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plastic vegetarian recipes

Tricked-Out Tofurky

November 23 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Tricked-Out Tofurky This year, we will have Thanksgiving dinner on Saturday with friends, but I couldn’t let the actual day go by without doing at least some cooking — and we LOVE Thanksgiving leftovers! I happened to pick up a Tofurky roast on sale, but I always end up making a separate baking dish of my own stuffing.  This time, I decided to transform the humble Tofurky into a holiday roast to be reckoned with by opening it up, stuffing it with A LOT of stuffing, and wrapping the whole thing in yuba (bean curd skin), before roasting it to perfection. The actual process happened in a swirl of creativity, so I didn’t stop to take step-by-step photos.  I’ll explain what I did: TRICKED-OUT TOFURKY Ingredients: 1 recipe of your favorite stuffing, made ahead and refrigerated 1 Tofurky Roast 1 or 2 sheets of frozen yuba (bean curd skin), available in Asian markets, thawed and at room temperature Method: 1. Make your favorite stuffing ahead of time and refrigerate in a bowl until needed. 2. Cut the ends off the Tofurky and discard the plastic wrapper.  Cut about a 1-inch thick slice off the bottom of the Tofurky and place the roast, cut side up, on your cutting board. Cut that 1-inch slice lengthwise into 2 1/­­2-inch slices and set them aside. 3. Carefully make a cut long-way through the center of the roast stopping just short of cutting all the way through. (The roast should stay in once piece, if possible.  Removing the stuffing and adding it to your bowl of stuffing. Cut a few diagonal slits in each side of the inside of the Tofurky, essentially to open it up to be nearly flat. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. 4. If your yuba is stiff, place it (folded) in a large mixing bowl with about 1 cup of warm vegetable broth.  Let it soak until softened.  Carefully open up the yuba sheets and arrange them in the bowl to line it. (You can leave the broth in the bowl.) 5. Place the cut Tofurky in the bowl on top of the yuba, cut-side up,  Transfer the stuffing into the bowl on top of the Tofurky, pressing to shape it into an oval. Press the sides of the Tofurky into the stuffing to make a nice oval roast shape.  Place the 2 reserved 1/­­2-inch Tofurky slices on top of the stuffing, pressing them in to make a firm roast. 6. Gather the yuba up and around the sides of the roast so that the roast is entirely wrapped in yuba. Place a sheet of parchment paper on top of the roast and invert a rimmed baking sheet on top.  Carefully flip the bowl and baking sheet so that the roast is now on the baking sheet.  Remove the bowl. 7. Rub the outside of the roast lightly with oil or spray it lightly with cooking oil spray. Cover with foil and bake for 1 hour.  Uncover and bake for about 20 minutes longer or until the yuba is nicely browned. Transfer the roast to a serving platter (it’s easy to do with the parchment paper — you can then slide out the parchment paper and discard.  If your platter is large enough, surround it with roasted veggies.  Cut the roast with a serrated knife and serve with gravy.   We really loved the results.  I served the roast with roasted butternut squash, Brussels sprouts, and pecans; twice-baked stuffed potatoes; and cranberry sauce. Assembling the roastwas much easier to do than it sounds, and way more delicious with all the added stuffing and crispy yuba skin.  Plus you can serve way more people this way. Win-win, any way you look at it (especially for the turkeys).     The post Tricked-Out Tofurky appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt

October 24 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt This is a recipe that we’ve been excited to share for a while! The number of plant-based yogurt options has been growing like crazy on health food store shelves, which is amazing, and I always love seeing how companies innovate in this field. Still, I rarely buy yogurt. There are a few things that I find less than ideal about it: the single-use (mostly plastic) packaging, the presence of weird ingredients or additives (gums, etc.), and/­­or the price, which can often be quite steep. Knowing that I can easily make really good vegan yogurt at home is another huge reason. This recipe takes care of a few common problems that I’ve personally noticed when it comes to homemade, plant-based yogurt making: it’s not at all finicky (unlike coconut yogurt), and it’s not overly bland (looking at you, 100% cashew yogurt). Coconut yogurt is notoriously tricky to make at home. The ingredients couldn’t be simpler (just coconut milk + probiotic), but achieving the right texture is not easy. It’s common for coconut yogurt to refuse to thicken and remain the texture of milk, albeit a probiotic one. This is when you start getting into the nuances of which brand coconut milk works and which doesn’t, and what probiotic capsules to use. Not very universal. There are some incredible coconut yogurt brands out on the market (like Anita’s and Coconut Cult), but they are very expensive, hard to find, and honestly so incredibly rich that I can only handle one spoonful at a time. On the other hand, perfectly creamy cashew yogurt is very easy to make at home, but I find it to be pretty bland. It can also end up being fairly pricey to put together, since you are only using cashews, water, and probiotic, and you need quite a bit of cashews to bulk it up. Enter this cashew-oat yogurt recipe! It’s foolproof in my experience, always comes out luxuriously creamy, and has an interesting yogurt-y savoriness from the addition of oats. You don’t have to use as many cashews, which cuts down on price, and it seems to work with many probiotic brands. Here are a few more things to expect from this yogurt: - This yogurt does not taste like dairy yogurt, but it does have a satisfyingly creamy, fatty body, which goes well with fresh fruit, much like regular yogurt. - The texture of this yogurt is unique. It’s not fluffy like well-made coconut yogurt and not pudding-like, like store-bought yogurt that contains gums. It’s thick but pourable. - The flavor is unique, too. The cashews contribute fattiness and richness. The oats, once fermented with a probiotic, acquire a pleasantly sour, almost cheesy/­­yogurt-y type of flavor that I personally find delicious. We hope you’ll give it a try :) Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup raw cashews or cashew pieces - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight ⅓ cup gluten-free, old-fashioned rolled oats - soaked in ½ cup purified water overnight ¾ cup purified water 2 probiotic capsules (I use this one) Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Combine them with the soaked oats (the oats should absorb the water by now, so no need to drain) and water in an upright, high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass container, leaving some room at the top for the yogurt to expand. Open the probiotic capsules and pour the powder into the yogurt mixture. Stir with a wooden (or any non-metal) spoon to incorporate thoroughly. Cover the container with a piece of cheesecloth or breathable fabric, fixing it in place with a rubber band (or I use my nut milk bags here) and let culture in a dark place (no direct sunlight), at room temperature for 24 hours. Taste the yogurt. If it tastes good and yogurt-like enough to you, its ready. If not, leave it to culture more, for up to 48 hours total. The timing will depend on the temperature in your house and the probiotic you use. Once ready, keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes When you are ready to make the next batch of this yogurt, you can save a few tablespoons of yogurt and use it as a starter for your new batch. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Banana Toffee Tart Cauliflower Pesto Pasta Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sesame Mochi

