papaya - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Ceviche

Vegan Ravioli with Pink Beans

Masala Paratha (Besan Ka Masala Paratha)

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet










papaya vegetarian recipes

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl

July 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl If youre new to smoothie bowls, youll soon understand their their appeal. This one combines two juicy tropical fruits, mango and papaya. Add-ins are the best part of smoothie bowls, making them a little more interesting, better-looking, and possibly more filling too (depending on said toppings)? Speaking of toppings, choose as many or as few […] The post Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

POPPY SEED COCONUT PANCAKES W/ COCONUT YOGURT

October 27 2015 That's Food Darling 

POPPY SEED COCONUT PANCAKES W/ COCONUT YOGURT I made these poppy seed coconut pancakes rather spontaneously for a friend and I a little while ago. This combination is a total win. The poppy seeds bring along that desired crunch, the coconut flour that subtle sweetness, and the lemon zest that never-ending brightness. This simple oat-based pancake mixture has been my favorite for breakfast recently. The batter is made in a wink and you don't have to spend much time in the kitchen. That's the reason why this recipe isn't only a superb weekend breakfast but also pretty suitable for busy weekday mornings. I'm having a crush on everything including lemons recently. A splash of lemon juice here, a little bit of lemon zest there - lemon is a stellar ingredient, isn't it? All porcelain is designed and handcrafted by Copenhagen based ceramist Anne Black. The blueish plates come from the kyst collection. Kyst is danish for coastline and this table ware collection is all inspired by the Danish shore: thy sky, the sea, the horizont. I love this bright porcelain for its elegant and timeless design, created for everyday use. POPPY SEED COCONUT PANCAKES W/­­ COCONUT YOGURT    |makes 10-12 pancakes|   I love these coconut pancakes so much, they've replaced the originals in my kitchen lately. I you haven't coconut flour at home go for grated coconut or simply use almond meal instead. INGREDIENTS  45 g coconut flour 35 g oat flakes 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda   2-3 tsp. poppy seeds zest of half a lemon 1/­­4 tsp. of each ground cardamom and vanilla   a pinch of sea salt 2 organic free-range eggs 150 ml rice milk or coconut milk 1 tbsp. maple syrup   coconut oil for frying for serving coconut yogurt or organic full-fat yogurt bee pollen fresh fruits, such as papaya, pineapple or mango maple syrup INSTRUCTIONS  Place coconut flour, oats, baking soda, poppy seeds, lemon zest, cardamom, vanilla, sea salt, eggs, milk, and maple syrup into a longish jar, and blend with an immersion blender until both fluffy and  smooth . Set aside for 5 minutes to thicken.  Heat a good dollop of coconut oil in a non-stick skillet over medium-low heat. Add batter (a heaped tablespoon for each pancake, try to make 3 at once) and cook for about 2-3 minutes on first side, check the underside and flip when golden brown. Cook for 1-2 minutes on the other side until golden brown underneath, then remove and set cooked pancakes on a warming plate.  Continue cooking pancakes in batches until all of the batter has been used ( you should end up with about 10-12 pancakes) , adding more coconut oil for frying as needed.   Serve the pancakes with yogurt, bee pollen and fresh fruits, and smothered in more maple syrup.  Enjoy!

Pistachio Apricot Thumbprint Cookies

July 29 2015 Vegan Richa 

Pistachio Apricot Thumbprint Cookies My Dad loves thumbprints or any jam/­­preserve filled cookies. There are a few things that make his face light up like the a fruit and nut cake made with candied papaya,  Gobi Aloo matar , his favorite dals, Butter Paneer which he now loves with tofu (see Butter Seitan recipe in my Book and sub tofu or vegan Paneer from the book which is currently half off on amazon), and simple cookies. And of course, lots of work. He is happiest when he is working on something, something metal, wood, or planning a machine and making it, or spending hours at home depot :).  These thumbprints have raw pistachios to make them buttery, soft and melt in your mouth and apricot preserves filled in their center. Make these with your favorite summer fruit preserve. Easy, all whole grain and addictive. To make these gluten-free, use a gluten-free flour blend or use oat flour like in these Gluten free Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies. I have a bunch of bean bowl recipes in the draft, but it just felt like a day for some cookies. I need that sweet fix today.  Continue reading: Pistachio Apricot Thumbprint CookiesThe post Pistachio Apricot Thumbprint Cookies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mango Chayote Sunflower Seed Salad

