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parsley vegetarian recipes

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Theres nothing more comforting on a cool autumn day than a heaping scoopful of shepherds pie. This recipe is a blessing for those who want to recreate the decadent taste and texture of this classic dish without using any animal products. A layer of creamy mashed potatoes sits atop a rich filling of diced cremini or baby Portobello mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. This recipe comes from Anne Hernandez, co-founder of Urban Homestead, an online magazine that focuses on holistic remedies and healthy eating, and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - Mashed Potato Topping - 5 Pounds Russet Potatoes peeled & cut into 1-inch cubes - 1/­­2 Tablespoon Salt - 2-4 Tablespoons Vegan Butter - 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard Powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon Pepper or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Salt to taste   - Filling - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 1 Medium Onion diced - 3 Cloves Garlic minced - 1 Cup Baby Portobello/­­Crimini Mushrooms diced small - 2 Tablespoons Flour - 1 teaspoon Parsley dried - 1 teaspoon Thyme dried - 1/­­2 teaspoon Rosemary dried - 1 Bay Leaf - 1 Cup Red Wine - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste - 1 1/­­2 Cups Vegetable Broth or Stock - 1 Pound Lentils cooked - 28 Ounce Frozen Mixed Vegetables - Salt & Pepper to taste   Instructions Mashed Potato Topping Cover the peeled & cubed potatoes with cold water in a large saucepan. Sprinkle with 1/­­2 Tablespoon of salt and turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, partially cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Put a colander over a heat-proof bowl and drain the potatoes, reserving the potato water. Return the potatoes to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher. Stir in the dry mustard, salt, pepper, and vegan butter. Add the potato water 1/­­2 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition, until the mashed potatoes have a slightly loose consistency (but not runny). Set aside. Filling Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil until shimmering over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute longer. Add the mushrooms, season all with salt & pepper, and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir the flour, parsley, thyme, and rosemary into the mushroom mixture until evenly coated for at least a minute to cook the flour. Add the wine and cooked lentils (I used Trader Joes). Cook until most of the wine is reduced and absorbed. Whisk the tomato sauce into the vegetable broth and add with the frozen vegetables and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes then remove from the heat. Discard the bay leaf. If youre feeding a large crowd, leave the mixture in the skillet. If youd rather split the recipe into 2 pie plates, now is the time to do it. Follow the recipe but only bake one of the pies and freeze the other for another day. Top the filling with the mashed potatoes. You can spoon it on and spread carefully as to not mix in the filling or gravy, or use a piping bag to get fancy. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Remove the pie from the oven and let it rest for 15 minutes before serving. The post Vegan Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Chilled Beet Soup

August 2 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Chilled Beet Soup This soup tastes like you’re eating the garden in the best possible way. In Russia, we call it svekolnik, but similar recipes can be found in other Eastern European countries like Lithuania, Poland, etc. It tastes incredibly refreshing and life-giving, and the preparation couldn’t be simpler, with only 7 core ingredients. For beet skeptics, this chilled approach might be your key to enjoying beets, since their flavor is quite mild here. The mandatory dollop of yogurt or sour cream (we love coconut yogurt here) takes everything to the next level, so make sure not to skip it :) The cool thing about this soup is that it uses the entire beet, tops and greens included. You don’t have to have the tops to make it, but if your beets come with bushy tops, don’t throw them away. It’s no secret that beet tops are incredibly nutritious, so that contributes to the whole life-giving, garden feel of this dish. Typically, svekolnik recipes call for eggs, but since we keep things plant-based around here, we’ve come up with two delicious alternatives. I’ve been making this soup with white beans all summer long, and they fit in perfectly, so that’s one of them. And then recently, it occurred to me that silken tofu has a similar texture to egg whites and could be delicious in this recipe, like it usually is in Japanese cold tofu dishes. It worked – tofu is totally tasty and texturally perfect here, and, like the beans, it adds extra protein and makes the soup more satiating. We hope you’ll give this beet soup a try sometime this summer. Wishing you a beautiful weekend :) Easy Chilled Beet Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 5 medium beets, tops included if present sea salt freshly ground black pepper 16 oz silken tofu or white beans juice from 2 small lemons 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 4-6 small cucumbers, like Persian - cubed dill/­­parsley/­­green onion - chopped yogurt or cashew sour cream/­­other sour cream of choice - for serving Instructions Separate the beets from their tops, if present. Wash and scrub the beets clean and place them in a soup pot. Separate the beet stems from the leaves, setting the leaves aside until ready to serve the soup. Finely chop the stems and place them in the soup pot. Cover the beets and stems with water by about 2. Season with salt and pepper - this water will become your broth. Bring up to a boil and boil for 20-25 minutes, until the beets are tender throughout. Carefully remove the beets from the broth with a slotted spoon or tongs, leaving the stems in the pot. Let the beets cool or run them under cold water, then peel off the skins. Grate the beets on a box grater or with the grater attachment of a food processor. Return the grated beets back to the pot with the broth. Add the tofu or beans to the pot, along with the lemon juice, vinegar, and another pinch of salt if needed. Put the pot in the refrigerator to chill completely for 2-4 hours or overnight. Once chilled, taste for salt, pepper, and vinegar, and adjust if needed. To serve, place about 1 small cubed cucumber in each bowl. Finely chop the beet greens and add a handful to each bowl. Pour the soup over the vegetables, making to sure to catch plenty of the grated beets and tofu/­­white beans. Garnish with lots of herbs and a mandatory dollop of yogurt or cashew sour cream. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 The post Easy Chilled Beet Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Bean Salad

