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parsnip vegetarian recipes

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie Wild Blueberry Daisy Cake and a Cookbook Giveaway Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Curried Parsnip Fries with Cilantro Hummus Dip

March 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These curried parsnip fries are baked (not fried!) until crispy and served with a creamy cilantro hummus dipping sauce.

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus

January 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus If you ever do meal prep on the weekends for the week ahead, hummus is a great thing to consider including in your repertoire of preparations. It’s easy to make, keeps pretty well, and is a very useful thing to have on hand, since so many meals can be centered around it. Plop a generous dollop into your salads and grain bowls, spread onto sandwiches and flatbreads, use as a dipping component for snacks (roasted winter roots dipped in hummus is a recent favorite) – any way you use it, it’s a great, fast way to make your meal more filling and nourishing. Plus, homemade hummus tastes so much better than store-bought! I don’t think I’ve ever made the same hummus recipe twice. It always differs based on my mood and what I have on hand, but I tend to include a bit more than just garlic when it comes to the veggies (pack them in whenever you can!). Roasted cauliflower, red pepper, sweet potato and beets have all made their way into my hummus throughout the years, and it’s tasted good pretty much every time – hummus has a very forgiving and highly customizable recipe. Have you ever made a smoothie by packing your blender full of not only fruit but also a ton of greens, superfood powders, seeds, nuts and who knows what else? Did you then proceed to marvel at the result, which came out tasting nice and fruity, despite looking like swampy slush? It’s sort of the same deal with hummus – anything goes. Or most things do, anyway. This past week, I added roasted garlic, parsnips and red onion into a batch of hummus and it turned out exceptionally delicious. All the vegetables are roasted together until soft and caramelized, then thrown into a blender/­­food processor together with the chickpeas and the rest of the ingredients. The process is quick, and the veggies bring all kinds of additional nourishment to the hummus, along with sweet and earthy notes. The recipe is very alteration-friendly, too – add sweet potato instead of parsnips, regular onion instead of red, a few small cloves of raw garlic instead of the whole head of roasted garlic, it will all taste great in its own way. And you will be prepared for success with your meals and snacks for the next week or so. Last Sunday, we hosted a Moon Juice cookbook giveaway in our newsletter. In order to enter, we asked you to share one inspiring book, article, film or podcast that’s made an impression on you throughout the years. We were so moved by all your amazing suggestions and inspiring, personal notes, that we were truly wishing we had a cookbook to give away to each and every one of you. We feel so lucky to be connected with you guys, even in this tiny way. This Sunday’s links feature a selection of the suggestions and inspirations we received during the giveaway. We wish we could share them all because every one was amazing, but the list would be much too long, so there’s just a snippet below. So much good stuff there! Enjoy your Sunday :) Books - The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World (by the Dalai Lama) – from Angelina - Radical Beauty: How to Transforms Yourself from the Inside Out – from Danae - A People’s History of the United States – Kendal says, ‘it’s inspired me to think about our history in the Big Picture, and even helps a little with not getting too bogged down by all the bad news that’s out there. The main thing I think we need to do in these times is take care of ourselves and each other.’ - You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life – from Susan - Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words  – from Dina - Anam Cara: Spiritual Wisdom from the Celtic World – from Elizabeth Cookbooks, Nutrition, Food - Nutrition Stripped: 100 Whole-Food Recipes Made Deliciously Simple – from Joana - The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out – from Isa - Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back – from Rebekah - Healing With Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition – from Deb Podcasts - WANT Podcast – stands for ‘women against negative talk.’ Guests include Sarah Britton of My New Roots, Jessica Murnane of One Part Plant, Adina Grigore of S.W. basics and many, many more – from Lea - The Dinner Party Download, especially this episode – from Ariela - Radio Cherry Bombe, especially this episode – from Maia - The Rich Roll Podcast, especially The Best of 2016 – from Abigail Videos, Movies - World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements, the Ted Talk – from Robin - Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things – from Valentina - Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling, Ted Talk – from Elizabeth Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus   Print Serves: 3-4 cups Ingredients 3 medium parsnips - peeled and cut into strips 1 red onion - sliced into 8 wedges olive oil or neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 head garlic - about ¼ cut off the top of the garlic head, some of the outer skin peeled off 1 15oz can chickpeas or 1¾ cup cooked chickpeas ½ cup tahini 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for garnish 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted whole cumin seeds - ground 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon sea salt or more to taste 1 cup water olives - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place parsnips and red onion onto the baking sheet, drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and mix well with your hands. Drizzle the top of the garlic head with oil, salt and pepper. Make a parchment paper packet or tin foil packet and place the garlic inside. Place packet onto the tray with the vegetables. Garlic must remain covered when roasting. Put the tray with the vegetables into the oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, mix the parsnips and onion, trying to flip over each piece, then roast for another 15 minutes, until soft throughout and caramelized at the edges. Check the garlic, it should be soft and cooked through after the 30 minutes. If not, roast it for another 5 minutes or so until nice and soft. Let the garlic cool down a bit and slip all the garlic cloves out of their skins. Combine all the roasted vegetables, chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, paprika, ½ teaspoon sea salt and water in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth and creamy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the hummus garnished with more olive oil and olives, if using. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Miso Caramel Popcorn Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto

