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Vegan Stovetop Meat Lasagna (Skillet Lasagna)

October 11 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Stovetop Meat Lasagna (Skillet Lasagna)Vegan Meat Lasagna made in one skillet - a vegan spin on classic Italian Lasagna cooked on the stove! No baking required! An easy One Skillet pasta dinner your family will love! Gluten-free option included. Pasta lovers,  this easy Vegan One Skillet Meat Lasagna is going to be a new fave dinner for you. Im obsessed with one skillet dinners like this Stovetop Lasagna! Easy preparation and quick clean up – check and check. This vegan spin on classic lasagna bolognese makes the perfect weeknight meal. It is family-friendly, uses just 1 skillet, and is ready to eat in about 45 minutes! Preparing Lasagna on the stovetop is a lot quicker than making a regular lasagna in the oven and there will be way fewer dishes to clean than with a traditional lasagna as we skip the bechamel part. This also means that there is no layering needed which cuts down on prep time dramatically. Those lasagna sheets just go in with all the other ingredients. All the other ingredients being simple pantry staples like marinara sauce, Italian herbs, onions and garlic. After the popular French onion skillet lasagna  and the spinach Alfredo skillet lasagna, this is your classic red sauce and meat skillet version! If vegan meat crumbles or veggie crumbles arent your thing, you can easily substitute with cooked lentils. I prefer the crumbles as they make the dish feel like totally authentic Italian comfort food, but both options work nicely. MORE VEGAN SKILLET LASAGNA OR PASTA RECIPES: - French onion skillet lasagna - Spinach Alfredo skillet lasagna - Butter Chicken lasagna bake or skillet  - Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta - Creamy Mushroom Spinach Pasta  Continue reading: Vegan Stovetop Meat Lasagna (Skillet Lasagna)The post Vegan Stovetop Meat Lasagna (Skillet Lasagna) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings

October 5 2021 My New Roots 

Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings Hello friend. Its been a while. I sincerely hope that these words find you getting by as best you can in this strange world we find ourselves in. Staying centered and grounded these days is no small feat, and Im grateful to find myself here again, with the energy and space to share.  This post is actually two years in the making. The experience Im about to tell you about deserves thought, healing, and humility, and though I made a delicious recipe, I needed ample time to learn from, and honour the situation. Almost like with rich decadent food, your body and mind needs time to digest emotion and experience, and over the past 20 months of intense turmoil, discovering and uncovering, and worldly change, there is no better occasion or cultural climate than this moment to share one of my lifes most potent experiences. I hope youll join me on the entirety of this journey and take the time to read and digest it for yourself too. I welcome conscious comments and will receive your words gracefully and with humility in regards to my personal history and ask kindly that the inevitable missteps, mistakes, and /­­ or insensitivities in my story shared below are highlighted with respect and with the intention of learning, inspiring community and healing, and are supportive of a better and more just future.   The People Ill begin by introducing the people of the story that span many generations, many places of origin, and many cultures: The Anishinaabeg – an Indigenous community made up of the Ojibwa, Odawa, Potawatami, Chippewa, Mississauga, Algonquin, and Delaware peoples who stewarded the Great Lakes Basin before and through the late 1600s. A man named James Whetung of the Black Duck clan, Anishinaabe who has called this land home for his lifetime and the many generations before him. My European ancestors who arrived in this same area (Upper Canada then, and what is now known as Southern Ontario) in the early-to-mid 1800s. A young man named Mossom Boyd, my great-, great-, great-grandfather, who landed in 1833. He purchased 100 acres of land and cleared it himself in the hopes of building a prosperous life. After farming for a few years, he wasnt making the income hed hoped for, and sought work at a local sawmill, eventually taking it over, on the site which is now Bobcaygeon, Ontario.   As Boyd continued to work the land, benefitting from the abundant natural resources, he experienced great success with his lumbering enterprise. He later went on to cut forests in great swathes across Ontario, then moved out west to Vancouver Island with his son, Martin Mossom Boyd, who eventually took over the business. Needless to say, the familys enterprise had an indelible impact on the Canadian landscape and the Indigenous peoples. Me, a white, privileged woman who benefits from this history in seen and unseen ways with a mission to inspire health to the people of this world through conscious choices. Heres one of my many stories...  My Family I spent my summers in the Kawartha Lakes, just 12 kilometers upstream from the reserve where James lived and lives. My grandparents lived on the canal at the mouth of Pigeon lake, on the Trent-Severn Waterway. My grandfather owned a substantial portion of the land there (how we understand owned in our modern world), and a 1085-acre island just off the shoreline.  I was a very lucky kid to have so much wild land to explore, play with, and learn from. To say I feel connected to nature, to the earth and water, to the elements there, would be an understatement. That forest and lake are inside of me, just as much as I am inside of it – I knew every rock, nook, cranny, and crevice. I knew the plants, the poison ivy, the lichen, the cedar; the shallow soil, dry and bare rocks, the limestone; I can evoke the alchemical aroma of it all in an instant. My hideaways along the shoreline in giant rock fractures were coated in moss and gnarled cedar roots, and there I would live in worlds of my imagination, connected to natures creations and its magnetic energy. The sensation of being there, on every level, is burned into my being. It is cellular memory.    Mossom Boyd 1814-1883 /­­ My father and I canoeing on Pigeon Lake /­­ Fishing on Pigeon Lake, 1990 There is a museum in town, named after my great-great-great grandfather Mossom, honouring his vision and entrepreneurial genius (as our culture recognizes). This history was one to celebrate, an empire that spanned the country, a legacy to be proud of. We would visit the museum almost every summer when I was growing up, so that I could better understand where I came from. These truths coexisted within me — nature and empire. As I began to see the complexities of this place that is deeply a part of me, I sought out a way to understand the same land, water, air, forest through the eyes, hands, and hearts of the people with a completely different history to the shared nature and to the empire of my lineage.  The Whetungs James family has been living with the land known as the Michi Saagig Anishinaabeg territory for approximately 4,000 years, dated by wild rice fossils found by geologists. This being the same land, that Mossom Boyd purchased 3,780 years later.  When I drove up to Curve Lake First Nations to experience a wild rice (known as manoomin) harvest two years ago, I met James Whetung and his family. The man whose name I had heard before, but was admittedly afraid to come face to face with, as I had some idea of how my lineage had impacted his. At least I thought I knew. When the group of us had all arrived and settled, James introduced himself, and told his story – the side that I had never heard before. They cut all the trees, floated them down river using the highways of my people. They needed clearer waterways, so they dredged the lakes and removed the rice beds that had provided our food. The First Nations peoples were forcefully moved to reserves, and confined there, needing written permission to leave, and only in order to work for local farmers at slave wages. You had to be Christian to live on the reserve, and Natives were not allowed to practice their own spirituality or pass it on to subsequent generations. The people were starving. Listening to James, and hearing first-hand what his ancestors had gone through because of my ancestors, was heartbreaking, and it filled me with bitter shame and confusion. What was once a celebrated history of my family, became tainted and disgraceful. When he was finished, I raised my hand to speak, compelled to admit that I came from the family he was talking about. The lineage and industry that changed the landscape of his ancestors’ home. That I was deeply remorseful. He responded graciously by inviting me to canoe out with him to harvest manoomin. He said that those on the reserves eventually were able to take the remaining rice seeds and plant them. By 1920, the yields were up but only until the 1950s when destructive colonial farming practices began using chemicals (many of which still are in use today), which created chemical run-off causing imbalances in the lakes, soil, air, and water, further affecting the aquatic grasses; the nutritious, traditional food source.   Wild Rice on Pigeon Lake Canadian cottage culture took off in the area around this time as well, motor boat traffic increased destroying the rice beds, and leaked oil and gas into the water. Septic beds were added for sewage treatment, but none were regulated and leaching into lakes was a regular occurrence. In the years between 1950 and 1980, the Trent Severn Waterway underwent a weed eradication program using agent orange (a highly toxic herbicide) to make swimming more enjoyable for the cottagers. Shortly after, James started planting seeds to feed his family and community despite the many cultural and environmental concerns out of his control. Wild rice as a traditional food source is highly nutritious and is known to help prevent diabetes — a huge problem within Indigenous peoples due to a forced disconnection from their traditional practices and nourishment sources. James started sowing seeds on Pigeon lake, where his grandfather had seeded and harvested for many generations. He was healing his people, and as demand increased, he started to invent technologies to make his work easier and faster. The increased production meant that he could not only feed his community, but start selling his wild rice at local farmers markets.  Unfortunately, not everyone is as enthusiastic about the wild rice increase in Pigeon and surrounding lakes. Since 2007, a group of cottagers have been fighting against Whetungs seeding of wild rice, claiming that the shoreline is their property and that the rice beds impede recreational boating. Theyve gone so far as to form a protest group, called Save Pigeon Lake, which asks James to harvest without the use of a motorboat (he did this to increase efficiency) and to stop seeding the rice.  Canada and Curve Lake First Nation are both signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This Declaration states that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economic activities (Article 20). And further, that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of the sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora... (Article 31). The rice beds run along the TSW in the tri-lakes area, which includes Buckhorn, Chemong and Pigeon lakes. Despite the concerns of waterfront property owners, Whetung says the land falls under Treaty 20 and is therefore not under the jurisdiction of the TSW, which is operated by Parks Canada.  About James Im going to keep doing what I am doing. Why would I stop? Our people have starved for thousands of years. This is food; this is a livelihood, says Whetung. And personally, as an advocate for healthy food access for all, for a thriving world, and supported communities, I whole-heartedly agree. For more about James and his community’s work, please visit the Black Duck Wild Rice website. I am deeply grateful for James time, energy, heart, perseverance, and spirit. This is a forever healing journey and one I intend to continue with the peoples intrinsically linked to my own familys history here in Canada. Wild Rice Harvesting and Preparation Let’s talk about this beautiful offering, manoomin, or wild rice. Having always been drawn to this remarkable plant, I knew that when I moved back to Ontario, Canada, I had to learn more about it firsthand, and perhaps even how to harvest and process it. That is what led me to James and Black Duck Wild Rice. Every year around the September full moon, the manoomin harvest takes place, and he and his community welcome those who want to join and learn. Harvesting James taught us the traditional way, in canoes, all by hand. With two people per boat, one navigates and steers, while the other uses two long, thin sticks (bawa’iganaakoog); one to bend the rice into the canoe and the other to beat the grasses until the rice seeds fall into the hull of the canoe. Once you get the hang of it, it’s rhythmic and meditative, but still a physical and time-consuming ritual that requires community. As with most traditional food cultivation practices its a closed loop cycle, for whatever rice that doesnt fall into the canoe to be processed falls into the water, planting next years crop at the same time! Curing Once on shore, the canoes are emptied by hand onto large sheets which are transferred to a cool dark place so the rice can cure. Two or three times a day for a week or so, the rice is turned and aerated, left to dry.  Toasting /­­ Parching The rice was traditionally toasted in a cast-iron cauldron over an open fire. James showed me how to use an old canoe paddle to turn the rice constantly so as not to scorch it — its texture and scent slowly transformed. This takes about an hour of constant stirring with a keen eye on the fire so it remains at the perfect temperature for toasting. If you stop for even a second, the rice will burn. James could tell from the smell, and how the rice felt between his fingers when it was ready the mark of a true artisan, energetically connected to his craft. Nowadays, James uses a machine that he designed and built himself, that stirs the rice automatically over open flames and gets the rice toasty faster and with less manual labour. Toasting the rice increases the flavour, and helps preserve it. If properly toasted and dry, wild rice can last in storage for five years or more (a necessity to help balance the yearly ebbs and flows of the harvest).  Dancing /­­ Jigging This was my favourite part of the process because it involved several people working together, and having the pleasure and honour of wearing beautiful, specially-designed moccasins just for this process. The toasted rice is put into another large cauldron (or sometimes a hole in the ground lined with leather cloth or a tarp) while three people sit around it, with our feet in the center. Once we had our soft shoes laced all the way up, we vigorously twisted and swooshed our feet around on the rice to loosen some of the chaff from the rice kernels — this was extremely hard work! We rotated through the group as people got tired, and eventually we were ready for the last step. Winnowing The danced rice is then turned out onto a large fabric sheet, with everyone holding the edge with both hands. Count to three and up the rice goes into the air, the breeze blowing the chaff away. This needs to be repeated countless times to separate the rice from the chaff completely. This is unbelievably time-consuming work and experiencing it first hand made me appreciate every grain so much more! At the end of a grounding day of traditional work, you are gifted a few cups of cleaned wild rice. The appreciation I felt to see the yield of the countless hours by many people, not to mention the effort and contribution of this Earth truly became overwhelming. The experience solidified how food has the unparalleled ability to bring people together — requiring many enthusiastic, hard-working hands (and feet!) to get the job done, start to finish. At the end of the journey, everyone is rewarded with delicious food, straight from the Earth, her waters, her people. It is so simple, and so powerful. Wildly Nutritious Wild rice is not related to true rice nor is a grain at all in fact, but the seed of aquatic grass that grows along the shores of freshwater lakes in Canada and the Northern US. Its a little more expensive than other varieties, as it is often harvested by hand.  Wild rice is also, of course, wildly nutritious and is no surprise that Indigenous peoples made a point to cultivate this true super food. Containing high levels of protein, fiber, iron, and calcium, wild rice is also gluten-free. It is extremely high in folic acid, an essential B-complex vitamin lacking in many peoples diets. Just half a cup of cooked wild rice yields 21.3 mcg of folic acid – necessary for cardiovascular support, red blood cell production, brain and nervous system health, and of particular importance during pregnancy – where brown rice by comparison offers only 3.9 mcg. The niacin content of wild rice is also notably high with l.06 mg for every 1/­­2 cup cooked rice. Potassium packs an 83 mg punch, and zinc, which is usually available in trace amounts, registers 1.1 mg. Wild rice is a wonderful alternative to any grain that you would use in either hot or cold dishes. My favourite is to enjoy it in veggie bowls, soups and stews, as well as hearty salads. Its rich, nutty flavour pairs well with other earthy-sweet foods like beets, sweet potato, pumpkins and squash, making it the perfect ingredient to add to your fall recipes, already full of abundance and gratitude. It lasts for about a week after cooking, so making a large batch at the beginning of the week will give you the honour to grace your meals with a serious boost of nutrition and spirit with every grain! Wild Rice & Butternut Blessings This recipe was born from the desire to combine the elements that James and I had a hand in growing: wild rice from his lake, and butternut squash from my garden, coming together for one beautiful meal. Stacking the squash rounds makes for a grand, dramatic, and eye-catching presentation where the simple ingredients are made into something very special. This would be the most stunning main dish for a harvest celebration meal, or even into the winter holidays. It has the perfect balance of flavours, textures, and nutrition, so youll feel satisfied on every level. Try to find a butternut squash with a long and hefty neck. Since we are after nice big rounds, the longer your neck, the more rounds youll have! And try to source your wild rice from a local reserve or farmers market, if possible. There are several components to this recipe, but Ive written it in a way that you can juggle all the elements with seamless management of your time.    Print Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings with Mushrooms, Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce, and Sumac Author Sarah Britton Ingredients4 lb. /­­ 2kg butternut squash about 1 large, try to find one with a long neck! 1 cup /­­ 175g wild rice soaked for at least 12 hours 9 oz. /­­ 250g mixed wild mushrooms or any mushroom of your choice 3 cloves garlic minced a couple sprigs fresh thyme and rosemary 1/­­2 cup /­­ 13g chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 batch Toasted Walnut Sauce recipe follows 1 Tbsp. sumac divided freshly cracked black pepper handful of walnuts for garnish if desired Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce1 cup /­­ 125g raw walnuts 1 garlic clove 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. pure maple syrup 2 generous pinches of fine sea salt plus more as needed InstructionsStart by cooking the wild rice: drain and rinse the soaked rice well, place in a pot. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of fresh water, a couple pinches of sea salt, then bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. While the rice is cooking, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Spread the walnuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Toast for 7 to 10 minutes, watching them carefully so they do not burn, until they are golden and fragrant. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Turn the oven heat up to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Give the butternut squash a good scrub, making sure to remove any dust or dirt. Leaving the skin on, slice the squash neck into rounds about 1 /­­ 2.5cm thick. Place on a baking sheet, sprinkle with a little salt, and roast in the oven for 20-30 minutes, flipping once halfway through cooking, until the squash is fork tender. Remove from the oven and drizzle with olive oil and a little more salt, if desired.  While the squash is roasting, make the Toasted Walnut Sauce. Place the toasted walnuts, garlic, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and maple syrup in a blender. Blend on high, adding up to 1 cup /­­ 250ml of water to thin the dressing as needed--you are looking for the consistency of melted ice cream. Season with salt. Store in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to 5 days. Lastly, prepare the mushrooms. Clean and cut the mushrooms as desired (I used king oyster mushrooms, sliced in half lengthwise and scored diagonally). Add a knob of your favourite cooking fat to a large skillet, and once melted add the mushrooms and a couple pinches of salt. Cook the mushrooms without crowding them, and do not move them about in the pan too much. Youre looking for a nice sear and that comes after the mushrooms have been in constant, direct contact with high heat. Once golden on one side, flip, and continue cooking until golden on the other. In a large bowl, combine the wild rice and parsley. Drizzle a touch of the sauce and about 1/­­2 Tbsp. of the sumac, a few grinds of black pepper, and fold to incorporate. To assemble, drizzle or puddle some sauce on the bottom of your serving plate. Add a round of butternut squash, followed by the wild rice mixture, a couple mushrooms, then repeat the layers of squash, rice, mushrooms. Drizzle remaining sauce over top, sprinkle with additional sumac and black pepper, and a handful of walnuts. Say thank you and enjoy each bite, each grain. NotesServes 4 Makes approximately 1 cup /­­ 270ml of Sauce In Closing I would love to hear your thoughts about how we can better respect and heal our pasts culturally, together. I wanted to open up the conversation here, not try to offer some kind of solution. This is a complicated, complex, deeply layered issue that has deep roots, well beyond us here today. I feel really lucky to have had the opportunity to be in a canoe with James himself, to witness how to harvest with intention and gratitude. It felt deeply meaningful to be there with him, the place our two family lines have crossed in many ways for many years, finally converging in a peaceful, cooperative, and hopefully reciprocal way. This extends far beyond James and I, and takes many more hands and hearts. The first step of many, I am forever grateful to James for sharing the story of his family and community as it has been silenced for too long. Thank you for taking the time to read this today. Id also like to add for those who havent seen Canadian news over the past few months, that there has been uncovering of more extreme darkness in this country in relation to the Indigneous people of this land. The residential school system removed children from their Indigenous culture, communities, families, and ways of being. These Anglo-Saxon, Christian boarding schools are sites of mass unmarked graves where thousands of children’s bodies were found, taken from their families. There are many agencies working towards healing, remediation, and reconciliation in response to these unfathomable atrocities in our history. One of them is the Downie Wenjack Foundation, which aims to to aid our collective reconciliation journey through a combination of awareness, education, and action. This link will take you to their page about Reconcili-ACTION, and a list of ways to catalyze important conversations and meaningful change, recognizing that change starts with every one of us and each person can make an impact. The post Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegetable Balti

