pizza - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Palak chakli recipe | palak murukku recipe | spinach murukku

Methi dal recipe | methi dal fry recipe | how to make dal methi fry

Vegetarian & Vegan Nutrition for Teens

Vegan Strawberry Chocolate Ice Cream Cupcakes










pizza vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Carrot Fritters, Black Bean Burgers & Caprese Pizza

July 7 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: carrot fritters with cumin lime cashew cream; chipotle black bean burgers with sweet corn relish; blueberry corn panzanella with maple chipotle dressing; grilled Caprese naan pizza; and Swiss chard and gruyere strata.

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy Sauce

July 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy SauceMethi Malai Paneer made vegan with Tofu and Cashews. Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce. Easy Weeknight Restaurant style Indian entree. Serve over Naan or rice. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Soy-free Nut-free option. Methi Malai Matar (Fenugreek/­­Greens and peas in creamy white sauce), Methi malai paneer (fenugreek and Paneer cheese cubes in creamy sauce) are some Mughlai dishes you might find in some Indian restaurants. The dishes use malai or dairy cream and cheese or other dairy ingredients. Its like a spiced up Spinach dip, with lots of complex flavor! But this version is free of all that, tastes amazing, and comes together quickly as well. Fresh fenugreek leaves are a favorite to use in the dish when in season. If you find some then definitely use them fresh, else use dried fenugreek with greens of choice. Serve with hot garlic Naan or rice/­­grains or make a bowl with roasted veggies, add to wraps or on a pizza!. Dried fenugreek (kasuri methi) is available in Indian stores and online on amazon. Definitely get some, as I use it in many recipes, so it will not just get stored and expire :). Fenugreek has an amazing flavor profile, bitter but pleasing. You can use ground mustard + celery seed as a substitute when used in small quantities. Continue reading: Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy SauceThe post Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

pizza puff recipe | pizza mcpuff recipe | mcdonald’s veg pizza mcpuff

June 16 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

pizza puff recipe | pizza mcpuff recipe | mcdonald’s veg pizza mcpuffpizza puff recipe | pizza mcpuff recipe | mcdonalds veg pizza mcpuff with step by step photo and video recipe. perhaps one of the popular side snacks one the mcdonalds indian menu which has the combination of pizza and puff taste. basically the stuffing is prepared with the veggies and pizza sauce later to to be stuffed inside the puff pastry. typically it is deep fried but can also be baked in oven till it is crisp. Continue reading pizza puff recipe | pizza mcpuff recipe | mcdonald’s veg pizza mcpuff at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with 20 min Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza Sauce Topped with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Pesto Pizza Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Roasted Eggplant and Pepper Pizza on a Buckwheat Crust Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus

May 17 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus I’ve been enjoying my (sort of) new air fryer, but I haven’t been getting as creative with it as other people in my Facebook group have. I’ve done potatoes in fancy ways but mostly plain French fries and hash browns, tempeh bacon, asparagus, and, most successfully, tofu. After weeks of just “winging it,” I decided to take a look at the recipe book that came with my AF (as I abbreviate it) and noticed a non-vegetarian recipe for portobello mushroom pizzas that looked easy to veganize. (...) Read the rest of Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus (1,036 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Air Fryer, Chickpea Recipes, Eat-to-Live, Gluten-free, Soy-free, Under 200 The post Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless Monday