December 21 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto I posted a photo of thinly sliced spuds on instagram a while back, mentioning that we would roast them, add kale, beans, red onion and cherry tomatoes, slather with pesto and call it dinner. The response was unusually loud for such a humble dinner that we decided to recreate and share this simple recipe here. I’m sure you have seen this potato technique before - slicing them thinly but not all the way through, drizzling with fat and baking them until the edges are crispy and the middle is creamy and soft. Hasselback potatoes were apparently invented at a restaurant here in Stockholm in the 1950’s, as a method to shorten the baking time. It was a very popular dish when I was around Elsa’s age (almost 30 years ago!!!). My mom made Hasselback potatoes almost as often as she did her famous baked giant sausage stuffed with pineapple and cheese - yup, that was what we ate back in 1989. I haven’t seen a lot of pineapple stuffed sausage since then, but Hasselback potatoes sure made a comeback and have been increasingly popular during the last couple of years. The original version uses butter and breadcrumbs but we’re simply using oil. I’m sure some almond flour could be tossed on top towards the end of the baking, if you like it with a little crust. We also stuff herbs into the slices to give the spuds more flavour and that also helps the fat to find its way inside the potato. A good trick is to place the potato in a large wooden spoon when you cut it, to prevent from cutting it all the way through. Or placing it between two chopsticks or chopping boards. On the photo above, Luise uses a metal spoon which actually makes it more difficult to slice because the potato isn’t flat and it can also be bad for the knife. So not the best example. What can I tell you, she’s Danish, very stubborn and she doesn’t like to follow my instructions. But she got the job done with that spoon as well. As I mentioned in the intro, we add kale, beans, tomatoes and onion towards the last 15 minutes of the roasting and then serve with pesto on the side. It’s an easy one-tray dinner. It is however also an awesome side dish on the Christmas table. It looks really nice and Christmassy on that bed of kale. While we were at it, we compiled a list of a few other great Christmas related recipes from the archives. Last year’s loaf would make an excellent companion to the potatoes. o Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake o Shaved Brussels Sprouts Christmas Salad o Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf o Pomegranate, Raspberry & Thyme Jam o Saffron Falafels o Quinoa, Kale & Apple Salad o Homemade Nutella Finally, can we just say a massive Merry Christmas /­­ Happy Hanukkah or whatever yo are celebrating! This has been an intense year for us with books, babies and lots more. We haven’t been posting recipes as often as we intended but we want to thank you for your constant support, kindness and cheering comments. We have a lot more planned in the near future so stay tuned. BIG LOVE! /­­David, Luise, Elsa, Isac and baby Gabriel Hasselback Potatoes with Kale, Beans & Pesto The baking time can vary depending on the potato size and variety. Smaller potatoes will need a little less time. Hasselback potatoes 2 kg /­­ 4 lbs (roughly 12) large baking potatoes 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil sea salt black pepper 1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked To serve 3 large handfuls kale, thick stalks removed and leaves roughly chopped 1 small red onion 170 g /­­ 1 cup cooked black beans (1/­­2 can), rinsed 12 cherry tomatoes 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pesto (if you are vegan, choose a pesto without cheese) 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. 2. Wash and scrub the potatoes. 3. Slice each potato thinly. Let each slice cut about two-thirds into the potato, leaving the bottom intact. This is easiest done by placing the potatoes inside a large spoon, the edges of the spoon will then stop the knife from cutting too deep. 4. Tuck some thyme leaves sporadically between the slices of each potato and place them on a baking tray. 5. Use a brush to drizzle the potatoes with about half of the oil and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. 6. Bake for 30 minutes and then brush the potatoes with the remaining olive oil. The potatoes should have started to fan out slightly which will make it easier to get some of the oil down in-between the slices as well. If the slices are still stuck together, you can let them roast a while longer before adding the last oil. 7. Bake for 30 minutes more. Meanwhile, cut the onion in thin slices and place it in a bowl along with the kale, beans and tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine. 8. When the potatoes have been in the oven for about 1 hour in total, arrange the onion, kale, beans and tomatoes on the tray, around the potatoes and bake for 15 minutes more, or until the potato edges are crispy and the centre feels soft when pierced with a toothpick. 9. Drizzle pesto over the potatoes and kale and serve immediately, while still hot. ******************** PS! We have also updated our Green Kitchen app with 6 Christmas recipes. Apart from this Hasselback Potato recipe and some favorites from last year, you’ll also find our simple Sesame & Gingerbread Truffles and this delicious Saffron Overnight Oats recipe there. Enjoy!