May 4 2015 Meatless Monday 

Crunchy chayote is tossed with sweet mango, crisp bell pepper and red onion. A cilantro lime vinaigrette dresses the chayote mango micro green salad, topped off with toasted sunflower seeds. This recipe comes to us from Karen of Sprouts in the Hood. Serves 4 For the cilantro dressing: - 1 bunch cilantro leaves, stems removed - 2 garlic cloves, peeled - 1 medium red onion, quartered - juice of 3 limes To complete the Mango Chayote Sunflower Seed Salad: - 1 chayote*, cut into julienne - 1 mango, diced - or - 1 papaya, diced - 1 red pepper, diced - 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced - 1 teaspoon salt - juice of 1 lime - 8 cups micro greens - 1 cup toasted sunflower seeds *Found in Mexican markets or the produce section of most grocery stores. To make the cilantro dressing: Place the cilantro, garlic, red onion and lime juice into a food processor. Puree and set aside. To complete the Mango Chaoyte Sunflower Seed Salad: Place the chayote, mango or papaya, red pepper and red onion into a medium sized bowl. Season with the lime juice and salt. Refrigerate and let sit for 2-3 hours. Divide the microgreens into 4 portions. Top with the Mango Chayote mixture and dress with the cilantro dressing, to taste. Sprinkle the sunflower seeds on top and enjoy. The post Mango Chayote Sunflower Seed Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Composed Rice Salad (Kao Yum Pahk Dai)

December 23 2014 VegKitchen 

Thai Composed Rice Salad (Kao Yum Pahk Dai)Though you wont find this on domestic restaurant menus as often as you would traditional green papaya salad, the basic ingredients for this southern Thai composed salad are more readily available to the home cook. Central to this gorgeous composition is a mound of rice, which is surrounded by a variety of veggies plus one fruit -- usually pineapple or green apple. A feast of flavors, textures and colors, what really pulls it together is the toasted coconut. Once youve got the rice cooked and cooled, this dish comes together quickly. Though this version makes use of common ingredients, we present options for using more authentic ones if theyre available to you -- Thai basil in place of ordinary basil, and galangal in place of ginger. Serves: 4 Dressing - 1/­­4 cup natural reduced-sodium soy sauce or tamari - 1/­­4 cup lime juice - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger or galangal - 2 tablespoons natural granulated sugar (coconut sugar is good) - 2 shallot cloves, minced, or 2 tablespoons minced scallion (white part) - 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro - 8 to 10 leaves fresh basil or Thai basil, thinly sliced Salad - 2 cups cooked whole-grain rice (any variety of brown rice, or an exotic rice blend), cooled to room temperature - 1 cup fresh mung bean sprouts, or green sprouts such as sweet pea shoots - 1 cup coarsely shredded carrots - 1 cup shredded green or red cabbage, or a combination - 1 cup diced pineapple or papaya, or 1 medium diced green apple - 1 cup thinly sliced cucumber, cut into half-circles Garnishes: - Lime wedges - 2 thinly sliced scallions, green parts only - 1/­­4 cup thinly sliced lemongrass, optional - 1/­­2 cup shredded coconut, toasted on a dry skillet Combine the ingredients for the dressing in a small serving bowl and set aside to allow the sugar to dissolve. Lightly oil a round soup bowl. Pack the rice into it, then invert onto the middle of a platter to release, forming a nice mound. Surround the rice with the sprouts, carrots, cabbage, pineapple or apple, and cucumber in separate small mounds. Garnish the platter lime wedges, sliced scallion, and optional lemongrass. Just before serving, place the toasted coconut in its own small serving bowl, and whisk the dressing together. To serve, have everyone take about 1/­­2 cup of rice, and arrange a little of the other components over or next to it. Pass around the dressing and coconut for embellishing individual portions. Originally published in the Sept. 2014 issue of Vegetarian Times. - Here are more Main-Dish Salads.