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless MondayThe days are getting longer, the sun is getting warmer and already its time for seasonal produce to bring its garden-fresh flavors to our tables. Weve rounded up some of our favorite Meatless Monday springtime recipes to share with you this week. Special thanks to our family of bloggers and supporters who contributed these delicious recipes. Enjoy! Spring Vegetable Flatbread Pizza | Mom’s Kitchen Handbook   Green Goddess Avocado Toasts | Feed Me Phoebe   Roasted Asparagus with Gremolata | Kayln’s Kitchen   Spring Vegetable Gallettes | Apron Strings   Spring Ragu | The Meat Free Monday Cookbook   Green Buddha Bowl with Spinach and Asparagus | Driftwood Gardens   Spring Onion, Pea and Mint Soup | Morning Berries   Tomato & Asparagus Salad with Fried Goat Cheese Rounds | Craving Something Healthy   Greek-Style Fava Beans with Dill | California Greek Girl   Fast and Easy Spring Minestrone with Spinach Pesto | JoyFoodly   Farro and Pea Salad with Lemon-Mint Vinaigrette | Grab A Plate   California Avocado Ramen | La Fuji Mama   Fava Bean Crostini | A Little Yumminess   Pepper-Stuffed Artichokes | Chickadee Says The post Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Easy Vegan Pizza Recipes

April 20 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Easy Vegan Pizza Recipes Pizza is such a convenient main dish to make at home, now that great crusts and sauces get you started. Just add veggies! Here are our favorite easy vegan pizza recipes. Garlicky Fresh Tomato and Basil Pizza (shown at top) is a fresh take on the classic fresh tomato and basil pizza known as Margherita. This variation is […] The post 10 Easy Vegan Pizza Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegetarian & Gluten-Free Meal Plan | Tempeh Tacos, Vegetarian Pho & Pesto Grilled Cheese

April 14 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian and gluten-free meal plan includes: tempeh tacos; Mexican-style pizza with sweet potato crust; 30 minute vegetarian pho; spinach, basil pesto & tomato grilled cheese; and pizza quinoa stuffed portabella mushrooms.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Best of the First Quarter 2017

April 3 2017 Vegan Richa 

Best of the First Quarter 2017 2017 Q1 is packed and done and I am ready for q2 to move on quickly so I can head into sunshine and some break. New Posts, Updates, Book work made up q1. I added some new categories like Instant Pot and One pot meals and tagged the Recipes that now have Videos. Posts on the blog will keep getting updated with the categories over the next few weeks. The coming few months like this first quarter, are going to be shuffling a lot of the Book 2 work and the blog work. You might see more lag times in responding to comments on social media. Ping me again on more responsive options as facebook or email.   Here are all the Recipes/­­Posts from the first quarter. If you make any of these, please do leave me a comment about how it turned out, how you served it, suggestions or changes if any that worked well. Your comments help me learn on the job!  What were your favorite recipes so far from 2017? What were a bit out of the comfort zone ?. I know I would do the General Tso’s Sandwih differently. For Easter Recipe, see here. Scroll below to read about what other things we are working on this year. Continue reading: Best of the First Quarter 2017The post Best of the First Quarter 2017 appeared first on Vegan Richa.

A First Taste from Meatless Monday

June 26 2017 Meatless Monday 

A First Taste from Meatless MondayGet Ready for VegReady - Delicious New Plant-Based Meals Delivered to Your Door     Flavorful, Nutritious and Convenient Imagine being able to enjoy a delicious, ready-to-eat vegan meal whenever and wherever youd like. Thats the whole idea behind VegReady, a unique new food concept thats launching July 14 th on Kickstarter. VegReady is different for a number of reasons. First, the meals dont need refrigeration, defrosting or cooking. Theyre pasteurized and shelf-stable. So they can be eaten anytime and easily stored at room temperature. Next, theyll be sold online directly to you, rather than through retail stores. This is intended to develop a more personal relationship with each customer. Each meal will cost $7.50 and are ordered in quantities of 10 meals at a time. The meals arrive at your address in reusable pizza boxes. Initial VegReady Meals Sourced from Peru The first VegReady dishes will come from the mountains of Peru, where Quinoa is the traditional high protein dish. Quinoa was referred to as chisaya mama or mother grain by the ancient Incas. The meal will contain deliciously cooked Quinoa, sautéed greens and savory vegetables. Peru was selected because its the first country in the world to have a complete ban on GMOs. Following the initial launch, additional meals will be added with Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, India and Pakistan cuisines. Meals Optimized for Your DNA VegReady plans to work with doctors to offer custom meals created to meet your specific health needs and taste preferences. Theyre also partnering with a DNA analysis firm called 23andme, so your meals can be matched to your individual DNA makeup. Better Health for You - and for the Planet At Meatless Monday, we always welcome new ideas that encourage more plant-based eating. Choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, like on a Monday, decreases your risk of cancer, obesity, diabetes and other preventable chronic diseases. Whats more, it reduces your carbon footprint and promotes more sustainable food practices. For you - and the planet - its a win-win. Click this LINK to get on their launch list and save 40% or more! The post A First Taste from Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Kids: Practical Tips for Parents

