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pickles vegetarian recipes

12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks

September 5 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks A delicious dozen of Apple Cider Vinegar recipes will boost your intake of the most popular vinegar in the natural health community. ACVs health benefits are legion, many of which are backed by research (see 23 of these benefits here). It’s become well known as an aid to weight loss, and due to its probiotic […] The post 12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Japanese Carrot Pickles

July 25 2017 VegKitchen 

Japanese Carrot Pickles These traditional Japanese carrot pickles are great on their own as a snack or appetizer, but their flavor and texture truly shine when paired with other Asian dishes. This recipe is gluten-free, oil-free, soy-free, and super quick to prepare. Recipe and photo credit: Bold Flavored Vegan Cooking by Celine Steen, Page Street Publishing Co. (C) 2017. Reprinted by […] The post Japanese Carrot Pickles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup

July 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Restaurant RoundupThis Monday, were putting the spotlight on five restaurants around the United States that are participating in Meatless Monday! Every week, they offer discounts and vegetarian specials to their customers, giving them delicious meat-free options at their favorite places. The list of restaurants that have joined Meatless Monday continues to grow, and here are five to keep an eye on! 1. Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Multiple Locations: With its focus on local, sustainable cuisine, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar has a plentiful selection of healthy meal choices including several vegetarian choices. For Meatless Monday, CEO Dave Magrogan has one recommendation in particular: “I love the Spicy Tofu Stir Fry. The sweet flavors of the pineapple and coconut jasmine rice combine with spicy flavors, peppers, baby bok choy, snow peas and eggplant to create a great flavor profile. This dish is satisfying and filling without a high calorie count. The tofu gives a nice protein boost. Overall its a very well-rounded vegetarian dish for someone looking for bold flavors and solid protein content.” 2. Tattooed Mom, Philadelphia, PA: This Philly food joint can bring townies of all stripes together for cocktails and sandwiches. On Meatless Monday, the vegetarian sammies get the spotlight: “Our world famous Vegan Pickle Fried Chickn Sammy is a Meatless Monday favorite at Tattooed Mom. Our house brined vegan chicken is topped with fried pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion and crystal hot sauce mayo, all on a brioche bun. You’ll find it here, along with our full line up of 10 vegetarian and vegan delights, on special for half price EVERY Meatless Monday from noon – 10pm.” 3. Burrito San, Miami, FL: Burrito San has become famous for its sushi burrito, making it a great destination for pescatarians and sushi lovers alike. Their Meatless Monday features $10 lunch specials including vegetarian sushi options. Marketing manager Mitzi Napoles has a favorite: “The Buddhas Belly Burrito roll is the perfect Meatless Monday choice. It has a satisfying heft from the portobello mushrooms and a great contrast of flavors and textures. We also have it available as a Salad or Poke option if Giant Sushi rolls are not your thing!” 4. Forage, Cambridge, MA: Forage works with local farmers, foragers, and fisherman to bring sustainable, healthy cuisine to its Cambridge customers. But on Meatless Monday, seasonal veggies get a starring role. From owner and manager Stan Hilbert: “We love our veggies and the farmers that grow them. Meatless Monday is one way for us to support our farmer friends while highlighting seasonal and local produce and offering something different every week. We feature veggies in savory and sweet courses. We have a $39 four-course vegetarian or vegan tasting menu available every day of the week, but on Mondays we throw in another two courses for the same price!” 5. BeWiched, Minneapolis, MN: A believer in old-world culinary traditions, BeWiched certainly doesnt shy away from meat on their menu of deli sandwiches. However on Mondays, they offer up something different for their Meatless Monday specials. From Ally Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Catering & Sales: “Every Monday, we offer a new seasonal plant-based sandwich as an ode to #meatlessmonday. This is Farmer Bob (pictured above). He comes in at least once a week and sells us fresh produce picked from his farm. He recently harvested some tomatoes that we used for a Fried Green Tomato sandwich special. It doesn’t get any more farm-to-table than that!” Honorable Mentions: We cant leave out restaurants that go meat-free every day! Here are two vegan food joints that cater to everyone who loves great, sustainable, healthy meals! Choices Café, Florida (multiple locations): Choices goes meat-free every day of the week, in case you forget to stop in on Monday! Their mission statement: “Our mission is to inspire compassionate choices by serving delicious, healthy, and organic plant-based food prepared with love for people, animals and the planet.” VO2 Vegan Café, Cambridge, MA: Another spot with all vegan offerings is VO2 Vegan Café, which welcomes diners of all preferences who just want to treat themselves to something healthy and delicious. From VO2 manager Stephanie Kirkpatrick: All our food is 100% vegan, so everything is meatless and we celebrate Meatless Monday every day! It’s so wonderful when vegans and vegetarians come in and are so excited that they don’t have to ask about ingredients because they already know everything is vegan. Many meat-eaters also love our food and look at it as an awesome and easy way to enjoy delicious food knowing they are eating healthier, for themselves and our planet. Does your favorite restaurant participate in Meatless Monday? Wed love to feature them on our site! If you own a restaurant and are considering taking part in Meatless Monday, let us know! Send us an email: info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

Quick Pickled Vegetables

June 2 2017 VegKitchen 

Quick Pickled Vegetables When gardens and markets are bursting with veggies, its fun to make these quick pickled vegetables. With a mild sweet and savory brine, this addictive veggie snack just might tempt kids and picky eaters. Since this isn’t a vacuum-sealed canning project, you don’t need any special equipment. These pickles keep well for a week or more […] The post Quick Pickled Vegetables appeared first on VegKitchen.