Contest 2014 July

July 6 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

For July Contest, I am looking for Papaya recipes. You must also use any type of berry also.  The specific rules are the following: - It can be any type of Recipe (dessert, salad, drink, etc). - Papaya should be main the ingredient, but must also include some berry (blueberry, strawberry, etc). - I will be judging on creativity and presentation. - It must be vegetarian and also egg-less. - Please submit only ONE recipe. In general I will only consider recipes that I feel are complete in regards to ingredients, measurement, and instruction. From there I am looking for creativity and a recipe that my viewers would enjoy to prepare on their own. I will be judging on overall recipe and presentation also. Contest Rules: - Be Creative! - Ingredients should be listed with measurements. - Method must be explained clearly, so its easy to follow. - Please include your NAME along with the recipe (as you would like it to appear). - Search the web for ideas. There are many resources available. - Please send me a detailed recipe to contest@manjulaskitchen.com - You must also send original picture(s) of the recipe – do not simply grab a photo from the web. Otherwise your recipe will not be considered for entry. - The deadline is July 27th. - The winner will be featured on the homepage with the new recipe and a link to their website (if available). 1st Prize: $100 gift certificate from Amazon.com 2nd Prize: $25 gift certificate from Amazon.com **Anyone can join this contest** The post Contest 2014 July appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad

May 6 2014 My New Roots 

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Bali is bliss. Its not hard to believe weve already been here for a couple weeks, as Ive clearly sunken into a new, slower rhythm and just allowing the days to unfold at their languid pace. I havent been this relaxed in...well, I cant even remember when to be honest. It feels amazing to not have a schedule to follow, to not have any major deadlines looming, no calls to answer. Ive had to travel halfway across planet earth to find this solace, but I also dont mind being surrounded by tropical jungle, dazzling green rice fields, rivers, and volcanoes, and sparkling starry skies. Bali has a kind of beauty to it, unlike anything Ive ever experienced before. It is rich, mesmeric, mysterious. Everywhere you go, you are greeted with wafts of burning incense, floral offerings, and the sounds of flowing water. Spirituality and everyday life are intertwined, and god seems to be truly in the details. The food? As wonderful as it is to eat at restaurants (dont do much of that in Copenhagen), Ive actually been cooking a lot. Surprise! Weve rented a house with a rather makeshift, but functioning kitchen, and the one-burner hot plate and I have become well acquainted during my experiments with all of the local produce. My family and I head out around 7am to the morning market, and for pennies fill our bags with all sorts of unusual fruits and veggies, then head home to play with it all. The other groovy thing about where we are staying is the front yard full of fruit trees and coconut palms. There are papaya growing - no, bulging - off of their trunks. Fruit larger then my six-month-old baby (and hes a big boy). The housekeeper picked one for me upon my request and it sat ripening on my counter for a couple days until I knew it was time. Total. Bliss-fest. You couldnt take me to the fanciest restaurant and see me more excited than eating that silly, homegrown papaya. Truly. As much as papaya is perfect all on its own, the flavours around me beg to be enjoyed. This was a simple breakfast I tossed together with fresh ingredients I had just picked up at the market: kaffir lime, ginger, and freshly grated coconut (wow, nothing like it!). It is all together sweet, citric, spicy and rich - a delicious combination for starting your day on the right foot, or maybe an afternoon pick-me-up. Papaya Paradise Party Papaya are buttery, rich, satisfying, and a delicious taste of the tropics, but are available in most grocery stores throughout the year. Papayas contain a cornucopia of nutrients, its most unique being papain. Papain is a digestive enzyme that helps digest proteins, similar to the bromelain found in pineapple. If you take digestive supplements, yours will likely contain papain. Papaya is rich in antioxdants, such as carotenes, vitamin C and flavanoids, folic and pantothenic acid, as well as the minerals copper, potassium and magnesium. These nutrients all add up to major cardiovascular protection, due to their ability to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. Papayas vitamins, minerals and antioxidants also provide immune support, promote digestive health, and protect against macular degeneration and rheumatoid arthritis. Much like bananas, papaya contains a substance called chitinase, which is associated with the latex-fruit allergy syndrome. If you have a latex allergy, you should avoid eating papaya (and banana too). If you cannot find kaffir limes, regular lime would be fine of course. Kaffir limes tend to be smaller, so if you are using regular lime, just one would likely be enough for the recipe below. And if you cant get yourself to a Balinese market and have someone grind your coconut for you this morning, no worries, just use shredded desiccated coconut in its place. You can even lightly toast it if your heart desires. The recipe for this salad is rather loose. Ive added some rough measurements, but the dressing here depends greatly on the size of your papaya, so just use the ingredients below as a guideline and make the dish to suit your taste. If you like a more citric flavour, go heavy on the limejuice; if you like it spicy, add more ginger, etc. I also drizzled in some local virgin coconut oil, which had the most incredible coconut taste, but this is entirely up to you. Keep in mind that the fat in the coconut and coconut oil will only help in absorbing the carotenes in the papaya.       Print recipe     Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 1 large papaya (mine was approx. 2lbs /­­ 1kg) 1/­­2 cup freshly grated or unsweetened desiccated coconut 1-2 organic limes 2-3 tsp. finely minced ginger, to taste pinch sea salt 2 tsp. honey, to taste (or any liquid sweetener) 1 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, melted (optional) Directions: 1. Rinse the papaya well. Slice through the entire fruit lengthwise, the scoop out the seeds. Cut off both ends from each half. Stand one of the halves on its flat end and slice off the skin starting at the top and running down to the base. Repeat with other half. Next slice the papaya across into 1-inch sections, and then into 1-inch cubes. Place in a large bowl. 2. Rinse the lime and zest it with a microplane or box grater on the finest setting. Whisk together the ginger, lime zest, lime juice, honey, and salt. Add the coconut oil, if desired. Pour dressing over the papaya just before serving, add desiccated coconut, and fold gently to combine. Enjoy immediately. I served the salad with some sliced bananas on the side, and garnished with lime halves.  This salad is just a little warm-up here - I thought a slow work up to the more complicated and technique-intensive dishes I plan on making would be best. For now, its time to just relax and enjoy the simple and blissful flavours of Bali, unwind, breathe. Find a corner of your home to curl up with this dish, light a stick of incense and drift away on a papaya cloud...Ill meet you in paradise.

