pasta - vegetarian recipes

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pasta vegetarian recipes

masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes

before yesterday hebbar's kitchen 

masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipesmasala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes with step by step photo and video recipe. a unique and fusion recipe between 2 popular cuisine i.e indian cuisine and italian cuisine. basically a desi or spicy twist to the authentic italian pasta recipe to meet the taste buds of spice lovers. it is an ideal lunch box/­­breakfast recipe and can also be treated as kids recipe too. Continue reading masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

If you think you’re looking at an ooey gooey cheese sauce, look again! That luscious coating is made from a nutrient-packed fall favorite, butternut squash, with sage and lemon to balance the squash’s sweetness. This recipe comes to us from registered dietitian Maria of Bean A Foodie. Serves 4. - 3 cups cubed butternut squash - 1 tsp. dried sage - 1/­­2 onion, diced - 3 cloves of garlic, minced - 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided in half - 1 tsp. each salt and pepper - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus extra for serving - 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice - 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock - 1 lb. spinach, finely chopped - 8 oz. short cut pasta, like rigatoni or penne Preheat your oven to 425F. Boil water for pasta and cooking according to package directions. Save about 1 cup of the pasta water and set aside. Toss butternut squash with sage, 2 tbsp olive oil and salt and pepper. Roast squash for about 30-40 minutes or until fork tender and lightly golden brown. While squash roasts, heat the remaining 2 tbsp of olive oil in a medium saute pan over medium high heat. Add in diced onions and garlic. Saute for about 3-5 or until onions and garlic are just starting to get translucent. In a high powered blender or food processor, place the roasted squash and onion mixture in the bowl. Blend on high until the squash is smooth. Add in the parmesan cheese, lemon juice and blend on high for another minute. Taste and adjust for seasoning. At this point the sauce is probably somewhat thick. Slowly add in some of the vegetable stock, blending at the same time. Check frequently for consistency. You may or may not use all of the stock, depending on how thick or thin your sauce. If you want the sauce thinner (or if it thickens over time on the stove) thin out with the reserved pasta water. Pour the butternut sauce back into the medium saute pan. Heat over low and add in the chopped spinach, stirring to combine. Cook over medium low until the spinach wilts — about 10 minutes. Again, if the sauce thickens, use some of the reserved pasta water to keep it at the consistency you like. Toss in the hot cooked pasta with the butternut and spinach sauce. Toss to combine. Add more parmesan cheese if you’d like. Serve hot! The post Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Vegan Soups for Fall & Winter

November 9 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Mina Rome‘s easy vegan soups for fall and winter have us daydreaming of cold fall days with a cozy blanket and warm comfort food. Soups are an absolute must for colder days, and the possibilities are just endless — even for vegan soups! So why not add a few more recipes to your vegan soup arsenal with this video? Mina shares recipes for Creamy Broccoli Soup + BBQ Chickpeas, One Pot Pasta Soup,  and Roasted Sweet Potato and Carrot Soup. All easy, and all delicious! Here’s how to make them: Read the full recipes in the video description here. The post Easy Vegan Soups for Fall & Winter appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Halloween Pasta Salad (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

October 26 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a recipe from Something Vegan that really screams Halloween – complete with the festive black and orange colors! We love how creative, yet simple, this idea is and are so excited to have one more vegan Halloween recipe to add to the books. Check out the video tutorial below to see all the ingredients included in this pasta salad (but of course, you can always feel free to add other ingredients)! Whip up a batch of this scary pasta with the kids — they’re sure to have a blast with this dish. Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Halloween Pasta Salad (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

18 Vegetarian One-Pot Pasta Recipes for Busy Weeknights

October 11 2017 Oh My Veggies 

One pot pasta is the ultimate easy weeknight dinner, and there are lots of delicious ways to make it! Here are 18 of our favorite recipes to try.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime Rice

September 29 2017 Vegan Richa 

Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime RiceCajun Tofu Bowl with Cilantro Lime Rice. Baked Cajun Spiced Tofu, over greens, cilantro lime rice, and tomatoes. Easy Spicy Bowl. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Use Chickpea tofu to make soy-free. I go through these weeks where I will obsess about one particular spice blend or combination or play around with similar flavor profiles. This past few months have been about Cajun. Exhibit 1 Cajun Cauliflower over Garlic pasta, so Good!, exhibit 2 Cajun Spiced Sloppy lentils, oh my gosh! This week serve up this easy Cajun Tofu Bowl however you want it, but make some! The Tofu is rubbed up with Cajun spice blend and lime. Then baked to dry and infuse the tofu. Meanwhile, make the other bowl components like a refreshing cilantro lime rice. Add roasted veggie,  chopped up tomato/­­crunchy veggies or pico de gallo, some greens or lettuce. Slice the baked tofu and serve. You can use the cajun blend paste over chickpea tofu, chickpeas/­­beans or hearty vegetables as cauliflower, eggplant, sweet potato, zucchini and roast them until tender and use those in the bowl instead of tofu. Fall Comfort in a bowl.  The book work has kept be on my toes the past few weeks (its out, get your copy!) so I haven’t been cooking up much new stuff. Catch up on the book being reviewed on magazines and blogs here. There are many new recipes in the drafts, but they all need post edits and photos/­­video editing and I am trying to get back into the schedule of editing and scheduling today. I always end up cooking more for a break rather than edit. Wait maybe I need a vacation first! Continue reading: Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime RiceThe post Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime Rice appeared first on Vegan Richa.