How to Pickle Anything Like a Pro

May 11 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Pickle Anything Like a Pro Have you always wanted to try pickling, but intimidated by the process? Heres a visual guide on how to pickle vegetables. Pickling allows you to give your favorite summer produce a whole new flavor. Experiment with some of these tips and make your own pickling recipes. Source: Fix.com Here are more recipes for canning and […] The post How to Pickle Anything Like a Pro appeared first on VegKitchen.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Turmeric Lentil Fritters Tomato Bowl with Tahini Dill Sauce

January 4 2017 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Lentil Fritters Tomato Bowl with Tahini Dill SauceTurmeric Lentil Fritters Tomato Greens Bowl with Tahini Dill Sauce. Baked Seedy Golden Lentil fritters with greens, tomatoes and a tahini sauce make an easy Lunch bowl. Vegan Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. Easily Glutenfree. These seedy lentil fritters are amazingly easy. Cook the lentils with turmeric and spices, fold in some spinach or greens, add seeds like chia, flax, sesame or hemp or other of choice, chill, scoop into bite size fritters, bake and done. The lentils when cooked make a wet mixture, which bakes up perfectly into crisp on the outside Golden fritters, soft and flavorful on the inside. I use a cookie scoop to make the fritters as it takes just 5 minutes without any mess. Tahini dill sauce complements these fritters incredibly well. Some juicy tomatoes and baby greens make this bowl an amazing meal. I eat up those fritters right off the baking sheet with the dill sauce, they are so good! so you might want to double the recipe. You can also make wraps with these life a falafel wrap. Some crunchy lettuce, pickles, tomatoes, fritters and sauce in a warm pita bread.  If you make these. do let me know in the comments how you liked them. Continue reading: Turmeric Lentil Fritters Tomato Bowl with Tahini Dill SauceThe post Turmeric Lentil Fritters Tomato Bowl with Tahini Dill Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunch, vegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Sesame Cappuccino Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy Vegan Falafel Burger

August 29 2016 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan Falafel BurgerEasy Vegan Falafel Burger. Chickpea patties with 5 minute tahini dressing, tomatoes, onions, pickles make for a filling and flavorful burger. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free. Pin it for later. Everyone needs a falafel burger! A simple Chickpea burger with falafel flavors, tahini dressing, pickles, lettuce and other fixings.  This falafel burger uses cooked chickpeas, cumin, coriander, cardamom, parley, lemon and a binder and comes together within minutes. Pan fry until golden. Make the 5 minute Tahini dressing. Serve these between buns with a generous dressing or in a pita bread! Sesame seeds add an amazing flavor and crunch to the patties. Use breadcrumbs, or coarsely ground oats as binder. Make these flavorful soft moist falafel burger patties! Oh yes, if you use all cilantro instead of parsley, serve these with chutneys of choice. Also, serve 1 patty per burger. The stacking is for photo purposes only ;).Continue reading: Easy Vegan Falafel BurgerThe post Easy Vegan Falafel Burger appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle

June 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle This is a simple plate of tangled summer vegetables – tender zucchini noodles and carrot ribbons, gently blistered green beans and shallot-kissed mushrooms, all dressed up in a bright, smoky sauce. We’ve been eating it this week, first as a salad on its own, then as a side dish, and the leftovers made their way on top of hearty sourdough toast – all equally delicious and so fresh. There’s a few things to be said about the bright orange sauce that completes this summery veggie tangle. The color comes from Spanish smoked paprika, which is one of my most reached for items on the spice rack. The spice, which comes from hot peppers that have been smoked dry and then ground, can add just the right amount of deep, savory flavor to so many dishes. It yields a warming, complex flavor, but isn’t as hot as pepper flakes or cayenne, so I use it pretty generously. In the winter, when I roast squash and roots, I often give them a pinch of smoked paprika, which takes them to that next level of heartiness. I also love adding it to all kinds of grain dishes, stews and marinades. If you haven’t tried smoked paprika yet, I encourage you to give it a go, it’s a game changer and will be your friend when building up flavor in many savory dishes. At first, the sauce acts as a dressing, but after a few nights in the fridge, the vegetables marinate in all the smokiness, and the dish gets a sort of second life, and a delicious one at that. This kind of spicy, marinated vegetable dish reminds me of the cuisines of my homeland in the southwest of Russia, the Caucasus, where in the summer, the markets are overflowing with stands full of the most colorful pickles and marinated veggies that you can buy by the kilo. Food has an extraordinary ability of bringing back the feeling of home, if even for a second. Enjoy! Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the smoky sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon tamari juice of 1 lemon ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­hot sauce of choice 2-3 garlic cloves - minced for the tangle 1-2 small to medium firm zuchini - sliced into noodles using a julienne peeler, spiralizer or mandoline (I use this one) 1 medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler ½ tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - chopped ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced tamari for drizzling - to taste 2 large handfuls young green beans - strings removed if present juice of ½ lemon handful parsley leaves - chopped (optional) salad greens and/­­or microgreens few tablespoons chopped hazelnuts or almonds - toasted if preferred Instructions to make the smoky sauce Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. Set aside. to make the tangle Combine zucchini and carrots in a large mixing bowl or platter. Set aside. Warm ½ tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a large saute pan. Add shallot and saute for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for another 5-7 minutes, until they begin to brown. Lightly drizzle with tamari and stir around until absorbed. Add the sauteed mushrooms and shallot to the zucchini and carrots. Warm the remaining 1 teaspoon coconut oil over medium heat in the same saucepan. Add green beans and saute for 2-3 minutes, until bright green and blistered in places. Squeeze lemon juice over beans and lightly drizzle with tamari. Cook for another 1-2 minutes, until liquid is evaporated and beans are crisp-tender. Add to the bowl with the vegetables. Add parsley, if using, and salad greens and/­­or microgreens. Drizzle the smoky sauce over vegetables. Toss to coat and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Serve immediately. You can also store the tangle in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. The vegetables will become marinated and delicious in a new way. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Vegan Cheese Plate Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard

April 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Mung beans have been my legume of choice as of late. I love them for their versatility, good nutrition record (protein of course, manganese, potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc.), brief cooking time, and a very fair price tag. They work well for falafel, with very similar properties to chickpeas, albeit lighter in every way. Soaking the mung beans overnight and baking the falafel instead of frying makes them easy on the stomach – I say this because even though I love to get traditional fried falafel when out, it always makes me feel unwell. These mung bean falafels are made with my favorite spice mix that goes well with their bright, lemony flavor. When I go to the farmer’s market, I often have the eyes bigger than the stomach problem, especially with greens. Last week, there was lots of beautiful rainbow chard at the stand, and I carried away more bunches than we could ever eat. Pickling was the next best choice and I was pleasantly surprised by the result. The marinade I came up with is very mild and simple, and the pickling only takes a day. It seems that in our little health food community, bowl format has become the default lunch format, and we are right there with everyone, happy to enjoy a veggie loaded and colorful lunch bowl, any time of day really. As usual in spring, I can’t get enough of quickly sautéed, crispy and tender asparagus, which complements any grains or legumes. A base of quinoa, which can be substituted with any grain, tangy tahini sauce, crunchy nuts, herbs, and pickles complete this meal. All these components are, of course, suggestions, and dishes like these are highly customizable. I do very much recommend trying all the parts – the falafel, the pickles and tahini sauce – if not together, then independently, added to sandwiches, salads, and the like – you won’t regret it. Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard serves 4-6 for the mung bean falafel bowl 1 cup rainbow quinoa or other grain of choice – cooked sea salt – to taste 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil about 20 asparagus – tough ends removed freshly ground black pepper – to taste mung bean falafel – recipe below pickled rainbow chard – recipe below large hadful baby spiach/­­other salad greens handful cilantro leaves/­­pea shoots/­­other microgreens tahini sauce – recipe below sesame seeds – for garnish (optional) chopped pistachios/­­other nuts – for garnish (optional) to assemble the falafel bowls Distribute quinoa between bowls. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook, undisturbed, for 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes, until soft and bright green. Divide asparagus between bowls on top of quinoa. Arrange falafels on top, followed by chard pickles, if using. Add spinach or other salad greens, herbs/­­microgreens. Drizzle with tahini sauce, sprinkle with sesame seeds and nuts. Mung Bean Falafel makes about 18 falafels 1 cup mung beans – soaked overnight 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil or olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds – freshly ground 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). 2. Drain and rinse mung beans and cook them in plenty of salted water for about 7 minutes, or until soft but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. 3. Coarsely grind pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Add mung beans and the rest of ingredients. Pulse to combine. 4. Shape about 18 small falafels and arrange them on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side. Keep covered and warm, if using right away. Otherwise, keep refrigerated in an airtight container and reheat in the 350° F (180° C) oven for about 10-15 minutes. Pickled Rainbow Chard 1 large bunch rainbow chard – leaves and stems separated 4 garlic cloves – sliced pinch red pepper flakes roughly chopped dill and cilantro – to taste (optional) Thinly slice chard stems and leaves into bite sized pieces. Place into a large water-proof bowl, and pour purified water over them to just cover. Drain water, reserving it, and measure it, as you will need to prepare the marinade according to these proportions: 5 cups water 1/­­2 cup apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 tablespoons sea salt 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 2 bay leaves 3 whole cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon black peppercorns to pickle Combine measured water with other marinade ingredients in a medium saucepan. If you have more or less water than the recipe calls for, adjust the amount of vinegar, salt and spices accordingly – it doesn’t have to be exact. Bring the marinade to a boil over medium high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes. Meanwhile, add garlic, red pepper flakes and herbs to the chard, mixing to distribute evenly. Pour hot marinade over the chard and place a plate over it to keep all the chard emerged in the marinade. You can use a heavy object to weigh the plate down, such as a jar filled with water. Pickles will be ready the next day. Keep refrigerated. Best within 1 week. Tahini Sauce 1/­­4 cup sesame tahini 1/­­4 cup purified water juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove – chopped sea salt – to taste tiny pinch red pepper flakes (optional) Combine all the ingredients in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Soda Battered Eggplant w/ Carrot Chips, Sprout Salad + Fresh Pickle