July 31 2019 VegKitchen 

Green Bean Salad This simple Green Bean Salad showcases fresh seasonal vegetables and is perfect as a side dish on a BBQ night.   Save Print Green Bean Salad Serves: 8   Ingredients 1 lb green beans 25 cherry tomatoes, cut in half 1 bell pepper 3 French shallots, finely chopped 50 mL olive oil 25 mL balsamic vinegar 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1 tsp honey 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley salt and pepper Instructions Strain the beans and steam for about 6 minutes. The post Green Bean Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chickpea Buddha Bowl

July 3 2019 VegKitchen 

Chickpea Buddha Bowl A Buddha Bowl is a healthy meal composed of various vegetables layered over a base of grains such as brown rice, quinoa, or barley.     Save Print Chickpea Buddha Bowl Serves: 2   Ingredients 1 red onion, sliced 1 pepper, sliced 1 cup canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained 6 mini bok choy 1 pinch cumin 1 pinch turmeric 1 pinch ground coriander seeds ⅔ cup cooked quinoa ½ cup sprouts 1 tsp parsley 1 tsp sesame oil 1 tbsp canola oil ½ tbsp rice vinegar salt and pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 450°F. The post Chickpea Buddha Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

Panzanella

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This classic Florentine salad of bread and tomatoes is ideal for a light summer meal. Until the twentieth century the salad was based on onions rather than tomatoes, but its evolution takes advantage of tomatoes when they’re at their best. This recipe come to us from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook by our friends at Meat Free Monday. Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox!   Serves 4 -  1/­­2 loaf ciabatta - 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 garlic cloves, 1 peeled, 1 crushed -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped flatleaf parsley - 1 tablespoon baby capers, drained - 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped - 1 small red onion, finely sliced -  1/­­2 cucumber, deseeded and cut into chunks - 2 celery stalks, finely sliced - 12 fresh basil leaves, ripped - 50g stoned black olives, halved - salt and freshly ground black   Cut the ciabatta in half and brush the cut sides with a little extra virgin olive oil. Heat a ridged grill pan or normal grill and toast the ciabatta until crisp and golden. Rub the peeled garlic clove over the cut sides of the bread, tear the bread into rough chunks and set aside. In a small bowl whisk together 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, the crushed garlic clove and the red wine vinegar. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the freshly chopped flatleaf parsley. In a large bowl, mix together the bread and baby capers, plum tomatoes, sliced onion, cucumber, sliced celery, basil leaves, and black olives, and toss with the dressing. Season to taste. The post Panzanella appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Crispy Vegan Smashed Potatoes with Chimichurri

