parmesan - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










parmesan vegetarian recipes

Eggplant and Shiitake “Meatballs”

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is an excellent meatless protein source and this fun preparation mixes the superstar grain with hearty vegetables to create a delectable dish that can either be served as a main with pasta, or as an intriguing meatless party appetizer (make mini balls and don’t forget the little toothpicks!). This recipe comes to us from Stefanie of Sarcastic Cooking. Serves: 3-4 (makes 8 meatballs) - 1 small eggplant - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, cleaned, stems removed, and diced - 3/­­4 cup quinoa - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1 large egg - 1 egg white - 1/­­4 cup grated Parmesan cheese - 2 cloves garlic, grated - 1 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - pinch of crushed red pepper flakes - 1 teaspoon chopped basil - 1 teaspoon chopped parsley - vegetable oil, for frying - marinara sauce, to serve Preheat the oven to 350F. Using a fork, prick holes all over the eggplant. Place the eggplant on a baking sheet and roast it in the oven for an hour, until the eggplant collapses/­­shrivels. While the eggplant roasts, cook the quinoa and mushrooms. In a small saucepan, bring the 1 1/­­2 cups of water and quinoa to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover with lid, and let cook for about 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, uncover and fluff with a fork. In a small skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat for a minute or so. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté for 7-10 minutes until golden. Once the eggplant is cooled, slice it in half length-wise. Use a spoon to scoop out the flesh of the eggplant. Give it a chop and discard the eggplant skin. Add the eggplant, quinoa, and mushrooms to a medium mixing bowl. Mix in the egg, egg white, parmesan, garlic, salt, pepper, crushed red pepper flakes, basil, and parsley. Mix well. Line a baking sheet with parchment/­­wax paper. Form the shiitake/­­eggplant mixture into large balls. Place the balls on the lined baking sheet. Place the sheet with all the meatballs on it in the refrigerator for twenty minutes while you heat the oil. Fill a large, heavy-bottomed skillet about 1/­­4 of the way up with vegetable oil. Heat the oil over medium/­­high heat for about ten minutes. Remove the meatballs from the fridge, add four meatballs to the hot oil at a time. Fry the balls, turning occasionally, for 8-10 minutes until golden on all sides. Remove with a slotted spoon, add to a plate lined with paper towels to drain. Fry the next batch in the same way. Serve the meatballs with marinara sauce and your favorite pasta. The post Eggplant and Shiitake “Meatballs” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Roundup: Treat Yourself to a Vegetarian Night Out!

November 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Restaurant Roundup: Treat Yourself to a Vegetarian Night Out!Now that Thanksgiving is over, its time to get back on a healthy track. But that doesnt mean you cant take a short break from cooking! Weve rounded up some of the best restaurants from around the country that offer Meatless Monday. Not only can you eat plant-based this holiday season but you can support a local business that is doing its part to make their communities healthier! Here are some restaurants offering great vegetarian and vegan options every Monday: Oddfellows (Seattle, Washington) Oddfellows proudly supports Meatless Monday in an effort to make the world a healthier place. Just one of several plant-based meals offered at Oddfellows is a salad of baby greens with watermelon radish, gorgonzola & gooseberry-sherry honey vinaigrette. It’s simple and delicious, and we hope our guests enjoy it as much as we do. Tallulahs (Seattle, Washington) Tallulah’s thinks every day can be meatless and is proud to be a part of Meatless Monday. They’ve created a vegetable-driven menu and on Monday’s they take it up notch. Our recent favorite is a seared king trumpet mushroom dish with farro charred corn, zucchini ribbons, peas and ramp chermoula. We always enjoy eating our veggies at Tallulah’s, but especially when it’s for a good cause. Snarfs Sandwiches/­­Snarfburger (Boulder, Colorado) Jimmy Seidels two restaurant chains offer vegetarian and vegan options all the time but actively participate in Meatless Monday. Their vegetarian sandwiches include: the Cheese & Mushroom (sautéed mushrooms, American, Swiss and provolone cheeses topped with mayo, mustard, giardinera peppers, onion, lettuce, tomato, pickles, seasoning and oil), the Vegetarian (avocado, sprouts and provolone cheese topped with mayo, mustard, giardinera peppers, onion, lettuce, tomato, pickles, seasoning and oil), and Eggplant Parmesan (breaded eggplant cutlet, marinara sauce, Swiss, provolone and parmesan cheeses). Yuzu (Lakewood, Ohio) Yuzus Asian-inspired menu offers up Meatless Monday specials every week. Their vegetarian bowls are half-price and offered until 2:00 AM. The bowls - which come in Indian-style and Tex-Mex options - can also include cauliflower rice for a small added charge! Plant Power (San Diego, California) Plant Power is a vegetarian restaurant every day of the week, but it boasts several customers who arent vegetarian or vegan at all. It has become a destination for Meatless Monday diners as well as others who are eager to try a better-for-you, fast food option. In addition to using natural, plant-based ingredients, Plant Power is also dedicated to using only biodegradable materials for their packaging, utensils, and dishes. If you have a favorite restaurant in your hometown that follows Meatless Monday, we want to know about it! Contact us at info@meatlessmonday.com. Wed love to put them in the spotlight. And if you have a place that might want to try Meatless Monday, you can find more information on our site. The post Restaurant Roundup: Treat Yourself to a Vegetarian Night Out! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

