parsnip - vegetarian recipes

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Crispy Tofu with Asian Sauce










parsnip vegetarian recipes

Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

This take on a meatless shepherds pie will brighten any holiday table. Lightened up with parsnips rather than potatoes and seitan or beans rather than meat, this light dish will leave plenty of room in your belly for holiday treats. This recipe comes to us from Robin Asbell. Serves 6   - For the Parsnips: -  - 8 cloves garlic whole, peeled - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 pounds parsnips (5 cups chopped) - 1 cup non-dairy milk or milk - 1 teaspoons salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon white pepper   - For the Filling -  - 12 ounces spinach washed - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 large onions chopped - 2 large carrots chopped - 3 tablespoons unbleached flour or white rice flour for GF - 3 tablespoons fresh sage chopped - 1 cups non-dairy milk or milk - 1 cup vegetable stock - 2 teaspoons tamari - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 8 ounces seitan, or a can of drained white beans, optional   Pre-heat the oven to 400 F. Place the garlic cloves and olive oil in a small metal bowl and cover with foil, and roast for 20 minutes. The garlic should be very soft and browned. Take out to cool. In a large pot, place the parsnips and cover with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce to medium low and simmer until the parsnips are very soft. Test by piercing with a paring knife. Drain well. Transfer the garlic and oil to a blender or food processor, and add the parsnips and salt. In a food processor, puree completely before adding the milk. In a blender, add the milk and puree. When smooth, transfer to a large piping bag with a large star tip, or just reserve to spread on the pie. Prepare a 9×13 inch pan or other medium casserole. For filling: Boil a large pot of water and drop the spinach in, cook for about 2 minutes, then drain. Rinse with cold water, squeeze out, then spread on a thick kitchen towel, roll up, and squeeze until very dry. In a large pot, heat the olive oil and saute the onions and carrots until golden and tender, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the onions in the pan and stir to coat the vegetables with flour and eliminate any lumps. Gradually stir in the milk and stock, and cook over medium heat until thick. Add salt, tamari and pepper and stir. Take off the heat and stir the spinach (and seitan or beans, if using) into the sauce, then spread in the 9×13 inch casserole. Pipe the parsnips on top of the spinach filling as shown, or place dollops on top and spread them with a spatula. Spritz with a little olive oil, then bake at 400 for 35 minutes. Optionally, use a broiler and watch carefully for a few minutes to get the parsnip topping nicely browned. The post Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe Roundup

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe RoundupEating seasonal produce is a great way to try new recipes and explore new tastes and flavors. As we head into winter, root vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots and parsnips are in season, so are winter squashes like pumpkin, butternut, and acorn. Weve gathered 11 delicious plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday bloggers featuring seasonal winter produce to warm your heart, your kitchen, and your belly. Enjoy! Breakfast Sweet Potato by Kroll’s Korner Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew by Picky Diet Pomegranate-Smashed Butternut Squash by Jackie Newgent Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherd’s Pie by Robin Asbell Butternut Squash and Pear Crostini by Fork in the Kitchen Oat Cranberry Pilaf with Pistachios by Sharon Palmer Vegan Gingerbread Loaf by The New Baguette Mushroom Pot Pies with Cauliflower Sauce by The Mountain Kitchen Aloo Gobhi by The Kitchen Docs Three-Bean Vegetarian Chili by The Quotable Kitchen Spiced Butternut Squash Waffles by The Garden of Eating Monday has been proven  to be an effective day to start healthy routines; studies show that people who start a new routine or activity on Monday are more likely to keep it up for the rest of the week. Meatless Monday has multiple benefits , not just for your health but also for the environment. Interested in becoming a Meatless Monday blogger? Find out more here . Wed love to hear from you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! Did you try one of the recipes? Please share your photos and experiences with us on social media by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. The post Eat with the Season this Meatless Monday with Our Winter Recipe Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Green Christmas 2018

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve. Otherwise we’ll just call it a post-Christmas cake ;) Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of tahini. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Harvest Vegetable Tart