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache

December 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Since we’ve been making a point of keeping things festive around here for the past month or so, we thought it was time that we do a proper cake recipe. By proper I mean layered, frosted, stunning and decadent. Then again, this cake is also vegan, gluten-free and the chocolate layers contain no added sugar, which are all elements not very commonly seen in those ‘proper’ cakes, but that’s just the way we do things around here ;) By now it’s no secret that sweet root vegetables are not to be underestimated when it comes to vegan baking. They are so good at contributing that right texture, moisture and body to baked goods, together with a neutral base for any flavor. Beets, the root vegetable I use in this cake, are all that and happen to be nature’s very best food coloring. The rich and moist chocolate layers of this cake are made of a mixture of gluten-free flours, dates and beet, and get their depth of flavor from cocoa, chicory coffee and a splash of balsamic vinegar. If you are wondering what the coffee and balsamic are doing in this recipe – they both work well at emphasizing the chocolate flavor and taking it up on the decadence scale. The beet-colored frosting is based on home-‘condensed’ coconut milk and is creamy but very light, and the same can be said for the chocolate ganache that glazes over the cake. Although this is a layered cake that requires time, attention and ritual, I would say that technique-wise, this cake is on the simpler side when it comes to traditional layer cakes. All the elements come together fairly quickly, and I find the assembly and frosting to be the most challenging part, as always. We hope this beauty makes it on your holiday table or birthday table, or rainy day baking table. In any case, let us know how it goes :) Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache   Print Serves: one 6-inch, double layer cake Ingredients for the pink frosting 2 cans full fat unsweetened coconut milk ⅔ cup raw sugar 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling parchment paper 1½ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours, divided ¼ small beet root 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅔ cup almond milk or purified water for the cake 1 cup brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ½ cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda pinch sea salt 1 cup Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup chicory coffee (1 teaspoon ground roasted chicory root or coffee substitute such as Dandy Blend per 1¼ cups boiling water, brewed for 5 minutes and strained) or strong regular coffee ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 medium beet root - peeled and shredded for the chocolate ganache ½ cup condensed coconut milk (reserved when making frosting) ¼ cup cashews (reserved when making frosting) 5-7 tablespoons cocoa powder 2 tablespoons almond milk or water Instructions to make the frosting Combine coconut milk and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, stirring often, for 20 minutes, until the mixture thickens and resembles condensed milk. Stir in coconut oil until well incorporated. Reserve ½ cup of the condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup soaked cashews for the ganache, below. Combine the rest of the condensed coconut milk, remaining soaked and rinsed cashews, beet, lemon juice and almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Scoop into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator until firm, preferably overnight. to bake the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare two 6-inch spring forms or cake pans by lining them with lightly oiled parchment paper (if you only have one spring form/­­pan, you can bake one chocolate cake layer at a time). Combine all flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the date soaking liquid and combine it with the dates, chicory coffee/­­regular coffee and apple sauce in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Add coconut oil and balsamic vinegar and pulse to incorporate. Pour the blended liquid into the bowl with the dried ingredients and mix to combine. Fold in the shredded beet. Divide batter in half between prepared pans and bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean (or bake one at a time if you only have one pan). Remove from the oven and let cool completely. to make chocolate ganache Combine reserved ½ cup condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup reserved soaked and rinsed cashews with cocoa powder and 2 tablespoons almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. to assemble the cake Invert one of the chocolate cake layers onto a large plate or cake stand. Frost with about ⅓ of well-chilled, firm frosting. Place the other cake layer on top and frost the entire cake with the rest of the frosting. Chill the cake in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes to firm up the frosting once again. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and pour the chocolate ganache over the cake, taking care to create photogenic drips, if you wish. Place the cake in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour before slicing. Keep the leftovers refrigerated. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream

November 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey. Roasting pears is the easy road to a sophisticated dessert. You let the heat of the oven do the work of softening their flesh to a silky, melt-in-your-mouth consistency while tending to other things (perhaps making something creamy to serve the pears with). More specifically, honey-roasting with various spices will always be a winning technique, especially when you use a high-quality honey like the wild thyme blossom honey from Smiley Honey I used here. The honey melts under heat and envelops whatever you are roasting with its soothing, complex sweetness, contributing to those crispy, caramelized edges we all love so much. Serve the warm pears with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or take it one step further and make a nutritious cashew vanilla cream. This is not your ordinary cashew cream, as it’s made lighter with the addition of one of the roasted pears. When whipped up, the pear contributes an airiness to the cream, making it less dense and adding interest to the flavor. There is also a studding of ground chia, for its gelling abilities and amazing nutrition. The cream pairs perfectly with the jammy pears, and the garnish of pomegranate seeds, though optional, adds to that festive look and flavor. The whole thing is easy and quick to whip up, so if you are still looking for a dessert to serve this Thursday and like pears and cream, this might just be the one. Smiley Honey is a raw honey company offering a fine collection of uniquely flavored honeys from around the world, from Spain to Romania, Italy to a number of states in the US. They sent me some samples of their honey, and I was impressed by how distinctly different each of them tasted. There is a tendency to think that honey is honey and that’s that, but there is a world flavor in each kind, depending, of course, on the blossoms the bees forage the nectar from, among other factors. The Smiley Honey shop has a thoughtful flavor profile description for each kind of honey they sell – it almost feels like choosing a wine, and rightly so. I chose to go with the thyme honey from Spain for this dessert – it has a boldness of flavor, along with savory and earthy notes, is very aromatic and absolutely delicious. Other flavors that caught my eye are sage, tulepo, sourwood and acacia. All Smiley Honey is raw, which means it’s rich in health benefits and will help boost your immune system. Together with Smiley Honey, we think that a jar from them would make for a perfect gift or treat to yourself during this time of year. If you’d like to try it out, use code Golubka at checkout in their store to get 10% off any of the honeys. Lastly, it’s the time to give thanks in these parts, so thank you for cooking from this page throughout the years. Wishing a Happy Thanksgiving to all those in the U.S. and a peaceful rest of the week to those elsewhere :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage S O U P Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream   Print Serves: 4-8 Ingredients for the honey roasted pears neutral coconut oil - for oiling the baking dish 5 ripe pears - cut in half and cored ¼ cup filtered water 1 cinnamon stick 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, coarsely crushed in a mortar and pestle 3-5 whole cloves 1-2 star anise (optional) freshly squeezed juice of ½ lemon honey - to taste for the vanilla cashew cream 1½ cups cashews - preferably soaked for 2 hours ¾ cup unsweetened almond milk - preferably homemade ⅓ cup honey 1½ tablespoons chia seeds 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 roasted pear - from above ¼ cup plus 3 tablespoons neutral unrefined coconut oil - melted for serving more honey to drizzle crushed pistachios (optional) pomegranate kernels (optional) Instructions to roast the pears Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Lightly oil the baking dish with coconut oil. Arrange pears inside the dish cut side down. Pour water over the bottom of the dish and place spices in between pear halves. Drizzle with lemon juice and honey. Bake for 40-45 minutes, basting the pears with the liquid every now and then, until soft throughout. Let cool. to make the vanilla cashew cream and serve Drain and rinse cashews. Combine with almond milk, honey, chia seeds, vanilla extract and roasted pear in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Drizzle in the coconut oil with the motor still running and blend to incorporate. If using a regular blender (not a high-speed one such as Vitamix or Blendtec), optionally strain the cream through a fine-mesh sieve for a silky-smooth consistency. Refrigerate for 2-4 hours or overnight, letting the cream set. To serve, whisk cream to fluff it up. Distribute between bowls, top with 1-2 pear halves, drizzle with honey, garnish with crushed pistachios and pomegranate kernels and enjoy. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... 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Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel

November 10 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel Focusing on love, peace and hope today and sending all those vibes your way, but we know you come here for the pie, among other tasty things, and today’s pie is a true beaut. Cooking heals and sharing food breaks all kinds of walls, so let’s keep cooking together, no matter what :) If you are still looking for a pie to make for Thanksgiving, but being thrown in different directions while deciding between the traditional apple, pumpkin, or pecan pies, this one might be your solution. It’s sort of a three-in-one of all those flavors, and is guaranteed to impress those you feed. Although this pie’s got a harmonious combination of apple/­­pecan/­­pumpkin, it’s the silky baked apples that take on the main role here, cozied up in heavenly spiced layers to make up the filling. The pumpkin and pecans come in in the form of a decadent, salted caramel that tops the pie and seeps into the apple filling, too. There’s also a crumble that comes between the apple filling and the caramel, and adds crunch, texture and some seriously comforting toasty notes. If all this sounds like too much to you, don’t worry – there is just the right amount of every element to make for a well-balanced dessert that’s not too sweet, just the way we like it. Going to keep it short and sweet today. Hope you consider this treat to share in celebration with your loved ones during the holidays or at any time that calls for pie. Hugs and warmth to you all. Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Pear Cranberry Chai Lots more coming your way until the end of the year. Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel   Print Serves: one 9 pie Ingredients for the pumpkin caramel 1 can full fat unsweetened Thai coconut milk ¾ cup coconut sugar ⅓ cup canned or freshly made pumpkin/­­squash purée ¼ teaspoon sea salt for the pecans 1 cup pecan halves for the crust 1½ cups sprouted or whole spelt or wheat flour pinch sea salt ½ cup neutral coconut oil - cold and solid 4-5 tablespoons ice cold water for the crumble ½ cup oats ½ cup pecans - chopped 1 tablespoon coconut sugar or other sugar of choice 3-5 cardamom pods - freshly ground 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder pinch sea salt 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - cold and solid for the filling 5-6 apples - peeled, cored and thinly sliced 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ cup coconut sugar or ⅓ cup raw sugar 2 teaspoons cinnamon powder 5-7 cardamom pods - shelled, freshly ground about ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional) 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder Instructions to make the pumpkin caramel Combine coconut milk and sugar in a small/­­medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Establish a steady, strong simmer and let reduce for about 15 minutes, until thickened. Add pumpkin purée and salt, and cook for another 5-7 minutes. Let cool completely, keeping in mind that the caramel will thicken further once cool. Keep refrigerated if making in advance. The caramel is delicious on its own, drizzled over yogurt, granola, fruit, etc. to toast the pecans Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C), spread pecans on a baking tray and toast for 10 minutes, or until golden. to make the pie crust Keep oven at 350° F (180° C). Combine flour and salt in a food processor. Cut oil into small pieces and add to the flour. Pulse until the mixture resembles sand. Add 4 tablespoons cold water and pulse to combine. Test the mixture by pressing it between your fingers, it should stick together. If not, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time until dough sticks together between your fingers. Oil a 9-inch pie dish thoroughly. Press the dough against the bottom of the dish into an even crust, starting in the middle and working up the sides. Prick with a fork several times and let chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and place baking beans inside. Bake blind for 20 minutes. Let cool. to make the crumble Mix all the crumble ingredients, with the exception of oil, in a bowl. Work in the oil using your fingers, until all ingredients are well combined. to make the pie Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine all the filling ingredients in a large bowl and mix gently to coat evenly. Transfer apples into the chilled crust, sprinkle with the crumble and bake for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 375° F (190° C), cover crust with a pie cover or a piece of parchment paper and bake for 35-40 minutes, or longer, until apples are completely cooked through and soft throughout. Let cool completely, allowing at least 2 hours before serving, for the filling to solidify. You can stop here and serve the pie as is with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or spread the pumpkin caramel over the chilled pie and sprinkle with the toasted pecans - ice cream is good with this variation as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip

March 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip This is the time of year that I start having uncontrollable cravings for all things bright, fresh and fruity. I want more smoothies and salads, raw fruit, snappy veggies, etc. Thankfully, this is also when yellow champagne mangoes start showing up everywhere. They perfectly satisfy my cravings with their sunny, sweet flesh, and I manage to fit them into almost every one of my meals while the season lasts. I of course love using mangoes in sweet dishes (smoothies, porridges, dessert), but they also make for a really special addition to savories. That’s how the idea for this curry came about. Nothing about it is terribly authentic, in fact it’s sort of a mishmash of ingredients used in cuisines around the world, but it’s vibrant, delicious, loaded with nourishing produce, and it’s exactly the kind of curry I want to eat right now. There’s silky fennel with its refreshing, mild anise flavor, parsnips for some substance and earthiness, chili and curry powder for spice, and broccoli for a flash of green. Everything gets cooked in a heavenly, creamy mixture of mango, pureed with coconut milk, and the result is a satisfying, savory, sweet and sour curry that’s incredibly good for you. You might be wondering what the soba noodles are doing in a curry, but hear me out. I’ve recently been really into adding noodles to creamy soups for texture and substance. A common weekday meal for me is a quick blender soup of avocado, bell pepper, greens, a bunch of cilantro, dulse, and lemon juice served over soba. The soba gets slathered with the creamy soup, and the whole thing makes for a really nice eating experience. It works the same way in this curry, but you can of course serve the curry over any rice of your choice instead. Enjoy! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip :) You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Ant Hill Forest Cake Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins

February 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins This creamy amaranth porridge is another cozy breakfast recipe we developed for Nuts.com. Amaranth is the superstar of the pseudograins, since it has more protein than both quinoa and buckwheat, and is the only grain/­­pseudograin to contain vitamin C. Needless to say, it’s a great thing to start yourself off with in the morning, and tastes absolutely delicious when cooked with a bunch of warming spices, and topped with stewed apples. Paloma is currently obsessed with apple sauce and eats it with breakfast and as a snack at school, so a pot of stewing apples on the stovetop has been a weekly occurrence in my kitchen. If you’ve never made apple sauce/­­stewed apples before, the process is surprisingly easy – the apples pretty much take care of themselves with some heat and water, and become incredibly velvety in a short amount of time. Add some spices to the equation, and you’ll have yourself an incredibly versatile topping for porridges, yogurt and even toast. We’ve got some links for you after the jump, wishing you a peaceful Sunday. Stuff We Can Do – a comprehensive instagram outlining the actions we can take to oppose some of the crazy things happening in our country concerning human rights, the environment, etc. Lots of very doable stuff there. Healthyish – loving Bon Appetit’s new spinoff website, which follows the philosophy that healthy food = delicious food. Lots of great interviews, recipes, and ideas there. Dr. Melanie Joy on the Rich Roll podcast – a psychologist who coined the term carnism, which examines the meat paradox, or why we love certain animal species (cats, dogs) and eat others (cows, pigs). A Cook’s Remedy – Aran Goyoaga’s beautiful new video series, which explores her relationship with food and cooking. Red Velvet Hot Chocolate – so excited to try Sophie’s recipe, made with beets! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins :) You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Creamy Apple-Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now. – Chef David Burke David Burke is world-renowned as a chef, artist, entrepreneur, cookbook author, innovator and inventor. In 2009, he won the James Beard Award for Whos Who of Food & Beverage in America and was twice nominated earlier for Best Chefs in America. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and a student at the École Lenôtre Pastry School in Plaisir, France, his 30-year career includes opening over a dozen celebrated restaurants.  David is often recognized from his TV appearances on Bravos Top Chef Masters, NBCs TODAY Show and as a featured guest on Rachael Rays Every Day Show. In 2015, David joined ESquared Hospitality as a Culinary Partner to open new restaurants nationwide including his latest restaurant, Tavern62 by David Burke which opened in October 2016 on New York Citys Upper East Side. For our first interview of the New Year, we sat down with David to ask whats currently on his plate.   Its the beginning of a New Year, a time when many are making a fresh start and making resolutions about diet and nutrition. What are some easy ideas to incorporate more vegetables and fruits into a daily diet? Have pre-cut fruit and vegetables ready in your refrigerator and make olive oil-based dipping sauces for them. Winter is a good time to make vegetable soups and stews. I would also recommend buying an Indian cookbook (lay off spices if you dont like heat) to get inspiration for vegetarian dishes. Are there any professional secrets or tips you can share on your favorite ways to prepare vegetables? I like to slowly sauté my vegetables. Cut them smaller and add olive oil, onion, and garlic, then let them caramelize. That works for home fries, a vegetable hash, a filling for a pasta, a purée, or the base of a soup. When youre cooking at home or for friends, what are some of your favorite meatless dishes? Pasta. Cous Cous. Eggplant Parmesan. Stuffed Zucchini Boats. Couch potatoes, which we serve at BLT Prime by David Burke. Cabbage is also really underrated. Chef David Burke’s Couch Potatoes   At your new restaurant Tavern62 by David Burke, what winter vegetables are you looking forward to using and where do you source them from? Salsify, parsnips, parsley root, celery root, butternut squash, kale, and cabbage. We source produce from the Hunts Point Produce Market. Sustainable foods are a topic of discussion these days. What are your thoughts on the subject and why is this important? With any good business comes responsibility. Responsibility of keeping a sustainable supply is important for the future. Your restaurants are typically meat heavy or meat-centric. Why are you interested in supporting and participating in Meatless Monday? My restaurants are designed for great business that highlight hospitality and give our customers what they want. My personal choice and vision for the future is to start segueing into more vegetarian-centric and healthy eating options because no matter what other food trends come and go, customers being more aware of what goes into their food is a trend that will only continue to grow. I think we go through cycles. There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now.   The post Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower

December 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Since winter in the northern hemisphere is most definitely in full swing, we thought it was time for another quick, creamy winter soup recipe that’s nourishing and warming to the core. This one’s got a balance of grounding winter roots like celeriac and parsnip with some brighter, crisper veggies like spinach and fennel, finished off with a kiss of lemon. The roasted cauliflower pieces that stud each bowl are cooked in a special, sweet and spicy dressing that helps create those caramelized edges we are all so fond of. Eating this soup during this time of year just feels right – it’s incredibly cozy and feeds both body and soul. This soup is stunning enough in looks to serve as a starter to a festive meal, so we encourage you to get radical and serve green soup at your holiday party :) There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday. Natalie Weinberger interviewed on Sight Unseen – one of our favorite ceramicists Botanica – a soon to be, vegetable forward restaurant in LA + a lovely online journal with some amazing recipes like Spiced Spaghetti Squash Pancakes, Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Banana Buckwheat Poppyseed Bread The Founders of CAP Beauty interviewed by Ashley Neese – and if you haven’t heard of CAP Beauty, check it out, it’s an amazingly well-curated one stop shop for natural beauty products Pirelli Calendar 2017 Goes Makeup-Free McKel Hill of Nutrition Stripped interviewed on Chris Ducker’s podcast Pulp Pantry – a snack company that utilizes pulp from making juice, which normally gets discarded, to make granola, veggie crisps and more – such a smart idea! GIFs by NASA Gourmet Print Shop – Sarah Britton of My New Roots is now selling some of her beautiful food photographs for making prints Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon maple syrup ½ tablespoon tamari ½ teaspoon sriracha 1 medium cauliflower head - cut into florets for the soup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds or 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste 2 small or 1 medium to large celery root - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium parsnip - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium to large fennel bulb - roughly chopped, green fronds reserved 3½ - 4 cups purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) few large handfuls arugula or spinach leaves freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ lemon - juice Instructions to roast the cauliflower Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine coconut oil, mustard, maple syrup, tamari and sriracha in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Place cauliflower florets onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray, drizzle with the dressing and toss to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes or until soft and caramelized at the edges, stirring at halftime. to make soup While the cauliflower is roasting, warm coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add coriander and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and let onion sweat for a few minutes. Lower the heat to medium low and sauté for 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until onion is soft and caramelized. Add celery root, parsnip, fennel, water, bay leaves, if using, and a few generous pinches of salt to the pot, bring to a boil over medium high heat. Adjust the heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft throughout. Remove and discard bay leaves. Combine soup with half of the roasted cauliflower, arugula/­­spinach, fennel fronds (reserve a few for garnish) and black pepper in an upright blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Use caution when blending hot liquids. Transfer the pureed soup back into the pot, squeeze the lemon juice and mix it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute between bowls and serve warm, garnished with the rest of the roasted cauliflower florets and fennel fronds. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home