February 22 2016 Veggie num num 

Welcome to the new and updated veggienumnum.com!! I’m crazy happy to finally have this little space all fresh and shinny, with improved content and functionality. It’s just taken me forever!!! I hope you’re all enjoying the new look and have found things easy to navigate. Please be sure to drop me an email if you’ve come across any dramas or missing recipes. Veggie num num is here for you guys, so please feel free to let me know what you think To kick off the new site I am sharing a favourite recipe from my book Going Veggie. This recipe for soda battered eggplant has to be one of my favourite recipe creations, yep I love it!! Crispy battered eggplant, fresh pickle and sweet little roasted carrots, seriously, if you’re serious about the deliciousness of veggies, there is so much to love!! Kind of a take on tempura and kind of a take on battered fish and chips, this vegan recipe is crispy, fresh and packed with veggie power. Soda Battered Eggplant w/­­ Carrot Chips, Sprout Salad + Fresh Pickle Preparation time: 55 minutes /­­/­­ Serves 4 || Tips: The pickle, batter, and sprout salad can all be made ahead of time. The carrot chips and soda battered aubergine are best served immediately while still hot and crunchy. Make sure to get your oil nice and hot before adding the strips of battered eggplant and fry only one or two pieces at a time for the best results. || Fresh Cucumber Pickle - 1 Lebanese cucumber - 1 lemon - 1 tbs olive oil -  1/­­2 tsp dill seeds First, prepare the pickle, by slicing the cucumber in half lengthways and then very thinly slicing. Also, slice the lemon in half lengthways, before deseeding and finely dicing one half (reserving the other half for use later). Heat the olive oil in a small saucepan over a medium/­­low heat. Add the dill seeds and continue to heat until they begin to pop and crackle. Add the prepared cucumber and lemon and toss over a medium heat for just one minute. Remove from the heat and squeeze over the juice of the remaining half a lemon. Set aside to cool before placing in the refrigerator to chill. Just before serving pour any excess liquid off the pickles and place in a serving dish. Soda Battered Aubergine - 1 cup plain flour - 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder - 2 tsp nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1 cup chilled soda water (sparkling water) - 3-4 Japanese eggplant (aubergine) - peanut or sunflower oil for deep frying Prepare the soda batter by shifting the flour and baking powder into a big mixing bowl. Add the turmeric and nutritional yeast and stir to combine. Pour over the soda water and whisk until smooth. Pop in the fridge and chill while you prepare the sprout salad and carrot chips. Slice the aubergines lengthways into strip around 1/­­2 inch (1.5cm) thick. Place the aubergine strips onto absorbent paper and sprinkle over a few pinches of salt flakes. Leave for a few minutes until the aubergines begin to sweat. Turn over and repeat on the other side, patting the aubergine strips dry after a few more minutes and pricking the skins with a fork. To deep-fry the aubergine, pour your oil into a god-sized deep pot up to a depth of around 6 inches (15cm) and heat over a high heat until the surface begins to shimmer. Remove the batter from the refrigerator and whisk again, quickly, until smooth. Working with one piece at a time, dip a strip of prepared aubergine into the batter. Allow the excess to drip off, before carefully sliding into the hot oil. The batter should quickly begin to sizzle and golden. Fry for one minute before turning to fry on the other side for just one more minute. Remove with a slotted ladle and place on absorbent paper. Keep warm while you deep-fry the remaining pieces. Serve the warm soda battered aubergine and hot carrot chips accompanied by the sprout salad and fresh pickle. Carrot Chips  - 4 large carrots, diced into 1/­­2 cm rounds (approx. 4 cups) - small bunch fresh thyme - 2 tbs olive oil Preheat the oven to 200C/­­390F Place two good-sized baking trays in the oven to pre-heat for 3-4 minutes. Carefully remove the pre-heated trays from the oven and line with baking paper. Arrange the rounds of carrot in a single layer over the two baking trays. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle over fresh thyme, with salt flakes and cracked pepper to taste. Place in the hot oven, roasting for 30 minuets until carrots are golden and crisp. Sprout Salad  - 2 cups beans sprouts - 2 cups snow pea sprouts - 1 cup legume sprouts (mung, chickpea, lentil) - 1 1/­­2 tbs lemon juice - 3 tbs olive oil - tiny drizzle of honey or agave nectar Prepare the sprout salad by roughly dicing the tops of the snow pea sprouts and finely dicing the stalks. Add these along with the bean and legume spouts to a large serving bowl. Toss with you hands to combine. Make the sprout salad dressing by adding all the lemon juice, olive oil and honey, with salt flakes and cracked pepper to taste, to a screw top jar and shaking until well combined. Place both the salad and dressing into the refrigerator until ready to serve. Before serving shake the sprout salad dressing again and then pour over the sprouts, tossing roughly to combine. The post Soda Battered Eggplant w/­­ Carrot Chips, Sprout Salad + Fresh Pickle appeared first on Veggie num num.

Preserving Garlic

July 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Preserving Garlic Preserving garlic by any method is not a substitute for fresh, but it does have its own charms and advantages, especially if you grow it and have a bumper crop Here we’ll explore how to preserve garlic: freezing, drying, garlic vinegar, garlic salt, garlic oil, and refrigerator garlic pickles. Different methods of preserving garlic lend themselves […] The post Preserving Garlic appeared first on VegKitchen.

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich

June 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Everything tastes better on the beach. The sun and saltwater create a special kind of exhaustion that will make even the blandest piece of food taste mind-blowing. When I was a kid, we were usually handed fresh peaches after a long, tiring swim. The peach juice would inevitably end up all over our faces and running down our arms, but no one cared because the way they tasted made the whole world go quiet. Those same peaches never seemed quite as delicious at home, and one year I even made a point of only eating them when at the seaside. Today’s sandwich can be eaten anywhere and anytime, but it will also make for one very special beach snack. The main component of the sandwich is a white bean ‘tuna’ that has all of the best flavor components of tuna salad, with a little summer flare from fresh cucumber and basil. When mixed with red onion, pickles, olives, sunflower seeds, herbs and a mayo-like sauce, white beans taste remarkably close to tuna salad, especially sandwiched between some bread. Once you have all your ingredients at the ready, the ‘tuna’ comes together easily, and the batch will last you for close to a week’s worth of sandwiches. It’s sturdy and portable, and as a bonus has none of that characteristic scent that follows a tuna sandwich lunch. It’s satisfying and nutritious too, since white beans (as well as all pulses, aka chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. This year we are partnering with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some tasty, simple recipes centered around pulses, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. The goal is to kindly inspire you to include at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week, for sustainable, nourishing and tasty meals. This sandwich is a good start :) Summery White Bean Tuna Sandwich   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean tuna salad juice of half a lemon ¼ medium red onion - chopped ½ cup dried white beans (such as cannellini, navy, baby lima, etc.) - soaked overnight in purified water and cooked ½ cup chopped English cucumber ⅓ cup chopped pickles ⅓ cup chopped olives ⅓ cup toasted sunflower seeds ⅓ cup chopped dill and/­­or parsley 1 tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper handful basil leaves (optional) ½ teaspoon garlic powder (optional) ¼ cup mayo, or more to taste - recipe follows sea salt - if needed for the mayo 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon sunflower butter or any nut/­­seed butter 1 teaspoon sriracha juice of 1 lemon or more if needed sandwich add-ins shredded red cabbage tomato slices more whole basil leaves sprouts or microgreens Instructions to make the white bean tuna salad Pour the lemon juice over the chopped red onion in a small bowl and let it sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Combine the onions in lemon juice with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse a few times, taking care not to over process; the mixture should be slightly chunky. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Serve on good sandwich bread, with red cabbage, tomato, more basil, sprouts/­­microgreens, or any other favorite sandwich add-ins. to make the mayo Combine all the ingredients, except the lemon juice, in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and combine thoroughly. Add more of the lemon juice, if needed to achieve a creamy, slightly runny consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Lemon Tarts from Laura at The First Mess Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

amla pickle recipe | amla achar or amla ka achar | gooseberry pickle

May 2 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

amla pickle recipe | amla achar or amla ka achar | gooseberry pickleamla pickle recipe | amla achar or amla ka achar | gooseberry pickle with step by step photo and video recipe. there are several ways the traditional pickles are prepared in india and south east asian countries. however this is an instant variation prepared by steaming the amla and then mixing it with salt and spices. generally the shelf life of instant pickle are less compared to the traditional one which are exposed to sunlight for weeks. Continue reading amla pickle recipe | amla achar or amla ka achar | gooseberry pickle at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Taco Samosa

