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pears vegetarian recipes

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Passover Pineapple Crumble

February 3 2020 VegKitchen 

Passover Pineapple Crumble Matzo meal makes a perfect crumble topping for a fruity dessert made with pineapple and pears or apples to round out the Passover meal. Serve with a dollop of nondairy ice cream if you’d like to dress it up. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Passover Pineapple Crumble appeared first on VegKitchen.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grain-Free Autumn Fruit Crumble

October 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Grain-Free Autumn Fruit Crumble With the abundance of fall fruit and absence of grains, this dish offers a great lower-glycemic way to start your day. Add a bit more protein, and youre all set! For best results, select crisp, sweet apples, such as Gala, Honeycrisp, or Pink Lady, and firm pears, such as DAnjou or Bosc. The post Grain-Free Autumn Fruit Crumble appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette

September 16 2019 VegKitchen 

Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette This salad has flavors that speak eloquently of autumn--pears, walnuts, bitter greens, and cranberries. You can substitute other dried fruit if you like. It’s a simple enough salad to serve for every day, yet dressed up enough to serve as a first course for company meals. The post Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette appeared first on VegKitchen.

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink

June 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink And just like that, summer is here, and so is the very first heat wave. I’m deeply devoted to having warm and cozy drinks every day, but I’ve definitely been icing my matcha and superfood lattes for the past week or so. It also feels very nice to have something chilled and bubbly in the early evening, when it’s still light outside, and the sky is just beginning to turn pretty sunset colors. It’s those little details that make summer so special. For me, that something bubbly is usually kombucha, but I recently learned about fruit shrubs and fell in love. A shrub is a drinking vinegar syrup, which is delicious served over ice with seltzer or as a cocktail component. Today I’m specifically talking about fruit shrubs, which are so easy to make and last a while in the fridge. The flavor is definitely reminiscent of kombucha – fruity with a vinegary acidity, but the preparation requires much less patience than homemade booch. This is very much a no-recipe recipe, since it can be interpreted so many ways, with so many different fruit and aromatics. There’s a video explaining the whole process as well! Follow the ratio provided in the recipe below, using a combination of any of these ingredients. Experimenting with the flavors is the most fun part. Fruit Berries Blueberries Raspberries Strawberries Blackberries Etc. Stone Fruit Plums Peaches Nectarines Cherries Mangoes Etc. Other Apples Pears Pineapple Rhubarb Etc. Aromatics Spices Cinnamon Cloves Ginger (ideally fresh) Peppercorns (black or pink) Star anise Nutmeg Etc. Herbs Basil Mint Cilantro Rosemary Lemon thyme Lemon verbena Tarragon Etc. Citrus Lemon Lime Orange + their zest Etc. Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink   Print Serves: about 10-12 oz shrub syrup Ingredients 1 lb fruit of choice (see above for suggestions) ¾ - 1 cup sugar (I like to use raw cane sugar here) any aromatics of choice (see above for suggestions) - to taste 1 cup apple cider vinegar Instructions In a large bowl, combine the fruit and sugar, mixing well. Use a potato masher to gently mash up the fruit in order to get it to start releasing its juices and to break up the skins if present. Add the aromatics like bruised or chopped herbs, spices, citrus juice/­­zest, etc. Cover and set aside for at least 4 hours, or ideally refrigerate overnight, especially if using tougher fruit like apples, pears, rhubarb. Strain the fruit mixture through a fine mesh strainer, making sure to squeeze all the juices out of the pulp. Add the vinegar and mix well. Transfer to an airtight container and keep refrigerated. Enjoy your shrub by filling a glass with ice, adding a splash of the shrub, and topping it with seltzer and/­­or liquor of choice. Notes Most traditional shrub recipes call for a ratio of 1 cup sugar to 1 lb of fruit, but I find that ¾ cup of sugar is enough for me in most cases. This also largely depends on the initial sugar content of the fruit youre using. Experiment and see what you like! 3.5.3226 The post Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Restaurant Review: Mundo Elefante In Pucon, Chile