June 14 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Kids: Practical Tips for Parents The number of vegan kids has increased exponentially in recent years. Well-planned vegan diets are safe and offer health advantages, even for growing children. Talk to your practitioner and read up on the subject. Here are some practical tips for parents for dealing with everyday situations. Make sure to see the companion to this article by PCRM, […] The post Vegan Kids: Practical Tips for Parents appeared first on VegKitchen.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza base topping with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Roasted Strawberry Grilled Cheese, Pad See Ew & Spring Nourish Bowls

May 12 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: roasted strawberry and brie grilled cheese; balsamic roasted veggie baked ziti; vegetarian pad see ew; spring nourish bowls; and roasted asparagus and arugula pizza.

Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli

May 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. By the time this post is up, I will be in Russia. First in Moscow for a few days, checking out a few theaters and museums, then on to my hometown to spend time with family. Besides the simultaneous happiness and heartache that comes with finally getting to see your people after a few years away, here are some other things I’m really looking forward to: staring at the blossoming chestnut trees outside of my mom’s kitchen window, visiting the food market across the street from there every day, fresh sorrel soup, mom’s melt-in-your-mouth zucchini fritters, and a good morel mushroom season, if I’m lucky. All but one food related, what a surprise. I’m also excited to breathe sweet spring air and see the juicy green of newly budding leaves, since spring in Florida is typically only marked by a transition from hot to hotter. All those things that I used to take for granted when living in a four season climate now make me happy to no end. Spring. I miss it. That’s all. One place where there’s been no shortage of spring is my kitchen. I have to make up for it somehow. I love that spring produce needs very little in order to taste good – a quick steam, a drizzle of oil, a sprinkle of salt, and you’re good to go. A plate with a rainbow of vegetables, tasty sauce and some pulses (also known as chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) has been a common dinner around these parts ever since April rolled around. The pulse component is important, since the addition of those is one of the most graceful and easy ways to make a veggie-forward meal into something truly satisfying and nourishing. I confessed my love for batch-cooking dried beans in last weekend’s post, so it goes without saying that I’m very excited to partner with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some quick and simple pulse recipes here throughout the year. The goal is to hopefully help inspire some of you to include more beans, lentils and such into your weekly meals, and something tells me that a few of you are already on board :) In case you need any convincing, think of pulses as protein, fiber and antioxidant-packed little superfoods, but minus the hefty price tag that usually comes with most superfoods. On top of all that, pulse crops are sustainable, with low water and carbon footprints, and they act as natural fertilizers, enriching whatever soil they grow in. This colorful plate of barely-cooked, crisp spring vegetables is sprinkled with addictive, smoky and crispy chickpeas that are