January 26 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});   Taco Samosa This exciting recipe for Taco Samosa is exactly what it sounds like – a twist to the traditional Samosa. Taco Samosas are delicious and savory with the perfect crisp. When I had my family do the initial taste test, the reaction was WOW! These Taco Samosas should be in your must try list. Not only are they delicious, but will be the conversation piece for your next get together. One thing good about these Samosas is that you can prepare them in advance and simply assemble before serving. This recipe will make 8 Taco Samosas. For Shell - 1 cup all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 1/­­4 cup fine sooji (semolina) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1 1/­­2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­3 cup lukewarm water for the Filling - 2 cups Potatoes (boiled, peeled and chopped into very small cubes) - 1/­­2 cup green peas (I am using frozen green peas) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds - 1 tsp coriander powder - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - 1 tsp mango powder (amchur) - 1 tsp salt - 2 Tbsp green chilies (chopped, adjust to taste) - Oil to Fry For Serving - 1/­­4 cup cilantro chutney - 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney Making the Dough - Mix the flour, sooji, salt, and oil add water as needed to make a firm dough. -  knead the dough for about 1 minutes to make the dough smooth and pliable. -  Let the dough sit for at least 15 minutes . Making the Filling - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if it cracks right away oil is ready. -  Add cumin seeds as cumin seeds crack, add green peas stir-fry for about 2 minutes . -  Add all the other ingredients, potatoes, coriander powder, red chili powder, garam masala, mango powder, salt and green chili. Stir-fry for about 2 minutes , potato filling should be moist not very dry. Making Taco Shells - Knead the dough for few seconds. Divide the dough into 8 equal parts, and roll them into balls. - Roll each dough ball into about 4-inch diameter. Prick each rolled up Taco with a fork in several places both sides, this will prevent Taco from puffing and make them crisp. - Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should sizzle and come up slowly. - Place one rolled Taco in the frying pan and press with a skimmer, turn and fold in half. Doing this it will become taco shape. Do not press, between the fold there should be space to fill the potatoes filling. Gently do the next one same way do not over crowd the frying pan. Fry them until light golden brown on both sides. This should take about 2-3 minutes . Take the Taco out and place them on paper towels to absorb the excess oil. Repeat the process for remaining Taco. - You can prepare the taco shells in advance and store them in air tight container. Assembling the Tacos -  Fill the taco shell with potato filling (filling should be hot) and drizzle with chutney. Suggestions Taco Samosa you can prepare in advance and assemble before serving. Taco shells should be good for two weeks or more. Potato filling also can be refrigerated for 3-4 days just heat the filling before serving. Chutneys I always have ready. The post Taco Samosa appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug

December 21 2016 My New Roots 

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, youll be familiar with my obsession with Middle Eastern cuisine. Ingredients like tahini, lemon, pomegranate, sumac, zaatar, cardamom, thyme, and sesame have big, bold flavours, and act as strong backbones for plant-based recipes, so I enjoy them on a regular basis and rely on them heavily in my recipe development. And if I am out and about in the world, I seek out restaurants serving this style of food, knowing that theyll have a solid selection of vegetarian options with satisfying flavours. Speaking of which, whenever I am back home in Toronto, I love going to a restaurant called Fat Pasha. Its an Israeli place that serves the most decadent, delicious, over-the-top versions of all my favourites: falafel, hummus, fattoush, pickles, salatim, shakshuka...but the menu show-stopper is their whole roasted cauliflower. Brought to the table like a holiday roast, a giant knife sticking out of the top, ready to be carved, I love the ceremony of the entire thing, and the myriad of flavours and textures that it delivers. Slathered in tahini sauce, topped with glistening pomegranate jewels and golden toasted pine nuts, it is savoury, salty, sweet, herby, spicy, crunchy, creamy, nutty, BAM. Stunningly beautiful and deliciously satisfying. At Fat Pasha, they also serve the whole roasted cauliflower with an incredibly spicy, tasty concoction called skhug. Skhug is a Yemeni hot sauce made from chilies, spices and fresh herbs, mainly cilantro. It ranges from wicked hot to warmly herbaceous, with cumin, coriander, cloves, and black pepper providing added depth and complexity. I friggin love this stuff (*pours skhug over entire life*). Its delicious with hummus and pita, but also yummy folded into a grain salad, stirred into soups and stews, and drizzled over roast veggies, and to whisked into dressings and sauces. Skhug comes in two varieties, red (skhug adom) and green (skhug yarok). Both are delicious, but I chose green for my version since it tends to me more common, and I was trying to get into the festive spirit and looking for a contrast to the pommies, which were so assertively red. Use the kinds of chilies you can get your hands on, and add them to suit your taste. I (embarrassingly) only used one green Thai chili for my sauce, but I also wanted to enjoy the other flavours coming through (and also because I am a wuss). It was still very spicy, but not so much so that I couldnt generously dollop it on my cauliflower. Trying to recreate the whole roasted cauliflower dish at home is all too easy and the results are extraordinary. First, the cauliflower is doused in a spice-infused coconut oil before being roasted to golden perfection (this on its own is waaaay delish). But taking it to the next level is easy with a simple tahini sauce and the skhug, followed by a generous topping of toasted pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. This thing becomes unreasonably beautiful, just a warning, and if youre looking for something truly special to serve at a holiday meal this year - whether youre vegetarian or not - this recipe will impress the pants off anyone.     Print recipe     Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 large head cauliflower 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­4 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g pine nuts 1 small pomegranate, seeds removed Skhug: 2 bunches cilantro (about 3 cups chopped) 1 clove garlic, minced 1-2 green chilies, minced (add more to taste) 1/­­2 tsp. cumin 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom Pinch ground cloves a couple grinds black pepper 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt, to taste 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 Tbsp. water, or more as needed Simple Tahini Sauce: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tahini 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, minced pinch salt 1 tsp. honey or other liquid sweetener 4-6 Tbsp. water, as needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil and add spices and salt. Stir to combine and remove from heat. 3. Remove any outer leaves from the cauliflower and wash it well. Pat dry with a clean towel, then pour the coconut oil and spice mixture over the top and rub it in to all the nooks and crannies, making sure to coat the bottom as well. Place on a baking sheet and in the oven to roast for about 45 minutes. If it is getting too much colour before it is cooked, place a piece of foil over the top to prevent it from burning. The cauliflower is finished when it is tender. 4. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauces. Start by washing the cilantro well and spinning it dry. In a food processor or blender, add all the skhug ingredients and blend on high to make a smooth sauce, or pulse to make a chunkier one. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 5. To make the tahini sauce, combine all ingredients together in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, stirring often, until they are slightly golden. Remove immediately from the heat and set aside. 7. When the cauliflower is cooked through, remove it from the oven and place on a serving plate. Top with the various sauces, and sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately and enjoy. This will be my last post before 2017, so I want to wish all of you out there a warm, happy, healthy holiday and an abundant new year! Thank you for all for your love and support with all of my projects this year: the My New Roots app, Naturally Nourished, the Gourmet Print Shop and the blog too. You will never know how much you all mean to me! For real. In health and happiness, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * Exciting announcement! The Gourmet Print Shop is officially open! My vision of creating affordable and beautiful art for your walls is now a reality. After so many of you have requested high-res images of my food photography to print, Ive answered the call with larger-than-life photo files that you can download and print yourself. Its a fast, easy, and inexpensive solution to fill that blank space above the sofa, add some colour to the desk at your office, and keep you inspired in the kitchen. Did I mention it makes the most perfect holiday or hostess gift? Obviously. Check out the Gourmet Print Shop today and get printing! The post Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug appeared first on My New Roots.