September 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

This tart takes advantage of the exquisite red/­­orange palate of fall by using colorful root vegetables cut into small leaf shapes using cookie cutters to create an Autumn motif. It happens to be savory and delicious too! This recipe comes to us from Joyce of Goodmotherdiet. Serves 6 - 1 single pie crust - 1 butternut squash - 1-2 purple carrots - 1-2 parsnips - 1 large sweet potato - 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 medium shallots, minced - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 tsp flour - 1 can full fat coconut milk - 1/­­2+ cup shredded parmesan (optional) - 1/­­2 tsp dried thyme - salt and pepper to taste Pre heat oven to 375. Peel and slice squash neck into 1/­­4 inch rings. Using a cookie cutter, press firmly into squash. I recommend using a potholder to make pressing down easier on your hands. Peel and slice remaining root vegetables, using various leaf shapes. Reserve veggie scraps. Line one or two baking sheets with parchment paper or foil. Arrange the leaves on the baking sheets. If your cookie cutters have large and small shapes, separate them as they may have different cooking times. Spray or brush with olive oil and sprinkle lightly with salt. Prebake the leaves until they are tender enough to pierce with a knife tip, but not so tender that they fall apart, about 15 minutes. Larger leaves may need another 5 minutes. Let cool. Saute shallots until lightly browned in 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add garlic. Gather the veggie scraps and dice. You should have about 6 cups of veggies. Dont include purple carrot scraps as they will turn everything pink. Add to the shallots along with vegetable broth. Simmer 10 minutes with the lid off. Add more broth if necessary but liquid should mostly evaporate. Veggies should be soft but still somewhat firm. They will cook again in the tart pan. Stir in 2 tsp of flour and then add coconut milk, herbs and parmesan (if using). Roll out pastry dough and place it in a tart pan, pressing gently into the bottom. Roll the pin over the top to cut the dough to fit the pan. Pour vegetable filling into pie crust and spread evenly with a spoon. Arrange the leaf shapes onto the top of the filling, covering any gaps until entire tart is covered. Spray or brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with parmesan, if desired. Bake tart for 35-45 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting. Serve with a crisp green salad. Enjoy! The post Harvest Vegetable Tart appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip

March 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip This is the time of year that I start having uncontrollable cravings for all things bright, fresh and fruity. I want more smoothies and salads, raw fruit, snappy veggies, etc. Thankfully, this is also when yellow champagne mangoes start showing up everywhere. They perfectly satisfy my cravings with their sunny, sweet flesh, and I manage to fit them into almost every one of my meals while the season lasts. I of course love using mangoes in sweet dishes (smoothies, porridges, dessert), but they also make for a really special addition to savories. That’s how the idea for this curry came about. Nothing about it is terribly authentic, in fact it’s sort of a mishmash of ingredients used in cuisines around the world, but it’s vibrant, delicious, loaded with nourishing produce, and it’s exactly the kind of curry I want to eat right now. There’s silky fennel with its refreshing, mild anise flavor, parsnips for some substance and earthiness, chili and curry powder for spice, and broccoli for a flash of green. Everything gets cooked in a heavenly, creamy mixture of mango, pureed with coconut milk, and the result is a satisfying, savory, sweet and sour curry that’s incredibly good for you. You might be wondering what the soba noodles are doing in a curry, but hear me out. I’ve recently been really into adding noodles to creamy soups for texture and substance. A common weekday meal for me is a quick blender soup of avocado, bell pepper, greens, a bunch of cilantro, dulse, and lemon juice served over soba. The soba gets slathered with the creamy soup, and the whole thing makes for a really nice eating experience. It works the same way in this curry, but you can of course serve the curry over any rice of your choice instead. Enjoy! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip :) You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Ant Hill Forest Cake Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins

February 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins This creamy amaranth porridge is another cozy breakfast recipe we developed for Nuts.com. Amaranth is the superstar of the pseudograins, since it has more protein than both quinoa and buckwheat, and is the only grain/­­pseudograin to contain vitamin C. Needless to say, it’s a great thing to start yourself off with in the morning, and tastes absolutely delicious when cooked with a bunch of warming spices, and topped with stewed apples. Paloma is currently obsessed with apple sauce and eats it with breakfast and as a snack at school, so a pot of stewing apples on the stovetop has been a weekly occurrence in my kitchen. If you’ve never made apple sauce/­­stewed apples before, the process is surprisingly easy – the apples pretty much take care of themselves with some heat and water, and become incredibly velvety in a short amount of time. Add some spices to the equation, and you’ll have yourself an incredibly versatile topping for porridges, yogurt and even toast. We’ve got some links for you after the jump, wishing you a peaceful Sunday. Stuff We Can Do – a comprehensive instagram outlining the actions we can take to oppose some of the crazy things happening in our country concerning human rights, the environment, etc. Lots of very doable stuff there. Healthyish – loving Bon Appetit’s new spinoff website, which follows the philosophy that healthy food = delicious food. Lots of great interviews, recipes, and ideas there. Dr. Melanie Joy on the Rich Roll podcast – a psychologist who coined the term carnism, which examines the meat paradox, or why we love certain animal species (cats, dogs) and eat others (cows, pigs). A Cook’s Remedy – Aran Goyoaga’s beautiful new video series, which explores her relationship with food and cooking. Red Velvet Hot Chocolate – so excited to try Sophie’s recipe, made with beets! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins :) You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Creamy Apple-Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage No-Recipe Healing Soup Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