If you think you’re looking at an ooey gooey cheese sauce, look again! That luscious coating is made from a nutrient-packed fall favorite, butternut squash, with sage and lemon to balance the squash’s sweetness. This recipe comes to us from registered dietitian Maria of Bean A Foodie. Serves 4. - 3 cups cubed butternut squash - 1 tsp. dried sage - 1/­­2 onion, diced - 3 cloves of garlic, minced - 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided in half - 1 tsp. each salt and pepper - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus extra for serving - 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice - 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock - 1 lb. spinach, finely chopped - 8 oz. short cut pasta, like rigatoni or penne Preheat your oven to 425F. Boil water for pasta and cooking according to package directions. Save about 1 cup of the pasta water and set aside. Toss butternut squash with sage, 2 tbsp olive oil and salt and pepper. Roast squash for about 30-40 minutes or until fork tender and lightly golden brown. While squash roasts, heat the remaining 2 tbsp of olive oil in a medium saute pan over medium high heat. Add in diced onions and garlic. Saute for about 3-5 or until onions and garlic are just starting to get translucent. In a high powered blender or food processor, place the roasted squash and onion mixture in the bowl. Blend on high until the squash is smooth. Add in the parmesan cheese, lemon juice and blend on high for another minute. Taste and adjust for seasoning. At this point the sauce is probably somewhat thick. Slowly add in some of the vegetable stock, blending at the same time. Check frequently for consistency. You may or may not use all of the stock, depending on how thick or thin your sauce. If you want the sauce thinner (or if it thickens over time on the stove) thin out with the reserved pasta water. Pour the butternut sauce back into the medium saute pan. Heat over low and add in the chopped spinach, stirring to combine. Cook over medium low until the spinach wilts — about 10 minutes. Again, if the sauce thickens, use some of the reserved pasta water to keep it at the consistency you like. Toss in the hot cooked pasta with the butternut and spinach sauce. Toss to combine. Add more parmesan cheese if you’d like. Serve hot! The post Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sugar pumpkin is slow roasted with garlic, then seasoned with oregano and sage in this Autumnal lasagna. Roasted garlic, cardamom and nutmeg deepen flavor of the pumpkin ricotta, while dried cranberries and apricots are sprinkled throughout to lend their complimentary fruit flavors. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - 1 package lasagna noodles - 1 2 pound sugar pumpkin - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 6 cloves garlic, peeled - 15 ounces part skin ricotta cheese - 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree* - 1 teaspoon cardamom - 1/­­2 teaspoon nutmeg - 10 green onions, thinly sliced - 1 cup dried, sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup dried apricots, diced - 1 tablespoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon dried sage - 8 ounces lowfat mozzarella cheese, divided - 4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated *please note that canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. When water boils, cook lasagna noodles according to package directions, or until al dente. Scoop the seeds and strings out of the pumpkin. Cut the pumpkin flesh into large chunks. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on a baking sheet, cut size down. Scatter the garlic cloves over the pumpkin pieces. Roast 60-90 minutes, or until the pumpkin begins to brown and is tender when pricked with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Using a fork, smash the garlic cloves together in a medium sized bowl. Add the pumpkin puree, green onions, cardamom and nutmeg to the bowl. Stir together with the fork. When the pumpkin has cooled, remove its skin and cut into smaller cubes. Line a 13 by 11 inch baking dish with a layer of lasagna noodles. Top 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture and another layer of noodles. Top the 2nd layer of noodles with about 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture, then 1/­­3 of the cranberries, 1/­­3 of the diced apricot and 1/­­3 of the roasted pumpkin cubes. Season with 1/­­3 of the oregano and sage. Finish the layer with 1/­­3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat this layering process 2 more times, or until you are out of noodles, pumpkin, dried fruit, spices and cheeses. Bake for 30-45 minutes, or until the lasagnas edges are browned and bubbling. The post Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Taco Casserole, Curry Noodle Bowls & Eggplant Parm Stacks

September 1 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: cheesy taco casserole; rainbow vegetable curry noodle bowls; zucchini & corn panini with pepper jack cheese; lightened-up eggplant Parmesan stacks; and end-of summer vegetable stir-fry.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Polenta Kabobs, Chickpea Salad & Ratatouille Crepes

August 4 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: polenta, veggie and halloumi kabobs; Mediterranean pesto chickpea salad sandwiches; ratatouille crepes; kale and white bean tortilla; and socca with sautéed chard and Parmesan.