September 25 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Sesame MochiThe Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. These treats are eaten year-round, but are also a traditional food for the Japanese New Year. I admit I was never a fan of the traditional red bean paste filling, but when I tried them with a sesame filling, I was hooked. The microwave method used in this Sesame Mochi recipe was developed by Eleanor Urakawa, a mochimaker for thirty years, living in Hawaii. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. Sesame Mochi The Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. - 1 1/­­4 cups glutinous rice flour (mochiko) ((see headnote)) - 1/­­3 cup sugar - Pinch salt - 1 1/­­4 cups almond milk - 1/­­3 cup sesame paste - 1/­­3 cup cooked white beans - 2 tablespoons confectioners sugar - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - Coconut flour or finely ground unsweetened coconut, for dusting - In a heatproof bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Stir in the almond milk and mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave for 5 minutes, then uncover and set aside to cool for 5 minutes. Cut into twelve pieces. - In a food processor, combine the sesame paste, white beans, confectioners sugar, and sesame seeds and mix well. Set aside. - Dust your hands with coconut flour, then flatten each piece of mochi into a small disk. Place 1 1/­­2 teaspoons of the sesame mixture in center of each piece of mochi. Pinch closed to seal, then lightly roll it into a ball, using both palms. Repeat with the remaining mochi and filling. - Pour about 1/­­2 cup of coconut flour into a shallow bowl. Roll the balls in the coconut flour to keep the mochi from sticking. Transfer to a plate and serve. Mochi will keep for up to 2 days at room temperature. If not using right away, they will keep in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Do not refrigerate, or they will become hard. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Sesame Mochi appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom…

July 18 2017 Vegie Head 

How are you tracking with your #plasticfreejuly?! Last year was a brilliant success and many of you loved the tips found in these blogs here and here. However one thing many people have struggled with is one of the simplest things that we all need, and use, multiple times a day. No matter where you ... The post An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom… appeared first on Vegie Head.

Berry Kombucha Float

July 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Berry Kombucha Float A confession – I’ve never actually tried a classic root beer float, but if it’s anything like this kombucha float, I’m all in. It’s a recent discovery for me, and the absolute favorite, quick treat of the season in our household. I’ve been making my own kombucha for years, but took a very long break from the booch production recently, because of all the chaos that came with the kitchen renovations. I finally got the scoby and starter back in shape, and have been infusing my kombucha with strawberries, raspberries and basil for a summery flair. I thought a berry kombucha would make for a nice, probiotic alternative to root beer and decided to drop a few scoops of my favorite vanilla ice cream into a glass of it to see what happens. That first sip was so good that I had to take a quiet moment to myself and take the float down to the pool to enjoy it in the sun. The contrast of the bubbly sharpness of the kombucha and the smooth creaminess of the ice cream is heavenly. The berries and basil contribute their fresh, sunny notes, and I could imagine infusing this treat with all kinds of other fruit and berries. If you aren’t into making your own kombucha, you can just buy it (already flavored) for an express version of the float :) Lots of great weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! 16 Personalities – this nicely designed personality test was so fun to take and the results were pretty accurate (Anya is a ‘Mediator’ /­­ Masha is an ‘Architect’) The Savvy Cook – Izzy Hossack’s new budget vegetarian cookbook looks amazing Stasher Reusable Food Bags – I use ziplock bags a whole lot, and even though I tend to reuse them a few times, I don’t feel great about storing my food in plastic, not to mention eventually throwing the plastic away. Putting an end to that with these reusable, food grade silicone storage bags that are freezer/­­dishwasher safe. Self Care: Routines for Busy People – an interview with the founders of CAP Beauty The Vegan Argument (Made by a Non-Vegan) Sans Ceuticals Journal – even though I’ve never tried this brand’s products, I love the interviews and recipes over at their journal. Pyramid Crudité – tempted to cut all of my veggies this way from now on :p Raspberry Tomato Yogurt Pops?! – what a great idea Loungewear Dress – I want one in every color A Quick Interview With Me on The Plus Berry Kombucha Float   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients handful of mixed organic strawberries and raspberries, plus more for serving - sliced for strawberries handful of basil leaves - rubbed between your hands to bruise 3-4 cups plain kombucha a few scoops of vanilla ice cream (I used Coconut Bliss non-dairy) Instructions Place the berries and basil in a bottle or jar and muddle with the back of wooden spoon. Add the kombucha, cover and place in the refrigerator for about 24 hours. Distribute the kombucha between two glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Add more berries, if desired, and enjoy immediately. If using store-bought flavored kombucha, distribute the berries and basil between two glasses and muddle with the back of a wooden spoon. Add the chilled kombucha to the glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Double Chocolate Layer Cake and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Berry Kombucha Float appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Oh My Vegan Blueberry Pie with Perfect Double Crust Dough (and eight paws!)

July 1 2017 Vegan Thyme 

Oh My Vegan Blueberry Pie with Perfect Double Crust Dough (and eight paws!) In baking, like everything else in life, weather, moods and trips to the store dictate whether pie is in order. I'm that person who sees pies in grocery store cases and thinks: what a shame, why don't people bake their own pies anymore? Then crave pie all the way home. It's been humid and unbearable one day, dry and breezy the next so far this summer with very little rain.  Hot days of summer or not--I was baking a pie this week.  I don't know why I've always felt baking a pie is an all day affair. It never is. Pie memories I have are of a pastry cutter and my mother with a large bowl of flour and clumps of butter rolling about in pieces, seeping through the thin wires of the cutter, and of me asking for raw bits of dough to nibble on while she continues to roll through the process of butter, dough, shortening. Then her with a large wooden rolling pin (the same one I still use today), shaping a circle out onto the kitchen counter with a few flings of flour tossed over and under the dough before being carefully flattened into the vintage Corning Ware blue cornflower pie plate (the exact same pie plate I use to today). Then she'd take gobs of whatever fresh fruit was available at the store for filling and copious amounts of sugar. Peach pies more often than not, but for me--berries always in summer. It never seemed to be a big deal for her to just magically throw together a pie.  The pies were always scrumptious.  There are a few schools of thought out there as to whether pie crust is a butter only affair or a shortening AND butter affair. I am of the latter in terms of preference. Nothing fancy. Use whatever design you'd like to vent the pie during baking. Giving into my craving for pie the entire pie process comes together and bakes in about an hour and a half. The "half hour" set aside for mandatory cooling period for the dough. Eating of said pie commences after a good hour or two of cooling with a dallop of vegan vanilla ice cream: a la mode. Or saved for the next morning. . . for breakfast. (The best way to eat pie if you ask me.)   This is actually my second berry pie I've baked in two days.  And aside from pies: here's the newest member of the family.  This is our last addition to the family what with all the aging we have left in front of us . . we are now two dogs, two humans and four hearts. She is a little under weight and has much growing to go. She is super smart. Her sister loves her, but is a bit too big to have "full access" for play time (because her paw literally covers the little one's head entirely). Supervised play only for the time being.  She fell asleep on the exam table at her first vet appointment while getting her booster shots.  Awww.  The first day we ALL met her! Smallest. Sweetest. Big Sissy loves her, too.  Now. Yup. It's a whole new world around here. Vegan Blueberry Pie Perfect Double Crust Pie Dough 2 1/­­2 cups all purpose flour (10 1/­­2 ounces by weight) 7 T. cold vegan butter  1/­­4 cup cold vegetable shortening 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 8 T. ice cold water In a large bowl, sift together the flour and salt. Then cube the ice cold butter and shortening and using a pastry blender, work the dough until the butter and shortening are in small pieces--some larger pieces are okay--actually are fine! Then begin adding the water one tablespoon at a time, tossing the dough around with a spoon to incorporate the water. Begin to work the dough into a ball carefully with your hand--but don't "over handle" the dough--you want to be able to form a ball. Then divide the ball in half. Flatten each half into a disc, then wrap in plastic and place in fridge for 30-45 minutes.  Meanwhile, make the filling: 6-7 cups frozen blueberries (*I only had four cups of blueberries on hand, so added frozen black and red raspberries to offset the amount--it works out fine--but I did buy more blueberries for next time) 1/­­4 t. ground cinnamon 2 T. corn starch 2 T. all purpose flour 1/­­2 cup sugar juice of whole lemon Preheat oven to 425. Prepare a 9" pie plate for baking. Toss all filling ingredients together in a bowl. Roll out pie dough on well-floured surface to a 10" in diameter circle--or wide enough to cover the base of the pie plate with a bit of overhang. Place dough in pie plate, pressing it in to fit bottom and come up the sides. *You don't want the crust too thin--about a 1/­­4" works well. Add the filling. Repeat with other half of dough and then place on top of filling. Fold the dough around the edges under and using your finger and thumb, pinch the crust closed. For the top of the pie, use whatever "venting" system you'd like. I just used a knife and cut out my own decorations, well. . . triangles.  Bake for 20 minutes at 425. Then turn oven down to 350 and bake for an additional 40 minutes or until crust begins to brown.  Allow to pie to cool for at least an hour before slicing. Store in fridge. 