June 2 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable BaltiThis easy Vegetable Balti is a really delicious way to get the family to eat healthy veggies like bell pepper and cauliflower, as the Balti Spices add a fantastic Indian flavor to them. Glutenfree Soyfree and Nutfree!. Serve it with rice. Meet vegetable balti! An easy veggie-forward weeknight dinner made in one casserole! What is Vegetable Balti and how is it different from other curries Balti translates to “bucket” in Hindi and refers to the style of cooking used for this dish. The food is cooked in an iron pan with two handles that looks a bit like a bucket. This style of cooking is said to have originated in a Pakistani restaurant in Birmingham, back in the 1970s. The now-famous balti curry has become a restaurant favorite as it is flavorful yet mild! My Balti spice blend really takes mere moments to make and lends such an incredible depth of flavor to the vegetables. While there are balti spice pastes available, the homemade spice blend is far superior to anything found in bottles or ready-made pastes. Think of vegetable balti as a type of stir-fry. We bake this dish in the oven. No burnt spices! If you loved my Vegetable Curry Casserole, you will love this one too! What is Balti Flavour? Balti sauce is a fragrant Indian sauce based on garlic, onions and ginger and a blend of Indian spices. Fresh whole spices are ground and used for the best flavor. They add umami flavor to the sauce. Balti sauce is generally not creamy but you can easily add coconut milk or cashew milk instead of water.  Balti gosht is eaten in Pakistan and North India, as well as other parts of the world, such as Great Britain. More veggie-forward dishes to try - Butter Tofu GF - IP Tikka Masala Simmer Sauce , with Cauliflower. GF - Tofu Amritsari Masala.GF - Instant Pot Vegan Butter Chickin(soycurls). GF - Creamy, Delicious - Mushroom Matar Masala GF - Bombay Potato and Peas GF - Tofu in Spinach Curry - Palak Tofu GF Continue reading: Vegetable BaltiThe post Vegetable Balti appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Easter Recipes

March 25 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Easter Recipes Planning a plant-based Easter feast? You’ve come to the right place. I’ve rounded up all my favorite Vegan Easter recipes right here, so you can plan the perfect menu. From easy appetizers, to hearty main dishes, to sweet desserts – there’s something for everyone. Easter is the perfect holiday for putting together a vegan brunch or dinner. With all of the fresh, seasonal product of spring – these recipes are filled with light leafy greens, fresh asparagus, beets, carrots, and bright, citrusy flavors. So much deliciousness! Use these mix and match vegan menu suggestions to create a memorable Easter feast for your family and friends. Vegan Easter Appetizers Deviled Tomatoes Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Beet Muhummara Spinach or Arugula Strudel Green Pea, Parsley, and Pistachio Dip Raw Vegan Cheddar Cheese Spread Rosemary Roasted Mushrooms Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Vegan Easter Soups Greek-Flavored Spinach and Orzo Soup Vegan Tomato Gazpacho Lemony Leek and Mushroom Soup Creole Carrot Soup Vegan Cream of Broccoli Soup Creole Eggplant Soup Classic Leek and Potato Soup Vegan Easter Salads Spring Greens Salad with Endive and Oranges Mixed Greens Salad with Beets and Walnuts Asparagus with Mustard-Dill Sauce Beet and Red Cabbage Slaw Orange and […] The post Vegan Easter Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Mushroom Stroganoff – One Pot

March 7 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mushroom Stroganoff – One PotThis Vegan Mushroom Stroganoff recipe is packed with earthy flavor and umami from mushrooms and so creamy you wont believe its dairy-free. Paired with pasta and sprinkled with parsley its the ultimate vegan comfort food. And its all made in just 1 Skillet! Lovers of creamy mushroom sauces, you gotta try this vegan mushroom stroganoff recipe – it is so good. It has all that lovely earthy mushroom flavor you can dream of and is finished off with that signature Stroganoff tang from some homemade vegan cashew sour cream and a touch of white wine. The smell of brown mushrooms cooking with garlic and fresh herbs, is one of my favorite scents ever! Plus, this recipe is EASY! The most difficult part of the recipe is slicing mushrooms and chopping some garlic and onions. If you wanted to make this even easier you can purchase pre-sliced mushrooms . MORE VEGAN PASTA RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: - Creamy Vegan Cajun Pasta - Spinach Artichoke Pasta Bake - Vegan Mushroom Fettucine Alfredo - Cajun Cauliflower Pasta  - Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta - Roasted Red Bell Pepper Chickpea Pasta  - Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta Bake  - Vegan Sundried Tomato Pasta Continue reading: Vegan Mushroom Stroganoff – One PotThe post Vegan Mushroom Stroganoff – One Pot appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto

January 20 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto I find risotto to be incredibly fun to cook. I like to have something nice to sip by my side, some good music on, and all the ingredients measured out in advance. It’s a preparation process that really gets you in the zone, an almost meditative state of tending to the rice, and watching it magically transform from dry to beautifully creamy. Risotto has a reputation of being fussy, and although it requires constant attention, the ingredients it calls for couldn’t be more modest: alliums like onions and garlic, rice, wine, hot broth, and whatever other items you’d like to add to make it your own. In this recipe, it’s cabbage and lemon, both abundant in the depths of winter. Once you get the hang of it, the preparation becomes second nature as well. We gently stew the cabbage in lemon juice until incredibly tender, so much so that it completely melts and disappears into the risotto. It’s a great way to eat a whole head of cabbage almost without noticing. The bright and assertive flavors from the lemon juice and zest complement the starchiness and richness of the rice really nicely. A small warning: this risotto is quite lemony, so if you’re sensitive to sour flavors, I recommend reducing the amount of lemon (this is detailed in the recipe as well). Also, the lemon mellows out as it sits and in the leftovers. Since this is a vegan recipe, there’s no cheese, but we throw together a quick, ‘cheesy’ cashew dust, a cashew Parm of sorts, and stir it through the risotto. The result is so incredibly cozy and comforting, we hope you’ll give it a try one day this winter! Cabbage and Lemon Risotto   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ¼ cup raw cashews 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast sea salt freshly ground black pepper olive oil 1 medium head white cabbage, thinly sliced with a knife or mandoline zest and juice from 2 small lemons (see note) 1 yellow onion, diced 4 garlic cloves, minced 1½ cups Arborio rice ¼ cup dry white wine 6 cups hot vegetable broth, plus more if needed parsley or other herbs for garnishing (optional) Instructions Pound the cashews in a mortar and pestle or process in a mini food processor, until finely ground. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous pinch of salt, and plenty of black pepper. Mix to combine. Set aside for now. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the cabbage and a pinch of salt, and cook for 10 minutes, until the cabbage is just wilted. Add the juice of 1 lemon and stir it in. Turn the heat down to low, and cover the skillet. Cook the cabbage, covered, for 45 minutes, stirring periodically, until very soft. Transfer the cabbage to a bowl and wipe the skillet if needed. Heat the same skillet over medium heat and add more oil to coat the bottom well. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and stir it around until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and mix well to coat it with the oil. Cook, stirring constantly, until the rice grains are translucent, about 3-5 minutes. Add the juice of 1 remaining lemon and the wine, bring it up to a simmer and cook, stirring often, until the liquid is completely absorbed, about 2 minutes. Start adding the hot broth, one ladleful at a time. Bring the broth to a simmer and let it absorb into the rice, stirring often, about 2-4 minutes. Once absorbed, add another ladleful of broth and keep repeating this process of letting the broth absorb, then adding more. Stir the rice frequently and vigorously - this will help develop the starches/­­make the rice creamy. Add about half of the cabbage during the 4th addition of broth. Add the rest of the cabbage at the next addition of broth, and continue cooking, until the rice is creamy and al dente, and until the cabbage has collapsed completely into the risotto. The whole cooking process should take 25-30 minutes total from the first addition of broth. Turn off the heat, mix in the lemon zest and most of the cashew mixture, saving some for garnishing. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the risotto right away, garnished with more of the cashew dust and herbs, if using. Notes This dish is quite lemony, so if you are sensitive to sour flavors, use 1 lemon, divided between the cabbage and the rice, instead of the 2 lemons that the recipe calls for. 3.5.3226 The post Cabbage and Lemon Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet

December 17 2020 VegKitchen 

Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet This white bean and kale recipe makes for the perfect hearty, healthy meal. Complemented by fire-roasted tomatoes, sweet onions, and artichoke hearts, these Italian white beans are both delicious and 100% vegan.  This one skillet meal is ready in less than 20 minutes and requires minimal clean up! Just throw everything in the skillet to cook and serve it along with some warm bread. If youre craving an Italian-style recipe without leaving the house, this is the perfect recipe for you! Feel free to add extra spices, such as fresh parsley, basil, rosemary, oregano, and thyme. You may even add a couple bay leaves to the mix once youve added in the liquid.  This Italian white beans recipe is…  vegan vegetarian plant-based Italian-inspired ready in 20 minutes an easy weeknight meal How to Make White Beans and Kale Heat up the olive (or avocado) oil in a large skillet on the stove.  Add onions to the skilled and cook until they are softened. Add the garlic and sun-dried tomatoes to the skillet and cook.  Deglaze the skillet with either white wine or vegetable broth. Throw the beans, fire-roasted tomatoes, artichoke hearts, and Italian spices to the skillet.  Stir to combine […] The post Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet appeared first on VegKitchen.

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions

October 7 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions This is the kind of food I crave when it feels like fall is really here to stay. Fried potatoes were a staple growing up in Russia, and wild foraged mushrooms were often cooked up with onions and served alongside potatoes similarly to this. The whole thing tastes kind of like a walk in the autumn woods. Frying the potatoes is a little fussy, but the resulting golden coins that are crispy on the outside and creamy inside are seriously worth it. We parboil the potatoes, which makes it infinitely easier to get them cooked through and crispy but not burnt when frying. I also love leaving the skins on the potatoes to not only skip a tedious step, but also because they turn nice and crispy from the frying. Hope you’ll give this dish a try one chilly fall evening! Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1½ lbs baby potatoes (any waxy kind) sea salt olive oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms or other mushrooms of choice - sliced 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary (optional) freshly ground black pepper handful of parsley or dill - chopped Instructions Put the potatoes in a pot, cover with water and salt well. Bring to a boil and boil until just cooked, 10-15 minutes. Drain the potatoes, let cool, and slice into ⅛ coins. Meanwhile, heat a large cast iron pan (or another non-stick pan) over medium heat and add enough oil to coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and rosemary, if using, stir once to coat in the oil, then let the mushrooms brown, undisturbed, for about 10-15 minutes. Once the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid they release evaporates, season them with more salt and black pepper, mix to coat. Remove the mushrooms and onions from the pan and set aside for now. Wipe the pan if needed. Add more oil to generously coat the bottom of the pan and turn the heat up to medium-high. Add about a third of the potatoes to the pan and season them with salt. The potatoes should cover the pan in one layer and shouldnt be too crowded. Fry the potatoes for about 5 minutes, until the undersides are golden and crispy, then flip and fry the other side for another 5 minutes, or until golden. Transfer the fried potatoes to a plate and continue frying the rest of the potatoes in batches. Add more oil between batches if necessary. Once all the potatoes are done, return them to the pan along with the mushrooms and onions, mix carefully until warmed back through. Serve the potatoes and mushrooms right away, sprinkled with parsley or dill. 3.5.3226 The post Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Zucchini and Herb Hummus

June 17 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini and Herb Hummus There is a stand at the local St. Petersburg farmer’s market that sells the most delicious hummus. I got to talking with the owner one day, and she pointed out that the hummus is made without chickpeas, which I myself didn’t notice when trying a sample. She makes it this way is because of a legume intolerance and uses zucchini in place of chickpeas. The zucchini gives the dip that creamy texture and fairly neutral flavor that usually comes from the chickpeas. With the addition of tahini and lemon juice, the ingredient swap is almost unnoticeable. I thought it would be fun to try making a version of that hummus at home, and to share the recipe here. This dip is so fresh. It’s packed with herbs, and the zucchini makes it light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try this summer. Also, if you’re looking for an easy recipe for crackers to go with this hummus, this one is great. P.S. Thank you so much for your support on our new weeknight recipe ebook! In case you missed it, you can check it out/­­purchase here. Zucchini and Herb Hummus   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 3 medium-large zucchini - halved lengthwise 2 teaspoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling the zucchini sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup tahini zest and juice from 1 large lemon 3 cloves garlic - roughly chopped a few large handfuls fresh herbs (dill, parsley, basil, etc.) Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Put the zucchini on a parchment-covered baking sheet, cut side up. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the zucchini for 30-35 minutes, until knife-tender. Let cool for at least 15 minutes. In a food processor, combine the roasted zucchini, olive oil, tahini, lemon zest and juice, garlic, herbs, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Process until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Transfer the hummus to a sealable container and let cool in the refrigerator for at least an hour before enjoying. 3.5.3226 New Ebook! This ebook is a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of these vibrant, weeknight meals. Click Here to Buy   The post Zucchini and Herb Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Shawarma Tofu