15 Delicious Minestrone Soup Recipes

September 28 2017 Oh My Veggies 

With veggies and pasta in tomato broth, there is nothing more comforting than a big bowl of minestrone soup! Here are 15 delicious recipes to try.

Pesto Spaghetti with Vegan Meatballs (Chickpea Walnut balls)

September 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Pesto Spaghetti with Vegan Meatballs (Chickpea Walnut balls)Amazing Pesto Spaghetti with Vegan Meatballs made with Chickpeas. Vegetarian Chickpea Walnut “meatballs” over pesto pasta. 24 gms of Protein per serve. Ready in 40 Minutes. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be Glutenfree. A good Spaghetti is what I need on weekdays to feel satiated and happy. Pasta cooked perfectly, tossed in pesto or marinara with these easy Chickpea Walnut “Meatballs” /­­ Balls.   The meal comes together quickly with some planning. Make the pesto ahead of time. Cook some onion and garlic, toss it in the processor with the ball ingredients, shape or scoop and bake. While they bake, cook the pasta. Toss, garnish, add the toasty warm balls and done. Premade pesto or tomato based sauce makes it a faster meal. Make a double batch of these chickpea balls to whip up a meatball sub sandwich, add to wraps or serve with dips. Whats your favorite way to serve these super delicious chickpea balls?Continue reading: Pesto Spaghetti with Vegan Meatballs (Chickpea Walnut balls)The post Pesto Spaghetti with Vegan Meatballs (Chickpea Walnut balls) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Homemade Pasta – No Pasta Maker Required

September 1 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Making your own pasta may sound like a daunting task…but did you know it can actually be pretty painless? And if you don’t have a pasta maker on hand, that’s ok too! Mary’s Test Kitchen shows us that you only need a few simple ingredients to create pasta dough. Then she explains how to cut pasta quickly and easily with a kitchen knife! Follow this tutorial and you’ll be impressing friends and family with fresh homemade pasta in no time! Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Vegan Homemade Pasta – No Pasta Maker Required appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

3 Child-Friendly Noodle Dishes

August 30 2017 VegKitchen 

3 Child-Friendly Noodle Dishes When my kids were really young, my idea of meal planning during those truly frantic days was to rush into the kitchen at six o-clock, thinking: “Quick! Cook the noodles!” Child-friendly pasta dishes are a great choice when you want dinner in a hurry and need to please adults and children. Most varieties cook quickly enough to accommodate […] The post 3 Child-Friendly Noodle Dishes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free

August 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe Best Vegan Mushroom Garlic Alfredo with no nuts. Garlicky, Creamy, Amazing Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo. Nut-free, Easily Gluten-free, soy-free. 21 gm of protein per serving! This Fettuccine Alfredo packs a flavor punch with the browned mushrooms, wine, herbs, and creamyness from cauliflower, potato and hemp seeds.  I have several nut-free alfredo options on the blog and this is an addition to the list. You can use Cauliflower Alfredo  Lasagna, Pumpkin seed Alfredo or my garlic sauce with the mushroom mixture too.  Mushrooms add an amazing flavor. They are cooked to caramelize with onions then simmered with wine and vegan worcestershire sauce. The alfredo is blended up and added to simmer with the browning mushrooms, so the sauce picks up that caramelized flavor. Delicious, Smooth and amazing. Garnish with fresh basil and pepper flakes and serve. Continue reading: Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe post Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options

October 31 2017 Vegan Richa 

25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day! Seasonal Casseroles, Chilis, Gratin, Pot pies, Pasta, Soups, and Curries! Many are 1 Pot meals. Vegan Fall Recipes. Gluten-free Soy-free options. Is it cooling off where you live yet? Here are 25 meals to make on a chilly day. Squashes, chilis, gratins, pot pies, casseroles and curries. 25 Delicious Fall Vegetarian MealContinue reading: 25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free optionsThe post 25 Vegan Fall Meals for a chilly day – 1 Pot Gluten-free options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