Spinach Lasagna

January 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Offering up a meatless version of a familiar dish is a great way to encourage friends and family to give meatless eating a try. And who doesn’t love lasagna? This version spotlights spinach and fresh herbs and uses a mixture of white beans, tofu and nutritional yeast rather than cheese. This recipe comes to us from Kathy Freston‘s The Book of Veganish. Serves 4-6 - 12 lasagna noodles - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 14 ounces firm tofu, drained - 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon fresh or dried basil - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - 1 (28-ounce) jar marinara sauce - 1 cup shredded vegan cheese (optional) Place the noodles in a shallow 9 x 13-inch baking dish and pour on enough boiling salted water to cover. Set aside while you make the filling. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, combine the beans, tofu, nutritional yeast, parsley, basil, oregano, onion powder, garlic powder, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/­­2 teaspoon pepper. Mash with a potato masher until smooth and well combined. Add the spinach and mix well, then taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more salt if needed. Drain the noodles and spread them in a single layer on a plate or a piece of plastic wrap. Spread a layer of the marinara sauce in the bottom of the baking dish and place 3 noodles on top of the sauce, overlapping them slightly. Spread half the filling mixture over the noodles, then top with 3 more noodles. Spread a thin layer of sauce on top and spread the remaining filling mixture over it. Top with the remaining 3 noodles and spread the remaining sauce over the noodles. Sprinkle the top with cheese (if using). Cover with aluminum foil and bake until hot, 45 to 50 minutes. Let stand for 10 to 15 minutes before serving. Reprinted from The Book of Veganish by arrangement with Pam Krauss Books/­­Avery, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright (C) 2016, Kathy Freston and Rachel Cohn. Recipe by Robin Robertson. The post Spinach Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

(Podcast) S1E2 – Easy Green – Just How Bad is Plastic?

January 3 2017 Vegie Head 

Today I wanted to talk about plastic. I know its not glamorous, but dont switch off yet! Please. Its a serious issue and one thats not going away. Did you know that Australians dump over 1 million tonnes of plastic waste in landfill each year? Believe it or not, enough plastic is discarded every... The post (Podcast) S1E2 – Easy Green – Just How Bad is Plastic? appeared first on Vegie Head.

