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New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles)

January 16 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles) The New Year Glow Meal Plan is here! All kinds of carb-on-carb, dessert-every-day type of holiday indulgence happened for us over the past month, and at this point we are so ready to fill our plates with 99% plants. That’s what this meal plan is all about. We are employing the amazing, shape-shifting powers of spaghetti squash to create four distinctly different, plant-fueled dishes that will still keep us cozy in this frigid weather (no bone-chilling, cold salads or fully raw dishes here!). We’ve got special pesto ‘noodles’, pho, tacos, and lasagna. As usual, there is a step-by-step weekend prep guide, as well as a shopping list for your convenience :) Hope you enjoy this one! Menu - Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto - Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles - Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos - Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients youll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large or 3 medium spaghetti squash 1 lb Brussel sprouts 1 medium yellow onion 2 large leeks 1 head of garlic 1-inch piece ginger 1 bunch kale 1/­­2 lb shiitake 8-10 portobello caps 2-3 avocados 1 bunch cilantro 1 lemon 3 limes Spices 2 cinnamon sticks 2 star anise black peppercorns 5 whole cloves 3 whole cardamom pods 1 teaspoon coriander seeds Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil neutral avocado oil or other oil of choice apple cider vinegar brown rice vinegar tamari sriracha/­­chili sauce 24 oz marinara sauce 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas – gluten-free if needed sea salt Bulk 1 cup dried chickpeas 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 cup raw almonds nutritional yeast Basic Prep Complete these steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Roast The Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti Squash, the beautiful yellow vegetable with flesh that turns into ‘noodles’ when roasted, will be the base for all our dishes in this meal plan. Here, we are roasting 2 large squashes, which we’ll be using for pesto noodles, pho, tacos, and lasagna throughout the week. Roasted Spaghetti Squash   Print Ingredients 2 large spaghetti squash - halved, seeds scooped out avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 baking sheets, lined with parchment paper. Place the halved spaghetti squash on the baking sheets, face up. Oil thoroughly and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Turn the squashes face down, place in the oven, and roast for 30-40 minutes,until the flesh is soft, cooked through, and noodle-like when scraped with a fork. Take care not to overcook, as the noodles can turn mushy. Let cool slightly. Scrape all of the noodles out of the squash skins using a fork, and store refrigerated in an airtight glass container, until ready to use. 3.5.3226   2) Cook Chickpeas and Make Broth Base for Pho In this step, we are cooking chickpeas for the pho and tacos, while also making the broth base for our pho. Making ingredients using the offshoots from other ingredients is one of the most gratifying and humbling things about cooking! Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place the chickpeas in a pot and cover with about 8 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Test the chickpeas for doneness. Cook longer if needed, until completely soft. Add salt to taste at the end. Drain, reserving the cooking liquid for the pho broth (below). 3.5.3226   3) Make the Pho Broth This pho broth gets its deep, comforting flavor from toasted spices, chickpeas (cooked in the same water, in the previous step), tamari, and any other vegetable scraps you have around. Pho Broth   Print Ingredients 2 star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorn 5 whole cloves 3 cardamom pods 1 medium yellow onion - sliced into 8 wedges 3 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 1-inch piece ginger, sliced and crushed with a knife 6 cups chickpea broth - from above any vegetable scraps like leek tops, onion skins, etc. (optional) ½ lb shiitake - hard stems separated, caps reserved 3½ tablespoons tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add the star anise, cinnamon, coriander, peppercorns, cloves, and cardamom. Toast, stirring, until fragrant, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and sauté for another couple of minutes, until fragrant, and until the onion begins to get some color. Carefully add the chickpea broth (it may splatter), vegetable scraps (if using), shiitake stems, tamari, brown rice vinegar, and sriracha. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Reserve the shiitake caps for when you make the pho (recipe below). Remove the pot from heat and let infuse further for at least 30 minutes, or as long as you have (overnight is best, refrigerate if letting infuse overnight). Strain the broth, discarding the solids. Keep the broth in the same soup pot, refrigerated, until ready to make the pho. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Brussels Sprout Pesto This pesto is made with blanched Brussels sprouts, for a dose of cruciferous goodness, and pumpkin seeds, for a lighter alternative to nuts. The result is surprisingly delicious pesto, which will be used for the Spaghetti Squash Noodle dish, as well as the lasagna. Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 lb Brussels sprouts - ends trimmed off, sliced in half sea salt 1 clove garlic - chopped 1 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves (reserve a handful of leaves for the pho and tacos) - torn juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper ½ cup olive oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread the pumpkin seeds on a baking tray and toast in the oven for 5-7 minutes, until fragrant and slightly golden. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a rapid boil. Add the Brussels sprouts and blanch for about 8 minutes, or longer, until soft throughout, but not mushy. Drain and set aside. Reserve a small handful of pumpkin seeds and set aside to use as a garnish for the pesto noodle dish. Place the rest of the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, followed by a large pinch of salt and garlic. Pulse to roughly break up the pumpkin seeds. Divide the blanched Brussels sprouts in half. Save one half of them whole, to use later in the pesto noodle dish, keeping them refrigerated in an airtight container. Add the other half of the blanched Brussels sprouts to the food processor, along with the cilantro, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, another pinch of salt and black pepper. Process until well combined. Slowly poor the olive oil through the feeding tube on the lid, with the motor still running. Taste for salt, adjust if needed. Use the pesto right away or store refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   5) Make the Almond Ricotta This easy almond ricotta is mainly meant for the lasagna, but you can use any of the leftovers in the tacos or in the Brussels sprout pesto noodles. Almond Ricotta   Print Ingredients 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 1 small garlic clove pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast generous squeeze of lemon juice - to taste Instructions Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta. Place the almonds into the bowl of a food processor, along with the garlic, salt, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice. Add 2 tablespoons water and pulse, until you achieve a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes This is a meal that will take you minutes to prepare, thanks to all the weekend prep. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ go well with pesto of any kind, but they become something really special, when combined with the Brussels Sprout Pumpkinseed Pesto and silky, blanched Brussels sprouts. Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ⅔ of the amount of the Brussels Sprout Pesto - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above reserved ½ lb whole blanched Brussels sprouts - from the pesto recipe, above reserved handful whole toasted pumpkin seeds - from the pesto recipe, above Instructions Warm a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the pesto and let warm through, stirring, for about a minute. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to coat in the pesto. Add the whole Brussels sprouts and let everything heat through thoroughly, stirring. Serve right away, garnished with the whole pumpkin seeds and almond ricotta from above, if using. 3.5.3226   This Pho is incredibly cozy, but also very nourishing and light. The deep, dark broth holds the powers of various warming spices, shiitake, chickpeas, and veg. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles,’ chickpeas, and kale fill it out, and a scoop of avocado + a drizzle of chili sauce on top take it to that next level. Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients pho broth - from above 1½ cups cooked chickpeas - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above shiitake caps from ½ lb shiitake - sliced, reserved while making pho broth 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, roughly chopped juice from 1 lime, plus more for serving handful of cilantro leaves - for garnish ripe avocado - for garnish sriracha/­­chili sauce - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring the pho broth back to a boil, add the cooked chickpeas, spaghetti squash, sliced shiitake caps, and kale. Adjust the heat to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes, until the kale is cooked through. Remove from heat and mix in the lime juice. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve warm, with more lime slices, garnished with cilantro leaves, cubed ripe avocado, and more sriracha/­­chili sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226   This is the wintery version of our Kimchi Tacos from the Summer Meal Plan. It’s hard to do them justice with words or photos, but they are really good. Proof: my ten year old, who strongly dislikes squash and doesn’t eat kimchi because it’s too spicy, ate them for dinner two nights in a row without any comment (silence during a meal is always a good sign around here :). They are also so, so quick! Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 tablespoon avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, leaves torn sea salt 1½ cup cooked chickpeas - all of the remaining from above 2 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above about 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas of choice - gluten-free if needed 1-2 ripe avocado - cubed cilantro - for serving lime slices - for serving sriracha or hot sauce of choice - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a large sauté pan. Add the kale and salt, and sauté for about 7-10 minutes, until soft. Add the chickpeas to the pan and stir around to lightly toast. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to combine. Add the kimchi and stir to combine and warm everything through. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the warm veg in tortillas, topped with avocado, cilantro, squeezes of lime juice, and hot sauce (if using). 3.5.3226   Does this dish of layered vegetables, mushrooms, and sauces actually taste like lasagna? It really does! The spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ replace the carb component of regular lasagna noodles, while the portobello mushrooms add substance, depth, and meatiness. The almond cheese and pesto from prep day, as well as good, store-bought marinara add just the right punch of flavor. It’s a higher vibe lasagna that will still leave you satisfied, with a bonus of not weighing you down. Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice - divided, plus more for oiling the dish 8-10 portobello caps 2 large leeks, white and pale green parts only - sliced sea salt 24 oz marinara sauce about 7 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above almond ricotta - from above reserved ⅓ the amount of Brussels sprouts pesto - from above freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add as many portobello caps as the pan can hold and fry them on one side for a couple of minutes, until golden. Flip and fry the other side. Remove and continue with the rest of the portobellos. Set them aside on a plate and drain off any water that they release. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil to the same pan. Add leeks and a pinch of salt and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until soft. Oil a 10 x 1o-inch, deep baking dish or a baking dish of a similar size. Spread half of the marinara sauce over the bottom. Add half of the spaghetti squash, spreading it into an even layer. Spread half of the almond ricotta over top, in little clumps. Arrange all the portobello caps in the next layer, overlapping them as you go. Next, add a layer of the pesto and sautéed leeks. Continue with layers as follows: the rest of the almond ricotta, the rest of the marinara, and the rest of the spaghetti squash. Sprinkle the top layer with salt and pepper, and drizzle with avocado oil. Cover the dish, place in the oven, and bake for 30 minutes. Increase the temperature to 400° F (200° C), uncover and bake for another 15 minutes. Let the lasagna rest and cool slightly for 10-15 minutes before serving. Store refrigerated, reheat in the oven or in a pan, covered, until warmed through. The lasagna gets even more flavorful after a day or two in the fridge. 3.5.3226   You might also like... Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Rice (Congee, Fried Rice, Veggie Burgers) .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Corn-Stuffed Zucchini