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

You may be familiar with Shawarma, a traditional mix of spit-roasted meats served in a pita, so youll love this meatless spin on a classic Levantine dish. To your health, or L’Chaim! Recipe by Adi Shapira, from Cooking Meatless Monday Israel (in Hebrew). Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 2 and half cups of hard tofu, cut into thin strips with a carrot peeler - 4 tablespoons olive oil - 2 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced half rings - 1 carrot, peeled and cut into thin strips with a carrot peeler   - Spices: - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon cumin - 1 tablespoon shawarma spice - 1 tablespoon sweet paprika - Optional: - Chili pepper - Salt - 1 teaspoon garlic powder   - Serving suggestion: chopped parsley, tahini salad   Preparation: Place in a bowl: the strips of tofu, a tablespoon of olive oil, and all the spices. Stir. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan. Add the onion and fry for about 7 minutes, until golden. Add the carrots and fry while occasionally stirring another 2 minutes. Add the seasoned tofu and stir well. Stir until the tofu is golden at the edges. Transfer to a serving dish or place in a pita bread pocket, finish with chopped parsley and tahini salad. Serve! The post Shawarma Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Truffled Almond Alfredo With Really Garlicky Broccoli

March 14 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Truffled Almond Alfredo With Really Garlicky Broccoli Serves 4-ish (or two really hungries) Photo By VK Rees This alfredo is deceptively simple, but totally creamy with a hint of nuttiness. The almonds act a little bit different than cashews when blended, because they retain some of their texture reminiscent of hard cheese. Which is, of course, a must for Alfredo. Combined with a lil lemon and nooch, it gets the job done! I love to serve it with really really REALLY garlicky broccoli. The secret to getting it good and garlicky is adding the garlic at the end. That way the garlic doesnt burn but you can take your time getting the broccoli cooked just right. This recipe is originally from Isa Does It. Recipe Notes ~Slivered almonds are great here because the skin is removed, and it makes the sauce a bit smoother, and keeps the sauce looking creamy and pristine. ~Truffle oil gives this pasta an allure that screams Fancy day! Even if its just you on the couch watching Bridgerton for the third time. Or is it the fourth? Its a fun ingredient to have around, and, although its a little pricey, it aint nothing compared to the cost of an actual truffle. ~It will take about 1 1/­­2 pounds of broccoli to make 6 cups. That means it should weigh 1 1/­­2 pounds when you pick it up from the store and once youve butchered it and discarded the rough ends, it will equal about 6 cups. Ingredients For the Alfredo: 1/­­2 lb linguine 1 cup slivered almonds 1 1/­­4 cups vegetable broth 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons black truffle oil Fresh black pepper to taste 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley For the Broccoli: 6 cups broccoli florets and thinly sliced stems 1 tablespoon plus one teasoon olive oil, divided Big pinch salt 6 cloves garlic, minced Directions Boil a pot of salted water for your pasta. Prepare the pasta according to package directions. In the meantime, place all sauce ingredients in a blender. Blend until relatively smooth. I usually blend for about 5 minutes, giving the blender a break every minute or so so that the motor doesnt overheat. If you have a high speed blender it will be faster. Make the broccoli: Preheat a large heavy bottomed pan over medium heat. Saute the broccoli in one tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of salt for about 5 to 7 minutes, tossing often, until it is a bright green. Add a few splashes of water if it seems dry.  Now push the broccoli to one side of the pan, and add the garlic. Immediately drizzle the one teaspoon of olive oil over the garlic and toss to coat, then integrate the garlic with the broccoli and cook for another minute.  Assemble: Drain the pasta and add it immediately back to the pot you boiled it in. Add the sauce and parsley and toss to coat. Taste for salt and seasoning. Serve with broccoli!

Fennel and Lentil Soup with Gremolata

February 17 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel and Lentil Soup with Gremolata I love fennel, always, but especially during this time of year, when cravings for spring start coming on strong. Fennel’s one-of-a-kind anise flavor, brightness, and crunch really hit the spot, while I dream of verdant spring produce. It’s also citrus season, and simple mandolined fennel and blood orange salads are a favorite (something like this salad, plus segmented or sliced orange, and often without the beans). Fennel is delicious cooked, too – caramelized sauteed fennel, fennel gratin, etc. We also love it in soups, and this week’s recipe is a super simple lentil soup, centered around fennel. We use fennel seeds and bulbs in the soup, and even include the greens from the fennel tops in gremolata, for topping the soup. When it comes to very simple dishes like this one, it’s all about the accompaniments, which is where the gremolata comes in. It’s a condiment kind of similar to Italian salsa verde but without oil, made with just chopped parsley, garlic, and lemon zest. It’s delicious spooned over pretty much any savory fare. That, plus maybe some good, crusty bread, and you’re in for a very cozy meal with this soup. Hope you’ll give it a try! P.S. We just revived our Youtube Channel! Come and stay for simple, seasonal, plant-based cooking and other fun kitchen activities. Our very first video back happens to show you exactly how to make an orange and fennel salad, in case you’re as obsessed with fennel as we are. Fennel and Lentil Soup with Gremolata   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon fennel seeds 1 large or 2 medium fennel bulbs olive oil sea salt 1 yellow onion, diced small 1 medium carrot, diced small 1 celery stalk, diced small 6 garlic cloves, minced, divided freshly ground black pepper 1 cup brown or French lentils, rinsed 2 bay leaves zest and juice from 1 lemon leaves from 1 small bunch parsley, finely chopped Instructions Toast the fennel seeds in a dry skillet on medium high heat until fragrant, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Watch closely so as not to burn. Let cool slightly and grind the seeds in a mortar and pestle, spice grinder, or a dedicated coffee grinder. Cut the stalks off the fennel, pick off the tender fronds and set them aside for later. Discard the stalks or save to use for vegetable broth or even for juicing. Cut the fennel into wedges. Heat a soup pot over medium heat and add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the fennel wedges and sprinkle them with salt. Let the fennel caramelize and brown for 3-4 minutes, until the undersides are golden, then flip and repeat on the other side. Transfer the fennel to a plate or bowl for now. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Saute over medium low heat, until the vegetables are soft but not browned, about 10-15 minutes. Add about 5 garlic cloves worth of minced garlic (saving 1 minced clove for the gremolata), ground fennel seeds, and black pepper to taste, stir around until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the fennel wedges, lentils, bay leaves, 6 cups of water, and more salt to taste. Bring to a simmer and simmer, covered, until the lentils and fennel are tender. Brown lentils usually cook in 15-20 minutes, while French lentils take a bit longer, 20-25 minutes. No matter which lentils youre using, start tasting them at 15 minutes to keep them from getting mushy. Once the soup is done, turn off the heat and add the lemon juice. Discard the bay leaves. Taste for salt and pepper, and adjust if needed. While the soup is cooking, make the gremolata. Finely chop the tender fronds reserved from the fennel. In a small bowl, combine the fennel fronds, lemon zest, parsley, and the remaining minced garlic (1 clove). Mix to combine. Serve the soup warm, garnished with the gremolata. 3.5.3226 The post Fennel and Lentil Soup with Gremolata appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions

December 30 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions Serves 2 to 4 If youre from Brooklyn — and youre probably not even though you say you are — then you celebrate with steak. Everyone knows this from every movie. Cavernous steakhouses that date back to the last, last century lurking all over the city, tucked under bridges or beside a forgotten waterway, with their historical plaques, creaky wood floors, and signed Frank Sinatra portraits on the wall.  Well, 2020 is over and its time to celebrate Brooklyn style. Whether its a night of somber reflection or one of dancing and drinking (in your own home with only your household members and/­­or just your cat) this recipe works. Its a visceral activity unto itself, injected with whatever meaning you need it to have.  Basically, youll work a pliable ball of gluten until its goth red and gristle-y. Then you roll and pound it. Throw it into a hissing cast iron pan to sear. Smoke. Fire. Sizzles. Who needs fireworks? I was striving for something that could come together in one pot. I like baking seitan, but it does tend to dry things out and I wanted this to be juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Enter sear/­­braise. The steaks are cooked, removed from the pan then you create a rich au jus with onions, garlic and red wine. Some miso for that savory je ne sais quoi. And the seared steaks are placed back in to cook through. The end result is some of the best seitan I have ever had! Seared and smoky, firm but tender. And totally juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Plus it comes with its own sauce, perfect for slathering. Serve with mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Or anything starchy and awesome. Happy New Year.  Recipes Notes ~ I tested this recipe using tamari, but something was missing. The Braggs Liquid Aminos really upped the flavor game here, adding nuance and just kind of this steak sauce flavor that really popped. I recommend it! Not only because you get a bottle with Patricia Braggs floral hat printed on it, but its a nice ingredient to have around for when youre like This rice needs to taste more hippy. ~ Beet powder is another fabulous ingredient. It honestly doesnt have much flavor in small quantities but adds so much color! You can try to use whole beets or whatever you are going to do but I didnt try that and any adjustments to liquid and dry ingredients in this recipe will change the texture dramatically. Ive found it in stores but Amazon is evil and the most reliable place to get it.  ~ If you dont have a cast iron pan, then….wait, why dont you? Get one. You need that hot sizzle when it hits the pan and nothing else will give you that.  ~ The broth you use will affect the outcome. Make sure it isnt too salty because the sauce reduces a lot. If youre using a concentrated bullion mixed with water, that is fine, but go light with it and taste as you go to see if it needs more. ~ I used Bobs Vital Wheat Gluten. If you use a different one, results may vary. Why? Protein content, probably. Not all VWG has the same amount. They should standardize this for our vegan future. ~ I really cant see one person eating a full steak like this, so I dont know, prove me wrong. Aesthetically I wanted it to be this big, but realistically, it serves four. Ingredients For the Steaks 1 1/­­4 cups vital wheat gluten 2 tablespoon nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons beet powder 2 teaspoons lemon pepper (salt free) 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon mild mustard powder 2/­­3 cup water at room temp 3 tablespoons Braggs liquid aminos 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar Everything else: Olive oil for cooking 1 medium onion, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons red miso 3 bay leaves Fresh black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon dried thyme 4 cups veggie broth Fresh parsley for garnish To serve: Mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Instagram seems to go gaga over crinkle cut fries. Or any potatoes, really. A baked potato would be just fine! Also a green veggie. Nothing with too much flavor because this has a lot! Directions In a large mixing bowl, combine wheat gluten flour, nutritional yeast, lemon pepper, onion powder and mustard powder. Make a well in the center. In a small bowl, mix together water, aminos, tomato paste, olive oil and vinegar until the tomato paste is incorporated.  Add wet ingredients to the well and mix until a lumpy ball forms. It will appear a bit dry. Now, use your hands (with gloves if you have them) to knead the mixture until all ingredients are incorporated and there are no dry spots. If its very cold in the kitchen, you may have a harder time kneading. Moisten your hands with warm water and keep going, it should take about 3 minutes and appear very stretchy.  Divide the ball in half with a knife. Again, if its cold, the seitan might spring back more so this process will take a big longer. On a large cutting board, flatten the dough into a kidney shape that is roughly 3/­­4 inch thick and 8 inches in length. Use a rolling pin to roll, flatten and form. Let the first one rest while you do the second one.  Let both doughs rest about 10 minutes, for the gluten to relax a bit, then repeat the rolling process. Again, its more resistant if your kitchen is very cold so you might need to let it rest one more time.  As the steaks rest the surfaces will get a little smoother, which if what you want for the sear and appearance.  Preheat the cast iron grill over medium high. It should be very hot and water should immediately evaporate. This is important because you want the steak to hiss immediately so that is sears and does not stick.  Pour in a thin layer of olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the steaks and sear until dark brown, but not burnt, about a minute and a half per side. Use a thin metal spatula to flip steaks. Once they are seared, lower the heat to medium and let them cook until somewhat firm, about 10 more minutes, flipping and pressing down on them with the spatula.  Now we are going to remove the steaks and cook the sauce in that same pan. Place steaks on a plate.  Turn heat up to medium high. Drizzle about 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the pan. Add onions and a small pinch of salt and sear the onions for about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and a little more oil if needed and cook for about 2 more minutes, stirring often.   Add the wine and stir to deglaze and reduce, about 3 minutes. Mix in the miso to dissolve. Add bay leaves, a healthy dose of fresh black pepper (1/­­2 teaspoon or so), thyme and veggie broth. Let the broth warm, reduce heat to medium. Once warm, return the steaks to the brothy pan and submerge, spooning broth and onions over. Cover the pan and let cook for about 30 minutes. The broth should be simmering this whole time, but not boiling too rapidly.  OK were almost done! Remove the cover and flip the steaks. Turn the heat up and let sauce reduce for about 15 minutes uncovered. The broth will get really boily and active. Spoon sauce over the steaks while they cook. The steaks should no longer appear submerged and the sauce should be thickened a bit and really flavorful. Taste for salt.  Let sit for 10 minutes or so before serving. Remove bay leaves and garnish with parsley.