March 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Pucón is a charming wooden village at the feet of the Villarrica volcano and its beautiful lake. In its bucolic scenery, a charming wooden cabin is standing out. This little house appears to be a vegan cafe and yoga studio, enriched by an inspiring story... Mundo Elefante is the successful final chapter of an audacious adventure María Lia went on a few years ago. Originally settled as a graphic designer in Chile, María turned her life upside down when she decided to put an end to her career and embark on an awakening journey. Learning about yoga, well-being, and nutrition as well as following her inner voice led her to leave her comfort zone and seek her true vocation. She left Chile with the ambition to discover the world and encounter new experiences away from her strong Chilean heritage. From the new world of Australia, she traveled to the ancient lands of India, yogas birthplace. Yoga, Ayurveda, the autochthones strong spirituality, it was all fascinating. Clarity came from her bravery–her purpose was to educate herself about the essence of a balanced and enriching lifestyle, and more importantly, to bring this knowledge back to her home country. She planned her travels […] The post Restaurant Review: Mundo Elefante In Pucon, Chile appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cashew Cr?me Pear Tart

December 31 2018 VegKitchen 

Cashew Cr?me Pear Tart Imagine delicately spiced pears cooked just until fork tender, sitting atop a luscious pillow of maple-scented cashew cr?me, all contained within a soft, nutty crust. Sound like a dream? Well wake up, because this delight is easily a reality! Continuing reading Cashew Cr?me Pear Tart on VegKitchen

Gingered Winter Fruit Medley

December 7 2018 VegKitchen 

Gingered Winter Fruit Medley This simple and pretty combination of winter fruits -- pears, apples, oranges, and pineapple, spiced with crystallized ginger -- is a refreshing finish to any meal. It’s pretty enough to serve as a Christmas dinner dessert, accompanied by your favorite cookies. Recipe adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photos by Susan Voisin. 5.0 from 1 reviews Save Print Gingered Winter Fruit Medley Author: Nava Recipe type: Winter dessert /­­ Christmas Cuisine: Healthy Prep time:  20 mins Total time:  20 mins Serves: 8   This simple and pretty combination of winter fruits is a refreshing finish to any meal, and pretty enough to serve as a Christmas dinner dessert, accompanied by your favorite cookies. Ingredients 2 pears, any variety, or two different types, including Asian pears, cored, seeded and diced 2 Granny Smith apples, cored, seeded, and diced 2 small oranges, such as clementines, peeled and sectioned or 2 small blood oranges, peeled and diced One 20-ounce can unsweetened pineapple rings or chunks, drained ½ cup dried cranberries ¼ cup sliced crystallized ginger, or more or less to taste Two 6-ounce containers  pi?a colada or vanilla nondairy yogurt (soy or coconut) Ground cinnamon or freshly grated nutmeg Instructions Combine all the ingredients except the yogurt in a serving bowl […] The article Gingered Winter Fruit Medley appeared first on VegKitchen.

Restaurant Highlight: Kynd in Bali, Indonesia

August 14 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

I love Bali! Before visiting, Id seen many pictures and heard a lot of stories, but theres nothing quite like experiencing Bali for yourself. Bali has so much to offer, its difficult to choose where to begin explaining my love for the island. Our first stop was Seminyak, an area known for its liveliness, great shopping, parties, and amazing vegan food finds! What also makes it so great is that if youre looking to escape the hustle and bustle of the area, there are other locations nearby that are quiet, serene, and amazingly breathtaking (like Geger Beach). Prior to visiting Bali, I was in Thailand and I thought they had the most amazing beaches; Im now being forced to reconsider. One of my first stops in Seminyak was Kynd, a cute little vegan café that seems to be most popular for their customized smoothie bowls. Before visiting, I cant tell you how many times I saw their bowls on social media! It appears that you can request them to spell out anything youd like (at no additional cost)! I kept it simple and just went with my name. Besides, its not often that I find souvenirs or trinkets with my […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Kynd in Bali, Indonesia appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday SeasonTis the season to incorporate more meatless dishes into your recipe collection. Weve made a list -- and weve checked it twice -- of some of our favorite holiday appetizers, mains, side, and desserts, almost all of which are plant-based! Craving chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Try our roasted chestnut soup. Jack Frost nipping at your nose? Nothing will keep you more snug than our warming carrot cauliflower stew. Grandma got ran over by a reindeer? Well, um, weve got a great recipe for honey-vanilla poached pears. Check out our Meatless Monday holiday menu below and see how you can wow your guests with some festive and flavorful meatless meals. Appetizers Set the proper tone for the meal with these seasonal holiday appetizers: Roasted Chestnut Soup Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip Sides On this holiday dinner table, let the side dishes take center stage: Maple Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts Rosemarys Beets with Hazelnuts and Basil Roasted Potatoes with Orange Couscous Baked Polenta Basil Fries Mains Plant-based mains can be just as hardy and comforting as their animal-based counterparts: Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Italian White Beans with Kale Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta Chickpea Burgers with Spicy Harissa  Desserts End with something sweet (but not too sweet): Honey Vanilla Poached Pears Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread Baked Apple Donuts   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post 14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chocolate-Drizzled Apples or Pears with Date Caramel