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Zucchini stuffed with corn is a delicious and healthy combination. This recipe is low in sodium, which helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 4 - 3/­­4  tsp, leaves  Dried Thyme - 1/­­2  tsp, ground  Black Pepper - 1/­­2  cup pieces  Mushrooms, White, Raw - 2  ounce  Cheddar Cheese – Low Fat - 4  tbsp chopped  Chives - 1/­­4  cup, chopped  Onion - 1 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 6  medium  Squash – Zucchini Cut zucchini in halves lengthwise. Cook in boiling water for 10 minutes. Carefully remove pulp. Drain corn and zucchini pulp well and combine with onion, mushrooms, pepper, chives, and thyme. Pile mixture in zucchini shells and place in a 13 X 9 inch pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 350 F for 20 minutes. The post Corn-Stuffed Zucchini appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney HealthStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! We hear a lot about how not eating meat just one day a week is good for the planet, but what about how good it is for our health? It turns out, Meatless Monday is also an easy way to take steps towards a healthier lifestyle and better health. Cutting out meat just one day a week and choosing plant-based foods instead can help promote kidney health . In fact, eating less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Your hard-working and multi-tasking kidneys work round the clock to remove wastes from your body, balance your bodys fluids and minerals, make hormones that control blood pressure and form red blood cells, and much more. You cant live without your kidneys! Were very pleased to say that Meatless Monday has partnered with the National Kidney Foundation  to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets in support of kidney health. Gail Torres, RN, MS, RD, Senior Clinical Communications Director at the National Kidney Foundation explains, “Studies show that eating less meat may play a key role in keeping your kidneys healthy and in improving your health overall. This doesnt mean you need to cut meat out completely from your diet, but rather, to replace some meat with plant-based foods, such as soy and nuts. She continues, This change in diet helps your body make less acid, which puts less stress on your kidneys. It also lowers your intake of saturated fat, which can harm blood vessels and lead to heart and kidney disease. Less meat in the diet is also linked to preventing and controlling diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main causes of kidney disease.” 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. But heres the good news! You can kickstart your Mondays by swapping out meat for plant-based foods to help promote kidney health. See this weeks Meatless Monday recipe for Corn-Stuffed Zucchini, courtesy of National Kidney Foundation. Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. To spread the word about Meatless Monday and kidney health, download our fun and shareable free graphics, here. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Crispy Potato Balls (Potato Nuggets)