September 5 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100. Since this vegan version of kuku sabzi is taken out of context and tradition, I thought we could add our own spin on the meaning here. Instead of a welcome-spring dish, it can be a farewell-summer one. Herbs are still abundant at the farmer’s market where I live, and I see them as such a gift of summer. At the same time, I’m noticing all these subtle signs of fall creeping in. The days seem a tiny bit shorter, there’s often a chill in the air in the evenings, and some trees are already beginning to yellow. This time of year is so abundant, but also very fleeting, which makes it even more beautiful and worth savoring. So let’s load up on local, sun-fed herbs while we can. Since fresh herbs are so readily available to many of us, we might take them for granted as a commonplace food. In truth, herbs are our everyday superfoods. Just think of the intense flavor that they provide – that intensity also signals their concentrated, nutritional power. I live in a city with windows that never get sun, but one of my biggest intentions is to soon live somewhere where I can have an herb garden (and beyond). Sprinkling fresh herbs on everything is a always a great idea, but this recipe really packs them in at 4 1/­­2 cups! Just a reminder that if you have a high-speed blender or grain mill, you don’t have to buy chickpea flour. You can just grind up dried chickpeas, which will also save you a few bucks. All in all, this recipe is pretty easy. The biggest effort you’ll have to make is chopping up all of the herbs and veggies. The rest is basically just mix and bake. I served this frittata with market cucumbers and sun gold tomatoes, topped with the tzatziki sauce from Simply Vibrant. You can also eat it on its own, or topped with coconut yogurt or cashew cream. Hope you enjoy this one :) Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)   Print Serves: 1 9-10 frittata Ingredients 2 cups chickpea flour 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder pinch of red pepper flakes a few grinds of black pepper 3 tablespoons avocado, olive, or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pans 2½ cups purified water 1 onion - finely chopped 1 large leek - thinly sliced into half-moons 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½ cups chopped cilantro 1½ cups chopped parsley 1½ cups chopped dill Instructions Preheat oven to 500° F (260° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie or tart dish by oiling it well. In a large bowl, mix together the chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes and black pepper with a fork. Gradually pour in the oil and water, whisking them in as you pour. Mix until smooth and let sit while preparing the vegetables. Heat a glug of oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and leeks along with a pinch of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, or until soft and cooked through. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the sautéed vegetables to the bowl with the batter, along with the cilantro, parsley, and dill. Fold everything in, making sure that the ingredients are dispersed well throughout the thick batter. Transfer the batter to the oiled pie/­­tart dish, patting it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Bake for 2o minutes. Open the oven door slightly to let any steam escape and proceed to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top of the frittata is solid to the touch and nicely browned. Let cool, slice, and serve with yogurt or your favorite creamy sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... 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Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London?

November 29 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Very near the center of the city, 100 yards down the road after taking a left out of Goodge Street Station, lies some of the healthiest food in London. Vantra Edens fare, its sign proclaims, contains No Dairy, No Gluten, No Sugar, No Fried Food, Non GMO, No Peanuts & Cashew, No Garlic, No Vinegar, No Artificial Chemicals, No Unhealthy Cooking Methods - Vegan, Raw & Steamed, Halal & Kosher Friendly, Detoxing, Energising. No garlic? I ask Phun, Vantras owner. Makes people too horny. They cant meditate, he laughs in reply. Of course, there are bowls of garlic and chilis to add at the end of the buffet should you have other appetites planned for the rest of your day. Vantra Eden is first in the community of food tents at 79a Tottenham Court Road, across the street from Habitat. Theyre open Monday-Friday from 12-3 PM, a buffet with lunch boxes, juices, cakes, & more. A medium box is ?6, while a large is only ?7.50. Very reasonably priced. And the food is amazing. With the dishes either raw or steamed, the buffet selection offers the deliciously creamy ‘Vegan Stroganoff’ (Shiitaki Mushrooms, Celery, Mustard, Parsnips, Rosemary and Herbs), incredibly flavorful […] The post Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London? appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie Wild Blueberry Daisy Cake and a Cookbook Giveaway Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Curried Parsnip Fries with Cilantro Hummus Dip

March 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These curried parsnip fries are baked (not fried!) until crispy and served with a creamy cilantro hummus dipping sauce.

