet. Drizzle the vegetables with the oil, sprinkle with minced garlic, salt and pepper, and toss with your hands, making sure to coat the vegetables thoroughly with the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, or until soft and golden in places, turning the baking sheet at half time. to cook the pasta While the vegetables are roasting, combine the milk, vegetable broth, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes in a wide saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Add the pasta and simmer until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add more broth/­­milk if needed. While the pasta is cooking, combine 2 tablespoons each miso paste and veggie broth/­­milk in a small bowl and mix until smooth. When the pasta is done, remove it from the heat and mix in the spinach to wilt it, if using. Add in the miso mixture, garlic, lemon juice and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir to incorporate. Mix in the roasted vegetables and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Polenta with Black Beans & Green Salad Dinner

June 14 2017 VegKitchen 

Polenta with Black Beans & Green Salad Dinner Prepared polenta offers great ways to add variety to the dinner repertoire. One of our long-time faves is pan-grilled polenta topped with a simple combination of black beans and spinach. In addition to being the main dish of a light yet satisfying dinner, this can also be a hearty warm appetizer. There are a number […] The post Polenta with Black Beans & Green Salad Dinner appeared first on VegKitchen.

Baked Polenta Casserole & Broccoli Slaw Dinner

May 26 2017 VegKitchen 

Baked Polenta Casserole & Broccoli Slaw Dinner What could be better than a comforting casserole at the end of a long, busy day? A comforting casserole that takes almost not time to prepare, like our Baked Polenta Casserole with Zucchini and Spinach, thats what! And while its in the oven, all you need to do is kick back, because bagged fresh broccoli […] The post Baked Polenta Casserole & Broccoli Slaw Dinner appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cauliflower Risotto from The Blossom Cookbook

May 17 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This vegan risotto is made from cauliflower rice thats cooked up in creamy cauliflower sauce and served over polenta cakes with sautéed shiitake mushrooms.

Saturday Six | Tempeh Bolognese, Buffalo Tofu Sliders & Chickpea Fudge

April 22 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including savory tempeh bolognese served atop crispy polenta cakes, spicy Buffalo tofu sliders, and vegan cookie dough fudge made from chickpeas.

Vegan Meal Plan | Southwestern Wraps, Carrot Lentil Soup & Sesame Soba Noodles

April 7 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: southwestern veggie wraps; carrot, ginger and red lentil soup; sesame soba noodle bowls with roasted veggies & baked tofu; barbecue chickpea sweet potato polenta bowls; and General Tsos (not) chicken bowls.

Baked Polenta Basil Fries

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Who says fries are always full of fat? Polenta is cut into strips and baked before being served alongside marinara sauce. Sea salt and fresh basil ground together make an ideal sophisticated seasoning as this finger food gets a health makeover. This recipe comes to us from Sherry of Exploits of a Vegan Wannabe. Serves 8 - 1 teaspoon sea salt - 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped - 1 18 ounce package prepared polenta*1 teaspoon olive oil - black pepper, to taste - a little marinara sauce**, for dipping *Found in a roll shape in the Italian section of most grocery stores. **Optional. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Grind the salt and basil together in a mortar and pestle or with the back side of a large knife. Unwrap the polenta. Cut in half, then cut the halves in half. Cut the quarters into slices the shape of French fries. Place the chopped polenta in a large bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and toss with the basil sea salt and pepper to taste. Place the seasoned fries in a single layer on a baking sheet. Season with a little more salt and pepper if desired. Bake for 20 minutes and flip for maximum browning and beauty. Cook 6-8 minutes more on their other side, or until the fries reach a desired level of doneness. Take the polenta fries out of the oven and place onto a paper towel or brown paper bag to absorb the remaining oil. Serve alongside marinara sauce for dipping, if desired, and enjoy! The post Baked Polenta Basil Fries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tempeh Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Wraps

February 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Tempeh Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Wraps If youd like to make your own tempeh bacon to use in TLT wraps or as a side for tofu scrambles and such, heres an easy and tasty way to do it. Prepared products like Fakin  Bacon) are good, but this DIY version of tempeh bacon allows you to control the flavor and tweak it to your liking. Youll need just a few ingredients to make tempeh -- and lots of other things -- taste like bacon.The post Tempeh Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Wraps appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Polenta, Vegan Sausage, and Mushroom Stuffing

October 19 2016 VegKitchen 

Polenta, Vegan Sausage, and Mushroom Stuffing Using prepared polenta and vegan sausage makes for a nice change-of-pace stuffing for fall and winter meals, and its great for the Thanksgiving table,  too. Adapted from


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