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mexican Magic Rice

May 3 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Mexican Magic Rice When I was living in the small village of Lo de Marcos on the Pacific coast of Mexico, I went shopping at the vegetable shops in the neighborhood and cooked in the kitchen of our rented house every day. One of my favorite standard dishes, which I cooked at least twice a week, was Mexican Magic Rice. Its sort of a spin-off of traditional Mexican Dirty Rice, also called Messy Rice. Its basically a tomato rice dish - easy to make and always a treat. Its great with smoked tofu or fancy mushrooms instead of seitan. Ive been focusing so much on the new Malaysia cookbook coming out later this year… and, sure, Im still obsessed with the recipes from my new SRI LANKA cookbook. But now its time to give some more love to Mexico and all my favorite Mexican recipes from my previous cookbook with recipes inspired by my travels I had always been fascinated by Mexico… I wanted to spend more time there, since my first brief visit across the border with my family in the late 1980s. My second visit, in 2001, was a week-long visit with my father and brother Adam, and we went mountain climbing on Iztaccíhuatl. Fast forward to 2013: After the success of my first vegan cookbook inspired by my world travels, it was time to plan the next project. Mexico was my first pick for a winter escape from the cold Berlin winter. I talked with other travel bloggers I knew, and heard about the elusive town of San Pancho, an hour north of Puerto Vallarta, and just around the bend from surfer town Sayulita. Theres a great story of how I found an amazing house to rent right on the sea, and where I spent two months living with the locals, learning to surf, improving my Spanish, and super-charging my Mexican cooking game. The original plan was to find a house in San Pancho. But the scene was much more touristy and less authentic than I had pictured. Maybe a few years earlier it was still real. And the rents were well over what we wanted to spend.After a few days of looking for a reasonable, charming and down-to-earth place, we pretty much gave up on San Pancho. Locals suggested I go north to Lo de Marcos and see what was up over there. The search continued: asking everyone, locals and foreigners, if anyone knew of a house to rent. After two days of walking around in the sun and asking, and exhausting all the online resources for holiday rentals, we were just about ready to give up again. We had only one more night at the small apartment for one week in San Pancho until we needed to find a new place. On that fateful day, exhausted and sweaty, I sat down on the sidewalk on the small street a few minutes walk from the ocean. I saw two guys walking back from the beach, shirtless and tan. One had a fresh tattoo of Santa Muerte, the elaborately decorated Mexican Lady Death with a painted skeleton face, still healing on his chest. Should I ask them if they knew of any places to rent? Or would it be just like all the times before: no particularly helpful suggestions and just a smile and wish of good luck in our search? If you dont ask, the answer is always No. I stood up and greeted the young men, Buenos días, were looking for a place to rent for a few months. Do you know of anything. The guy with the tattoo, laughed and said, How about my house? Were standing right in front of it. We leave to go to Montreal tomorrow afternoon. Want to come in and see the house? He unlocked the gate and we walked up the path. I have to warn you, the house is kind of... unique. I love to cook and I built out the kitchen with a six-burner stove and giant double refrigerator from a restaurant that closed in Puerto Vallarta. Its probably way more than you need, eh? It was my turn to laugh. I told him that I cook every day and had come to Mexico to spend a few months learning more about the local cuisine and to work on recipes for a new cookbook. The entry way opened up to an expansive garden with papaya trees, banana trees, towering coconut palms, and a large herb garden with massive bushes of