25 Vegan Pumpkin Recipes to Make this Fall

October 5 2017 Vegan Richa 

25 Vegan Pumpkin Recipes to Make this Fall25 Vegan Pumpkin Recipes to Make this Fall. Pumpkin Crumb Cake, Bread, Muffins, Salad, Chili, Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls and More. Gluten-free soy-free options It’s all things Pumpkin in this round up! A comforting Pumpkin Sage Sauce pasta, 1 Bowl Pumpkin pie spice bread, pumpkin pie, Pumpkin coffee cake, pumpkin Pizza, chili and more. Are we ready for fall! If you haven’t already, get my Book with amazing recipes like these! What are your favorite ways to use pumpkin?Continue reading: 25 Vegan Pumpkin Recipes to Make this FallThe post 25 Vegan Pumpkin Recipes to Make this Fall appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs

September 30 2017 VegKitchen 

Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs Rich and cheesy tasting without a lick of cheese (and with plenty of nutritional yeast), this comforting and easy tomato and herb-drenched baked farro casserole may bump your favorite pasta bake down a notch or two. Farro is a rustic, chewy variety of whole-kernel wheat rich in protein and fiber, and usually stocked in nice […] The post Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Pumpkin Kale Pasta Bake

September 29 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Because we can’t get enough pumpkin in our food right now, we’re sharing this awesome recipe from Something Vegan for a pumpkin kale pasta bake! This is such a great dinner recipe that’s easy, delicious and lasts for days. Make a big batch, invite some friends over and dig in to this dish that is fall vegan perfection! Everyone loves a good pasta dish, and this recipe is guaranteed to be a hit — even with non-vegans! Here’s how to make it: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Vegan Pumpkin Kale Pasta Bake appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

How to Make Waste-Free Nutritious School Lunches

August 31 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Make Waste-Free Nutritious School Lunches If youre like us, you start the school year with enthusiastic plans to send your kids to school with lunches that are nutritious, affordable, and easy to make. You promise that youll plan ahead. Youll put more effort into it. Youll cut out the junk. But somehow mid-year finds us settled once again into our […] The post How to Make Waste-Free Nutritious School Lunches appeared first on VegKitchen.

Penne Primavera with Avocado Cashew Cream

August 29 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Penne Primavera with Avocado Cashew Cream I like to use penne pasta in this recipe, but any bite-sized pasta will work well. This Penne Primavera with Avocado Cashew Cream is best if eaten immediately after prepared since the sauce may begin to turn brown if made in advance. Use gluten-free pasta to make this gluten-free. Penne Primavera with Avocado Cashew Cream - 12 to 16 ounces penne pasta - 1 1/­­2 cups small broccoli florets - 1 small carrot, thinly sliced - 1 small zucchini or yellow squash, cut into 1/­­4-inch dice - 1/­­2 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight and drained - 1 to 2 garlic cloves, crushed - 1 cup hot vegetable broth or water, or more if needed - 1 to 2 ripe Hass avocados, halved and pitted - 2 scallions, chopped - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - ground black pepper - Plain unsweetened almond milk, if needed - 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­3 cup chopped fresh basil leaves or parsley - Whole fresh basil leaves, for garnish - Cook the penne in a large pot of salted boiling water, stirring occasionally, until it is tender, about 10 minutes. About 5 minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the broccoli and carrots. About 2 minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the zucchini. Drain the cooked pasta and vegetables well and return to the pot. - While the pasta is cooking, combine the drained cashews, garlic, and broth in a high-speed blender or food processor. Process until smooth and well blended. Peel and pit the avocado and add it to the food processor along with the scallions, lemon juice, salt, and pepper to taste. Process until smooth and creamy. For a thinner sauce, add some almond milk, if needed. For a thicker sauce, add additional avocado. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. - Add the sauce to the pot containing the drained cooked pasta and vegetables. Add the tomatoes and chopped basil and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately, garnished with the whole basil leaves. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Penne Primavera with Avocado Cashew Cream appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Blossom – New York

August 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Blossom Restaurant has two locations in New York — one in Chelsea and one on the Upper West Side. We have visited the Chelsea twice! It is just around the corner from the beautiful High Line Park, which is truly a beautiful site! After a walk through the park, where I really really enjoyed all the beautiful flowers (very good job done by Piet Oudolf, the Dutch designer of the garden), we stumbled upon Blossom Restaurant by accident. We recognized the name while driving by in a yellow cab. So we asked the driver to stop and we went in for lunch. Not knowing the size of the portions, we ordered an entree. But after seeing the size of the salad we knew that we had ordered way too much! It was a very nice salad and the main course was even better. I had a wonderful portobello burger which I truly enjoyed. There is an easy going vibe at Blossom Restaurant and the menu is entirely vegan. For cautious carnivores, Blossom Restaurant offers one big surprise: all the eggless pastas and mock meats actually taste pretty good! For those who miss the taste of meat (I am not […] The post Blossom – New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.


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