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba

November 2 2016 My New Roots 

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Danes are not big pumpkin eaters. Carrots, sure. Cabbage, indeed. Potatoes, definitely. But even though they seem to have caught on to the Halloween jack-o-lantern carving thing, actually consuming pumpkins is not high on their list. Just last week I was at the grocery store and saw a display of huge spaghetti squash on clearance, being promoted as autumn decorations.  Pfff, what?! I scooped up as many as I could (I mean, they were less than two bucks a pop) and I excitedly starting telling the cashier about the wild and crazy deal in the produce aisle, all the amazing things you could do with this gourd, and how it turns into freakin noodles. She raised an eyebrow, but was largely unimpressed. Maintaining conviction, I awkwardly carried my bushel of spaghetti squash to my bike, but not before telling two random customers on the way out as well. Just trying to spread the word, people! So aside from decorative (and reminder: totally edible) spaghetti squash, there is really only one proper pumpkin here in Denmark, and that is the Hokkaido. These spherical, bright orange beauties are available at most grocery stores, and for good reason: they are a very delicious and super versatile variety. They are yummy roasted, stuffed, baked, blended into dips, or in soups and stews. I dig them because you can eat the skin, which gives a serious boost of carotenes and fibre. Hokkaido pumpkins can also be called Kuri squash, and similar varieties include red Kabocha, Hubbard and Ambercup. As a PSA to Denmark, I would love to suggest growing these or other varieties of pumpkin since every single type has something special to offer, besides a being a decoration that is. Anyway, on to the recipe! As soon as the one-and-only pumpkin hit the stores a couple weeks back, I made this soup. Craving something creamy and soothing to combat autumn drizzle, I blended the steamed pumpkin with ginger and miso for the most luscious of broths, made even more satisfying with the addition of soba noodles. A few nights later I made it again and added even more goodies: spring onion, seaweed, toasted sesame and sautéed shiitake mushrooms. So. Good. I am obsessed with the combination of the sweet pumpkin and savoury miso, especially with the spicy warmth of the ginger to bring it all together. I also love the consistency of the soup, which is thinner than most of the purées I make. Its really more broth-like, and coats the soba in the perfect way. Unbelievably comforting on a chilly fall night, this dish will be on heavy rotation here this season, and I hope in your home as well. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba comes together in under 30 minutes, so its the perfect weeknight dinner. Plus, it is made mostly with pantry staples, so all you need to pick up at the store is a pumpkin! If you want to make this meal even faster, you can skip the toppings altogether, as the soup on its own is totally delicious, and can be made in under 20 minutes. It also freezes well, so make a double batch and store half in the freezer for your next there-is-nothing-to-eat emergency. You can thank me later. Miso delicious! Most people are familiar with miso from Japanese restaurants where miso soup is served, but beyond that I think Westerners greatly under utilize this miraculous umami gift from the gods! It is a consistent condiment in my kitchen repertoire and most times when I use it in something Ive served to guests, they often ask why the dish tastes so special. The answer is miso. Miso is a Japanese word meaning fermented beans. Traditionally, miso is made from soybeans and is found in the form of a thick paste. The process of making miso involves soaking cooking, and mashing soybeans, then finally inoculating the mix with koji (a specific mold spore) and salt. This mixture is transferred to a crock or barrel where it is left to ferment for months or years. Miso comes in various colours, depending on whether or not other legumes or grains were used in the fermentation process, and the length of fermentation. White, yellow, red, brown and dark brown miso are some of the shades youll see in the store. In general, lighter miso tends to be sweeter and milder, while darker miso leans towards the saltier and pungent. I generally keep two kinds in my fridge, since they taste so incredibly different. This recipe calls for light miso, and I really stress using this variety since a dark miso would be far too rich and overwhelming. I prefer to use dark miso in things like gravies and sauces. Either way though, miso is an explosive umami bomb that will add tons of complex, satisfying flavour to many of your favourite foods. Because of this six taste, miso gives plant-based foods that umph that it can be lacking. When buying miso, look for an organic or non-GMO product that is raw /­­ unpasteurized. Unpasteurized miso will always come in the form of a paste, whereas the instant miso soup that you can find on the dry goods shelf is likely pasteurized and therefore not as health-promoting. If your miso comes packaged in plastic, transfer it to an airtight clean glass jar or ceramic crock when you get home, and store it in the fridge for up to a year. Unpasteurized miso is full of live cultures and for that reason it should never be boiled. If you read this recipe through, youll see that I only add the miso at the end when the soup is in the blender. This is to ensure that we preserve all of those delicate nutrients and precious enzymes that would be destroyed with high heat. If you are going to reheat this soup, make sure to do so gently and stir constantly to avoid scorching. Some notes on the recipe ingredients: if you absolutely cannot find light miso, a simple vegetable stock or bullion can be used in its place. But it’s worth tracking down. Soba noodles can be found at Asian supermarkets, health food stores, and gourmet foods shops. Make sure to look for noodles that are 100% buckwheat flour, as many brands of soba will add wheat flour to act as a binder, and keep in mind that these will not be gluten-free. Some people also find the taste of pure soba noodles off-putting since buckwheat can taste very strong, but I love it! Finicky kids (and adults) may prefer the milder-flavour of brown rice noodles, or even whole grain pasta.     Print recipe     Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Serves 4 as a main, 6 as a side Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium yellow onion 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic 1 medium, 2 lb /­­ 1kg Hokkaido pumpkin (or other favourite hard winter squash) 3 – 4 cups /­­ 750ml - 1 liter water 3 – 4 Tbsp. white or light miso 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 175g /­­ 6oz. soba noodles (100% buckwheat) toppings: spring onion sesame seeds sautéed shiitake mushrooms seaweed, optional (I used oarweed, but any sea vegetable is good!) Directions: 1. Roughly chop onions, mince garlic. Wash the pumpkin well (as youll be eating the skin), and chop into chunks. 2. In a large stockpot, melt the coconut oil. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat and cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are just starting to caramelize. Add garlic and cook for about a minute until fragrant. 3. Add the pumpkin and stir to coat. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of water, cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer for about 15 minutes, until the pumpkin is tender. 4. While the soup is cooking, prepare the toppings: Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Cook soba noodles according to package directions, drain and lightly rinse. Slice spring onion, lightly toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat, about 2-3 minutes. Sauté mushrooms in a lightly oiled skillet over high heat for 5-7 minutes. 5. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary - youre looking for a creamy consistency, but it should not be thick like a paste. I like the soup to be on the thinner side for this dish. Add the miso, ginger and blend again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Transfer soup back to the pot and keep warm (reheat if necessary, but try not to boil). 6. Ladle soup into bowls, top with soba, spring onion, sesame seeds, mushrooms and crumble the seaweed over top. Serve immediately and enjoy. This soup is wildly tasty and saisfying, and will probably make you look forward to cooler temperatures and nights spent in. I hope you all are having a lovely fall so far. Sending big love and cozy moments to you all, Sarah B. Show me your soups on Instagram: #MNRpupmkinmisobroth The post Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba appeared first on My New Roots.