January 13 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Crispy Potato Balls (Potato Nuggets) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Crispy Potato Balls, Potato Nuggets These bite-sized appetizers are the perfect snack to serve as a tea time snack or starter at a dinner party. Crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, these potato balls are just what you need to satisfy your taste buds. This recipe is my younger sister Kumkums recipe, and I am so glad to be sharing it today. - 2 cup potatoes (boiled, peeled and finely shredded) - 3 Tbsp corn starch - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp ginger (finely shredded) - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 2 tsp oil -  In a bowl mix potato, about 2-1/­­2 tablespoons corn starch, and salt. Oil your palm and knead the potatoes, making into very smooth dough, if needed oil your palm again. Add the ginger and green chili and knead it again to incorporate all the ingredients together. If needed oil your palm again and dust the corn starch over the dough as needed. - Divide the dough into 20 pieces and roll them between your palms, making them into smooth balls. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little batter in the oil. The batter should raise to the top but not change color right away. - Drop the potato balls slowly in the oil making sure dont overlap them. - Fry the potato balls until they turn golden brown, turning them occasionally. This should take about 6-8 minutes. - When they are golden brown, take them out with a slotted spoon. Place them on a paper towel to absorb the extra oil. - Crispy Potato balls will be crispy outside and soft inside, that is texture you are looking for this recipe. Serving Suggestion,  Serve with tamarind chutney, recipe is on my website. The post Crispy Potato Balls (Potato Nuggets) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Spicy Spaghetti Squash Ramen with Homemade Vegan Kombu Dashi

January 7 2019 Meatless Monday 

Swapping spaghetti squash for ramen noodles adds extra veggies to this flavorful dish, which also features crispy pan-fried tofu, caramelized onions, broccoli, mushrooms and fresh ginger. This recipe comes to us from Austin at Building Our Rez.   Serves 4 - For the Tofu - 1 14 oz block extra-firm tofu, pressed - 3 tbsp cornstarch - 2-4 tbsp oil   - For the Dashi - 8 cups vegetable broth - 8 oz dried mushrooms - 1/­­3 cup low sodium soy sauce - 1 tbsp sesame oil - 1 onion, sliced - 6 garlic cloves - Thumb-sized piece ginger, peeled and grated (about 2 tbsp grated) - 1/­­4 cup rice vinegar - 1-2 tbsp. chili oil (depending on your heat tolerance) plus more for topping - 1 8-inch piece of kombu (seaweed)   - For the Veggies and Toppings - 1 spaghetti squash - Your choice of veggies, such as 1 head of broccoli (about 2 c chopped florets) and 1 bell pepper, chopped - 1/­­2 cup green onions, sliced - 1 14 oz can coconut milk   Add all ingredients for the dashi except the kombu to a pot. Bring to a boil and allow to simmer while the spaghetti squash is cooking 45 minutes – 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 400?F. Slice the spaghetti squash in half, lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and discard. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place cut side down on a greased baking sheet and bake for 45-50 minutes, flipping halfway or until cooked through. Cut your veggies. We cut our broccoli into florets and chop our bell pepper into 1/­­2 in pieces and add to the skillet with 1 tbsp. oil. Cook until veggies are cooked but still have a little bit of a bite. Slice green onions for topping and set aside. When the spaghetti squash is done, remove from oven and allow to cool. Cook the tofu. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the tofu. The cornstarch make it want to stick together so make sure to sprinkle it in piece by piece so the cubes get to cook individually. Be careful at this step: the oil tends to splatter when you add the tofu. Allow to cook over medium-high heat about 4-6 minutes or until browned. Flip tofu cubes over and cook 4-6 minutes on the other side. Add the kombu to the dashi and simmer (do not boil) for 20 minutes. Strain the dashi through a sieve to strain out all the large items. Taste the dashi for flavor and seasonings. Even the low sodium soy sauce lends a decent amount of salt, but add more if necessary. Add more chili oil if you desire a spicier broth. Assemble your bowl. Place spaghetti squash into bowls. Ladle broth over top. Layer on veggies and tofu on top with a drizzle of coconut milk, green onions and more chili oil if desired. The post Spicy Spaghetti Squash Ramen with Homemade Vegan Kombu Dashi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend Recipe