Golden Pepper & Parmesan Zucchini Pasta

July 31 2017 Meatless Monday 

This unique spin on pasta uses thinly sliced zucchini for noodles and switches up the sauce by featuring golden peppers rather than the traditional tomatoes. The result is a burst of summery flavor in a bowl. This recipe comes to us from Maria of Bean a Foodie. Serves 2 - 2 yellow peppers - 1 clove garlic - 1/­­2 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus more for serving - 1/­­3 cup ricotta cheese - 1/­­2 tsp salt and pepper - 1/­­4 cup fresh basil, roughly chopped - 2 medium zucchini Using a spiralizer or julienne peeler, slice/­­cut your zucchini into spaghetti like strands. Set aside. Pre heat broiled to high and place oven rack on the top most notch. Place both peppers in the oven underneath the broiled. Cook until skins are just blackened and blistered - about 2-3 minutes per side. This happens quickly, so dont leave the kitchen while you broil the peppers. Remove peppers from oven and allow to cool. Once cool enough to handle, peel away the blackened skin (though you can eat this if youd like a charred flavor). Remove stem and seeds and roughly chop. Place the peppers, garlic, parmesan cheese, ricotta cheese, salt and pepper into the bowl of a food processor. Process for about 30 seconds. Taste and adjust for seasonings. Process a few seconds more or until sauce is completely pureed. Heat a large sauté pan over medium high heat. Add in the pepper sauce and cook for about 7 minutes or until thickened slightly (water will be release from the zucchini when its cooked so sauce should be thick to prevent it from getting to watery). Add in the zucchini and cook for about 1-2 minutes or until zucchini is just barely tender. Toss with chopped basil and any extra parmesan cheese desired. Serve immediately! The post Golden Pepper & Parmesan Zucchini Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan

June 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’re looking for a vegan dinner recipe idea, this vegan eggplant Parmesan might do the trick for you! This is a delicious, hearty meal that is not difficult to make, and could leave you with enough for leftovers to take to work the next day! The Vegan Corner has put together a great video tutorial to explain how to make this yummy dish. We love how they say, “relax and enjoy the peacefullness of the layering”. Cooking is a joy, and eating the finished meal even more so! Have fun: Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Eggplant Parmesan appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Spring Vegetable Gallettes

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

Veggies like asparagus and green onions are naturally sweet, so showing them off is surprisingly simple. Just throw Springs bounty on a flattered pie crust, bake and crumble tangy feta over everything just before serving. This recipe comes to us from Donna Kelly of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - a little vegetable oil, for preparing the baking sheet - 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed & cut into 2-inch pieces - 6 radishes, sliced 1/­­4 inch thick - 1 bunch green onions, cut into 2-inch pieces - 2 9-inch uncooked pie crusts - 2/­­3 cup grated Parmesan cheese - 1 egg, whisked with 1 tablespoon water - 2 ounces feta cheese Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a light layer of vegetable oil. Microwave the asparagus for 60-90 seconds, or until its slightly softened. Cut the radish slices in half so they resemble half circles. Spread one of the pie crusts on the prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle the grated Parmesan in the center of the crust. Spoon half the asparagus, green onions and radish slices over the Parmesan in one layer. Fold up the crust around the edges of the gallette, leaving about 2 inches of crust overlapping on all edges. Brush the crust with the egg wash. Repeat with the remaining pie crust. Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes, or until the gallettes are lightly browned. Crumble the feta over the baked gallettes and enjoy! The post Spring Vegetable Gallettes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Goat Cheese Gnocchi with Tomato Mushroom Ragu and Wilted Spinach