September 30 2019 VegKitchen 

Chocolate-Drizzled Apples or Pears with Date Caramel Two or three crisp apples or firm pears plus vegan chocolate chips add up to a seriously good dessert. And if you have a few dates on hand (and a machine to blend them up) you can make a caramel-y sauce to dip them into, though this is entirely optional. Serves: The post Chocolate-Drizzled Apples or Pears with Date Caramel appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan

September 24 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan When I heard my friend and fellow vegan cookbook author, Nava Atlas, had come out with her first cookbook in five years, I was excited to participate in the blog tour for the book.  Especially so, since this book, 5-Ingredient Vegan:175 Simple, Plant-Based Recipes for Delicious, Healthy Meals in Minutes consists of my favorite kind of recipes: FAST and EASY! Nava has developed these delicious recipes especially for people who are busy and dont want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen, but still want to enjoy delicious vegan food. As these recipes show, with a few well-chosen ingredients, a simple meal can be just as delicious as a more elaborate one, with the added convenience of getting easy 5-ingredient plant-based meals on the table quickly. For this post, I chose an easy-peasy dessert recipe for Chocolate Granola Clusters. I love this recipe not only because its simple, quick, and delicious, but also because its made with ingredients I always have on hand.  As Nava says, Sometimes, when Im making a fairly elaborate meal (and for me, elaborate is a relative term) for company, I lose momentum when it comes to dessert. Thats when I turn to this clever dessert that results my culinary genius proclaimed by guests. This needs just ten minutes of prep, no machines, and no baking -- just a short time in the fridge to re-solidify the chocolate.  I hope you enjoy this recipe (and Navas new book) as much as I do!   Chocolate Granola Clusters Serve with pears or apples in fall, oranges in winter, strawberries in spring, and raspberries in summer.  Reprinted with permission from 5-Ingredient Vegan (C) 2019 by Nava Atlas, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photo by Hannah Kaminsky.   1 cup vegan chocolate chips 2 tablespoons vanilla or plain nondairy milk 1 1/­­2 cups granola (see note)   To cook on the stovetop: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in the top of a double boiler or in a bowl perched over a saucepan in which water is gently boiling. Cook over very low heat until the chocolate is melted, stirring often. Remove from the heat and stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. To cook in the microwave: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in a microwave-safe bowl. Start with 45 seconds, stir, and add 15 seconds at a time until the chocolate is melted. Stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. Line a large plate with wax paper or baking parchment. Spread the chocolate mixture onto it fairly evenly, to a thickness of no more than half an inch. Sprinkle the reserved granola over the top. Refrigerate for an hour or so, or until the chocolate has completely solidified. Break the mass into bite-sized chunks, and arrange on an attractive platter to serve. Store any not eaten at once in a covered container in the refrigerator, where theyll keep for at least a week. Note: Use a variety of granola that has a nice mixture of oats, seeds, nuts, and dried fruits. Its best to use granola thats fresh and crisp for better texture.   The post Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

kalyana rasam recipe | how to make brahmin wedding rasam

July 29 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

kalyana rasam recipe | how to make brahmin wedding rasamkalyana rasam recipe | brahmin wedding rasam | how to make kalyana rasam with step by step photo and video recipe. rasam recipes have become one of the popular and integral part of south indian cuisine. there are so much diversities and variations within south indian and evidently it appears in its cuisine. one such hugely popular south indian or particularly tamil cuisine variation is the kalyana rasam recipe. The post kalyana rasam recipe | how to make brahmin wedding rasam appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Quiche