Sourdough Salad Pizza

October 14 2016 My New Roots 

Sourdough Salad Pizza Along with ice cream, chocolate, and burgers, pizza was definitely on my hit list when I started eating healthier. But like every single one of those foods, I have come up with a way of making them not only not bad for me, but actually good for me. If you live in the pizza is junk food world, this is the post for you, as I will single-handedly convince you that this universally loved indulgence can in fact, be nutritious. It starts with the crust. The pizza youll get at your local restaurant, in the freezer section of your grocery store, or out of the backseat of a teenage kids delivery car, is typically made with white flour. It also likely contains commercial yeast, the magical ingredient that makes dough rise quickly and predictably. There are of course other ways of making dough or crust, but these ingredients and methods can be more expensive and take more time. Most places stick to the quick and cheap, which almost always compromises our health. How do we make a healthier crust? The answer is fermentation! Sourdough: whats the big deal? Sourdough is essentially fermented flour. And if youre familiar with fermented foods, youll know that they are easier to digest, and contain far more nutrients than the original ingredients themselves. Sourdough bread is made by combining flour and water together with the natural yeasts that live on everything - our hands, our food, swirling around in the air - and after letting it hang out for a few days, youll have whats called a starter.  This starter is added to a basic combination of more flour, water and salt, essentially inoculating it with all of the good bacteria and friendly yeasts. These organisms create lactic acid, which neutralize phytates, making nutrients more easily absorbed by the body. Lactic acid slows down the entrance of glucose into the blood stream, preventing the infamous glycemic index roller coaster. But my favourite of all, is that lactic acid helps break down the complex structure of gluten, making it far easier to digest. That means that people who have a sensitivity to gluten (except celiacs) can potentially eat sourdough bread without digestive upset, as the protein has been changed into a simpler arrangement that is easier to break down in the body. Three cheers for that, eh? Down below Ive included the recipe for both sourdough starter and making pizza from that starter. I think sourdough pizza is a great place to begin because it is far easier to pull off than bread, in my experience. No matter if your dough gets a solid rise or not, youll still end up with a gloriously crisp, chewy crust that will your body will also thank you for. Toppings: not just a pretty face The toppings on a pizza will make or break the overall flavour, but also the potential health benefits. It doesnt take a rocket scientist to know that gobs of cheese and pepperoni are not the most health-supportive choices. So, see topping your pie as an opportunity to get creative, while sneaking in all of those veggies! The best advice I can give you on this front, is to remember to prepare the toppings – meaning that they should be in the state that you’d enjoy eating them before putting them on the pizza. Since this style of pizza is cooked very quickly, things like garlic, onions, mushrooms, and greens are not going to change all that much in the oven. If you wouldnt mow down on a bunch of raw Swiss chard, take those leaves on a tour of a hot skillet first. Mushrooms should be marinated or cooked beforehand (unless you like them raw), and onions, in my opinion should be caramelized. Things like olives, zucchini, tomatoes, capers, and bell peppers can be added raw since they are delicious eaten that way. Sauce is optional, especially if youre going to use juicy toppings, but if you are using it, keep it sparse and dont let it sit on the dough too long, otherwise it will get soggy and sad. Pesto is a great alternative to traditional sauce, as is tapenade, roast veggie puree, romesco, chimichurri, and harissa. And while were on the subject of health, did you know that pizza is THE perfect vehicle for salad? I discovered this a couple years ago when trying to make my healthy pizza even healthier. Instead of putting salad on the side, I thought, why not pile it on top? This delivers a fantastic textural contrast, while delivering that much-needed hit of freshness and bright acidity to cut the richness of the pizza. How is this not a thing?  I posted a shot on Instagram some time ago and it received a lot of positive feedback, so it seems like many of you are down with the salad pizza idea. It’s two of the world’s best foods combined, and that equals true tummy happiness. Every summer I go to my friends cottage, just down the river from my own in the Thousand Islands. They are enthusiastic foodies and love to cook and eat good food as much as I do. They are also passionate about a plant-based diet, fermentation, pickling, and sourdough - all things healthy and delicious! Needless to say, this weekend has become the culinary highlight of my summer. The only difference between this year and previous ones, is that this time I was able to talk myself into snapping a few pics during this process and waiting to eat! Not an easy feat for me, you must know, but well worth it if it inspires any of you to try this recipe. Creating the sourdough starter Although it may seem daunting, creating a sourdough starter, culture, or mother is far easier than you may think, and only requires three simple ingredients: water, flour, and a little patience. A starter takes about five days to develop, but perhaps more or less depending on temperature, humidity, and the type of flour youre using. Nevertheless, its NOT complicated, and a very gratifying way to connect more to your food. Heres what you need: 4oz. /­­ 115ml filtered water (un-chlorinated) 4oz. /­­ 115g flour (choose whichever kind of grain-based flour youd like – 100% rye and spelt are great choices) a medium-sized glass container Method: 1. Stir the flour and water together for about 30 seconds until it is a consistent batter. Cover the container with a tea towel, secure with a rubber band and set in a warm place. 2. After 24 hours, feed the starter with the same amount of flour and water. Stir to combine. 3. After another 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see bubbles forming and smell something slightly sour. This is a good sign, and means that the wild yeasts are active. If there are no bubbles or sour aroma, keep feeding the starter and looking for signs of life. 4. After 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see many bubbles of varying sizes and the aroma should be pleasantly strong. 5. Around day five, the starter should have doubled in size from day four, and is ready to use. If the starter has not risen, continue with the feeding program until it has. This process can take a few extra days if youre in a colder environment. Dont give up! Storing your Sourdough Starter If you would like to use the starter daily, then I recommend feeding it daily. Keep it at room temperature on your counter top so that youll remember to do so, and remove half of the starter each time so that there is always room for the fresh flour and water. If you would however like to store your sourdough for occasional use, keep it in the fridge where the fermentation process will slow down and will only require a feeding once a week. To use again, simply remove the starter from the fridge about 12 hours prior to baking. Feed the starter to wake it up from hibernation. After about 12 hours from the last feeding, and once the starter is bubbly and smelling sour, its ready to go again! Resources and Troubleshooting There are so many resources for sourdough making out there, Ill leave you with a few that I really like in case you run into any issues. Cultures for Health Nourished Kitchen The Kitchn     Print recipe     Sourdough Salad Pizza Makes 4 individual pizzas Dough: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml sourdough starter 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml wholegrain flour, I like spelt or light spelt for making pizza (plus more for dusting) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Stir with a large wooden spoon until incorporated. Then turn out dough onto a clean, floured surface and knead for 5-10 minutes, until it is no longer sticky (add additional flour, as needed, or add water if the dough is too dry). 2. Split the dough into four balls and put them on a floured baking sheet. Cover with a moist kitchen towel or plastic wrap put them in the fridge for 12-24 hours. 3. Take the dough of the fridge out about 30 minutes before you plan to make the pizzas. Toppings: Tomato sauce Local, seasonal veggies (our favourites include zucchini, eggplant, caramelized onions, fresh tomatoes, sweet and /­­ or spicy peppers, mushrooms, olives, sundried tomatoes, crushed chili flakes Greens such as beet tops, kale, Swiss chard, spinach Cheese such as Pecorino Romano, ch?vre, feta, goat or sheeps milk mozzarella Fresh herbs Salad greens such as arugula, baby spinach, leaf lettuce, tossed in lemon, olive oil, and salt Directions: 1. Preheat your oven to 500°F /­­ 260°C. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven while it preheats, or use a baking sheet. 2. Flour your work surface well and roll out the dough to desired size (tip: rolling out onto baking paper makes transferring the pizza much easier). 3. Spread a thin layer of sauce over the dough, followed by desired toppings (except for salad greens). Work quickly - you dont want the sauce sinking into the dough, as it will become soggy. 4. Slide the pizza (on the baking paper or not) onto the pizza stone or baking sheet. Let bake for 7-10 minutes until the crust is golden and the toppings are bubbly. 5. While the pizza is cooking, dress your greens with a little lemon juice, olive oil and salt. Toss to coat and set aside. (This step is optional, but delicious!) 6. Remove the pizza from the oven, let cool for five minutes, then top with greens, slice and enjoy!   I hope that this post puts you in touch with your inner baker, and that you commit to starting your sourdough culture TODAY. Through this miraculous process, you’ll be joining centuries of tradition, ritual, and connection. Not to mention that your pizza will suddenly be good for you. And that is the most important thing of all, amiright? Happy fermenting, friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In other THRILLING news, I’m co-hosting a retreat in Bali this coming January! Wild Heart, High Spirit is a 7-day revitalizing retreat for women, aimed to restore balance, cultivate inner peace, and nourish the body from inside out. Learn to take care of yourself on a deep level, and feel empowered moving forward in your life beyond our week together. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates and I for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity on the enchanted island of Bali to connect with your wild heart and your high spirit! Click here to find out more.  The post Sourdough Salad Pizza appeared first on My New Roots.

Penne with Cheesy Sauce

October 6 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Provolone is a cheese originally from southern Italy, though it is now also produced in the northern regions of Italy. Made from cow’s milk, this semi-hard cheese comes in various shapes and sizes thanks to the plasticity of its dough. Provolone brings a gourmet touch to many dishes. This Penne with cheese sauce is creamy, tasty, very easy, fast, helps you empty your fridge, and its nutritious too! Ingredients 2 tbsp. butter 1 chopped onion 2 tbsp. flour 2 cups milk 1 1/­­2 cups Provolone cheese, grated 3 tbsp. tomato paste 1 tsp. fresh basil, chopped 2 cups of penne pasta Preparation Melt the butter in a medium saucepan, then fry the onion until tender. Stir in the flour. Gradually add the milk. Cook and stir over medium heat until mixture is bubbling and thickening. Remove from heat. Add the cheese and stir until melted. Add tomato paste and basil. Warm up if necessary, but avoid boiling. Mix the sauce with the cooked pasta. Garnish with basil and more grated provolone if desired.