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway)

August 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) Hey friends, this is Masha. I usually do the photos and editing around here, but I am now venturing into doing some full posts as well. Today I’m excited to share some photos I took this past weekend in magical Woodstock, NY and its surrounding areas, along with a dish my boyfriend and I cooked there from Kristin Donnely’s beautiful new cookbook, Modern Potluck. True to its title, the book offers plenty of original, make-ahead recipes for gatherings, where contribution in the form of food is encouraged, along with useful potluck prep tips. Despite this wonderful theme, however, the recipes are very appealing to make and eat at home just as well. The book is not vegan or vegetarian (perfect for omnivores), but offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. Some of the recipes that caught our eye include Potato Salad with Fennel and Pickly Things, Miso and Molasses Baked Beans, Samosa-Filling Stuffed Poblanos, Vegetarian Borscht Salad, and Vegan Caprese Salad. All the photography is done by Yossi, who is one of our favorite food photographers in this whole wide world. We are giving away a copy of the book too, so read on for the giveaway details. I live in NYC, and my man and I have been thinking about getting away from the city to explore Upstate New York for a while. We finally got it together on one of the last weekends of summer and had the most incredible time. Woodstock exceeded all my expectations – I knew it would be nice, but didn’t expect it to be as breathtaking as it was, and now I daydream about one day moving there. The whole town seems to be woven into the woods, and this time of year, the forest is thick with green leaves and sweet summer air, accompanied by bird and cricket songs, scurrying chipmunks, and majestic deer. At night, it’s dark enough to see the Milky Way, of which we are very deprived in the city. We rented this Airbnb – a cottage built by the owner, an artist, and secluded in the woods, right off his main property. The place was amazing, from the layout and tree-filtered light streaming through the windows all day, to all the well-considered, hand-crafted details. The kitchen was very well equipped for all the cooking we did, and there is an outside grill, as well as a fire pit. It’s technically in the town of Saugerties, but very close to the main stretch in Woodstock, The Big Deep and Opus 40. Big Deep  A popular swimming hole in the area. You leave your car in an unpaved parking lot in the woods and follow a short trail to the water. We were there right around golden hour and I felt like I was in a fairy tale – the water was clear and refreshing, with sunrays streaming through the surrounding tall trees. As we witnessed, it can get crowded at the immediate entrance off the trail, but if you walk away from the main area a bit, you can find plenty of quieter, semi-private spots for taking a dip. Opus 40 A huge environmental sculpture, built by sculptor Harvey Fite over the course of 37 years in an abandoned bluestone quarry. Fite originally planned out the space as an outdoor sculpture gallery, and had a 40 year plan for finishing it, but died on the 37th year of completion. The structure is composed of curving steps, levels, passageways and water pools, and the entire thing is built without cement, inspired by ancient Mayan building techniques, and using old quarrymen’s tools. Everything about Opus 40 is incredibly impressive, and the whole time, I felt like I was walking around an alien-built playground. It’s also a great spot for eating lunch – there are plenty of places to sit down and enjoy the view. Kaaterskill Falls A 260 ft waterfall, one of the highest in New York. We overheard someone talking about it at a cafe and decided to check it out, and so glad we did. It’s a drive away from Woodstock, around 20 minutes, up a serpentine road and into the Catskills. The amazing thing about this waterfall is that there are trails leading to both the crest of the waterfall, where it first begins to drop, and the bottom, where it makes a nicely-sized pool, and you can swim in both places. As in, you can stand under a waterfall (!) and you can swim in river pools, in water which will be dropping hundreds of feet after it brushes past you. Insane. This was the last thing we did before heading back to the city, and it was the perfect closing to our trip. Some food-related places we liked: Kingston Farmer’s Market There are plenty of farmers markets in the area, but we only got to try out this one. A very nice, medium-sized farmer’s market with a good number of produce stands. The August produce was absolutely beautiful – heirloom tomatoes the size of a baby’s head, jewel-colored eggplants, ground cherries, peaches, shiso leaf (!), purslane, etc, etc. Open Saturdays 9am-2pm. Bread Alone We buy this company’s bread in NYC and were interested in visiting one of their home stores, since the company originated in the Catskills. This location sells many different varieties of their bread, a ton of pastries, coffee (Irving Farm) and sandwiches. Good for breakfast and lunch. Shindig Good burgers (they do have a brown rice and beet veggie burger for the veggie-inclined) and sandwiches (veggie melt), but I liked the watermelon gazpacho special I got the most. The cocktails are also fun, generously sized, and unique – their booze of choice seems to be soju and sake. Provisions Went here for lunch. A modern deli that bakes its own bread, pickles their own veggies and uses local produce. Lots of interesting sandwich options and a few salads. Sunflower Natural Foods Market A very well stocked local health food store. Fruition Chocolate  A local bean to bar chocolate company that offers a variety of chocolate bars for all tastes. They even sell a 100% cacao bar! Vinnie’s Farm Market A crazy place we stopped at on the way back from Kaaterskill Falls. A family-owned produce stand and store with a TON of homemade canned goods, from pickles to jams to hot pepper spreads, pastries and bread, homemade butter, farm eggs and milk. The amount of product they have is almost overwhelming, and the whole place feels like a step back in time. Since the cottage we rented was so cozy, we had no problem staying in for dinner and cooking with all the amazing produce we got at the farmer’s market. I’d been flipping through Modern Potluck the week prior, and was really attracted to the cover recipe for Spice-Roasted Carrots Over Lentils, which seemed perfectly simple, and like a good accompaniment to the grilled pizza we were planning on making in Woodstock. We loved the dish, it was a breeze to make and had all the elements I love in a side dish – substance from lentils and carrots, sweetness from dates, complexity from the spices and a fresh finish from the herbs. I imagine that bringing a platter of these lentils to a potluck would definitely earn you a status of a famous cook among your friends. Giveaway: For a chance to win a copy of Modern Potluck, leave a comment with your favorite potluck dish and a working email until Wednesday, September 7th, 2016. Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck   Print Serves: 8-16 Ingredients for the carrots 3 pounds real baby carrots or other small carrots - scrubbed if organic, peeled if not 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon ground cumin salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup tender fresh herb leaves - cilantro/­­dill/­­tarragon/­­mint/­­basil - roughly chopped, plus more for garnish ¼ cup finely sliced pitted medjool dates, dried figs or prunes for the lentils 1 pound dried black beluga or french green lentils salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion - quartered lengthwise, peeled and thinly sliced crosswise 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 2 large cloves) 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - roughly chopped plain yogurt or cashew cream for serving (optional) Instructions prepare the carrots Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, toss the carrots with olive oil, coriander, paprika and cumin, and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots out on the baking sheets. Roast, rotating the baking sheets halfway through and shaking the carrots, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the carrots are nicely browned and tender. Let the carrots cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl and toss with the herbs and dates. prepare the lentils In a medium saucepan, cover the lentils with water by 2 inches and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium heat until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid and season with salt. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season generously with salt. Cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, cumin, and cinnamon, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the lentils and reserved cooking liquid, and cook until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and the cilantro. Arrange the lentils on a platter and top with the carrots. Garnish with more herb leaves and dollops of yogurt/­­cashew cream and serve warm or at room temperature. potluck prep The lentils and roasted carrots, without the herbs and dates, can be refrigerated separately, overnight; bring to room temperature before serving. Bring the dish to the potluck already assembled with the vegetables on top of the lentils, then garnish with yogurt/­­cashew cream and herbs just before serving. Notes I halved the recipe for two people, but giving you a whole one here as per the book. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Pineapple and Mango Tart Raw Zucchini Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce Summer Market Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kidney Bean Millet Beet Burger