April 29 2019 Meatless Monday 

This quiche is vegan and soy-free, with a cheesy filling complementing a whole grain crust and crunchy asparagus or seasonal veggies of your choice. It’s also easy to prepare, taking 40 minutes to make from start to finish. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the crust: - 260 grams or 2 cups whole wheat flour - 1 tsp. sea salt - 1/­­3 c. olive oil - 0.4 cup (100ml) cold water   - For the filling: - 1 cup raw cashews soaked in water over night (if time is limited, one hour of soaking is sufficient) - 2/­­3 cup water - 1 tsp Marmite or nutritional yeast - 2 cloves garlic - 1 tbsp lemon juice - 1/­­2 tsp nutmeg - a pinch cayenne - 2 tbsp freshly chopped herbs (consider oregano and thyme) - salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste - 7 spears asparagus (or veggie of your choice)   Prepare the crust: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 °F. 2. Combine whole wheat flour, salt, olive oil and water in a medium mixing bowl. 3. Knead until the dough forms a ball. Roll it and transfer to a rectangular quiche or tart pan. (You can use 10 x8 in., 14 x 6 in, 12 x 12 in. or even round-shaped ones.) 4. Bake for 15 minutes. Make the filling: 5. Place soaked cashews, garlic, water, lemon juice, nutmeg and a pinch of cayenne in the bowl of your food processor or blender. 6. Pulse until smooth and silky to achieve consistency of a thin hummus. Add more water if needed. 7. Add chopped herbs, salt and black pepper to taste. Prepare your veggies: 8. Trim ends of asparagus and blanche in salted boiling water for 5 minutes. (This way you will pre-cook the thickest parts of your stems while the tops will be nice and crunchy.) 9. If using other vegetables (except for dried tomatoes), pre-cook by stir-frying or steaming. Assemble the quiche: 10. Spread the filling over the crust. Arrange asparagus on top and gently press it, so that it’s half drown in the filling. 11. Bake for 20 minutes or until he top is golden. The middle should be a little unset. If a firmer texture is desired, increase baking time to 30 minutes. 12. Let it cool and enjoy! The post Vegan Quiche appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Shakshuka

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Spring Green Shakshuka is a versatile one-pot breakfast (or dinner) meal packed with nutrients and vitamins. Ready in less than 30 minutes. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 2  tablespoons  olive oil 1  medium-sized yellow onion  chopped 2  cloves  garlic  minced 1/­­2 -1  jalapeno  with seeds for extra spiciness (otherwise, removed), chopped 1/­­2  teaspoon  ground cumin 1/­­2  teaspoon  smoked paprika 1/­­2  leek  chopped 4  spears asparagus  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup mung bean sprouts 2  green onions  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup baby beet greens 100  grams  or 1 cup stinging nettles  chopped, leaves only 100  grams  or 1 cup baby spinach 50  grams  or 1/­­2 cup wild garlic  chopped 2  sprigs oregano  chopped 4  eggs 2  tablespoons  chopped parsley  to garnish salt and freshly ground black pepper hot sauce  to serve (optional) crusty bread  to serve (optional)   1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet or cast iron pan over medium heat. Sautéing chopped onion, garlic and jalapeno until soft, for about 3 minutes. Add ground cumin and smoked paprika and cook for 1 more minute, stirring frequently. 2. Add chopped leek, asparagus, mung bean sprouts, green onions, baby beet greens, stinging nettles, baby spinach, wild garlic and oregano. Sauté until the liquid evaporates, stirring occasionally, for about 8 minutes. 3. Make wells in the green mass and poach eggs into them. Cook until the eggs are done. You can cover the skillet with a lid for a quicker result. 4. Garnish with chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve with hot sauce of your choice and fresh crusty bread (optional). The post Green Shakshuka appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pear Upside Down Cake