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus

January 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus If you ever do meal prep on the weekends for the week ahead, hummus is a great thing to consider including in your repertoire of preparations. It’s easy to make, keeps pretty well, and is a very useful thing to have on hand, since so many meals can be centered around it. Plop a generous dollop into your salads and grain bowls, spread onto sandwiches and flatbreads, use as a dipping component for snacks (roasted winter roots dipped in hummus is a recent favorite) – any way you use it, it’s a great, fast way to make your meal more filling and nourishing. Plus, homemade hummus tastes so much better than store-bought! I don’t think I’ve ever made the same hummus recipe twice. It always differs based on my mood and what I have on hand, but I tend to include a bit more than just garlic when it comes to the veggies (pack them in whenever you can!). Roasted cauliflower, red pepper, sweet potato and beets have all made their way into my hummus throughout the years, and it’s tasted good pretty much every time – hummus has a very forgiving and highly customizable recipe. Have you ever made a smoothie by packing your blender full of not only fruit but also a ton of greens, superfood powders, seeds, nuts and who knows what else? Did you then proceed to marvel at the result, which came out tasting nice and fruity, despite looking like swampy slush? It’s sort of the same deal with hummus – anything goes. Or most things do, anyway. This past week, I added roasted garlic, parsnips and red onion into a batch of hummus and it turned out exceptionally delicious. All the vegetables are roasted together until soft and caramelized, then thrown into a blender/­­food processor together with the chickpeas and the rest of the ingredients. The process is quick, and the veggies bring all kinds of additional nourishment to the hummus, along with sweet and earthy notes. The recipe is very alteration-friendly, too – add sweet potato instead of parsnips, regular onion instead of red, a few small cloves of raw garlic instead of the whole head of roasted garlic, it will all taste great in its own way. And you will be prepared for success with your meals and snacks for the next week or so. Last Sunday, we hosted a Moon Juice cookbook giveaway in our newsletter. In order to enter, we asked you to share one inspiring book, article, film or podcast that’s made an impression on you throughout the years. We were so moved by all your amazing suggestions and inspiring, personal notes, that we were truly wishing we had a cookbook to give away to each and every one of you. We feel so lucky to be connected with you guys, even in this tiny way. This Sunday’s links feature a selection of the suggestions and inspirations we received during the giveaway. We wish we could share them all because every one was amazing, but the list would be much too long, so there’s just a snippet below. So much good stuff there! Enjoy your Sunday :) Books - The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World (by the Dalai Lama) – from Angelina - Radical Beauty: How to Transforms Yourself from the Inside Out – from Danae - A People’s History of the United States – Kendal says, ‘it’s inspired me to think about our history in the Big Picture, and even helps a little with not getting too bogged down by all the bad news that’s out there. The main thing I think we need to do in these times is take care of ourselves and each other.’ - You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life – from Susan - Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words  – from Dina - Anam Cara: Spiritual Wisdom from the Celtic World – from Elizabeth Cookbooks, Nutrition, Food - Nutrition Stripped: 100 Whole-Food Recipes Made Deliciously Simple – from Joana - The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out – from Isa - Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back – from Rebekah - Healing With Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition – from Deb Podcasts - WANT Podcast – stands for ‘women against negative talk.’ Guests include Sarah Britton of My New Roots, Jessica Murnane of One Part Plant, Adina Grigore of S.W. basics and many, many more – from Lea - The Dinner Party Download, especially this episode – from Ariela - Radio Cherry Bombe, especially this episode – from Maia - The Rich Roll Podcast, especially The Best of 2016 – from Abigail Videos, Movies - World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements, the Ted Talk – from Robin - Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things – from Valentina - Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling, Ted Talk – from Elizabeth Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus   Print Serves: 3-4 cups Ingredients 3 medium parsnips - peeled and cut into strips 1 red onion - sliced into 8 wedges olive oil or neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 head garlic - about ¼ cut off the top of the garlic head, some of the outer skin peeled off 1 15oz can chickpeas or 1¾ cup cooked chickpeas ½ cup tahini 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for garnish 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted whole cumin seeds - ground 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon sea salt or more to taste 1 cup water olives - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place parsnips and red onion onto the baking sheet, drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and mix well with your hands. Drizzle the top of the garlic head with oil, salt and pepper. Make a parchment paper packet or tin foil packet and place the garlic inside. Place packet onto the tray with the vegetables. Garlic must remain covered when roasting. Put the tray with the vegetables into the oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, mix the parsnips and onion, trying to flip over each piece, then roast for another 15 minutes, until soft throughout and caramelized at the edges. Check the garlic, it should be soft and cooked through after the 30 minutes. If not, roast it for another 5 minutes or so until nice and soft. Let the garlic cool down a bit and slip all the garlic cloves out of their skins. Combine all the roasted vegetables, chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, paprika, ½ teaspoon sea salt and water in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth and creamy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the hummus garnished with more olive oil and olives, if using. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Miso Caramel Popcorn Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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