August 5 2016 Vegan Richa 

Kidney Bean Millet Beet BurgerKidney Bean Millet Beet Burger. Veggie Burgers with Beet, beans and millet (or quinoa). Bake or pan fry and serve with vegan cheese and garnishes of choice. Vegan Burger patties. Soyfree, gluten-free patties. Pin this Recipe for later! Because we all need a Beet Veggie Burger this Summer! These Burgers have beet and millet which are cooked together saving time and pans. Add kidney beans, herbs, flavors, mash, mash, shape, bake and done! You can use already cooked millet or cooked quinoa and cooked/­­baked/­­canned beet as well. Add them to the bowl with the kidney beans or other beans of choice and add the spices of choice and bake or panfry. I like these baked with a vegan cheese melted over in the last few minutes of baking and served with lettuce, vegan mayo, and pickles/­­ jalapeno. All the Veggie burgers this Summer! Continue reading: Kidney Bean Millet Beet BurgerThe post Kidney Bean Millet Beet Burger appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols

May 13 2016 My New Roots 

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols Being someone who loves a meal with many elements, Sri Lankan food was pretty much my dream come true. Every meal is served with plenty of sides: sauces, chutneys, relishes, and pickles, to make each bite unique and surprising. Sambol is the word for this seemingly endless collection of condiments, and I lost count trying to sample them all in a week. I believe I mentioned in my previous post about Sri Lanka, how spicy the food is there. Like, blow-your-head-off spicy. And as if the curries themselves werent hot enough, the chili-based sambols on the side will certainly commit your taste buds to perplexing levels of pain. Pol sambol is the ubiquitous, fiery condiment served at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is probably one of the simplest dishes to make, consisting mainly of chili, shredded coconut, chili, lime, and chili - did I mention the chili? Yea. This mix ranges from very spicy to volcanically hot depending on whose table youre sitting at. On the second day of the trip, my tongue seeking refuge in something, dare I say it, borderline bland, I discovered one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted - and it wasnt bland to say the least, just not sweat-inducing. Seeni sambol, a fragrant, Sri Lankan caramelized onion jam, turned out to be incredible on everything from hoppers to curries, and could turn a pretty plain bowl of red rice into something remarkably special. I became totally obsessed with this sambol and it was the very first thing I attempted to make when I came home. I really cannot tell you enough how awesome this stuff is. Do yourself a favour and make a batch soon! The most memorable experience I had in Sri Lanka was learning to cook traditional recipes with two women in the local village. It was likely one of the most eye-opening culinary experiences Ive ever had - not only learning from such passionate and experienced cooks, but seeing their traditional kitchen, tools, and techniques really inspired me. Take their stove, for example. A large clay bench with large mounds molded into it held the earthenware pots in place, and the heat underneath was adjusted by adding more sticks to the fire, or taking them away. Genius. Above the stove was a large wooden wrack to hang beans, seeds, and herbs for fast drying, which I thought was a brilliant way to take advantage of the residual heat. Ingredients were prepped on the floor, since its cooler down there, and also nice to sit while youre working. The knife to cut veggies was actually attached to a stool, and instead of holding the blade, you hold the vegetables and basically drop them on top, slicing them in the air to fall onto a grass mat. The sambol was made by grinding all the ingredients together on a huge flat stone designed specifically for this task, and as such took all of ten seconds to prepare. Spoons were made from dried coconut shells. The plates were made of woven grass, topped with fresh lotus leaves from the nearby creek. The leaves protected the plates from the saucy curries, and when you were finished your meal, youd discard the leaf into the compost, so that there was literally nothing to wash! I mean. This day made me take a long hard look at how much stuff I use in the kitchen. Water, electricity, appliances - these women were literally using nothing but things from the earth around them and it made me wonder how weve come so far from that connection. Cooking has become so overblown, and it was this experience that reminded me to cook simpler and eat simpler. Get closer to the earth. I dont have some grand solution, but its food for thought. I’ll share a few notes on the recipes… You will likely think Ive lost my mind when you begin the task of slicing two pounds of onions (#worthit), but I promise you it is the correct amount, and youll see that it cooks down to nearly nothing. I tried half this amount my first time and it just simply wasnt enough. If youre going to go for this, you may as well make a batch that will last you at least a few meals, right? Fresh curry leaves are a definite preference for this recipe, but Ive never been able to find them here in Copenhagen so I used dried. Theyre not great, but better than nothing. If you dont want to gnaw on whole spices or curry leaves you can remove them after the seeni sambol is cooked, but it can be a bit of a treasure hunt situation, just sayin. Once Ive smashed the cardamom pods, I like to remove