March 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the New York regional winner and comes from Brayden Boscio of Harry S. Truman High School. Serves 6 Pasta Dough (Gnocchi) Ingredients: - 4 Eggs - 1 t Salt - 1 T Olive Oil - 10 1/­­2 Oz Goat Cheese -  1/­­4 t Nutmeg - 2 3/­­4 Flour Gather Mise-en-place Combine wet ingredients (including goat cheese) 3. Combine dry ingredients Add dry to wet, incorporate everything gathering the dough together. 5. Knead the dough very gently together, let it rest for 20 min After letting it rest, begin to roll dough back an forth creating a log of dough, cut that dough into small little pillow shaped pasta pieces and roll with fork to create texture on Gnocchi Freeze for 5 min After freezing, boil pasta in salted water until your pasta begins to float approximately 5 minutes. Strain Gnocchi, then sauté with whole butter to lightly brown pasta Add Tomato ragu with mushrooms, finish with parmesan, butter and fresh chopped parsley Sauce Ingredients: - 10 Shitake Mushrooms - 10 Button Mushrooms -  1/­­2 Onion - to taste: Salt and Pepper - 6 plum Tomato Concasse - 3 Cups Crushed tomatoes - 8 cloves of Garlic - 1 T Parsley - 1 T Basil - 1 T Sugar Gather Mise-en-place Cut mushrooms, mince garlic, and cut plum tomatoes small dice. Sauté mushrooms, add minced garlic, after 60 seconds add cut plum tomatoes, chopped onions, finely chopped parsley, basil, and crushed tomatoes. Let it simmer for 5 min Add sauté gnocchi into sauce enough to coat the pasta. Wilted Spinach Ingredients: - 2 lb Baby Spinach - 2 T Olive oil - to taste: Salt and Pepper Coat pan with Olive oil, and Heat pan Add baby spinach and Sauté spinach until tender, add salt pepper to taste Serve as a side with gnocchi and tomato ragu The post Goat Cheese Gnocchi with Tomato Mushroom Ragu and Wilted Spinach appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Sizes Up SuperfoodsMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve your health. This is the third article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. For many adults, being time-pressed has become the norm. Theyre driven to pack more into any given moment. With this mind, perhaps its no surprise that theres a recent surge of interest in superfoods - plant foods that pack in more nutrition than other food items. Sure, this food trend is hot right now, but does the reality actually live up to the hype? Turns out the answer is yes, as long as youre consuming the right foods for the right reasons. According to Diana K. Rice, a registered dietitian who works with Meatless Monday, Many plant-based foods pack in more fiber, minerals and fiber than other dietary choices, said Rice. So if youre looking to improve the quality of your diet, its a great idea to rely on these foods over choices like processed carbohydrates and animal products. But dont expect superfoods to deliver a miracle cure for your medical problems, cautions Rice. She explains, No single food is going to help you lose weight, give you clearer skin or achieve whatever other health goal youre after. The main reason to eat superfoods is that they are nutritious and convenient. One easy way to pack more superfoods into yoir diet is to adopt the practice of Meatless Monday. When you choose not to eat meat one day a week, theres a lot of room left in your diet to fill with nutrient-packed superfoods, Rice said. And when you try tasty new dishes containing plant-based superfoods on a Monday, youll be more likely to incorporate them into your diet over the rest of the week, too. To kick off your new Meatless Monday habit, Rice recommends these plant-based superfoods: Peanuts: Not only is this plant-based source of protein highly affordable, its adored by the masses for its appealing flavor. In addition to seven grams of protein per one ounce serving, peanuts are a terrific source of folate and resveratrol - yes, the red wine nutrient! Found in whole peanuts (as well as grape skins), resveratrol is an antioxidant thats linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think outside the peanut butter sandwich with Peanut Noodles or Peanut Butter Chili.   Avocados: This fruit is a super substitute for animal products on Meatless Monday because its healthy fat content satisfies the same craving you might have for a juicy steak. But since the fats found in avocados are mostly heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, theyre doing your body a favor along with your tastebuds. Grill them and top with salsa for a new twist or try them with pasta in this Pea and Avocado Penne.   Kale: Sure, kale isnt as trendy as it once was. Nowadays, foods like collard greens and Brussels sprouts are stealing the spotlight. However, kale rose to popularity for good reason - it scores a perfect 1000 on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index, meaning that it packs in more nutrition per calorie than most other foods. In particular, its a great source of vitamins A, K, C and fiber. Give it a spin in this Forbidden Rice Salad or try a new variation on your lasagna with this kale-packed version.   Mushrooms: Not many foods pack in a hefty dose of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin. But one portabella mushroom can pack in 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D, which is more than half of the recommended daily intake level. Theyre an especially good choice for people who are averse to sun or live in northern climates, plus they offer the crave-able umami flavor found in meat. Try them in Mushroom Tikka Masala or Mushroom Hemp Tartlets.   Tomatoes: No, not the pale pink slice thats suspiciously topping your sandwich. Were talking deep, dark red tomatoes - especially canned tomatoes - that are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant thats linked to heart health and reduced cancer risk. Pump up your lycopene intake with dishes like Shakshouka with Rainbow Chard and Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup. The post Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan

March 7 2017 Veganpassion 

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan Spring seems a long time coming and I thought to get it a little cozy inside we're going to make a whole week full of comfort foods ? ? ?. Pasta, risotto, waffles and pancakes make an appearance. Make sure to check Instagram and Facebook for more inspiration. Let's begin with a well known classic: spaghetti bolognese. Always a good idea. With sweet lupines from Germany or Austria it's going to be regional. Have a wonderful week and enjoy the nasty weather with some good food ?. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup sweet lupine shred 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. vegetable broth 1 onion 1/­­2 can (340 g) sieved tomatoes 1 carrot 1 tsp. Italian herbs salt, pepper olive oil 1/­­2 tbsp. almond butter 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 14 oz spaghetti Cook the pasta as the package says and drop them off. Cook sweet lupines in vegetable broth with closed lid for 5 minutes. Put it aside and allow it to infuse another 10 minutes. Cut carrot and onion into cubes and roast them with olive oil. Add sweet lupines and roast until golden. Mix with sieved tomatoes and Italian herbs, salt and pepper. Stir in almond butter and yeast flakes. For the vegan parmesan: 1/­­4 cup cashews 1/­­4 cup almonds, blanched 2 tbsp. yeast flakes 1/­­4 tsp. ground garlic salt, pepper Mix all ingredients in a mixer. Serve with the Bolognese. Enjoy

Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang

February 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with GochujangSpicy Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang. Use sriracha for variation. Vegan Recipe. Gluten-free with gluten-free pasta  There can’t be too many mac and cheese recipes right. This version has some gochujang (Korean condiment that is spicy, fermented and pungent). Gochujang makes an amazing glaze for tofu.  It also makes a great addition to a creamy sharp flavored mac and cheese. Add as much gochujang as you like, or use Asian Chile Sauce or Sriracha instead. Serve this mac with roasted veggies that are glazed in gochujang + soy sauce+ sugar or over some broccoli or with a lentil loaf with a sriracha maple glaze. I like this with a sprinkle of vegan parm and generous black pepper. A toasty breadcrumb topping with a mix of toasted bread crumbs, a clove of garlic minced and herbs of choice, works amazing as well.  Continue reading: Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with GochujangThe post Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now. – Chef David Burke David Burke is world-renowned as a chef, artist, entrepreneur, cookbook author, innovator and inventor. In 2009, he won the James Beard Award for Whos Who of Food & Beverage in America and was twice nominated earlier for Best Chefs in America. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and a student at the École Lenôtre Pastry School in Plaisir, France, his 30-year career includes opening over a dozen celebrated restaurants.  David is often recognized from his TV appearances on Bravos Top Chef Masters, NBCs TODAY Show and as a featured guest on Rachael Rays Every Day Show. In 2015, David joined ESquared Hospitality as a Culinary Partner to open new restaurants nationwide including his latest restaurant, Tavern62 by David Burke which opened in October 2016 on New York Citys Upper East Side. For our first interview of the New Year, we sat down with David to ask whats currently on his plate.   Its the beginning of a New Year, a time when many are making a fresh start and making resolutions about diet and nutrition. What are some easy ideas to incorporate more vegetables and fruits into a daily diet? Have pre-cut fruit and vegetables ready in your refrigerator and make olive oil-based dipping sauces for them. Winter is a good time to make vegetable soups and stews. I would also recommend buying an Indian cookbook (lay off spices if you dont like heat) to get inspiration for vegetarian dishes. Are there any professional secrets or tips you can share on your favorite ways to prepare vegetables? I like to slowly sauté my vegetables. Cut them smaller and add olive oil, onion, and garlic, then let them caramelize. That works for home fries, a vegetable hash, a filling for a pasta, a purée, or the base of a soup. When youre cooking at home or for friends, what are some of your favorite meatless dishes? Pasta. Cous Cous. Eggplant Parmesan. Stuffed Zucchini Boats. Couch potatoes, which we serve at BLT Prime by David Burke. Cabbage is also really underrated. Chef David Burke’s Couch Potatoes   At your new restaurant Tavern62 by David Burke, what winter vegetables are you looking forward to using and where do you source them from? Salsify, parsnips, parsley root, celery root, butternut squash, kale, and cabbage. We source produce from the Hunts Point Produce Market. Sustainable foods are a topic of discussion these days. What are your thoughts on the subject and why is this important? With any good business comes responsibility. Responsibility of keeping a sustainable supply is important for the future. Your restaurants are typically meat heavy or meat-centric. Why are you interested in supporting and participating in Meatless Monday? My restaurants are designed for great business that highlight hospitality and give our customers what they want. My personal choice and vision for the future is to start segueing into more vegetarian-centric and healthy eating options because no matter what other food trends come and go, customers being more aware of what goes into their food is a trend that will only continue to grow. I think we go through cycles. There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now.   The post Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Meatless Monday News Roundup

August 21 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday News RoundupMeatless Monday always has exciting news of its own to share. Once in a while, we like to take a look around to see who else is promoting healthy eating, sustainability, and other programs we can support. This week, Meatless Monday was featured in the articles below as an example of how going meatless once a week can have a positive impact on our health and the environment. Here is a roundup of stories from around the web that will interest anyone who follows our campaign: The New York Times: Weekly Occurrence Meatless Monday made an appearance in the Times Monday crossword puzzle! Recipes for cauliflower parmesan and a mushroom burger are also featured. The Kitchn: Our 2020 Climate Goals Can Be Met with One Dietary Swap More proof that making healthy changes to your diet has an impact on the environment - if the entire country went Meatless Monday, we could reduce greenhouse gases by 16.3 percent by the year 2020. Rodales Organic Life: 5 Ways You Can Eat Healthy on the Cheap Its never a bad time for a how-to on eating healthy on a budget. Incorporating more fruits and vegetables, planning your own meals, and avoiding processed foods are just some of the hints on saving money while making smart food choices.  Meatless Monday is specifically mentioned as one option for a more budget-friendly diet. VegNews: Pittsburgh City Council Adopts Meatless Monday Another major American city has joined the Meatless Monday movement! Earlier this month, Pittsburghs City Council pledged to go meatless on Mondays and encourage their staffs, local businesses, and citizens to join them.   Fortune: How Your Diet Can Save the Planet Fortune magazine takes a closer look at the environmental impact of eating less meat, from how much feed it takes to raise animals to the forests being razed to make room for animal farmland. Consider this fact: Factory farmed animals contribute more to climate change than all the worlds cars, trucks, trains, planes, and ships combined.  The growing popularity of Meatless Monday is mentioned as plant-based food options are becoming easier to find, making it even simpler to be healthy and climate conscious. The post Meatless Monday News Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan

August 1 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you dont want to have fake processed meats every night, cauliflower is a really good meat alternative. And this recipe by Alethea Todaro really proves it! Alethea has created an amazing vegan cauliflower parmesan that looks too good to be true. We were so hungry after watching her video! This dish is sure to satisfy the entire family, and preparing the cauliflower couldnt be easier! Heres how its done: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan

June 6 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Street Fair Corn from NYC VeganI love New York — and I REALLY love NYC Vegan, the fantastic new cookbook by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment aka the Vegan Mos.  It’s such a fun book, billed with personal anecdotes and stories about New York City.  Best of all, of course, are the wonderful recipes — all the great food New York is know for, made deliciously vegan.  One of my favorites is the Street Fair Corn (below) which I will be making regularly this summer. Kudos to Michael and Ethan for a job well done and for bringing New York City into our kitchens!  If you don’t own NYC Vegan, do yourself a favor and order a copy today. Street Fair Corn Summer in New York City means weekend street fairs. The fairs have no rides or games. Instead, avenues are closed to traffic for several blocks, where dozens of vendors sell food. One of the most popular foods is Mexican Street Corn--freshly grilled sweet corn coated in a mixture of cheese and spiced mayonnaise. We created a vegan version of this dish that tastes even better than the original. (From NYC Vegan, copyright (C) 2017 by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment. Used by permission. Photo by Jackie Sobon.) Serves 4 Ingredients - 1/­­4 cup nondairy mayonnaise - 1/­­4 cup nondairy sour cream - 1/­­4 cup nondairy parmesan, plus more for serving - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder, plus more for serving - 1 medium clove garlic, finely minced - 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley - 4 ears sweet corn, shucked - 1 lime, cut into wedges Preparation - Heat a grill for direct-heat grilling, or heat a grill pan over high heat on the stove. While the grill is heating, in a medium mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, nondairy parmesan, chili powder, garlic, and cilantro. Stir until completely combined. - Place the corn directly on the hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until cooked through and charred in spots on all sides, about 8 minutes total. - Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a serving plate. Use a pastry or basting brush to generously coat each ear of corn with the mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with extra cheese and chili powder and serve immediately with lime wedges.     The post Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta Bake

April 15 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta BakeVegan Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta Bake. Pasta, marinara sauce, Crispy Cauliflower slices coated in breadcrumbs and spices, and vegan mozzarella make a great Cauliflower Parmigiana. Soy-free Recipe. Can be gluten-free This Cauliflower Parmesan Bake you all has everything you want in the parmigiana, Crispy Cauliflower, tomatoey sauce and all the cheesyness.  The process is pretty short and straightforward. Bake the cauliflower slices to cook and roast them to al dente. Then top with some vegan mozzarella and herbed breadrumb mixture and place over the pasta mixture. Bake until hot and bubble and crispy. You can also bread the cauliflower and bake instead.  Make it whichever way. Serve with some rusty garlic bread. Continue reading: Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta BakeThe post Vegan Cauliflower Parmesan Pasta Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

March 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the Arizona regional winner and comes from Austin Neanover of Glendale High School. Serves 6 - For the Spicy Tomato Sauce: - 1 Small onion, minced - 28 oz crushed San Marzano tomatoes - 1 Tbsp red pepper flake - 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp basil - 1 Tbsp - 1 Tbsp Honey - 4 cloves garlic - To Taste - salt - To Taste - pepper - For the Spaghetti: - 1 pound spaghetti of your choosing - Roasted Vegetables - 2 Zucchini, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes - 2 Yellow squash, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes 2 I Red bell peppers, cored and cut into 1-inch strips - 1 Red onion, peeled and cut into 1-inch strips - 10 Cremini mushrooms, quartered -  1/­­4 Extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp ground black pepper - 1 tsp basil - 1 tsp oregano -  1/­­2 tsp thyme -  1/­­2 tsp marjoram -  1/­­4 tsp rosemary - 3 cloves garlic - To Garnish: - Parsley, minced - Parmesan cheese Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. In a bowl, toss the peppers, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, and onions with olive oil, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of pepper, and dried herbs. Lay on baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes or until Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil over high Add pasta and cook until al dente. Drain in a colander. In a saucepan, pour olive oil and tablespoon of red pepper flake until the chilis get aromatic. Add onion and stir until they begin to sweat or become translucent. Then, pour crushed tomatoes, garlic, honey, and basil, stir. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Lastly, In a large bowl, toss drained pasta, roasted vegetables, and spicy tomato sauce. Use tongs or a spoon to gently mix the ingredients until all the components are incorporated and pasta is covered with sauce. Top with Parmesan cheese and minced parsley. The post Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Oh yeah Lasagne!