January 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend RecipeThis quick Garam Masala spice blend takes 2 mins to make at home with everyday spices. Use it in Indian dishes, with roasted veggies, in soups, stews, cookies and more. Jump to Recipe Garam means hot and Masala in this context means a blend of spices. The spice blend itself is not generally hot. It has black pepper but no cayenne or chili powders. It can however feel hot once you eat some because of the pepper and cloves. The spices together will warm you up from the inside.  Garam masala recipes vary by family recipes, regions, states within India and of course personal preference. There are several regional versions of the spice blend and they have their own names like kashmiri garam masala, goda masala, sambhar powder etc.  This is the basic garam masala to use in Indian curries, stir fries, veggie dishes, dals and more. I have the traditional whole garam masala mix on the blog here. The whole masala stays fresh for much longer. I grind a portion of it and use it for a month or 2 and then grind more. For smaller quantity spice blend, use this quick recipe with ground everyday spices.  Use it in Butter Tofu , Cauliflower Tikka Masala,  Masala Pot Pie, lentil sweet potato dal curry. And many more Indian dishes! or add to soups, stews, to veggies to roast, cookies, yes cookies work too.  Curry powder is not the same as garam masala. Get the recipe and Read more about it here.Continue reading: Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend RecipeThe post Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

This comforting stew is the perfect way to warm up over the holidays. Carrots and cauliflower are seasoned with an enticing spice blend to make a saucy stew you and your guests are sure to enjoy. This recipe comes to us from Picky Diet.   Serves 4   - 3 Tbsp olive oil, divided - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 medium cooking onion, chopped - fresh ground sea salt and pepper - 6 medium/­­large carrots, peeled and cut into 1/­­4″ rounds - 1/­­2 tsp crushed red pepper - 1/­­4 tsp paprika - 1/­­4 tsp chile powder (optional – add more or less to taste) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric - 4 cups (1 tetra box) of vegetable broth - 1 head of cauliflower, chopped into bite size pieces - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder - 1 15oz can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained - parsley for garnish (optional)   Preheat the oven to 400 and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large soup pot sauté the onion and garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium heat. Season with salt and pepper and cook until onion is translucent. Stir in the carrots and season with crushed red pepper, paprika, chili powder and turmeric. Add in the vegetable broth, bring to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the carrots are tender. While the carrots are cooking, toss the chopped cauliflower in a large mixing bowl with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt and pepper and 1/­­2 teaspoon of garlic powder. Spread the cauliflower evenly on the lined baking sheet and roast in the oven until golden and lightly crispy – about 20 -25 minutes. Once the carrots are tender, remove the pot from the heat and puree the carrot broth mixture with an immersion blender until smooth. Stir in the roasted cauliflower and chickpeas and warm the stew on medium heat for 10 minutes. Serve garnished with parsley. The post Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe Roundup

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe RoundupEating seasonal produce is a great way to try new recipes and explore new tastes and flavors. As we head into winter, root vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots and parsnips are in season, so are winter squashes like pumpkin, butternut, and acorn. Weve gathered 11 delicious plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday bloggers featuring seasonal winter produce to warm your heart, your kitchen, and your belly. Enjoy! Breakfast Sweet Potato by Kroll’s Korner Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew by Picky Diet Pomegranate-Smashed Butternut Squash by Jackie Newgent Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie by Robin Asbell Butternut Squash and Pear Crostini by Fork in the Kitchen Oat Cranberry Pilaf with Pistachios by Sharon Palmer Vegan Gingerbread Loaf by The New Baguette Mushroom Pot Pies with Cauliflower Sauce by The Mountain Kitchen Aloo Gobhi by The Kitchen Docs Three-Bean Vegetarian Chili by The Quotable Kitchen Spiced Butternut Squash Waffles by The Garden of Eating Monday has been proven  to be an effective day to start healthy routines; studies show that people who start a new routine or activity on Monday are more likely to keep it up for the rest of the week. Meatless Monday has multiple benefits , not just for your health but also for the environment. Interested in becoming a Meatless Monday blogger? Find out more here . Wed love to hear from you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! Did you try one of the recipes? Please share your photos and experiences with us on social media by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. The post Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Shakshuka

December 20 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Shakshuka If youre looking for something different to wake up your taste buds, this vegan shakshuka may be just the ticket. Tofu replaces poached eggs in this spicy dish that originated in Tunisia. It’s great for brunch or a light supper.  I like to serve it with a side of oven-fried potatoes and a salad. Chopped cooked artichoke hearts are a good addition to the zesty sauce and are a good foil for the spicy heat. If you prefer less heat, you can reduce the amount of harissa, red pepper flakes, and/­­or jalapeno.  Serve with warm crusty Italian bread or pita bread. This is one of the 25 all-new recipes featured in One-Dish Vegan (Revised and Expanded edition).   Vegan Shakshuka Makes 4 servings   12 ounces firm tofu, drained 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon Indian black salt (kala namak), optional Salt and ground black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 red onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1 jalape?o chile, seeded and minced 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 2 teaspoons harissa paste or 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon sugar 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained 1 teaspoon Za’atar spices or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano Chopped parsley or cilantro, as garnish Crusty Italian bread or warm pita bread, to serve 1/­­2 cup vegan unsweetened yogurt   Cut the block of tofu into four 1/­­2-inch thick slices, and then use a cookie cutter to cut the slices into 4-inch rounds.  Save the tofu scraps to use in a scramble or other recipe. Rub kala namak (if using) on the surface of the the tofu rounds. Rub the turmeric in a 1 1/­­2 -inch circle in the center of each tofu round. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic, bell pepper, and chile and cook until tender, 5 minutes. Stir in the smoked paprika, cumin, tomato paste, harissa, sugar, tomato paste, and diced tomatoes. Cook, stirring, until slightly saucy, about 4 minutes, mashing any large pieces of tomato. Reduce the heat to low, season with salt and pepper to taste, and simmer for 10 minutes. Arrange the tofu rounds on top of the sauce, pressing down so just the centers show and the rest of the tofu is submerged in the sauce. Simmer for 10 minutes longer to thicken the sauce and heat the tofu. To serve, sprinkle Za’atar spices and garnish with fresh parsley.  Serve with toasted crusty bread or baguette or pita bread and yogurt, if using.   The post Vegan Shakshuka appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles

December 18 2018 My New Roots 

Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles   Everyone has strong food memories around holidays or special occasions in their life. I can completely recall the distinct taste of boxed cake from my childhood birthdays. Summer vacations were steeped in melting grape juice popsicles made by my grandmother. And one of my favourite treats during Christmas, was undoubtedly Turtle chocolates. The iconic striped box was always within arms reach during the holidays, so as soon as the tree went up, it was like a Pavlovian response…the Turtle cravings began! If you live outside of North America, you may not be familiar with these pecan-chocolate-caramels (and for this, I feel very sad for you), but today, rejoice! Im posting my own version, which is a healthier spin on this classic candy that you can whip up yourself with just six simple ingredients. The original Turtle candies are relatively basic: pecans, caramel, and chocolate, but seemingly so much more than the sum of these parts. There is a magical synergy in this trinity, each ingredient complimenting and highlighting the others in perfect union. There isnt much to improve upon, so my mission was clearly to health-ify the caramel and find some high-quality chocolate to steer us all away from refined sugar, modified milk ingredients, and emulsifiers. Blech. I started off on my journey by looking online and found that healthyish Turtle recipes exist, but they all use dates and I didnt want that to be the predominant flavour. Plus, I knew that the caramel needed some serious creaminess, so I started by blending up cashew butter with vanilla as the base, then added brown rice syrup to achieve that distinctive gooey-ness that makes Turtles so crave-able. The results were sooooo right on the money, confirmed by several of my closest, discerning friends, lined up to taste test.     Pecans are one of my favourite nuts because they are tender-crisp and so naturally sweet. I love them in baked goods like pecan pie, on top of waffles or pancakes, or in candies like these babies! Pecans are native to North America, and grow in tough, wood-like shells on large, sprawling trees, some of which can live up to 200 years. The name pecan is a Native American word used to describe nuts that require a stone to crack - but you can easily open them by crushing two of their hard shells together. Along with macadamias, pecans contain the lowest amount of protein (5-10%) and the highest amount of fat (80-95%) of all the nuts. The fat that they do contain however, is mostly monounsaturated, with some polyunsaturated fat as well. Pecans are high in minerals, like manganese, copper, and zinc. They also contain a good amount of fiber and protein. There are a wide variety of pecans, but if you live outside North America, you may only have access to one type. Thats okay! The thing to look for is shelled pecans that are uniform in size and colour. Check the date on the package or bulk bin, and smell the nuts beforehand if youre able to - they should be sweet, and well, nutty. If youre shopping in bulk, visit a shop that has a high turnover to ensure that the nuts are fresh. Once you get them home, store shelled pecans in an airtight container at room temperature for up to six months (although try to eat them sooner) and in the freezer for up to a year. Pecans are highly susceptible to absorbing other smells, so keep them locked up tight in glass to prevent them from tasting like garlic, onions, or last nights casserole.     I had hesitations about using brown rice syrup in this recipe, since I know its one of those harder-to-find ingredients, but its just SO perfect in this context that I had to! If you cannot find brown rice syrup, try whipped or creamed honey in its place. I recognize that this isnt an alternative for vegans, but I think it is the only sweetener that would work due to how thick and viscous it is. If the caramel is too runny, if will be impossible to work with. Trust. Its best to store your Turtles in the freezer, and take them out about 10-15 minutes before serving. Theyre also fine at room temperature, but will keep better cold. I actually dig them a little on the frozen side - the caramel is extra thick and chewy at subzero temperatures!         Print recipe     Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles Makes 30 candies Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g raw pecans 400g dark chocolate, 75% or higher (chose organic and fair-trade, if possible) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml cashew butter (raw or roasted) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml brown rice syrup 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 tsp. flaky sea salt (I used Maldon), plus a little more for garnish Directions: 1. Find a baking sheet or tray that will fit in your freezer, then line it with parchment paper. 2. In a medium sized bowl, stir together the cashew butter, rice syrup, vanilla and flaky salt until thoroughly combined. Taste (yum), and adjust the saltiness and vanilla levels to your liking. 3. Scoop a teaspoon of the caramel onto the lined baking sheet, using another spoon to help remove it - this stuff is seriously sticky! 4. Press a whole pecan on one side of the caramel blob, allowing the nut to peek over the edge just a bit, then add two halves to the sides, peeking over the edge just a bit too. Repeat until youve used all the caramel. Place in the freezer for at least one hour, up to 24 hours. 5. Once the caramels have chilled, prepare the chocolate. Heat a few inches /­­ centimetres of water in a small pot and heat on high. Roughly chop the chocolate bar into small chunks and place it in a heatproof bowl. Lower the heat to simmer, then set the bowl over the pot of so that it is sitting well above the water itself. Stir occasionally until the chocolate has completely melted. 6. Remove the caramels from the freezer. One at a time, drop each caramel into the melted chocolate pecan side-down, flip and ensure that the top is entirely coated. Remove from the chocolate with a fork, and drag the bottom along the edge of the bowl to remove any excess chocolate. Place back on the lined baking sheet and sprinkle with a couple flakes of salt. Repeat until youve coated all the turtles in chocolate. Place them inside the freezer until set, then transfer them to an airtight container and store in the freezer or fridge until ready to serve. If you want to see some of the pecans, drop the caramels on their bottom side first, then remove and place on the lined baking sheet. Drizzle enough chocolate over the top to fully cover the caramel (if you dont coat it completely, it may spill out at room temperature), but allowing a few parts of the pecans to show through. This will be my last post before the New Year, my friends! Im off to Bali in a mere 10 days (!!!) and words cannot describe how excited I am for the Wild Heart High Spirit Retreat, and meeting women from all across the world. If youd like to know more about my retreats, visit the Golden Circle Retreats website. Were planning another round for 2019, so sign up to mailing our list to be the first notified when we announce the dates. We are also taking orders for the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread Subscription Box! What better way to start off the new year than with a delicious monthly gift of health to yourself? If you want to learn more, or place your order, visit the shop page here. All love from Canada, and happiest of holidays to you and yours! xo, Sarah B The post Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles appeared first on My New Roots.