the outer skin and just add the inner seeds to the spics mix. I tend to leaves the cloves and curry leaves in since I like those bursts of flavour. The pol sambol recipe Ive written here is admittedly, a wimps version. Ill admit that I can only tolerate spice until it begins to overwhelm the other flavours in the food, so mine is strong but still edible on its own. I invite you to go with your instincts on this one and dial up the heat to suit your tastes. If you can find freshly grated coconut (or a fresh coconut that you can grate yourself) by all means use that instead of the desiccated variety! Some versions of pol sambol include curry leaves, but because I only had dried I left them out. If you can find fresh ones, add about a sprig for this recipe, and crush them well before incorporating. As far as serving these two sensational sambols go, they are pretty much great with All. The. Things. Rice dishes, curries, stews, soups, wraps, sandwiches, salads...I mean it! Once you taste them Im confident youll find infinite uses for them. The first photo is of steamed brown rice and the Kale Mallung recipe that I wrote from the last Sri Lankan post - still a major fav around here. I love this meal for breakfast with a poached egg, lots of seeni sambol and, ahem, lightly sprinkled with the pol sambol.     Print recipe     Seeni Sambol Makes 1 heaping cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 2 lb. /­­ 900g red onions 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 10 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 Tbsp. dried curry leaves (or 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves if you can find them!) 1 cinnamon stick 2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar Directions: 1. Peel and slice the onions. 2. Pound the cardamom pods in a mortar and pestle until they have split open. You can remove the outer skin and just save the seeds inside, but its only if you dont like eating the exterior. 3. Place a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and melt the coconut oil. Add the cardamom pods, cloves, curry leaves, and cinnamon stick. Stir and cook until fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the onions, salt and sugar, stir very well to coat and cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes until the onions have completely melted down - this can take anywhere from 30-45 minutes. Be patient and enjoy the process! 4. Transfer seeni sambol to a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to one month. Remove from fridge at least half an hour before serving, as the coconut oil will cause the sambol to solidify in the fridge.   Pol Sambol Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 180g desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml warm water or coconut water 1 clove garlic 2 shallots or small red onions 1-3 red chilies (or as many as you think you can handle!) I used fresh Thai chilies 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chili powder (or as much as you think you can handle!) juice of 1 lime Directions: 1. Combine the desiccated coconut with the water and stir thoroughly to combine. Let sit for 15-30 minutes until softened. 2. Place the garlic in a food processor and blend to finely mince. Roughly slice shallots and chili, and place them in the food processor with the garlic and blend to mince.  Add the softened coconut, salt, chili powder and lime juice. Blend on high to fully incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts  and Sri Lankan Airlines for making this incredible trip possible! Show me your sambols on Instagram: #MNRsambol The post Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols appeared first on My New Roots.

Real Pickles Turmeric Kraut -- a review

April 11 2016 VegKitchen 

Real Pickles Turmeric Kraut -- a review Ive long been a fan of

Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free

February 16 2016 Vegan Richa 

Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free Stuffed Parathas used to be a favorite breakfast, lunch or evening snack when growing up. There was always some dough in the fridge, so it was matter of grating or mashing some veggies or other fillings, cooking them slightly if needed, and using as stuffing. Parathas are generally served with Indian pickles which commonly use raw mango, lime, chilies or vegetables preserved in an oil base with spices such as mustard seeds, fennel, fenugreek seeds,salt etc. These pickles are available in Indian stores or online. The stuffed flatbreads can also be used anywhere where you use flatbreads, as a side with curries or soups, or with a dip.  These Broccoli parathas have shredded broccoli and chickpeas with spices stuffed into a wheat dough. Use other cooked beans or lentils of choice and other spices of choice for many variations. The process of making the dough and rolling it out seems tedious, but it gets easy with practice. For a gluten-free paratha, see my book for the chia flatbread dough that works well for making stuffed flatbread or use this Sweet Potato gluten-free flatbread dough or use any chapati/­­roti dough of choice.  These flatbreads have the veggie stuffing inside them. You can also add the veggies directly in the dough while kneading like this Squash flatbread- Lauki Paratha. Do you like stuffed flatbreads? What is favorite stuffing?  Continue reading: Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-freeThe post Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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