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Chocolate Dipped Eclipse Shortbread Cookies

August 20 2017 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Dipped Eclipse Shortbread Cookies We're in the 'path of totality' so I thought I'd bake some cookies. Who needs an eclipse to be inspired to bake? Not me, but the idea of something coated in chocolate to munch on while the sun disappears tomorrow is where I was going. (Apparently this is kinda a big deal and maybe the first and last one I'll witness in my fifty-some years of living on this planet! So we'll call it a BIG DEAL!) The dough will come together in under fifteen minutes or so. It requires about two hours of chilling (and I will tell you the dough is quite solid after this chill)--you'll need a sharp knife to cut into the quarter-inch thick sliced miracles. There's a bit of cinnamon in the mix to add a little zing to the flavor with all the chocolate happening. Also, there's coffee for good measure and then, THEN, the chocolate dipping thing happens. These are so crunchy and melt-in-your-mouth, you'll love 'em. (We had to taste-test before the eclipse!)   See you after the eclipse St. Louis! Vegan Chocolate Dipped Eclipse Shortbread Cookies (makes about 20 cookies--double recipe if you'd like more) 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1/­­2 t. ground cinnamon pinch of salt 1/­­4 cup vegan butter, room temperature 1/­­4 cup vegan shortening 1/­­4 cup brown sugar 1/­­4 cup sugar 2 t. coffee granules 2 t. warm water (to mix in with the coffee) 1/­­2 t. vanilla extract 2 t. ground flaxseed plus 2 T. water AND 1 t. light flavored olive oil (egg replacement) 1/­­8 cup chocolate chips melted For dipping sauce: 1/­­2 cup chocolate chips 1 1/­­2 T. shortening In a medium bowl, sift dry ingredients together. In another bowl, mix together the butter, shortening and sugars until light and fluffy. Add the flax egg, melted chocolate chips, vanilla extract and coffee mix, blend until well mixed. Then add the dry ingredients and mix until a soft dough forms. (Your dough will be a little sticky, but just flour the counter before you roll it into a log--about six inches long.) Wrap in plastic and place in fridge for about 2 hours until firm.  Preheat oven to 350. Remove the dough and slice into 1/­­4" slices and place about an inch apart on cookie sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes--until the cookies are just getting a little color around the edges.  Allow to cool completely. While cookies cool, prepare the dipping sauce. (I used the "20 seconds at a time in microwave" to melt the chocolate/­­shortening for dipping.) Dip cookies and place on parchment. Enjoy! Store in the fridge for best results once the dipping edge has solidified. 

Protected: An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom…

July 19 2017 Vegie Head 

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.... The post Protected: An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom… appeared first on Vegie Head.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto

July 4 2017 My New Roots 

Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto Its pretty redundant to say that I love cooking. So much. But even though I find myself enamoured with some small detail of every meal that I make, this chickpea pasta was next-level emotional. In fact, was one of the few recipes Ive made in my entire life that turned me into a wide-eyed child again, and reaffirmed my deep, unrelenting passion for creating food. Kneading the dough, rolling the pasta through this perfectly designed machine, seeing it transform before me, mysteriously almost nothing into so very much. Im not ashamed to say it nearly brought me to tears. There is something about cooking - and cooking something so ancient - that delivers a feeling of satisfaction that can hardly be described. Its entirely transcendental. And the best part? You get to eat it. It all started when one of my dear friends suggested making pasta out of chickpea flour and that she had seen a vegan version using ground flax seeds. I found the recipe and followed it, but it didnt work, I tried again, and after another pretty epic fail where I felt totally out of my depth, I decided to go the classic egg route. Not only was it better, it was absolutely, unbelievably delicious. In fact, I could hardly trust that what I was eating was made from chickpea flour, since it tasted so much like the beloved white pasta of my past. How is this not a thing?!  Its so easy and infinitely healthier, why isnt everyone and their uncle Bob making pasta with chickpea flour? I made this pasta three time in a week and found the prefect al dente cook time, all kinds of things to dress it with (olive oil, Pecorino, black pepper - guh.), and that I could freeze it to come back later and pop a nest into boiling water for almost-instant dinner that even my three-year-old loves. Rejoice! The only potential issue with using chickpea pasta like this is that since the chickpea flour is made from ground raw chickpeas, and some people who are sensitive to legumes may find this difficult to digest (i.e. lots of farts). I dont know how to overcome this issue since sprouting the chickpeas, then dehydrating them, then grinding them seems like a whole lotta rigmarole, so Im using chickpea flour and calling this an indulgence, like socca. If you know you have legume issues, I suggest purchasing sprouted chickpea flour, which is a little more challenging to find, but you can certainly buy it online. Now that I understand the correct moisture levels and consistency, Im going to go back and try the vegan version again, perhaps using something other than flax this time. If any of you have had success, please let me know! Do you need a pasta machine for this recipe? Kind of. Unless you are very skilled at rolling out pasta by hand, I recommend picking one up (theres always one at the second-hand store). Pasta machines are simple to use, and make this process very fast, fun, and satisfying. The one I have is pictured below (its Atlas brand #notsponsored), and it creates flat sheets that are perfect for lasagna or ravioli, or you can run the thin sheets through the spaghetti or tagliatelle roller, like I have done for this recipe. And theres another recipe in this recipe, and that is for the delightful Basil-Pea Pesto. Herb-y, nutty, and bright, its a cinch to whip up and keeps for 2-3 days in the fridge, so you can make it ahead or use the potential leftovers for many delish things (its a great dip or sandwich spread). Use frozen peas if thats all you have - no stress! And I like to use even more peas and basil to finish this dish off, so that it is even more satisfying with all the bright flavours and textures. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does.     Print recipe     Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 1 batch chickpea pasta (recipe follows) 1 batch Basil-Pea Pesto (recipe follows) 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350g shelled green peas (fresh or frozen) a small handful of basil leaves Olive oil to garnish flaky sea salt and black pepper Chickpea Pasta 2 - 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250 - 310g chickpea flour 3 large eggs, organic and free-range if possible 1 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil Directions: 1. Measure out 2 cups /­­ 250g of chickpea flour and place in a mound on clean work surface. Make a large well in the center of the mound and crack three eggs into it, along with the salt and olive oil. Using your hands, mix the ingredients together until you have a smooth dough (if the mixture is dry, add a tablespoon of water to moisten it. If the dough is wet, add the remaining flour, one tablespoon at a time until it less sticky). Knead the dough for about five minutes, then cover tightly with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for at least half an hour. 2. Unwrap the dough and divide it into quarters, then again for that you have about eight equal portions. Work with one portion at a time, and cover the rest. Flour your work surface and work the dough into a square-ish shape, about the width of the pasta maker (the pasta will become much longer, not wider, so its best to take full advantage of the width). Flour the dough again and run it through the thickest setting on the machine (usually #1). Change settings to the slightly thinner setting (usually #2) and run it through the machine. If your pasta sticks at all, dust both sides with more flour. Repeat until the pasta is your desired thickness, then feed it through the cutter of your choice. I went to #6 before cutting it into tagliatelle. 3. As soon as the pasta comes through the cutter, toss it generously with flour and spread it out on clean work surface to dry, or use a pasta drying wrack if you have one. 4. Bring a pot of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Add the amount of pasta youre using to the water and cook for about 2-3 minutes (dont overcook! This pasta will disintegrate quickly if boiled for too long). The pasta should float to the top of the pot when its ready and be al dente. Drain and plate quickly. 5. You can finish this pasta two ways: one, place the pasta back into the pot and fold in the peas, basil, desired amount of pesto, and a glug of olive oil, the divide among the plates. Alternatively, divide the pasta among the plates, dollop with the pesto, drizzle with olive oil, and garnish with pine nuts and basil. Grind fresh pepper over the top and serve immediately. Basil-Pea Pesto Ingredients: 1 clove garlic 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g pine nuts zest of 1 lemon 3-4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil (as needed) 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups loosely packed /­­ 35g fresh basil leaves 1 cup /­­ 140g shelled green peas (fresh or frozen) Directions: 1. Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Add peas and turn off the heat. If using fresh peas, let them sit for about 2-3 minutes until bright green. If using frozen, let them sit for about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts until lightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. 3. Place peeled garlic in a food processor and pulse to mince. Add the toasted pine nuts (reserve a few for garnish), olive oil, salt, basil, and one cup /­­ 140g of peas and blend on high to mix. Add more olive oil if you like a looser pesto. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Im currently on holidays in Canada and Im going to keep this post short and sweet so that I can get back to all of my funky food projects, reading on the dock, and naps. So many naps. I hope youre all having a glorious summer so far! Big love, Sarah B Show my your pasta on Instagram: #mnrchickpeapasta ***** Dear friends! I am getting SO excited about hosting my next wellness retreat in Ibiza, Spain, September 5-10 and September 17-23. And Ive decided to offer the same program twice so that more of you can join in. This is going to be an intimate group of 12 women only, housed in a stunning, 400 year-old finca in the hills surrounded by fig trees, wild herbs and carob. Come join me for seven days of total inspiration and rejuvenation - delicious and healthy meals, cooking and nutrition workshops, yoga, pilates, dance, and meditation that will balance your body and mind, and empower you to move forward on a path to greater wellness. I cant wait to see you there! Click the image below to go to the retreat page or click here for the booking page at Supersoul Yoga: Week 1 (Sept. 5-10) or Week 2 (Sept. 17-23) The post Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto appeared first on My New Roots.