Crispy Treats

December 17 2018 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Treats Im pretty pleased with myself for perfecting this recipe. Turns out, its a lot harder making the classic Rice Krispie treat than youd think. Previous versions were too wet and thus sogged the cereal, or the sugar re-crystallized and the whole thing fell apart. But these! These have the perfect blend of crispness, sweetness, and chewiness that defines this childhood classic. These freeze and thaw very well should you need to make them ahead for a holiday party.   INGREDIENTS Marshmallow - 3/­­4 cup salt-free chickpea aquafaba - 1/­­2 tsp xanthan gum - 1 tbsp vanilla extract - 1 cup sugar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1/­­2 cup light corn syrup - 1 tsp agar powder Crispy Squares - 1/­­3 cup margarine - marshmallow from above - 1 tsp vanilla extract - 8 cups crisp rice cereal METHOD Make the Marshmallow: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly grease it. 1. Place the aquafaba in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until reduced to 1/­­2 cup. Pour into a mixing bowl (of a stand mixer if you have one) and let cool to room temperature. Place the bowl in the fridge to speed this up if youd like. 2. When aquafaba is cooled, sprinkle in the xanthan gum. Whisk to stiff peaks with a hand mixer or stand mixer. Whisk in vanilla extract until incorporated. 3. Add sugar, water, corn syrup, and agar powder to a small sauce pan. Bring to bubbling over med/­­med lo heat, stirring constantly to keep the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Bring the mixture to firm ball temperature: 245 to 250 F (use a candy thermometer). Be patient. The temperature will rise, then plateau, then rise again. Resist the urge to crank the temperature up. 4. Once the sugar mixture has reached firm ball, whisk it into the aquafaba by drizzling it down the side of the bowl with the mixer running (I like to use a hand mixer for this part for greater control). Once all of the sugar had been incorporated, keep whisking until the bottom of the bowl is no longer hot (I like the stand mixer for this part). 5. Transfer the marshmallow to the prepared baking sheet and spread to about 1/­­2 depth. Let fully cool. 6. Once fully cool, lightly grease the top of the marshmallow. Cut into 2x2 squares and transfer to a cooling rack. Let dry at room temperature for at least 12 hours. Make the Treats: Lightly grease an 8x14 pan 1. Melt the margarine in a large pot over lo/­­med lo heat. Once melted, add the marshmallow pieces. Once again, be patient. Stir with a wooden spoon until all melted and smooth, then stir in the vanilla. Remove from heat, add in the cereal, and mix well. 2. Press the cereal mixture into the prepared pan with a silicon spatula. Allow to fully cool, then cut into squares. Enjoy!

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! 5.0 from 2 reviews Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about […] The article Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf appeared first on VegKitchen.

How To Make Banana Fruit Leather (without a dehydrator!)

January 11 2019 Oh My Veggies 

So I’ve made Raspberry Peach Fruit Leather. And then I made Mango Fruit Roll-Ups. But I’m not going to rest on my delicious fruit snack laurels! No! I’ve been floating around ideas and trying to think of something that would work during winter and then it hit me: banana fruit leather. So I made it and it was good. And then I made it again and it was still good. Good enough to share, in fact. Here’s how to make banana fruit leather without a dehydrator: Before you start, you will need 4 ripe bananas. You’ll need to pre-heat your oven to 175?F and spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray. (Don’t spray on too much–you don’t want oily banana fruit leather.) Peel your bananas and cut them into large chunks. Now you need to puree your bananas. I like using an immersion blender, but a food processor or regular blender is fine. Make sure there are no large banana pieces. It needs to be smooth! Try not to eat the puree. It’s delicious! It’s almost like banana pudding. (Okay, not really. But I try to convince myself it is.) Pour the puree onto your greased baking sheet. Hopefully […]

Dal Pakwan Chaat

January 5 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Dal Pakwan Chaat (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Dal Pakwan Chaat This recipe is a little twist to an authentic breakfast delicacy in Sindhi homes. This style of serving makes this dish perfect for a gathering. I was inspired to do this recipe from when this was served to me in Jaipur while I was visiting my daughter-in-law family. For Pakwan - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida, plain flour) - 1/­­4 cup fine sooji (samolina) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) For Dal - 3/­­4 cup chana dal (bengal gram) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 Tbsp ginger chopped - 1 green chili chopped - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) For Garnishing - 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney (check the recipe on my web site) - 1/­­2 cup cucumber chopped in small pieces Pakwan, Crispy This Puries -  Crisp Puries known as Pakwan: Mix flour, sooji, salt, cumin seeds, and oil. Add enough water to make firm dough. Knead the dough well. Set the dough aside and let it sit for at least 15 minutes or longer. - Divide the dough in 10 equal parts, Roll the dough into about 5-inch diameter. If the dough is sticking to the rolling pin or rolling surface, put couple of drops of oil on the rolling pin and a couple of drops of oil on the surface. - Prick the rolled dough all over with a fork. This will limit puries from puffing and make them crisp. Cut them in 6 pieces giving them in triangle shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. The frying pan should have at about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should sizzle and come up slowly. - Fry few triangles at time not crowding them. Fry until both sides are a light golden-brown. Transfer triangles over paper towel, it will absorb the extra oil. For Dal -  Wash and soak chana dal for at least 2 hours in 3 cups of water. - Drain the water, heat the oil in pressure cooker over medium heat, when oil is moderately hot add cumin seeds. As seeds crack add dal, 2 cups of water, salt, turmeric, green chili, and ginger, close the cooker and cook over medium high heat. - As the pressure cooker starts steaming turn the heat down to medium and cook for about 4 minutes. Turn off the heat and wait until steam has stopped before opening the pressure cooker. - Dal should be soft well-cooked but not mushy. Add black pepper, mango powder and garam masala, mix it well. Dal should be thick in consistency. Serving Suggestion -  Serve pakwan with hot dal with drizzle of tamarind chutney, topping with cucumber. Cucumber gives them nice crunch. Notes:  After the triangle chips cool to room temperature they should be crisp. Chips can be stored in airtight container for 1 month. The post Dal Pakwan Chaat appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