basil, oregano, parsley, cilantro, and rosemary. The house itself was a cosy and quaint, two-level casita, painted bright yellow and had a classic terracotta tiled roof with a thatched veranda. There are two bedrooms downstairs, and another room upstairs with its own bathroom and mini-kitchen. You can eat on the veranda upstairs, or downstairs on the patio. Weve got fast internet, a working washing machine, and... oh, heres the outdoor shower. I imagined myself showering in the outdoor shower and rinsing the salt water from my surfboard after a day in the waves. The house was perfect. Everything was falling into place in that awesome way. My friend Ben from Germany was coming to visit for a few weeks with his brother. My dad was planned to visit for a week, too. The upstairs room would be perfect for visitors, and could be my yoga room and work studio at other times. Instead of renting a small place (and we had seen many, but they just didnt feel right, so wed kept looking), we could rent this and the guests could stay here with us, instead of finding another place. We worked out a fair price for the rent the next day. I helped him finish packing the car and he gave me the keys to our beach house in Lo de Marcos, Mexico. Mexican Magic Rice is fantastic with Cashew Sour Cream or Guacamole and served on a bed of greens, lettuce, or with a salad. Its also awesome for packing killer bean burritos and much more fun than just plain rice. Similar to my Cambodian Fried Rice recipe from my first The Lotus and the Artichoke cookbook, this dish is a readers’ favorite, and can easily be doubled for a big family meal. I cook it all the time for dinner parties and cooking classes. And I still cook it regularly at home for my own family and friends. Enjoy! Mexican Magic Rice tomato rice with spicy seitan serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 35 min recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MÉXICO! - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced or chopped - 3/­­4 cup (75 g) green peas - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) black olives sliced or chopped - 3 Tbs vegetable oil - 1 medium onion chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 tsp cumin ground - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 cup (200 g) rice - 2 Tbs tomato paste - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 1 bay leaf - 3/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) beer or vegetable broth - 1 cup (240 ml) water - 1 tsp smoked paprika ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 1/­­2 tsp ground chipotle or chili powder optional - 1 tsp fresh oregano chopped - 1 Tbs lemon juice - fresh cilantro or parsley chopped, for garnish - Heat 2 Tbs oil in large pot on medium high heat. Add chopped onions, garlic, ground cumin, and coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. - Add rice, tomato paste, turmeric, bay leaf, salt. Mix well. - Stir in beer (or vegetable broth) and water. Bring to boil, stirring, Reduce heat to low. Cover and cook 15-20 min until rice is cooked. Remove from heat. Mix with a fork. Cover and let sit 5-10 min. - Heat 1 Tbs oil in large frying pan on medium high heat. - Add ground paprika, pepper, chipotle (or chili powder), chopped seitan. Fry, stirring regularly, until lightly crispy and browned, 4-5 min. - Stir in chopped oregano and lemon juice, followed by peas and chopped olives. Cook another 2-3 min, stirring regularly. Remove from heat. Cover until rice is ready. - Add cooked seitan, peas, and olives to rice pot. Mix well. Cover until ready to serve. - Garnish with chopped cilantro or parsley and serve. Variations: No fake meats: Replace seitan with chopped mushrooms. Sliced oyster Mushrooms or portabellos are best! No olives: Replace with corn kernels, chopped bell pepper, broccoli or other vegetables. Extra Spicy: Add 1 chopped chipotle (or other) chili with spices when frying seitan. More Red: Sauté 8-10 cherry or small plum tomatoes with seitan, halved or whole. The post Mexican Magic Rice appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Vegan Coconut Oil Shortbread Cookies with Pumpkin Pie Spice