like croutons, but infinitely more nutritious and a breeze to put together. I’ve been on a real aioli kick lately, and I make it right in my mortar and pestle, since I tend to agree with those that say hand-mixed aioli is the way to go. I wanted a bright and striking sauce for this platter, so I came up with an avocado aioli that fits the bill perfectly. This can be an entirely fork-free meal – just dip the veggies in the aioli and chase them down with handfuls of chickpea croutons. Or chop the veggies up into more bite-sized pieces and serve as a salad with a sprinkling of croutons and dollops of the aioli. Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the smoky chickpea croutons? 2 cups cooked chickpeas ½ tablespoon neutral coconut oil ¾ teaspoon sea salt 1 heaping teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika ¾ teaspoon garlic powder for the avocado aioli? 2-3 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife sea salt handful cilantro leaves (optional) freshly squeezed juice from 1 lemon - divided 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 small avocado freshly ground black pepper for the vegetables 1 bunch baby carrots - peeled 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed 1 tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 small bunch radishes handful chives - chopped (optional) handful microgreens (optional) Instructions to make the smoky chickpea croutons? Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Cover a large baking tray with parchment paper. Dry the chickpeas with a clean kitchen towel and remove any loose skins. Place the chickpeas on the baking tray, drizzle with the oil, and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt, paprika and garlic powder and toss to coat once more. Place the tray in the oven and roast for 20 minutes, then stir and roast for another 10 minutes, or until golden. to make the avocado aioli? Place the crushed garlic and a large pinch of salt into a mortar, and partially crush the garlic with a pestle. Add the cilantro leaves, if using, and continue crushing the garlic and cilantro into a paste. When the paste is almost done, squeeze about 1 teaspoon of lemon juice into the mortar and work it in with the pestle. Begin to add the olive oil, slowly drizzling about 1 tablespoon in while continuing to stir, allowing the oil to emulsify. Continue to add in the rest of the oil by drizzling it in slowly while stirring until all of the oil is incorporated and emulsified. Cut the avocado in half, remove the pit and scoop the flesh out into a medium bowl. Mash with a fork and mix in the rest of the lemon juice and freshly ground black pepper. Fold the avocado mash into the aioli. Taste and add more salt and chopped cilantro, if desired. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to three days. If you dont have a mortar and pestle, combine all the ingredients but the olive oil in a blender. Slowly pour in the olive oil with the blender still running to emulsify. to prepare the vegetables and serve Arrange the asparagus and baby carrots in a multi-level bamboo steamer or a steamer basket. Steam the asparagus for around 3 minutes, until just tender, and the baby carrots for around 4 minutes. Move the carrots and asparagus to a medium bowl, drizzle with the olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix. On a large platter, arrange the steamed asparagus, carrots and radishes. Garnish with chives or microgreens. Serve with avocado aioli and chickpea croutons. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