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

November 2 2020 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter Visit Kickstarter to pre-order: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2TE62bO  My first book has been a bestseller for almost eight years, but ever since the sequels came out, I’ve wanted to go back and massively upgrade the visuals on the original book: to re-do the cover artwork and re-shoot most of the food photos. After publishing 5 other books and spending additional years in the kitchens of the world, I knew I could improve the recipes, add outstanding dishes that didn’t make it into the first versions, and bring more culinary authenticity and cultural awareness to the entire book. The newly updated, re-photographed and freshly illustrated edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures is my classic, first journey in the world of vegan cookbooks reimagined and upgraded. Its my tribute to powerful memories, awesome individuals, and fantastic meals that Ive made, found, and shared with countless others like you. I’ve wanted to re-create my first cookbook for years, but the opportunity didn’t really arise until the surprises and challenges that have been this monster of a year, 2020. Yasai Izakaya Genki, Tokyo 2019 You see, I’d planned to return to Japan and continue my adventures from late 2019. Ultimately, now, Id be wrapping up The Lotus and the Artichoke – JAPAN. But when Corona hit, not only did it cancel nearly all my events and most of my income, like for so many people, lockdowns and border closures meant drastic changes not just daily life but to our travel plans as well. The struggle to return to a form of life that is more predictable and free has been different for all of us. As life has become more routine and restricted, our travels have been more in our minds and through the eyes of others-- through art, music, video and social media. A big part of my own escape these last months has been getting into the kitchen and diving back into my first cookbook - revisiting the intense dishes, unforgettable places and global flavors that shaped my life and projects over the last eight years. Ive cooked for the family, for friends, and for neighbors. Hopefully opportunities for more lunch and dinner parties and big cooking events will shape up soon! updated world map & photo collage for WORLD 2.0 edition NEW in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0: - brand NEW cover art & illustration! - NEW introduction & kitchen info! - more travel stories! - 8+ totally NEW recipes (not found in earlier editions!)  - 70+ newly photographed dishes!  - 100+ updated & improved recipes!  - better recipe names with respect to cultures & inspirations - 8+ additional pages of adventures & travels! As with all 6 of my cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. - My fully updated and re-envisioned first cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide -  224 pages with 100+ recipes and over 90 full-page color photos  - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in over 50 countries.  - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients  - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Palak Paneer – North Indian spinach with tofu paneer Pad Thai – rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime Omelette *NEW RECIPE* Mombasa Red Curry – with sweet potatoes & tofu Buka – Nigerian stew & Jollof – Senegalese rice *NEW RECIPES* Koshary – Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW RECIPE* Mini Meat Pies – made with lentils & vegetables Lasagna – with smoked tofu, cashew cheese, zucchini & mushrooms Recipes in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0 AMERICAS -  Salade a la Montréal arugula, pears, walnuts & lemon dressing -  Lower East Side Salad avocado and tomatoes on quinoa & carrot ginger dressing -  Jersey Summer Salad spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, walnuts & raspberry dressing -  Pancakes American breakfast classic -  Waffles *NEW*  -  French Toast another American breakfast classic -  Tofu Scramble with mixed vegetables -  Omelette *NEW*  -  North End Pasta Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce -  Ithaca Mac & Cheeze baked casserole -  TLT Tempeh Lettuce Tomato sandwich -  Black Bean Burgers 90’s style classic burgers -  Three Bean Chili with assorted vegetables -  Mango Pear Crumble with ginger & cinnamon -  Roasted Walnut Brownies double chocolate delight -  Oatmeal Cranberry Walnut Cookies American classic -  Guacamole Latin American avocado dip -  Salsa Latin American spicy tomato dip ASIA -  Cold Sesame Noodles Chinese dim-sum classic -  Wontons Chinese steamed dumplings with soy ginger dipping sauce -  Congee savory rice porridge *NEW*  -  Horenso Goma-ae Japanese chilled sesame spinach -  Miso Soup Japanese classic with tofu -  Teriyaki Tempeh Japanese stir-fry with vegetables -  General Tsos Chicken Cantonese classic -  Sesame Ginger Tofu Chinese fusion -  Tom Kha Thai coconut soup with tofu & vegetables -  Pad Thai rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime -  Pad Horapa Makua Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews -  Bai Cha Cambodian fried rice with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Gói Cuôn Vietnamese fresh spring rolls with ginger peanut sauce -  Pho Vietnamese noodle soup with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Banh Mi Vietnamese seitan sandwich -  Mirza Ghasemi Persian eggplant -  Gajar Masala grated carrots with pineapple, dates & cashews -  Aloo Raita Indian potatoes and cucumbers in yogurt -  Poha Indian flattened rice with potatoes & spices -  Gobi Tikka Indian baked marinated cauliflower -  Pakoras Indian spinach fritters with apple tamarind chutney -  Masoor Dal North Indian red lentils -  Chole Bhature Indian chickpeas with fried flatbread -  Hyderabadi Biryani South Indian rice dish -  Dhokla South Indian savory steamed chickpea cake -  Masala Dosa South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling -  Sambar South Indian vegetable & lentil stew -  Coconut Coriander Chutney South Indian condiment -  Paneer Makhani North Indian tomato curry with tofu paneer -  Mutter Paneer North Indian peas with tofu paneer -  Palak Paneer North Indian spinach with tofu paneer -  Navratan Korma North Indian creamy vegetable curry -  Vegetable Jalfrezi North Indian spicy mixed vegetables -  Dal Makhani North Indian creamy bean curry -  Sindhi Bhindi Masala North Indian okra -  Bengan Bhartha North Indian eggplant -  Chilli Paneer Indo-Chinese tofu paneer -  Vegetable Manchurian Indo-Chinese dumplings -  Halva Indian semolina sweet -  Saffron Mango Lassi Indian yogurt shake -  Naan North Indian flatbread -  Nariyal Chaval South Asian coconut rice -  Haldi Chaval North Indian golden rice with turmeric -  Jeera Chaval North Indian rice with cumin seeds AFRICA -  Plasas & Fufu Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava -  Koshary Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW* -  Tanjine Moroccan stew with couscous *NEW* -  Mombasa Red Curry with sweet potatoes & tofu -  Ful Medames North African spicy bean dip *NEW* -  Hummus North African & Middle Eastern chickpea spread -  Buka Nigerian stew mushrooms and soy meats *NEW* -  Jollof Senegalese seasoned rice *NEW* EUROPE -  Endive Sprout Boats with sesame soy dressing -  Field Greens & Seared Apples with chickpea ginger parsley dressing -  Borscht Russian beet soup -  Blintzes Russian-Ukrainian cr?pes -  Gazpacho cold tomato & cucumber soup -  Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup classic & creamy -  Roasted Root Vegetables with rosemary & spices -  Rotkohl German stewed red cabbage -  Kartoffelpuffer German potato pancakes with homemade applesauce -  Semmelknödel Bavarian bread dumplings -  Auflauf German zucchini & potato casserole -  Zwiebelkuchen German baked flatbread with onions & smoked tofu -  Schnitzel Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets -  Käsespätzle Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cheeze sauce -  Tofu Mushroom Stroganoff with fresh herbs -  Quiche French savory pie -  Cashew Mushroom Risotto with sun-dried tomatoes -  Lasagna with smoked tofu, zucchini & mushrooms -  Tempeh Stuffed Mushrooms with garlic & herbs -  Stuffed Peppers with tomato rice & smoked tofu -  Spinach & White Beans with sun-dried tomatoes & herbs -  Vegan Meat Pies with lentils & vegetables -  Turkish Bulgar Pilaf with Tofu-Feta & fresh herbs -  Grah Balkan bean stew with seitan -  Gibanica Balkan cheese pie -  Bratäpfel baked apples stuffed with dates, figs & walnuts -  Apfelstrudel Austrian-German apple pastry -  Lebkuchen traditional German Christmas cookies -  Tarte au Citron French lemon pie -  Mandeltorte German-Swedish almond pie Dal Makhani – North Indian creamy bean curry Masala Dosa – South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling, sambar & coconut chutney Pad Horapa Makua – Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews Borscht – Russian beet soup Blintzes – Russian-Ukrainian tofu cheese cr?pes with jam Beaner Schnitzel – Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets Käsespätzle – Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cashew cheese sauce Pasta Famiglia – Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce Teriyaki Tempeh – Japanese stir-fry with vegetables Hyderabadi Biryani – South Indian rice with vegetables Chilli Paneer – Indo-Chinese spicy stir-fry with tofu paneer Vegetable Manchurian – Indo-Chinese dumplings The Lotus and the Artichoke – World Adventures from World Adventures 2.0, my updated, re-photographed & illustrated original cookbook is only available for pre-order on Kickstarter for 21 days!

Japanese Sea Vegetable Salad with Noodles

July 13 2020 VegKitchen 

This Japanese Sea Vegetable Salad with Noodles recipe contrasts colorful carrots and parsley against black arame and white noodles. Rich in calcium and quick to make, this salad is also remarkably beautiful. Contributed by Leslie Cerier, adapted from Going Wild in the Kitchen. The post Japanese Sea Vegetable Salad with Noodles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus

June 10 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus Coming to you with this creamy, lemony pasta that’s under 10 ingredients and presents a really delicious way to eat a lot of asparagus. I have to admit that asparagus is not my favorite vegetable, but I still eat tons of it in the spring because the mission here is to learn to love and take full advantage of all vegetables in season. I do find asparagus to be truly enjoyable in this pasta – it’s hard not to when it’s framed by carbs and a rich, creamy sauce. This dish comes together pretty quickly. We whip up a simple lemony cashew sauce in the blender and blanch the asparagus together with the pasta, then mix it all together and serve. The brightness and acidity of the lemon punctuates the richness of the sauce and gives the whole thing a sunny feel. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ½ cup raw cashews sea salt 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped zest and juice from 1 large lemon 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper pinch red pepper flakes (optional) 12 oz spaghetti or other pasta of choice about 13 oz asparagus - tough ends snapped, cut into 2-inch pieces basil or parsley - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Soak the cashews in hot water for at least 15 minutes. Set a large pot of well-salted water to boil. In an upright blender, combine the drained cashews with ¾ cup water, garlic, lemon zest (reserve some for garnishing), lemon juice, nutritional yeast, pepper, red pepper flakes if using, and a generous pinch of salt. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed, the sauce should be fairly salty. Cook the pasta in the prepared pot until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add the asparagus to the pot at the last 3 minutes of cooking the pasta, to blanch. Reserve 1½ cups of the starchy pasta water before draining the pasta. Drain the asparagus and pasta and return both to the pot. Pour the cashew sauce over the pasta, along with a generous splash of the reserved pasta water, mix well to combine. Add more pasta water as needed, until you have a nice saucy consistency. Serve right away, garnished with the reserved lemon zest and herbs, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking

May 4 2020 Meatless Monday 

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based CookingCulinary secrets exist, and they can elevate your cooking from good to give-me-seconds. Dinner may never be the same after you start adding a tablespoon of smooth peanut butter to your chili, a splash of soy sauce to your tomato sauce, or a touch of vinegar to soups and stews. When it comes to improving the taste, texture, and flavor profile of your meatless dishes or recreating plant-based versions of animal-based ingredients, its all about knowing the right techniques. Maybe your tofu Buffalo wings didnt come out crispy because you forgot to press the tofu, or your kale not as tender because you didnt massage the leaves. Sure, these suggestions may seem minor, but they can dramatically affect the outcome of a recipe. As we are all doing more home cooking, take a look at the list below and see how you can incorporate these cooking hacks into your next Meatless Monday meal. Add a Spoonful of Peanut Butter to Chili It might sound crazy, but the secret to many award-winning chili recipes is a heaping amount of smooth, creamy peanut butter. The subtle hint of sweet paired with the peanuts inherent nuttiness is enough to balance out the spice and acid of vegetarian chili.   Press Tofu for Crispy Wings Removing the moisture from tofu allows it to get nice and crispy, an important step if youre baking, pan frying, or cooking up Jamaican jerk tofu tacos . To properly press tofu, line a plate with paper towels or clean kitchen towel and place the block of tofu on top. Place another layer of paper towel on the tofu block and apply something heavy -- book, cutting board, pan -- on top. Let it press for at least 20 minutes, replace the paper towels and let it rest for another 10 minutes for extra an extra chewy meaty texture. Massage Kale for Tender Salads Kale needs some TLC to become, well, tender. To break down the tough fibers, rip the leaves off the rib (or stem), add to a bowl, coat with some olive oil, and knead them (as if you would bread dough) for around four minutes. Add them to a Mediterranean salad for a quick weeknight meal. Blend Cauliflower for an All-Purpose Cream Sauce Add richness, depth, and creaminess to any dish with this magic, all-purpose cauliflower sauce . To make this simple sauce, boil cauliflower spears until tender. While boiling, sauté sliced garlic in olive oil until fragrant. Drain the cauliflower and scrape all of the garlic-infused oil into a blender and blend until smooth. Photo Source: FoodieWithFamily Refrigerate Coconut Milk for Easy Whipped Cream Simple, easy, and decadent, refrigerating a can of coconut milk overnight results in a thick and creamy whipped topping for desserts, waffles, or coffee. Add some vanilla extract and powdered sugar for some extra flavor and sweetness.         Freeze Bananas for Nice Cream The best kept secret that every plant-based eater knows about, frozen banana soft serve will change the way you think about dessert. Simply peel a few bananas, throw them in the freezer, and blend them up with some frozen fruit the next day. Maybe add a splash of lemon juice, nut butter, or a sprinkle of maple syrup if so inclined. Photo Source: Detoxinista   Use Avocado in Place of Butter With a one-to-one ratio, you can use avocado to replace butter in most baked goods and desserts. And while avocado wont impart a noticeable flavor, you can also avoid butter by using a non-dairy butter substitute (also a one-to-one ratio).         Make Your Own Plant Parmesan Cheese Parmesan elevates anything from pastas and risottos to soup and roasted vegetables. Recreate the sharp umami flavor of Parmesan with a combination of nutritional yeast, walnuts (or cashews), salt, and garlic powder. Give the mixture a couple of pulses in the food processor and youre good to go. Photo Source: MinimalistBaker Customize a Creamy Tofu Herb Dip Tofu comes in all different types and textures. Blend soft silken tofu together with salt and fresh herbs -- basil, parsley, chive, cilantro, rosemary -- for a quick and easy dip for crudité. Add some avocado or a splash of citrus to round out the flavor. Photo Source: CrowdedKitchen   Finish Cooking Pasta in Sauce for a Creamier Consistency   Contrary to the instructions on the box, pasta should actually be slightly underdone when you drain it. After draining, immediately toss the pasta into the simmering sauce for another two minutes. This helps the pasta absorb the sauce, but it also releases the starch within the pasta, giving the sauce a creamier consistency.       Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post 10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based RecipesCooking is a joy, but making every meal from scratch can get tedious, not to mention time consuming. And thats where big-batch cooking comes in. Weve created a list of plant-based recipes that are well suited for families (and leftovers). To do this, we looked through our Meatless Monday recipe database to find dishes that dont require a lot of preparation, are easy to scale up, and are hearty, nutritious, and filling. Although not all the recipes listed below are main dishes, they can still be prepared in large quantities and can be used to accompany other meals as side dishes or mid-day snacks. From Moroccan split pea soup and roasted chimichurri vegetables to Thai pumpkin curry and green tea pesto pasta the options for bulk cooking are only limited by your imagination -- and maybe the size of your stock pot. This Monday, do yourself a favor and cook a batch thats big enough for leftovers.  Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash This recipe is an opportunity to get creative. Add whatever vegetables you have on hand and cook them up in your biggest skillet with some soy sauce, scallions, garlic, and chile oil. For the Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash recipe, click here .   Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables Pungent and flavorful, these roasted vegetables can be prepared in bulk. The aromatic parsley-based chimichurri sauce is easy to scale up as well. For the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables recipe, click here .         Freekeh Pilaf Swapping out rice for freekeh -- an ancient grain made from roasted green durum wheat -- makes for a healthier and more textured version of this classic dish. As with any pilaf, the flavor is only as good as the broth you use to cook it in, so make sure to use a nice, flavorful vegetable stock when cooking. For the Freekeh Pilaf recipe, click here . Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad Chunks of butternut squash and Brussels sprouts makes this fragrant and flavorful ginger orzo more of a main meal than a side dish. The recipe serves eight, so expect leftovers, which is a plus because the flavors become more pronounced after they spend a night in the refrigerator. For the Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad, click here . Green Tea Pesto Pasta An exceptionally unique recipe, this green tea pesto pasta is perfect to make in big batches. You can also make extra sauce and keep it in a plastic container for when pasta cravings hit. Add any variety of vegetables -- cherry tomatoes, zucchini, broccoli -- to add some oomph to the meal. For the Green Tea Pesto Pasta recipe, click here . Lemon Ginger Peas Frozen peas are humble ingredients, but they can be wonderfully delicious. This dish is simple to prepare and can be made in large batches, depending on how many bags of frozen peas youre willing to store in your freezer. Experiment with different seasoning combinations to keep your taste buds guessing. For the Lemon Ginger Peas recipe, click here . Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya This meat-free jambalaya is packed with smoke, heat, and creole flavor. The recipe feeds six and doesnt require much in terms of prep -- just sauté the aromatics, pour in the stock, beans and rice, bring to a boil, and simmer away until the rice is fluffy and tender. For the Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya recipe, click here .     Moroccan Split Pea Soup No matter the season, a hearty cauldron of split pea soup can feed an army. Besides being incredibly affordable, split peas are easy to prepare and packed with protein and fiber. Moroccan-inspired seasonings add a refreshing punch of flavor to each spoonful. For the Moroccan Split Pea Soup recipe, click here . Quick and Easy Hummus Making your own hummus is so much more affordable than buying it prepackaged at the store. Double or triple this recipe (depending on the size of your food processor), and have delicious, creamy hummus available all week. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here . Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie Hello leftovers. Making a platter of this shepherds pie will feed a large family. Prep the platter the day before cooking and store in the refrigerator if you want an easy weeknight meal. For the Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie recipe, click here . Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry This recipe can easily be doubled if you want an extra few servings the following day. Although it calls for pumpkin, feel free to incorporate eggplant, extra tofu, or a bag of frozen spinach to add more heft to the dish. For the Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry recipe, click here . Vegetarian Gumbo Gumbo gets its color and flavor from its roux -- a paste-like mixture of flour and fat. This recipe is rich, decadent, packed with vegetables, and easy to scale up. For the Vegetarian Gumbo recipe, click here . Zucchini Scallion Cakes As simple as making pancakes, you can whip up a few dozen of these lemony zucchini cakes in no time. For the Zucchini Scallion Cakes recipe, click here . Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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