March 8 2017 Veganpassion 

Oh yeah Lasagne! Lasagne is one of everyones favorite dishes. I get to notice that I'm creating so many new recipes that I often have no time to cook the old fashioned classics. Sometimes I think that life is too short to try out all the ideas I have. It feels like two hands are far too little to get everything done that goes through my mind. Good things can be so easy though. It's good to have a boyfriend who nags for some lasagne. My little creature of habit ? . But he was right and it tasted delicious. This is one of the simplest lasagne recipes I have created so far. With good ingredients and without any frills. Enjoy! Makes 4-6 portions. Ingredients: 1 1/­­3 cup tofu olive oil 1 big onion 2 garlic cloves salt, pepper, paprika spice Italian herbs 3 tbsp. tomato paste 2 carrots 3 tbsp. yeast flakes 4 cups sieved tomatoes 2 tbsp. almond butter 1/­­2 cup red wine Preheat the oven 356°F upper-/­­lower heat. Crumble tofu into a pan and roast it in olive oil. Cut onions and garlic into fine cubes and add to the pan. Spice everything. Add tomato paste and caramelize it. Chop carrots. When roasted enough add carrots and yeast flakes to the pan. Pour sieved tomatoes on it. Stir in almond butter and red wine and let it cook 5-10 minutes. For the béchamel: 1 1/­­2 tbsp. vegan butter 2 tbsp. spelt flour 1 1/­­2 cup dairy free milk 1 tbsp. lemon juice salt, pepper, nutmeg 1 pinch curcuma 1 pinch kala namak salt 3/­­4 cup vegan parmesan 2 zucchini 1 package lasagne sheets Melt butter in a pot, stir in flour until the mass gets thick. Stir in dairy free milk and add lemon juice. Spice it and add 1/­­4 cup parmesan. Cut zucchini into fine stripes. In a baking dish put in 3-4 tbsp. bolognese then lasagne sheets then zucchini stripes. Repeat this step. At last put the béchamel on top. Put the rest of the parmesan on top of it and bake at 356°F upper-/­­lower heat for 45 minutes. Have fun with cooking and enjoy! p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Helvetica; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Helvetica; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} span.s1 {font-kerning: none}

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup

February 27 2017 Veganpassion 

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup Millet is one of my favorite cereal species. All-round talent, delicious and clean I could eat it all the time. From my morning muesli until my evening patty. I really love millet. And that's why millet is my favorite veggie of the month. Enjoy! Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup millet 1 3/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1 black Spanish radish or 1 kohlrabi 2 carrots 1 onion 1/­­4 cup + 1 tsp. chickpea flour 2 tbsp. dairy-free milk salt, pepper nutmeg, cumin mustard seed olive oil Cook millet in vegetable broth for about 15 minutes. Shred carrots and radish and cut onions into cubes. In a mixing bowl, mix together millet, veggies, chickpea flour and dairy-free milk and spice everything. Form 12 pattys and roast them in olive oil on each side. Additionally: 2 romaine lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber Pumpkin Ketchup 4 tbsp. vegan parmesan 1 garlic clove salt, pepper 1 tsp. agave syrup 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. water 1 tbsp. olive oil Was lettuce and cucumber and cut into pieces. Blend parmesan, garlic, spices, agave syrup, vinegar, water and oil in a mixer. Best dressing ever! Serve some lettuce and dressing on four plates and serve everything with 3 millet pattys. Serve with pumpkin ketchup.