June 10 2019 Vegan Richa 

Crispy Vegan Smashed Potatoes with ChimichurriCrispy Vegan Smashed Potatoes with Chimichurri. These Smashed potatoes are baked to a crisp and served with fresh homemade parsley chimichurri. Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Soyfree Recipe Jump to Recipe Crispy from the outside and buttery inside is how all potatoes should be! These crispy smashed potatoes make a great side with a meal. Serve these right out of the oven with dressings such as chimichurri or pesto or just some garlic. I use yukon gold or white potatoes. They get pressure cooked (saucepan instructions are also listed), then smashed and baked. These smashed potatoes are best served fresh. If planning to make ahead, then preboil, smash and refrigerate and bake when needed. You can use various flavors and toppings with these smashed potatoes other than chimichurri, a simple basil pesto, some minced garlic and black pepper, vegan parm and garlic, tahini sauce, spices such as chili blend or cajun. Baby Potatoes work best here. But you can use regular size as well. Just slice into quarters and smash and bake!Continue reading: Crispy Vegan Smashed Potatoes with ChimichurriThe post Crispy Vegan Smashed Potatoes with Chimichurri appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Goddess Dressing

June 3 2019 VegKitchen 

Green Goddess Dressing This strong herbal dressing made of fresh herbs, plus tahini and cucumber, not only has a luscious taste, but makes good use of nutrient-rich parsley. Photos by Evan Atlas. Makes: The post Green Goddess Dressing appeared first on VegKitchen.

Fantastic Falafel

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

These flavorful patties are fun served family style. Letting everyone have the opportunity to assemble their own distinct creation is an excellent way to inspire kids to enjoy their food. If you like your falafel slathered with a savory spread, consider adding either hummus or eggplant dip to your offerings. For a super-simple tahini sauce option, whisk some water, a tablespoon at a time, into 1/­­2 cup tahini until it reaches the desired consistency, then season to taste with garlic powder, a squeeze of lemon juice, and salt. This recipe comes to us from OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet , by Suzy Amis Cameron. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the falafels - 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 onion, chopped - 4 garlic cloves, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 4 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1/­­2 cup whole wheat flour - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 1 teaspoon salt - For serving - 6 whole wheat pitas - 12 butter lettuce leaves - 1 cup chopped tomatoes - 1/­­4 cup chopped red onion - 1/­­4 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped - 1 cup chopped cucumbers     In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, chili powder, and turmeric. Cook until the onion softens, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer the onion to the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add the chickpeas, flour, parsley, cilantro, and salt. Pulse until smooth, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl. With a clean paper towel, wipe out the pan you used to cook the onion. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Using a tablespoon measure, carefully place heaping scoops of the falafel mixture in the skillet. Do not overcrowd the pan (six at a time is ideal). Cook the falafel until golden brown and crispy, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked falafel to a baking sheet and cover loosely with foil. Repeat with the remaining falafel mix, adding 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil to the pan before each batch. Serve the falafel family style and let each person build their own sandwich by topping their pita with the falafel and lettuce, tomato, onion, olives, and cucumber as desired.   The post Fantastic Falafel appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Here’s a vegan take on a southern classic. This brown rice jambalaya gets a Tex-Mex-inspired flavor from an assortment of spices, including paprika, cayenne and cumin. Black-eye peas and collard greens add both texture and nutrients to the dish that makes for a filling and dinner. Maybe best of all, this recipe serves six, which means it can make plenty of leftovers if you’re feeding a smaller group. This recipe is from Phoebe Lapine for Think Rice . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 4 Tbsps Olive Oil, divided - 1 Bunch Collard greens, thick stems removed and thinly sliced - Sea Salt & Pepper - Small Yellow Onion - Red Bell Pepper, finely diced - 2 Celery Stalks, thinly sliced - Large Jalapeno, minced, seeds & ribs removed - 2 Cloves Garlic, minced - 1 Tsp Smoked Paprika - 1 Tsp Paprika - 1/­­2 Tsp Ground Cumin - 1/­­4 Tsp Cayenne - 2 Cups Chopped Tomatoes - 2 Bay Leaves - 4 Sprigs Fresh Thyme - 8 Cups Vegetable Stock - 2 Cups Dried Black-Eyed Peas, soaked overnight - 2 Cups U.S. Long Grain Brown Rice - 1 Bunch Scallions, thinly sliced - 2 Tbsps Chopped flat-leaf parsley   In a large pot over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the collard greens and stir-fry until wilted and tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and remove to a plate. Set aside. Add the remaining olive oil along with the onions, bell pepper, and celery, and sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the jalapeno, garlic, smoked paprika, regular paprika, cumin, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 2 minutes more, until very fragrant, then add the tomatoes, bay leaves, and thyme. Bring to a simmer and allow the tomato mixture to thicken slightly. Pour in the stock, black-eyed peas, and brown rice. Bring to a boil, partially cover, and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the peas and rice have grown in size, but still have quite a bite to them. Cover the pot completely and continue cooking over low heat, undisturbed, until tender (but not mushy) and all of the liquid has been absorbed, another 20 minutes. Fold in the collard greens and half the scallions. Cover and cook until the rice has absorbed all the liquid and the veggies are tender, about 10 minutes longer. Remove from the heat. Season the vegetarian jambalaya with parsley, the remaining scallions, and serve warm. Note: If you dont have time to soak the peas in advance, you can a) cover them with boiling water for 10 minutes, or b) start with canned black-eyed peas. For the latter, simply cut the amount of stock in half, and add the rinsed beans to the pot when you fold in the collard greens in step 4. The post Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Shakshuka