December 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home I’ve recently been putting more emphasis on having plenty of good fats in my diet. Hormonal balance, healthy brain function, energy, and yes, weight regulation are all associated with a regular intake of healthy fats (together with a diet mindful of sugar), and that’s enough reasons to get me to be a bit more attentive to my fat consumption. Virgin coconut oil is on high rotation in my kitchen, so I’m covered there, but I’ve recently been adding more variety to my fats by mindfully incorporating things like avocado, flax/­­other seeds and nuts, and ghee into everyday meals. I just got back into making my own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein) at home. It’s such an easy and gratifying process, and I thought I would share my method here, since I’ve heard some people describe ghee-making as intimidating. It is not! It does take some time, but my double-boiler recipe does not require too much babysitting – the magic mostly happens on its own. Since gift season is fast approaching and I like to cook my gifts, I’ve been brainstorming edible presents I’ll make this year. The idea for compound ghee came up. Chances are, you’ve heard of compound butter, which is butter mixed with other flavorful ingredients like herbs, spices, dried fruit and more, and used as an extra-flavorful agent in cooking. I applied this flavoring idea to ghee and whipped it with miso and dates, to mind-blowingly delicious results. In Ayurvedic tradition, ghee is regarded as a highly medicinal food (anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting and a digestive aid), and what better thing to give your loved ones than a jar of health-promoting ghee that also tastes amazing and can be used to enhance so many foods in their kitchens – anything from toast to veggies. And of course, the flavor possibilities for compound ghee are endless, next on my list is a roasted garlic and herb one. It’s going to get wild. This easy, festive brussels sprout dish is one idea for utilizing the miso-date ghee. To me, well-roasted brussels sprouts often resemble popcorn in flavor, so a slather of buttery, sweet and salty ghee seems like a very logical finishing touch. Serve it as a side dish on your holiday table and don’t forget to offer your guests a dish of extra miso-date ghee for dipping, they will appreciate your generosity very much ;) Miso-Date Ghee   Print Serves: 3¼ cups ghee, 1 cup miso-date ghee Ingredients for the ghee 2 pounds (8 sticks/­­908g) unsalted butter, preferably grass-fed (I use Kerrygold) for the miso-date ghee 1 cup ghee 1 tablespoon sweet white miso 3-4 dates Instructions to make the ghee Cut the butter into large chunks. Place into a medium-sized heatproof pan/­­bowl that is approximately twice as large as the volume of the butter. Prepare a large, heavy-bottomed pot or saucepan that can fit the bowl of butter within to make a double boiler. Half-fill the large pot with water and place the bowl with butter inside. Make sure the bowl is stable and not floating and the water in the pot is somewhat level with the butter. Bring the water to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for about two hours or longer, until the upper foamy layer of the butter turns golden in color. Keep an eye on the water level in the pot and add more hot water as needed. The butter will melt and separate into three layers - foam on top, clear golden ghee in the middle, and white milk solids on the bottom (some might float atop). Remove bowl with butter from the heat and let cool slightly. Skim the foam off the top with a slotted spoon and discard. Prepare a cheesecloth-lined, fine-mesh strainer and strain the ghee into a clean jar, pouring carefully and trying to keep the milk solids at the bottom from sliding into the strainer. If you see that a lot of the white solids got into the jar through the strainer, strain one more time. The finished product should be clear and golden in color. Ghee does not have to be refrigerated, but you can refrigerate it if you prefer. The ghee will solidify a bit at room temperature and harden in the fridge. It stays fresh for months. to make the miso-date ghee Use soft, room temperature ghee. Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth. If you prefer to have some larger date chunks in your ghee, reserve one date and add it in once the ghee has been whipped smooth, pulsing once or twice to break the date up into chunks. Distribute the miso-date ghee between small gift jars or place into one jar and keep refrigerated. 3.5.3208 Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients 3-4 cups brussels sprouts - outer damaged leaves removed, halved sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon plain ghee or neutral coconut oil - soft 3-4 teaspoons miso-date ghee at room temperature (from above), plus more for serving ¼ cup pecans - toasted and crushed Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place brussels sprouts onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Add salt, freshly ground black pepper and plain ghee/­­coconut oil, mix thoroughly. Place in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of your brussels sprouts, until baked throughout and charred in places. Let cool slightly. Place the still warm brussels sprouts into a bowl and add the miso-date ghee, mixing thoroughly. Taste and add more if needed. Add toasted pecans and mix. Place onto a serving plate and serve with more miso-date ghee for dipping. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Vegan Cheese Plate .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese

November 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese To those who shared a little about someone special in your life in our last post, thank you. Reading every single one of your notes was an amazing experience, and we are so happy to have created a small space for nurturing a little love and appreciation. Chances are, most of us don’t express our gratitude enough – I know I don’t – yet it’s so important to our individual and collective wellbeing, not to mention it just feels so good and so right. I’m going to start doing that more, right now, by thanking you for coming to this page and cooking from it, you are awesome. And there’s still a chance for you to enter that copper mug giveaway and talk about someone, anyone who makes a positive difference in your life here. This salad is another idea for you to consider for brightening up your holiday table with some seasonal vegetables. It’s easy and parts of it can be prepared ahead of time, and there’s almond cheese! Lentils and beets do so well with marination – both are quite neutral and earthy in taste, and make an excellent canvas for whatever flavors you choose to infuse them with. In this case, they are marinated in a number of warming and piquant spices, along with garlic, parsley and oil. The marinade is transformative, taking the beets and lentils to the territory of being completely irresistible. They are great served on a bed of massaged kale or any other greens you fancy. I steamed the beets here, because of the healthfulness of the method and for that velvety texture that steaming creates, but you can also roast or boil them for this salad. You can easily prepare the marinated beets and lentils the night before, giving the flavors a chance to develop overnight, and having the major component of the salad ready for assembly. Same goes for the almond cheese. I took all the recipes for almond cheese that I’ve experimented with throughout the years and put them together to create the simplest, quickest version that still tastes cheesy and amazing, and that’s the recipe you see here. Its creaminess definitely adds to this salad, as does the sprinkling of bright, bursting pomegranate kernels. And if you are able to eat regular cheese and aren’t up to making this almond one, some nice sheep’s feta or many other crumbly cheeses of your choice would work well here, too. This salad has a nice balance of the qualities I aim to check off in my recipes – easy but sophisticated, interesting in flavor, nutritious and visually stunning, and I hope you’ll consider it :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the salad 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sweet or smoked paprika 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 garlic cloves - minced 1 lemon - juice 6-8 small beets - quartered, steamed, roasted or boiled until silky soft and peeled 1 cup cooked French lentils about 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil small pinch of sea salt kernels from ½ pomegranate almond cheese (recipe below) for the almond cheese 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight, skins optionally removed for a whiter color 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 teaspoon raw honey 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the salad Toss cumin and coriander seeds in a small frying pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine ground spices, salt, paprika, olive oil, garlic and juice of 1 lemon. Place cooked beets and lentils into a bowl and sprinkle with parsley. Pour the marinade over and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours or overnight. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. Place torn kale into a large bowl, add olive oil and a small pinch of salt and massage with your hands until tender. Add marinated beets/­­lentils to the bowl, along with pomegranate kernels and toss. Serve garnished with almond cheese. to make the almond cheese Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Raw Kale Chips Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month