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese

January 23 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese Pavarotti’s “Nessun Dorma” (none shall sleep) is blasting on repeat in my headphones. But it’s the opposite case over here. All the children are finally asleep and while Luise is taking care of the dishes, I’m trying to channel my inner Italian so we can publish this recipe before another year has passed. We wrote our last blog post in Copenhagen and this one is brought to you from a house we are borrowing, on the slope of the Table Mountains in Cape Town, South Africa. If we keep this trend of travelling south for every new blog post, we will be writing the next one from Antarctica. It feels a little weird writing about these comforting and wintery pasta bowls from here, but I’m trusting that Pavarotti will help me channelling my inner Italian and get me in the right mood. It’s summer in South Africa, we’ve got lemon trees growing in the garden, there is a small pool, a cute kitchen and Elsa and Isac are keeping occupied by throwing grapes at each other in some kind of never-ending grape war. In short, we are very happy and grateful to spend a month here. Apart from the children’s fights, the scene is vastly different from two weeks ago when we shot this recipe. Isac had pneumonia, Elsa and Gabriel were snoring with colds and we were all cozied up (or more like stuck) in our Stockholm apartment - pale, tired and gloomy, surrounded by cold winter. The only thing we craved then were simple and comforting pasta dishes like this. Vegetarian bolognese is perhaps not one of our most unique recipe ideas but it is January food at its best, so we thought it might be something you’d also be interested in maning. We often make a kids pasta sauce that contains tomatoes, grated carrot, grated zucchini and red lentils. As it simmers, the lentils dissolve into the tomato sauce and it all becomes quite sweet and smoothly textured. It’s a simple way to sneak extra nutrients in a meal that our kids always are happy to eat. This is a slightly more adult approach on that dish. The sauce has more texture and chunks and a deeper flavour from herbs and red wine. We use black lentils as they stay intact in the sauce. The lentils work as replacement for the meat in the classic bolognese ragu - they both add protein and have a nice and soft, chewy consistency. We combine chopped and grated carrots to get a mix of textures. You can of course add more veggies if you prefer. We kept it simple and used what we had at home because of sick kids and cold weather, but also because it is what Italians do. “Pochi ingredienti, tanto tempo” (few ingredients, long cooking time) is an Italian expression - that I just invented, but I’m pretty sure Pavarotti would agree. Simple cooking with great ingredients is key in the Italian kitchen. However, if you have some mushrooms or an eggplant/­­aubergine at home, either of them would work excellent in this recipe as well as they add meaty texture to the dish and make it even more vegetable packed. Enjoy! That’s it, blog post number two of the year. And no babies were neglected this time. I even managed to mention Pavarotti three times, talk about grape wars and make up my own Italian food expression. If that doesn’t qualify me as a full-blooded Italian, I don’t know what does. You can call me Davide from now on.  Vegetarian Bolognese Serves 4-6 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2 large carrots, peeled 2 sticks celery, rinsed 4 tbsp green olives, stones removed and slightly bruised 1 tbsp fresh basil (or 1 tsp dried) 1 tbsp fresh oregano, rosemary or marjoram (or 1 tsp dried) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup red wine 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked beluga lentils (or puy), rinsed 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock (or water) 2 bay leaves 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins crushed tomatoes sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve pasta of choice (we used a lentil flour spaghetti) vegetarian parmesan style cheese fresh parsley olive oil Heat the oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for a few minutes. Meanwhile, chop one of the carrots and the celery into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch chunks and add them to the pan along with olives and dried herbs (if using). Let soften for a couple of minutes, add the red wine and let cook until the alcohol evaporates. Add lentils, half of the vegetable stock, bay leaves, tinned tomatoes, fresh herbs (if using) salt and pepper. Grate the remaining carrot and add it as well. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are cooked, stirring from time to time as not to burn the base of the sauce. Add the remaining stock or water, little by little, to loosen the sauce whenever it is looking dry. Cook your pasta of choice. Serve the sauce stirred through the pasta, topped with a sprinkling of grated cheese, fresh parsley or other herbs and a drizzle of oil. PS. We actually prepared one more blog post before we left and we will try to share it soon,  along with some photos and tips from Cape Town. Meanwhile you can see some snapshots from out trip on instagram.

Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake

January 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Say cheese, because you’ll be smiling after tasting this Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese recipe. This recipes uses sweet potatoes to replace some of the cheese, making it a healthier choice. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie of Kroll’s Korner. Serves 4 For the mac and cheese: - 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed - 13 ounces elbow macaroni noodles (whole wheat or gluten free, if preferred) - 1/­­2 large onion, diced - 2 cups fresh spinach, chopped - 4 garlic cloves, chopped - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­4 cup all- purpose flour - 2 cups fat free milk - 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard - 1 teaspoon red pepper chili flakes - 6 ounces of four cheese blend - Salt and pepper, to taste   For the Breadcrumb Topping: - 1 cup Panko breadcrumbs - 1/­­4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese   Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Bring a medium pot of water to boil and add in the sweet potato that has been peeled and cubed up. Boil sweet potato for 10-15 minutes, or until tender. Drain sweet potatoes and then mash well. You should have ~2-2.5 cups of sweet potato. Next, cook the elbow noodles according to the package. While pasta is cooking, heat the olive oil in a large pan with onion and garlic. Cook for about 4-5 minutes over medium heat. Add the flour and whisk for 30 seconds and then slowly pour and whisk in the milk and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and continue to whisk. Mixture should begin to thicken after 3-5 minutes. Bring heat to low and mix in the mustard, salt, pepper, red pepper chili flakes, cheese and sweet potato. Stir well and then remove from heat. Add in the noodles and mix in well. Taste and adjust any seasonings you may want extra. Pour in a oven safe casserole dish and top with panko crumb/­­Parmesan cheese mixture. Place in oven, uncovered, for 10-15 minutes, or until it gets bubbly. Serve warm and enjoy! The post Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!