September 23 2015 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Coconut Oil Shortbread Cookies with Pumpkin Pie Spice Holidays are just around the corner and so are the plans to whip up cookies! Though one doesn’t need the holiday season to bake some and enjoy right.  These are simple shortbread cookies with a few ingredients and spiced with fall spices. I used coconut oil and non dairy yogurt in these. I used refined coconut oil to keep them neutral tasting. Use virgin or refined to preference or use vegan butter.  You can also use thick cashew cream or thick aquafaba instead of yogurt. I haven’t tried these, let me know how it works out if you do.  I added candied papaya that Mom brought along when she was visiting. Dad loves those candied bits in cakes, cookies and yeasted bread buns. Mom and Dad drink itsy bitsy cups of chai throughout the day (6-7 times!). Breads, cookies, nuts and savory Indian trail mix are their choice of snack with the tea. I am hoping Mom sees this post and whips up a batch.  Use any other candied fruit like mango, or dried fruit like apricot or cranberries or nuts like cashews or hazelnuts.  For a gf version try my Gluten free Shortbread Cookies from the blog. Continue reading: Vegan Coconut Oil Shortbread Cookies with Pumpkin Pie SpiceThe post Vegan Coconut Oil Shortbread Cookies with Pumpkin Pie Spice appeared first on Vegan Richa.

A Guide to Cruelty-Free Summer Beauty

July 1 2015 Vegetarian Times 

A Guide to Cruelty-Free Summer Beauty Summertime, and the livin should be easy. So, simplify your grooming routine, and get your (sun-damage-free) glow on ?with an assist from naturally sourced, ?cruelty-free goods. Cut the Fuss Streamlining the basics of your skin-care regimen to ?a gentle cleanser, toner, and moisturizer will keep skin balanced while also reducing summer primp time. Danny Neifert of Santa Barbara, Calif.-based Skin Harmonics suggests nurturing skins natural protective barrier with products containing rosewater to soothe dryness and irritation, hyaluronic acid to help skin retain moisture, and natural oils to seal in hydration. Oil-rich moisturizers should be used in two phases, Neifert says. Pat and glide on more than you think, wait five minutes, then massage in to even it out. Other calming, hydrating ingredients to seek out include cucumber and aloe. To prep your face for your pared-down routine and help clear clogged pores, Claudia Colombo, founder of Fábula Skincare & Wellness in New York, advises a weekly exfoliating treatment; for those with ultra-sensitive skin, she suggests a patch test before trying bi-monthly exfoliation. And she recommends using a mild exfoliant with papain and bromelain, found in papayas and pineapples. Product picks for fresh, ?dewy skin: Nourish Organic Face Cleanser ($13.99/­­6 oz.; nourishorganic.com) Andalou Naturals 1000 Roses Floral Toner ($12.95/­­6 oz.; andalou.com) Acure Sensitive Facial Cream ($19.99/­­1.75 oz.; acureorganics.com) Alba Botanica Pineapple Enzyme Hawaiian Facial Scrub ($13.99/­­4 oz.; albabotanica.com) Cover Up in the Sun Slathering on the sun protection is a must when it comes to your daily routine. Sun damage is one of the biggest controllable factors that accelerates aging and skin cancer, says Alan Dattner, MD, a pioneer in the field of holistic dermatology. While a small amount of sun exposure is important to getting natural vitamin D, people often apply too little sunscreen and forget the parts that show age more quickly, like the hands, décolletage, ears, and lips. Thick application and consistent reapplication is key. Dattner recommends a physical sunscreen for its staying power and reduced likelihood of causing skin irritation. Physical sunscreens contain one or both of the active ingredients zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, natural minerals finely ground into powders that create a physical barrier between your skin and the sun. While the physical sunscreens of yesteryear had a reputation for leaving a sticky, ghostly-white pallor when applied, modern-day options are more pleasantly lightweight. Be sure to look for broad spectrum on the packaging of any sunscreen you choose. This signals the product will protect you from both types of the suns ultraviolet rays: UVA and UVB. The most recent evidence implicates both UVA and UVB in sunburn as well as premature aging and skin cancer. Jessica Krant, MD, of the Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, also cautions against direct baking in the sun between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., when the suns rays are the most potent. Shield yourself further by donning chic protective clothing and gear, such as wide-framed sunglasses, broad-brimmed hats, and swimsuits and cover-ups that boast UPF (ultraviolet protection factor), the apparel industrys version of SPF (sun protection factor). Product picks for foolproof ?sun defense: LiViTY Outernational Private Beach ?Hat ($39.99; ?livitystyle.com) California Baby Super Sensitive Broad Spectrum ?SPF 30+ Sunscreen ($19.99/­­2.9 oz.; californiababy.com) Hurraw! ?SPF 15 Sun Balm ?in Tangerine Chamomile ($4.29/­­0.15 oz.; hurrawbalm.com) Create the Look To replicate summers sun-kissed radiance and breezy allure--without risking damage from the sun and parching winds--Katie OSullivan ?(aka The Green Product Junkie) recommends products that conjure bronzed skin, a healthy flush, just-bitten lips, and dreamy beach waves. A tinted, illuminizing moisturizer with SPF 30-plus will even your complexion and shield it from the elements while imparting a just-got-back-from-vacation glow. And because its tinted skin care, you can reapply it during the day, focusing on the cheekbones for extra radiance; use it on arms, hands, and décolletage for sun protection in a pinch; and even rub it into legs to lend color and evenness. To enhance lips and cheeks with a vibrant flush of in-the-sun color, OSullivan suggests a multitasking tint. Apply it to lips first, and then pat whatevers left on your fingers onto the apples of cheeks for a natural blush, or even onto eyelids, especially if its a neutral tan or peach hue, for extra pop. For a tousled, ocean-breeze-swept mane, a texturizing sea salt spray lends volume and texture: just spritz and scrunch at the root and down the length of your hair. A natural salt spray with moisturizers such as coconut and aloe can also be used to revive limp hair when you hit the snooze button too many times to catch a shower. Product picks for breezy, bronzed beauty: Juice Beauty SPF 30 Tinted Mineral Moisturizer, shown in Sand ($29/­­2 oz.; juicebeauty.com) Aster & Bay Beet Root + Hibiscus Lip Stain ($12/­­0.25 oz.; asterandbay.com) The Gnarly ?Whale Cucumber Melon Hair Beach Waves ($12/­­8 oz.; ?thegnarlywhale.com) 