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Spring Green Shakshuka is a versatile one-pot breakfast (or dinner) meal packed with nutrients and vitamins. Ready in less than 30 minutes. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 2  tablespoons  olive oil 1  medium-sized yellow onion  chopped 2  cloves  garlic  minced 1/­­2 -1  jalapeno  with seeds for extra spiciness (otherwise, removed), chopped 1/­­2  teaspoon  ground cumin 1/­­2  teaspoon  smoked paprika 1/­­2  leek  chopped 4  spears asparagus  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup mung bean sprouts 2  green onions  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup baby beet greens 100  grams  or 1 cup stinging nettles  chopped, leaves only 100  grams  or 1 cup baby spinach 50  grams  or 1/­­2 cup wild garlic  chopped 2  sprigs oregano  chopped 4  eggs 2  tablespoons  chopped parsley  to garnish salt and freshly ground black pepper hot sauce  to serve (optional) crusty bread  to serve (optional)   1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet or cast iron pan over medium heat. Sautéing chopped onion, garlic and jalapeno until soft, for about 3 minutes. Add ground cumin and smoked paprika and cook for 1 more minute, stirring frequently. 2. Add chopped leek, asparagus, mung bean sprouts, green onions, baby beet greens, stinging nettles, baby spinach, wild garlic and oregano. Sauté until the liquid evaporates, stirring occasionally, for about 8 minutes. 3. Make wells in the green mass and poach eggs into them. Cook until the eggs are done. You can cover the skillet with a lid for a quicker result. 4. Garnish with chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve with hot sauce of your choice and fresh crusty bread (optional). The post Green Shakshuka appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw Mock Tuna

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Nuts, seeds, seaweed, and kelp come together to create a convincing plant-based take on tuna that can be enjoyed in a lettuce wrap on a sandwich, or wherever you’d use tuna salad. This recipe comes to us from Heidi Liv Tompkins, Co-Founder, CFO, product development manager, Heidis Health Kitchen . It was the winning entry in the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - Ingredients: - 1 cup sunflower seeds, raw - 1 cup almonds, raw - 1/­­3 cup water - 1/­­4 cup lemon juice, fresh - 2-3 tbsp vegan fish sauce substitute (such as Fysh Sauce) - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder - 1/­­2 tsp dulse powder - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup cashew mayo (recipe below) - 1/­­4 cup onion, chopped - 1/­­4 cup celery, chopped - 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley, chopped - 2 tsp kelp powder - 1/­­1/­­2 tsp garlic, minced - Yum Yum Ginger Sauce (recipe below)   - Cashew Mayo -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup raw macadamia nuts - 1 cup raw cashews - 1 Tbsp. garlic - 1 1/­­2 tsp. Celtic sea salt   - Ginger Yum Yum Sauce -  1/­­2 cup fresh lemon juice -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup coconut aminos -  1/­­2 cup coconut nectar -  1/­­2 cup tahini - 2 inches ginger root, peeled - 2 cloves garlic - 1/­­2 bunch mint leaves   Directions: 1. Soak almonds, sunflower seeds, cashew, and macadamia nuts in water, separately, overnight. 2. In a food processor, process almonds, sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, fysh sauce, garlic powder, dulse, & salt until fairly smooth. 3. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add Cashew Mayo and incorporate thoroughly. 4. Fold in finely chopped onion, celery, parsley, powdered kelp and freshly minced garlic. 5. Serve in lettuce wraps with Yum Yum Ginger Sauce, on sandwiches or on toast.   For the Cashew Mayo: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate.   For the Ginger Yum Yum Sauce: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate. The post Raw Mock Tuna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Roast Summer Vegetables