October 27 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month This post is created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home. Hey! It’s good to be back after a week off. We are going to try something different with the way we post recipes here from week to week. Instead of presenting you with a random assortment of whatever dishes strike our fancy, we are going to have more focused themes to center our recipes around. We are doing this to be more purposeful, exploratory and thorough with our recipe development, and to learn alongside our readers as we cook and elaborate on our themes. Ultimately, we want our recipes to be more useful to you, to help you avoid the dead end of making a recipe once and then never again, and to start more of a conversation and community around your suggestions for these themes. The themes can be based on all kinds of circumstances, from the time of year to a particular ingredient, type of dish, or a feeling we are shooting for. So, without further ado, starting with today’s post and until the end of this year, we will be focusing on holiday recipes – indulgent but healthy, full of whole foods and plant power, festive and fun. There will be things to serve at your holiday table, bring to a potluck, or even gift as a present. We are so excited to get this going! We came back from a peaceful week in a North Carolina cabin (including some photos from the trip here) to an empty, disassembled kitchen and just today sold our stove on Craigslist unexpectedly fast. I am basically left with very little to nothing in terms of cooking space and equipment and feel a bit at a loss. I did set up a small cooking nook in our garage, but I’m hoping I won’t have to be there too long, as the kitchen renovations are well on their way. Thankfully, we got a bunch of holiday recipes pinned down while in NC (always-working-on-vacation-club here), starting with this lovely gratin. It’s a perfect side dish for the holiday table for so many reasons – there are seasonal Brussels sprouts and sweet potato, it’s a single dish affair and simple in preparation, which will give you time to focus on other more elaborate main dishes, it’s quite striking in color, and so impressively tasty. It’s also worth mentioning that this is my new favorite treatment for Brussels sprouts. They stew in the spiced turmeric coconut milk and become incredibly tender, silky, almost buttery. I have an inkling that this would be a great dish for converting Brussels sprout skeptics into lovers. Besides the Brussels, there is a middle layer of sweet, caramelized onions, along with thinly sliced sweet potato, which gets slightly crispy at the edges after some time in the oven, then finished with a grating of garlic, pecans and nutmeg. So good! Truffle Toast Home is a well-curated online shop for wine and specialty food accessories. They sent me a set of their stainless steel graters to try out, and I put them to the test while making this gratin. The set includes a fine grater, coarse grater and a shaver, all of which are hand held and great for finishing off all kinds of dishes. I used the shaver for the thinner shavings of sweet potato (I also sliced some), the coarse grater for garlic and pecans, and the finest one for grating whole nutmeg – all were a pleasure to work with. I was especially happy about how effortlessly I was able to grate the nutmeg, because at times grating whole nutmeg can seem like a daunting task. So whether you are in the market for some good graters or need a gift/­­stocking stuffer idea, consider these Truffle Toast Home ones. They come in a very presentable, gift-ready drawstring pouch, too ;) To get 20% off your grater order, use code CUC7MCNV at checkout here until November 25th, 2016. Enjoy! Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided, plus more for oiling baking pan 1 large yellow onion - sliced sea salt - to taste 3 large sweet potatoes - thinly sliced or shredded on mandolin 1 lb Brussels sprouts - thinly sliced or shredded 2 large garlic cloves - shredded or minced, divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 can unsweetened coconut milk 1 tablespoon curry powder - preferably homemade, or to taste ⅓ cup pecans or walnuts - chopped or shredded whole nutmeg - to taste, for grating on top (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a medium sauté pan. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté until caramelized and lightly golden, for about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a medium baking dish or 10-inch cast-iron pan by oiling it with coconut oil. Arrange half of the sweet potatoes on the bottom of the dish/­­pan. Scatter caramelized onion on top. Combine Brussels sprouts, 1 garlic clove, pinch of salt, freshly ground black pepper and the remaining ½ tbsp of coconut oil in a mixing bowl, toss to coat. Spread Brussels sprouts in a layer on top of the onions. Arrange the rest of the sweet potatoes on top. Combine coconut milk and curry powder, whisk or blend to mix. Pour mixture over the gratin. Combine pecans with the rest of the garlic, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle the mixture on top of the potatoes. Cover your baking dish or pan with a lid or foil and bake for 25 minutes. Take off the cover and continue to bake for another 30 minutes, or until soft throughout. Garnish by grating nutmeg on top and serve right away. Leftovers are delicious when reheated in the pan, with some coconut oil and covered, over medium-low heat, or at 350° F in the oven for about 10-15 minutes. Notes 1. If you dont have curry, you might have all the spices to mix your own curry. Use a mixture of turmeric (1 teaspoon), cumin seeds (1 tablespoon), 5 crushed cardamom pods and a pinch of red pepper flakes instead of pre-made curry powder. Adjust amounts of spices to your taste if desired. Fresh turmeric root is also an excellent addition here, when blended with coconut milk and other spices. 2. I find that the best and most convenient way of preparing this gratin is baking it in a cast-iron pan. In the absence of my own kitchen and dishes, I made it in baking dishes for this post. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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