February 25 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pear Upside Down CakeVegan Pear Upside Down Cake. This amazing Vegan Upside Down Cake needs just 1 Bowl and 40 mins. Use other fruits for variation. Vegan Nutfree Soyfree Recipe. Glutenfree option.  Jump to Recipe I had some pears leftover after entertaining my niece recently and whipped up this upside down cake that she could take along. For some reason hubbs isn’t fond of pears and lately they’ve started giving me headaches if eaten raw. Go figure. But everything works out for everyone in this cake! A gooey caramelized top, soft delicious cake, a dollop of whipped coconut cream.  The pears are sliced and arranged on the bottom of a pan. Maple syrup or brown sugar helps them caramelize during baking. Then a simple vanilla batter on top. Bake until done, then serve with some whipped coconut cream or vanilla ice cream and a sprinkle of cinnamon. Delish! Use the same method to make pineapple upside down cake or use peaches or apple.Continue reading: Vegan Pear Upside Down CakeThe post Vegan Pear Upside Down Cake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Fresh Cranberry Muffins

December 31 2018 Meatless Monday 

Fresh cranberries add a delicious tart kick to these muffins, but feel free to substitute other fruits like blueberries, apples, pears or pineapples, when the season strikes. Or freeze these long lasting treats and it only takes 10-15 minutes to reheat and enjoy them anytime of year. This recipe comes to us from our friends at myrecipes.com. Serves 12 (1 muffin per serving) - 2 cups all-purpose flour - 2/­­3 cup sugar - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 cup fresh cranberries, chopped - 2/­­3 cup 2% reduced-fat milk - 1/­­4 cup butter or stick margarine, melted - 1 teaspoon orange rind, grated - 1/­­2 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 large egg, lightly beaten - cooking spray Preheat oven to 400°. Coat a muffin tin with cooking spray. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl and stir well with a whisk. Stir in cranberries and make a well in center of mixture. Combine milk, butter, rind, vanilla and egg. Add milk mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until moist. Spoon batter into 12 muffin cups coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400° for 18 minutes or until muffins spring back when touched lightly in center. Remove muffins from pan immediately and place on a wire rack to cool for a few minutes before eating. The post Fresh Cranberry Muffins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Gingerbread Pear Bundt Cake

October 15 2018 Oh My Veggies 

I wanted to create a cake that embraced the season and its rich flavors. Bold gingerbread, sweet pears, a little caramel sauce swizzled over the top to bring it all together. Something that would work well as a mid-morning snack cake alongside a perfectly brewed cup of coffee, but would also be well-received by all as a special occasion dessert (Thanksgiving, anyone?) Initially, I thought of a few go-to vegan baking ingredients. Flax eggs. Almond milk. Coconut oil. But then my mind turned to one of my very favorite cakes, a cake I enjoyed often growing up, a cake I had no idea was vegan until a few years ago. It’s a rich, moist chocolate number called Wacky Cake, though growing up, we called it Crazy Cake – and we always enjoyed it with a dollop of whipped cream. So much for being vegan. Wacky Cake was reportedly created during the Great Depression, when staples such as eggs and milk were in short supply. Enterprising cooks dreamed up a cake that utilized vinegar and baking soda instead, creating bubbles that help the cake to rise. I thought I’d borrow that naturally vegan cake’s formula for this gingerbread version. Other than omitting the […]

Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017

December 11 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

HappyCow’s Ken Spector traveled to Dublin, Ireland, checked out the vegan scene, and attended and spoke at Dublin Vegfest in Dublin, Ireland on September 23+24, 2017. Ken interviewed two Irish vegans who discussed highlights from the event and provided exclusive insider vegan tips. Vegan celebrities such as strongman Patrik Baboumian attended and spoke at the event. Below is our video containing interviews and highlights: For more information see: http:/­­/­­dublinvegfest.com Watch our video here: Veg Restaurants featured in video: Soya Vegan Butcher in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­sova-vegan-butcher-dublin-53343 Veganity in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­veginity-restaurant-dublin-98189 143 V in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­143v-cork-92211 My Goodness in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­my-goodness-cork-105957 Special Thanks to the event coordinator, Pears Hussey, and to the two women Ken interviewed in the video, Dearbhla Mitchell and Tamasin MacCarthy Morrogh. The post Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017 appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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