June 17 2019 Oh My Veggies 

We’ve listed the most common summer veggies here along with instructions for preparation and approximate cooking times. You can season these vegetables with salt and pepper alone, or use our suggested additions to fancy things up a little. All of these veggies should be roasted on rimmed baking sheets. We like to coat them with non-stick cooking spray or olive oil from a mister too because sometimes vegetables have a tendency to stick even after being tossed in olive oil. Most additions can be added either before or after the vegetables are done roasting, although garlic is usually best when added before, while tapenades, basil, cilantro, parsley and marinara sauce are best added after. Summer Squash (Zucchini, Crookneck Squash, etc.) Start by: Trimming ends, cutting into thick slices and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 400 degrees for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: Pesto and pine nuts, fresh herbs, garlic, balsamic vinegar, sun-dried tomato tapenade. Tomatoes Start by: Cutting into 1-inch pieces and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 375 degrees for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: A few pinches of brown sugar, garlic, capers, kalamata olives, […]

Lemon and Asparagus Salad

June 15 2019 VegKitchen 

Lemon and Asparagus Salad This delicious lemon and asparagus salad is perfect as a side dish for your next BBQ.   Save Print Lemon and Asparagus Orzo Salad Serves: 4   Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cup cooked orzo 8 to 10 asparagus, cut into sections 3 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp lemon zest 1/­­2 tbsp lemon juice 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped salt and pepper to taste Instructions In a saucepan of boiling salted water, cook the orzo al dente. The post Lemon and Asparagus Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Spaghetti with toasted garlic breadcrumbs and blistered cauliflower

June 7 2019 Vegan Richa 

Spaghetti with toasted garlic breadcrumbs and blistered cauliflowerEasy Spaghetti with toasted garlic breadcrumbs and blistered cauliflower. 30 Min Vegan Pasta Meal with toasted breadcrumbs and roasted cauliflower. Vegan Nutfree Soyfree Recipe Jump to Recipe I had been eyeing Mario batali’s toasted breadcrumb spaghetti when I first happened upon it. The toasty garlic and breadcrumb idea was intriguing. I changed up the process to toast the breadcrumbs and garlic together. The flavor of the mix is enhanced with some lemon zest and pepper instead of cheese. The dish gets rounded up with some blistered cauliflower that enhances the toastyness and balances the garlic and parsley. I use fresh bread for breadcrumbs in this dish as the breadcrumbs are tastier, less dry and absorb a lot more flavor. Be generous with the garlic, breadcrumbs, toasting time and parsley or other favorite fresh herb! Lets make it.Continue reading: Spaghetti with toasted garlic breadcrumbs and blistered cauliflowerThe post Spaghetti with toasted garlic breadcrumbs and blistered cauliflower appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich

May 30 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich It seems like we come back every year with a bean salad idea similar to today’s buffalo chickpea variation (see this sandwich and this salad). Beans do so well when combined with all kinds of sharp, punchy ingredients, like pickled items, herbs, and spices. Dressed up like this, they make for a flavorful and satiating component to include in sandwiches, bowls, salads, etc. They last a while in the fridge, which makes them great for meal prep and generally for thinking ahead. This buffalo chickpea version features a balance of spicy, savory, sweet, and briny. It’s especially delicious in a sandwich format, but it can definitely be enjoyed a bunch of different ways. The chickpeas are mashed and dressed with buffalo sauce, lemon juice, mustard, etc., and bulked up with pieces of roasted red pepper, olives, red onion, celery, and dried cranberries (which provide perfect little pockets of sweetness). Most of the ingredients here are pantry items for us/­­things that we almost always have in the fridge, so this type of lunch-saver is always at an arm’s reach. Maybe that’s the case for you as well? We hope you’ll give this one a try :) Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich   Print Serves: around 6 sandwiches Ingredients 3 cups cooked chickpeas (2 15 oz cans) 3 roasted red bell peppers - cut into bite-sized pieces juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons to ¼ cup Buffalo hot sauce 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup olives and capers or just olives - chopped packed ¼ cup dried cranberries - chopped 1 large celery stalk - finely chopped ¼ of a red onion - finely chopped 1½ teaspoon garlic powder 1½ teaspoon onion powder handful of herbs of choice like dill, basil, parsley, chives - chopped salt and pepper - to taste Instructions Put half of the chickpeas and all of the roasted red pepper in a large bowl and mash with a masher until fairly smooth. Add the rest of the chickpeas and mash them in, leaving some pieces intact for texture. Add the lemon juice, hot sauce, mustard, olive oil, olives/­­capers, cranberries, celery, red onion, garlic powder, onion powder, herbs, and salt and pepper. Mix everything through, taste for salt and adjust if needed. You can also do all of the mixing in a food processor. Keep the buffalo chickpea salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve in sandwiches with fixings like lettuce, cucumber/­­tomato slices, or in salads, bowls, etc. Enjoy! Notes Buffalo hot sauce varies greatly in hotness from brand to brand, so taste as you go when you add it, until you have the desired level of heat. 3.5.3226 The post Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chickpea Salad with Zucchini, Vegan Mozzarella, and Basil

April 15 2019 VegKitchen 

Chickpea Salad with Zucchini, Vegan Mozzarella, and Basil Serve this hearty salad of chickpeas, vegan mozzarella, and zucchini on its own as a first course preceding a lighter pasta dinner (see some tempting possibilities in Pasta on the Lighter Side). If you’re a basil fan, use as much as you’d like. If not, substitute another herb, like parsley. Continuing reading Chickpea Salad with Zucchini, Vegan Mozzarella, and Basil on VegKitchen

Japonica Rice Salad

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Deliciously chewy Japonica rice gets a serious upgrade with roasted vegetables, creamy halloumi cheese and a just-right preserved lemon vinaigrette. The colorful side makes for a satisfying snack on its own and the perfect base for a grain bowl. This recipe was created by Jill Fergus in partnership with Think Rice and The FeedFeed . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 cup U.S. Black Japonica Rice - 1 cup roasted zucchini, seeded (cut lengthwise into four strips, then crosswise in 1 increments) - 1 cup 1/­­2 cubed honey nut squash - 1 sweet red pepper, seeds removed, sliced - 1 cup cauliflower rosettes - 4 oz halloumi, pan seared until golden on each side - Two 1/­­4 cups olive oil - Leaf parsley, finely chopped - Flaky sea salt - Fresh ground pepper   1. Preheat Oven to 425 degrees. 2. Prepare rice per package or rice cooker instructions. I like add a generous pinch of salt and a tsp of olive oil to the cooking water. 3. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment. Separately, toss each vegetable in olive oil and arrange on baking sheet. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cook in 20 increments, removing each vegetable as its cooked to your liking. 4. Whisk remaining 1/­­4 cup of olive oil with 2 tsp preserved lemon paste (or 1 Tbs fresh lemon juice), chopped parsley, flaky sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Adjust acid to suit your taste. 5. When all ingredients have come to room temp or are still slightly warm, toss together and add Vinaigrette. Serve and enjoy! The post Japonica Rice Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lemony Spring Risotto