The Ten Most Popular Meatless Monday Recipes of 2018

December 31 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Ten Most Popular Meatless Monday Recipes of 2018Happy New Year from Meatless Monday! Thanks to you, Meatless Monday is celebrated every Monday all over the world. And, if 2018 is any indication, the message of Meatless Monday will continue to spread far and wide in 2019. We predict plant-based recipes will continue to rise in popularity and more noteworthy cookbooks with why-didnt-I-think-of-that recipes will appear in your kitchen. Folks around the globe agree, cutting out meat one day a week is a decision thats good for your health and the health of the planet. It can benefit your heart, kidneys, and so much more . And swapping out meat for fruits and veggies each week can help fight climate change . Plus, get on board because eating a plant-based diet is also super trendy and here to stay. Drum Roll Please! Were proud to present the top ten most-viewed Meatless Monday recipes from 2018!   #1: Jamaican Jerk Tofu This recipe is number one for the second year in a row! Read more below about this signature dish from Meatless Monday Jamaica and Jacqui Juicy Chef Sinclair. #2: Zucchini Tomato Curry A sweet and spicy second place. #3: Thai Fresh Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce A fun wrap with a group of friends is new to the Top Ten list! #4: Banana Date Smoothie Sweet! This delicious smoothie is coming back for a second year. #5: Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles Zoodles are so popular! They’re back for another year. #6: Kale, Potato and Carrot Curry Fragrant and easy, this curry is new to the list. #7: Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad A refreshing and simple salad squeaks in at number seven! #8: Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice) A delicious classic recipe from the Meatless Monday community in Honduras. #9: Cherry Tomato Pesto Penne Back for another year, a quick and easy dish for everyone to enjoy. #10: Breakfast Lentils This recipe proves lentils are delicious any time of day.   For the second year in a row, the number one spot on our Top Ten list has been occupied by Jamaican Jerk Tofu. This is a savory mix of herbs and spices that can convert anyone to tofu. We reached out to Jacqui Juicy Chef Sinclair, who leads the Meatless Monday efforts in Jamaica , to share her thoughts on jerk and why its so popular. Jacqui explains, Jerk is both a style of grilling and special type of marinade. With the rise in popularity of vegetarianism for health and climate change, the jerk technique has transcended beyond meat. And for those of you trying this recipe at home, Jacqui shares some suggestions, Plant-based foods such as tofu, eggplant, zucchini, mushrooms, cauliflower, and other hardy vegetables that lend themselves to grilling are great choices for jerk. These vegetables can easily soak up the addictive and distinct taste of Jamaica. Were excited to hear your thoughts on the 2018 Top Ten list! Share your reactions with us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! Meatless Monday is celebrated around the world. Join us and find out what its all about when you make the decision to cut out the meat on Mondays. The post The Ten Most Popular Meatless Monday Recipes of 2018 appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Chestnuts

December 28 2018 VegKitchen 

Roasted Chestnuts The chestnut vendor offering hot, charcoal-roasted chestnuts on the streets of many cities symbolizes the coming of winter. This seasonal treat can be enjoyed by a cozy fire at home as well. Chestnuts can be roasted in a popcorn basket over an open fire, in a shallow baking dish inside the oven, or in a skillet on top of the range. Recipe contributed by Nikki and David Goldbeck, from American Wholefoods Cuisine.* The first method is preferred, for the charred, crunchy portions that result from the uneven cooking are really part of the appeal. Serves: 4 to 8 1 pound chestnuts in shells To cook chestnuts, the shell must be slit first to prevent bursting. Using a small, sharp paring knife, cut a cross on the flat side of the nut, piercing the shell completely. For fireplace cookery, place nuts in a long-handled basket or popcorn popper without crowding and hold it just above the flame. Shake occasionally so that all sides are exposed to the heat. Be patient and do not put the basket directly in the flame or the outside will char before the inside becomes tender. Chestnuts should cook through in about 15 minutes. When the shells have […] The article Roasted Chestnuts appeared first on VegKitchen.

Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

This take on a meatless shepherds pie will brighten any holiday table. Lightened up with parsnips rather than potatoes and seitan or beans rather than meat, this light dish will leave plenty of room in your belly for holiday treats. This recipe comes to us from Robin Asbell. Serves 6   - For the Parsnips: -  - 8 cloves garlic whole, peeled - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 pounds parsnips (5 cups chopped) - 1 cup non-dairy milk or milk - 1 teaspoons salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon white pepper   - For the Filling -  - 12 ounces spinach washed - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 large onions chopped - 2 large carrots chopped - 3 tablespoons unbleached flour or white rice flour for GF - 3 tablespoons fresh sage chopped - 1 cups non-dairy milk or milk - 1 cup vegetable stock - 2 teaspoons tamari - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 8 ounces seitan, or a can of drained white beans, optional   Pre-heat the oven to 400 F. Place the garlic cloves and olive oil in a small metal bowl and cover with foil, and roast for 20 minutes. The garlic should be very soft and browned. Take out to cool. In a large pot, place the parsnips and cover with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce to medium low and simmer until the parsnips are very soft. Test by piercing with a paring knife. Drain well. Transfer the garlic and oil to a blender or food processor, and add the parsnips and salt. In a food processor, puree completely before adding the milk. In a blender, add the milk and puree. When smooth, transfer to a large piping bag with a large star tip, or just reserve to spread on the pie. Prepare a 9×13 inch pan or other medium casserole. For filling: Boil a large pot of water and drop the spinach in, cook for about 2 minutes, then drain. Rinse with cold water, squeeze out, then spread on a thick kitchen towel, roll up, and squeeze until very dry. In a large pot, heat the olive oil and saute the onions and carrots until golden and tender, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the onions in the pan and stir to coat the vegetables with flour and eliminate any lumps. Gradually stir in the milk and stock, and cook over medium heat until thick. Add salt, tamari and pepper and stir. Take off the heat and stir the spinach (and seitan or beans, if using) into the sauce, then spread in the 9×13 inch casserole. Pipe the parsnips on top of the spinach filling as shown, or place dollops on top and spread them with a spatula. Spritz with a little olive oil, then bake at 400 for 35 minutes. Optionally, use a broiler and watch carefully for a few minutes to get the parsnip topping nicely browned. The post Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