cheese dosa recipe | cheese masala dosa recipe with red chutney

April 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

cheese dosa recipe | cheese masala dosa recipe with red chutneycheese dosa recipe | cheese masala dosa recipe with red chutney with step by step photo and video recipe. the steps for this recipe follows the same way as any typical masala dosa or mysore masala dosa. however grated cheddar cheese is topped on top of dosa very similar to any pizza recipe. later it is rolled similar to masala dosa and then cut into 2 halves to be served with sambar, chutney. Continue reading cheese dosa recipe | cheese masala dosa recipe with red chutney at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto

April 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto We enjoyed this pizza the other day, but wanted to hold off one more week before posting it here, until things got truly springy for most of you in the Northern hemisphere. Then some stuff didnt work out with this weeks scheduled recipe, so pizza it is. Im the type of person that has to have everything laid out ahead of time, and get overly stressed when things dont go according to plan. At the same time, I sometimes find it helpful to run into those plan-ruining situations, deal with them, and come out on the other side with the realization that none of it was as bad as I was making it out to be. Might as well exercise that muscle whenever we can, because how often do things in life actually go as planned? Just a note to self here, but thought it could serve as a nice reminder, in case someone out there is also dealing with a minor frustration and having trouble seeing any sort of bright side. To the pizza! One of my favorite weeknight-friendly recipes that weve ever posted is this lemony millet polenta from last spring. Its easy to make, requires some of the most affordable and modest ingredients, and the final result is outright delicious. I worked on a lot of alternative skillet pizza crust ideas for our second cookbook, ones made with vegetables and whole grains instead of flour, and since then, quick skillet pizzas have become a dinner staple in our house. When I was recently making the aforementioned millet polenta, I had the realization that, with some adjustments, the polenta would make for another great gluten-free skillet pizza crust. And it really did! The pizza is topped with a quick kale pesto, but you can use pretty much any pesto here, if you happen to have some on hand. Following the pesto, a mound of everything bright, fresh and springy – asparagus ribbons and tips, a ton of fresh greens and microgreens. Our fam has no problem consuming the whole thing in one sitting, but the leftovers keep well, in case you are more restrained. We also put together a step-by-step video (above), where you can see that the process is pretty quick and very satisfying. Enjoy :) Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto   Print Serves: one 9-10 inch pizza Ingredients for the crust 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon ghee or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the skillet juice of 1 lemon 3 cups warm vegetable broth sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup ground flax seeds for the pesto ½ cup almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 1 garlic clove sea salt about 3 cups roughly chopped kale juice of ½ lemon ½ cup olive oil for the pizza 1 bunch asparagus sea salt freshly ground black pepper neutral coconut oil or olive oil for drizzling topping options fresh salad greens microgreens nutritional yeast hemp hearts Instructions to make the crust Drain and rinse the millet and place it in a food processor. Grind until partially broken down. In a medium saucepan, warm up the ghee/­­oil over medium heat. Add the millet and stir to coat. Add lemon juice and stir until absorbed, for about 30 seconds. Add the broth, salt, garlic powder and black pepper, and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Mix in the flax and simmer for another 10 minutes, until creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Oil a 9-10-inch cast iron skillet or another heavy bottomed oven-proof pan. Evenly spread the millet over the bottom to make the crust. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to let set. to make the pesto Drain and rinse the almonds, optionally slip them out of their skins and rinse again. Add the almonds, garlic and salt to a food processor and grind into rice-sized pieces. Add the kale and lemon, and grind into pesto. With the motor still running, slowly add in the oil through the funnel. to make the pizza Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Bake the millet crust for 20 minutes. Cut the tough ends off the asparagus sprigs and discard them. Shave the sprigs into ribbons with a veggie peeler. Reserve the leftover, unshaved parts and cut them into bite-sized pieces. Remove the crust from the oven and evenly spread the kale pesto over it (you may have some leftovers). Pile the asparagus ribbons and pieces on top of the pesto. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil and place under the broiler, on the low setting, for another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, and let cool slightly before topping with greens and microgreens, if using. Optionally, garnish with nutritional yeast and hemp hearts, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Melon Basil Summer Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

mug pizza recipe | pizza in microwave recipe | 2 mins mug pizza cake

April 8 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

mug pizza recipe | pizza in microwave recipe | 2 mins mug pizza cakemug pizza recipe | pizza in microwave recipe | 2 mins mug pizza cake with step by step photo and video recipe. basically a quick and cheat version which is prepared very similar to mug cakes within minutes. this veg pizza recipe does not involve any fancy toppings as the baking is quick and hence reduced to minimal. also the mug pizza is prepared in flat bottom small mug so that the flour cooks properly. Continue reading mug pizza recipe | pizza in microwave recipe | 2 mins mug pizza cake at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love

April 7 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love Vegan diets arent without hot dogs, pizza, favored Chinese restaurant dishes and even facsimiles of bacon, of course. So its time to show your non vegan partner what vegan cooking can do. The post Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Vegkitchen Monday Menu, April 3, 2017

April 3 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegkitchen Monday Menu, April 3, 2017 In our home, pizza night has almost always been more of a Friday kind of meal. Pizza dinners are great way to crash at the end of the week, accompanied by wine or beer and a movie. But theres no earthly reason that a semi-homemade pizza cant be enjoyed on a weeknight. The post Vegkitchen Monday Menu, April 3, 2017 appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!