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

This vegan lemony spring risotto recipe is the perfect dish to bridge the gap between the warm comfort foods of winter and the light, fresh flavors of spring. This recipe comes to us from The Healthy Voyager . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 12  ounces  asparagus 1  cup  peas 1  quart  vegetable stock or vegan chicken bouillon stock - 2 cups water 1  tablespoon  olive oil 1  medium leek,  thinly sliced 2  cloves  garlic,  finely minced Salt and pepper 1 1/­­2  cups  Arborio rice 1  cup  dry white wine 1  tablespoon  fresh lemon juice 2  teaspoons  lemon zest 2  tablespoons  fresh, chopped parsley 1/­­3 cup vegan parmesan cheese  (about 1/­­3 cup)   1. Trim the ends from the asparagus. Cut the remaining stalks into 1-inch pieces. 2. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and add the asparagus. Cook until crisp tender, 3-4 minutes. If using fresh peas, add the peas along with the asparagus. If using frozen peas, add them during the last minute. 3. Transfer the vegetables to a bowl of ice water. Drain the vegetables and set aside. 4. Heat the stock along with water in a large saucepan. Add the trimmings from the asparagus and leek and the parsley stems to add flavor to the stock. Bring to a simmer and then keep warm on low heat while you make the risotto. 5. Heat the oil in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat. Add the leeks and garlic and season them with salt and pepper. Cook until leeks are partially softened, 4-5 minutes. 6. Add the rice and stir to coat all of the grains with the oil. Cook 1-2 minutes to lightly toast the rice and then add the wine. Cook a few minutes until the wine is reduced, stirring occasionally. 7. Add the warm stock, a few ladles at a time, stirring the rice frequently. Each time the liquid is almost completely absorbed, add some more stock. Continue adding the liquid in this manner, stirring often, to develop the starch in the rice. It should take about 20 minutes for the rice to cook once you start adding the liquid. 8. When the rice is done, it will be plump and al dente- tender but still firm to the bite. At this point, lower the heat and stir in the lemon juice and zest, asparagus, peas, parsley, parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. 9. Stir to combine all ingredients well. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with parsley and lemon zest. Serve hot. The post Lemony Spring Risotto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Carnitas with Mushrooms

March 3 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Carnitas with MushroomsEasy Vegan Carnitas. Mushrooms marinated in Spicy Smoky Zesty Marinade and Baked. Serve these Mushroom Carnitas with toppings in tacos, wraps, burritos. Use Jackfruit for variation. Glutenfree Nutfree Oilfree Recipe. Soyfree option. Jump to Recipe Every since I baked jackfruit with sauce for Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches, I’ve fallen in love with crisp caramelized result! Its much easier, no mess, short active time. Just mix everything and bake! I use the same process for these mushroom Carnitas. Sliced mushrooms, sliced onion, spices, herbs, and a flavorful marinade. Just put everything in a bowl, marinate for a bit if possible, spread in a baking dish and bake and done! No oil needed. The onions caramelize to a juicy sweet spicy state. Mushrooms cook wonderfully and crisp. Bake less or more time depending on your preference. Fill up tacos or wraps, add your favorite toppings like mashed avocado/­­guacamole, vegan sour cream or salsa and done. Add some smoky black beans or refried beans to the tacos for a hearty meal. You can use the same process with Jackfruit, shredded oyster mushrooms, hearts of palm and shredded seitan. Continue reading: Vegan Carnitas with MushroomsThe post Vegan Carnitas with Mushrooms appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo

January 24 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo We had the most transcendent experience eating this simple, Italian peasant soup during our retreat in Abruzzo this past fall. We had just returned to our b&b from a beautiful mountain hike, where we foraged rosehips and mint, and everyone was very ready for lunch after that good dose of exercise and fresh air. Our hosts at the bed and breakfast served a homemade pasta e ceci (pasta and chickpea soup), and it really hit the spot with its coziness and simplicity. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. There will be lots of fun and useful cooking workshops with us, as well as visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary below, and book here! Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Abruzzo 2019 Retreat Sample Itinerary *details are subject to change /­­ all meals are vegan with a vegetarian option DAY 1 – Pick up in Rome at 1:30 PM, Piazza Bologna – Drive to Abruzzo – Unpack and relax – Aperitif and dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team DAY 2 – Morning yoga and meditation with our on-site certified yoga instructor – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration (different recipe every day) – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Time to relax, forest bathe, and hike the grounds after gua sha/­­acupressure appointments – Dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation DAY 3 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Foraging walk to gather herbs + medicinal jam and herbal tea workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Optional evening meditation DAY 4 – Morning yoga + sun gazing/­­A.M. sun therapy – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit to an olive grove with 600 year old trees + meditation and grounding in the orchard – Sample olive oil made with the olives from the grove + light picnic-style lunch – Plant-based cooking & meal planning workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 5 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Truffle hunting in Villa Santa Lucia – Truffle lunch in a locals home – Pasta-making workshop with an Abruzzo local + vegan cheese workshop with Golubka Kitchen – Pasta and vegan cheese dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 6 – Morning yoga and meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit a 200-year-old family-run winery + wine tasting and light lunch – Magic Moisturizer + homemade skincare workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Goodbye dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 7 – Breakfast – Head back to Piazza Bologna in Rome (12:30 PM drop-off) Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Let’s talk more about the soup! Pasta e Ceci is not a strictly Abruzzese dish, it’s made all over Italy, in slightly different variations. This recipe is inspired by the Abruzzo version. This soup completely blew us away with its ratio of simplicity to flavor. All the ingredients are very, very modest. You start out by making a good broth, with chickpeas and some aromatics. Then while the broth simmers, you make a very rustic, eggless pasta dough, which is then cut into short, flat noodles, called sagne pasta. The pasta then gets cooked right in the chickpea broth, and everything is served as a chunky soup, with plenty of olive oil and some spicy red pepper on top. There’s also an ingenious, crispy element that helps switch up the textures in the soup. Some of the fresh pasta gets toasted on a dry skillet, until it turns into crispy strips, that are then used to garnish every plate. It is so good. This is a great time to say that you can totally use store-bought pasta here! The eggless sagne pasta is easy to make, but it’s still much more of a project than just opening up a package and being ready to go (just skip the crispy pasta element). If you’re ever craving something resembling chicken soup from your childhood, this is a great, vegan version that still hits all of those comfort notes. Enjoy! Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 ribs celery - sliced in half 1 yellow onion - quartered, skin on 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 10 cups water sea salt black pepper 2 medium carrots - grated red pepper flakes - to taste handful chopped parsley - for garnish olive oil - for garnish fresh sagne pasta (recipe below) or about 12 oz dried store-bought pasta for the sagne pasta 1½ cups spelt, whole wheat, or sprouted spelt/­­wheat flour ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup purified warm water, plus more as needed Instructions to make the soup Drain and rinse the chickpeas. In a large soup pot, combine the chickpeas, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, and water. Bring up to a boil over high heat. Turn down the heat and simmer, covered, or until the chickpeas are cooked and tender (this might take up to an hour or even longer for older chickpeas). Make the pasta while the broth is cooking. Salt the broth well at the end. Remove the aromatics (celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves) with a slotted spoon and discard. Add black pepper to taste to the broth, along with the carrots and red pepper flakes. Bring everything up to a boil, then simmer for 10 more minutes, or until the carrots are cooked through. Meanwhile, heat a dry pan over medium-high heat. Add ¼ of the amount of the pasta to the pan and toast, stirring often, until the pasta becomes crispy. Use the crispy pasta to garnish the soup. Bring the soup back up to a boil, add in the rest of the pasta (recipe below) and cook for 30 seconds to 2 minutes, until al dente. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup, topped with crispy sagne pasta, parsley, and a drizzle of olive oil. If using dried store-bought pasta, cook it into the soup until al dente, and skip the crispy pasta step. to make the sagne pasta Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl with a fork. Make a well in the center and pour in the oil and water. Begin to mix with a fork, slowly incorporating the flour into the well of oil and water. When all the flour is mixed in, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead it for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. All flour takes on water differently, so add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if your dough seems dry. It should feel smooth, but not too wet, with no cracking. Form a ball with the dough and tightly wrap it in plastic wrap, or cover with a damp kitchen towel in the bowl. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Place the dough back on the well-floured work surface and knead it for another 10 minutes, until even more springy. Cut the dough in half and keep one half covered with a damp kitchen towel while you roll out the pasta. Keep your working surface well-floured. Roll one piece of dough at a time into a paper-thin sheet. Cut the rolled-out dough into the sagne pasta shape, about 1½ x ¼, using a pizza cutter or a knife. Transfer the pasta to a parchment-covered tray, sprinkled with plenty of flour to prevent sticking. Continue rolling out and cutting the rest of the dough. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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