DIY Homemade Spice Mixes for Gifts

December 22 2018 Vegan Richa 

DIY Homemade Spice Mixes for GiftsHomemade Spice Mixes for Gifts! Fresh spice blends take the meal from eh to wow. Gift these homemade mixes like garam masala, curry powder, cajun spice, pumpkin pie spice and more. Vegan Glutenfree Recipe You all sometimes double up on the spices in some of my spiced up meals, curries, recipes. There are some blends such as ones with more herbs and flavors, that work well to double for the flavor impact, while there are others like my garam masala, that I often use half of that what I list in my recipes or others. This probably happens because my blends are generally quite fresh and hence very potent. They often have a lot of flavor payoff! And using huge amounts can spoil the overall balance of flavors on the recipe.  Fresh Spice blends that have fresh and vibrant flavors make great gifts for foodies and cooks. They take the meals from ok to Wow! You can use these spices in various ways. Some examples are listed with each. Store in an airtight glass container away from sunlight and heat and they will be fresh for a few months.  Let’s make some homemade Spice mixes!Continue reading: DIY Homemade Spice Mixes for GiftsThe post DIY Homemade Spice Mixes for Gifts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Orange Chai Latte + Video

December 19 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Orange Chai Latte + Video This has been our favorite, warming drink this fall/­­winter. Chai is surprisingly easy to make at home, and fills your whole space with the most lovely, festive scent. It tastes like pure coziness, and is also full of spices that are great for digestion and blood sugar stabilization. Today, we are sharing our favorite way to make chai (and a chai latte), which involves lightly toasting the spices, adding some orange peels, and not including any caffeine (though you easily can). We also have a new ‘day of eating’ video for you, which shows you the whole step-by-step process of making this chai :) We both have issues with handling caffeine, so we generally completely avoid it, except for a rare matcha latte treat, a cappuccino in Italy, etc. Turns out that it’s totally possible to make really good chai by just steeping some spices in water, without adding any tea. We toast the spices for a deeper flavor and also add orange peel, which contributes a beautiful, zesty note. Serving this chai as a latte really takes it to the next level. The addition of creamy plant milk and a little bit of sweetener brings out all the beautiful flavors in the best way possible. It’s like a soft, warm blanket in drink form. Hope you give it a try! Orange Chai Latte   Print Serves: about 6 cups chai Ingredients for the orange chai 1 tablespoon cloves 1 tablespoon fennel seeds 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns 2 tablespoons whole cardamom pods 2 cinnamon sticks about 10 star anise 2-3 piece ginger - peeled if not organic and sliced peels from 1 organic orange - white parts trimmed off as much as possible 1 piece fresh turmeric - peeled if not organic and sliced (optional) 6 cups purified water for the orange chai latte a mugs worth of orange chai from above - hot 1 pitted date or a splash of maple syrup/­­honey to taste generous pour of any plant milk of choice or a handful of raw cashews Instructions to make the orange chai In a dry skillet warmed over medium-high heat, toast the cloves, fennel, black pepper, cardamom, cinnamon, and star anise until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat. In a medium pot, combine the toasted spices, ginger, orange peel, turmeric (if using), and purified water. Bring up to a boil, then turn the heat down and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Strain to serve. The spices, ginger, orange peel, and turmeric can be re-steeped up to 2 times. Keep refrigerated. to make the orange chai latte In a high-speed blender, combine the chai, date or maple syrup/­­honey, and plant milk or cashews. Blend until smooth and frothy and enjoy. Notes If youd like to add some tea to the chai, just steep it in with the rest of the spices, however long and strong you prefer. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Superberry Smoothie A Day of Smoothies Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah at The Vanilla Bean Blog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Orange Chai Latte + Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Christmas 2018

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve. Otherwise we’ll just call it a post-Christmas cake ;) Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of tahini. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Gluten-Free Peach Pie

December 17 2018 VegKitchen 

Gluten-Free Peach Pie Remarkably delicious, this pie is fun and easy to make. For a light-colored piecrust use ivory teff flour; for a chocolate-brown piecrust use brown teff flour. Both are equally scrumptious and both are available at natural foods stores to make great gluten-free pie crust and other baked goods. Contributed by Leslie Cerier, from Gluten-Free Recipes for the Conscious Cook. Photo by Stephanie Ferrate of Gluten-Free West. Delicious served over nondairy ice cream, as shown. Serves: 6 to 8 Crust: 2 cups teff flour 1/­­2 cup melted extra-virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt Filling: 5 ripe peaches, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon maple sugar or date sugar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons cinnamon Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly oil a 9-inch pie pan. To make the crust, combine the teff flour, oil, syrup, vanilla, and salt in a medium-size bowl and stir until well combined. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the mixture to use as a crumb topping. Transfer the dough to the prepared pie pan and use your fingers to press it out in an even layer over the bottom and sides of the pan. Poke a few holes in the dough with a fork. […] The article Gluten-Free Peach Pie appeared first on VegKitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage No-Recipe Healing Soup Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf”

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Lentil  and sunflower seed “meatloaf” What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about 10 minutes. Add the […] The article Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf” appeared first on VegKitchen.


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