Best of the First Quarter 2017

April 3 2017 Vegan Richa 

Best of the First Quarter 2017 2017 Q1 is packed and done and I am ready for q2 to move on quickly so I can head into sunshine and some break. New Posts, Updates, Book work made up q1. I added some new categories like Instant Pot and One pot meals and tagged the Recipes that now have Videos. Posts on the blog will keep getting updated with the categories over the next few weeks. The coming few months like this first quarter, are going to be shuffling a lot of the Book 2 work and the blog work. You might see more lag times in responding to comments on social media. Ping me again on more responsive options as facebook or email.   Here are all the Recipes/­­Posts from the first quarter. If you make any of these, please do leave me a comment about how it turned out, how you served it, suggestions or changes if any that worked well. Your comments help me learn on the job!  What were your favorite recipes so far from 2017? What were a bit out of the comfort zone ?. I know I would do the General Tso’s Sandwih differently. For Easter Recipe, see here. Scroll below to read about what other things we are working on this year. Continue reading: Best of the First Quarter 2017The post Best of the First Quarter 2017 appeared first on Vegan Richa.

S1E2 – Just How Bad is Plastic?

January 3 2017 Vegie Head 

Today I wanted to talk about plastic. I know its not glamorous, but dont switch off yet! Please. Its a serious issue and one thats not going away. Did you know that Australians dump over 1 million tonnes of plastic waste in landfill each year? Believe it or not, enough plastic is discarded every... The post S1E2 – Just How Bad is Plastic? appeared first on Vegie Head.

Tips for a Waste Free Household + how to #gogreen2017!

December 8 2016 Vegie Head 

Where we sit as a society right now, is on top of a large rubbish tip – also known as Planet Earth. We’re trashing our home, making a bed of our waste… and now we must lay in it. I saw my neighbours bin the other day, overflowing with plastic milk cartons, chip packets, polystyrene... The post Tips for a Waste Free Household + how to #gogreen2017! appeared first on Vegie Head.

Pumpkin Brioche Cinnamon Rolls

October 15 2016 Vegan Dad 

Pumpkin Brioche Cinnamon Rolls This recipe is a bit fussy but I thought I would post it anyway. The idea was to create a cheaper and easier brioche using margarine (instead of Earth Balance which I think has a weird taste, or homemade vegan butter). The problem is that margarine does not firm up in the fridge the way butter does, so the final dough is tricky to work with. Also, you need to keep the ingredients cold so the margarine does not melt. The xanthan gum gives the dough some structure, and flouring the dough before rolling helps as well. Dont worry if the rolls look a bit sloppy before they prove, as you can see from the pic it will all work out in the end. If this sounds like too much trouble, just use vegan butter and forget the xanthan gum.  INGREDIENTS Sponge - 2.25 oz bread flour - 2 tsp instant yeast - 4 oz lukewarm soy milk Dough - 8 oz  very cold  margarine - 6 oz cooked pumpkin, cold (see note below*) - 4 oz cold soy milk - 16 oz bread flour - 2 tbsp sugar - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp xanthan gum (optional) Filling - 2 tbsp cooked pumpkin, cold - 1 tbsp margarine - 1/­­2 cup brown sugar - 2 tsp cinnamon - 1 tsp ground ginger - 1/­­4 tsp nutmeg - 1/­­8 tsp allspice Icing - 2 tbsp soy milk (more if needed) - 1 1/­­2 c icing sugar METHOD Sponge 1. Mix together sponge ingredients until four is well hydrated. Cover and let sit for 45 mins. Dough 1. Measure out the margarine and place it in the freezer.  2. Add  pumpkin, soy milk, flour, salt to the sponge and bring together into a dough with the paddle attachment. Let the dough sit for 5 mins.  3. Using the paddle attachment on a mixer, add in 1/­­4 of the butter at a time, waiting until the previous amount has been fully incorporated before adding more. The final dough will be smooth, satiny, and very soft. 4. Switch to the dough hook and knead in the xanthan gum. The dough should gather in a ball around the hook. 5. Transfer dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.  6. On baking day: Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll/­­pat the dough on a well-floured surface into a 18 x 14 rectangle. Flour the top of the dough if needed.  7. Whisk pumpkin and margarine together. Mix in sugar and spice. Spread on to the dough, leaving a 1 space on the long side.  8. Roll up along the ling edge, ending at the 1 space. Cut into 12 1.5 pieces, tuck the piece of dough with filling on it to the bottom and place on the baking sheet.  9. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise a room temperature for about 2 hours, or until about doubled in size.  10. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bake for 15-18 mins, until golden. 11. Make the icing. Mix together soy milk and icing sugar. It should be thick but able to be drizzled off the end of a spoon. Add more soy milk as needed.  12. Let cool for 10 mins on the baking sheet, then drizzle the icing over the rolls. Let fully cool before eating.  *NOTE: Microwaving is the way to go here. Cut the pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds. Place cut side down on a plate and microwave until flesh if soft and coming away from the skin. Allow to cool in the fridge before using, and keep the leftovers in a sealed container for other recipes. 

Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat and The Mighty Fix

October 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat and The Mighty Fix This post is created in partnership with MightyNest, keep reading for a great discount. Right off the bat, I want to say that this tasty treat is not exactly nougat, as in, it doesn’t exactly have that distinct sticky, chewy texture. It’s not made of eggs, being vegan, nor is there a crazy amount of sugar. It is, however, similarly shaped and has a nice studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout. Now that we’ve gotten the name out of the way, let me tell you a bit about how lovely it is. Sweet potato caramel is at the base of this nougat, and is something I came up with a few years back. I’ve since been able to apply it to many things, from snack bars to cakes, I once even tried it in a smoothie. Roasted sweet potato mash tastes surprisingly similar to caramel when mixed with dates and nut/­­seed butters. It’s rich, decadent and very versatile. This nougat very much reminds me of a dessert I grew up eating, which was a mixture of cookie crumble, nuts and condensed milk, similarly formed into a sliceable log. We had a funny name for it in Russian – sweet kielbasa. I had it in mind when testing out this recipe. It might be nostalgic for me, but I truly can’t wait for you to try it – it’s just so delicious and simple, and includes a whole nutritious root vegetable. It’s a no bake type of affair (once you’ve baked the easy cookie crumble) and quite a breeze to put together, requiring not much more than a blitz in a food processor and some time to harden in the freezer. I give a recipe for two flavors here – caramel and chocolate, both dotted with crunchy, roasted hazelnuts, pecans, and the aforementioned cookie crumble. Considering the holidays coming up, I think this nougat would make for a wonderful dessert option at a festive gathering, or even a thoughtful, sweet gift. The neat, hive-patterned wrappers I used for shaping the nougat are called Bee’s Wrap – the best re-usable alternative to plastic wrap I’ve seen so far. I’m in love with this stuff! Bee’s Wrap is simply made of organic cotton muslin, beeswax, jojoba oil and tree resin (it smells so good). The wax in the wrap allows you to mold it with the warmth of your hands, and both the beeswax and jojoba oil have natural antibacterial properties, keeping your food fresh. It can be washed and re-used. I feel all kinds of guilt using plastic wrap, but sometimes, nothing can replace its functionality in cooking, or so I thought. This nougat was the perfect recipe to test out Bee’s Wrap on, since I would have normally used plastic wrap to shape and store this treat. The wrap truly exceeded all my expectations and was such a pleasure to work with – it smells fresh, it molds well, and just feels like a high quality product. I learned about Bee’s Wrap from MightyNest – an amazing online one stop shop for natural solutions to synthetic goods, from cookware to cleaning supplies, body care to baby gear and more, all free of harmful chemicals and carefully considered to help you make a better choice for yourself and the planet. They have a really cool subscription program called Mighty Fix, which sends you a new product to test out every month, at a lower cost than its original value, encouraging you to try out an alternative and more sustainable way of doing things. Think reusable produce bags and stainless steel food storage containers to replace plastic, nice-looking Swedish dishcloths to replace disposable sponges/­­paper towels, and much more (free shipping too). If you want to purchase something from the website independently from the subscription (perhaps some nut milk bags, a Chemex, or Dr. Bronner’s?) they will ship your order to you together with your monthly fix, free of shipping charges. I love that the fix helped me discover Bee’s Wrap, it’s a tool I will use in my kitchen for years to come. Want to try it? MightyNest is offering GK readers a special price of $3 for Bee’s Wrap (retail price is normally $13, so it’s a crazy good deal). Use code GOLUBKABEESWRAPFIX when you sign up for the fix and receive your first month, which includes two sheets of Bee’s Wrap, for a total of $3 + free shipping. Your next month and all months thereafter will cost $10, but there is no mandatory subscription period, so you can try out the fix for as long as you want. Follow this link, and the discount code will be automatically applied to your shopping cart. Enjoy :) Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat   Print Serves: 2 nougat logs Ingredients for the cookie crumble 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds 2-4 tablespoons ice cold water - divided 1/­­2 cup (70 g) oat flour 1/­­2 cup (50 g) almond flour 1/­­4 cup (30 g) tapioca flour/­­arrowroot powder 2 tablespoons coconut sugar pinch sea salt 1/­­2 cup (125 ml) neutral coconut oil - cold and solid, plus more for oiling the pan - soft for the sweet potato caramel 1 cup soft Medjool dates - pitted 1 medium sweet potato - baked and cubed ½ cup sesame tahini ⅓ cup almond butter 4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional) 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, toasted and ground (optional) pinch sea salt 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder 2 tablespoons maple syrup for the nougat 1 cup hazelnuts - toasted 1 cup pecans - toasted Instructions to make the cookie crumble Combine ground chia and 1 tablespoon cold water into a paste in a small bowl, keep refrigerated. Combine oat, almond and tapioca flours, along with coconut sugar and salt in a food processor, pulse to mix. Add in refrigerated chia paste and pulse to incorporate. Cut cold coconut oil into cubes, add to the food processor and keep pulsing until the mixture resembles sand. Add 2 tablespoons cold water and pulse. Test the mixture by pressing it between your fingers, it should stick together. If not, add more water, 1 more tablespoon until dough sticks together between your fingers. Form an about 2-inch thick rope with the dough, wrap in bees wrap/­­plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350° F. Remove the dough from the refrigerator, slice into slightly less than ⅜-inch thick rounds and place them on a parchment paper covered baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, flip and bake for another 15 minutes, until golden. Crumble up the cookies before mixing them into the caramel. to make the caramel and nougat Cover dates with boiling water and let soften for 10 minutes. Drain and place into the bowl of your food processor. Add sweet potato, tahini, almond butter, coconut oil, vanilla extract (if using), cardamom (if using), and salt. Blend until smooth. Scoop out ½ of the mixture into a bowl, add ½ nuts of the toasted nuts and ½ of the crumbled cookie dough and stir to incorporate. Transfer the mixture onto a sheet of bees wrap/­­plastic wrap. Wrap it around to enclose the nougat mixture and shape into a thick (2-2½-inch) rope. Place into the freezer until firm. Add cacao powder and maple syrup into the remaining caramel mixture and process until well-combined. Transfer the chocolate mixture into the same bowl and add in the rest of the nuts and crumbled cookie dough. Proceed to shape as with caramel nougat. Place into a freezer until firm. Store nougat in the freezer. Remove from the freezer right before eating. Slice and enjoy immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso Lemon Glaze Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat and The Mighty Fix appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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