CASHEW, COCONUT + PAPAYA GRANOLA

April 7 2015 That's Food Darling 

CASHEW, COCONUT + PAPAYA GRANOLA Hi friends!  I'm back, and I'm back with an amazing batch of homemade granola that's more than springlike, and even more summery: cashew, coconut + papaya granola. If I had to guess, I'd say that granola makes up about 33 % of my breakfasts. Granola plus milk or yogurt, and optional fresh fruit - yep, I'm in. Also, I'm used to snacking on granola straight from the jar after I've already finished my breakfast - that's how it goes. If you eat as much granola as I do, you should consider making yours at home for a few reasons: Homemade granola is way healthier, much cheaper and freaking tasty, oh, and the smell at home will be pretty good. This granola turns out both toasty and nutty, with pieces that break into crunchy clusters instead of crumbs, a nd the coco-nuttiness is pretty awesome! There's a base of oats, nuts, a little coconut oil and sweetener (hello, brown sugar, hello, maple syrup) that's refined with spices and flavorings, and pretty good mix-ins. You'll see! Granola is pretty adaptable to substitutions. Wanna use pecans instead of cashews? Done. Dried cranberries instead of dried papaya? Great. But keep the ratio of wet-to-dry ingredients roughly the same. Slow and low is the key to dry-not-burnt granola. I bake mine to golden-brown perfection between 140°C and 150°C. Well, stick with a low temperature, keep an eye on your batch, and stir it from time to time to help it brown evenly. All the ingredients go straight into the raw oat mixture so they can get toasty and fragrant while they bake, except for dried papaya. That mix-in has to be tossed in after the finished mix comes out of the oven. For the love homemade granola! CASHEW, COCONUT + PAPAYA GRANOLA |makes about 5 cups| INGREDIENTS 1/­­3 cup coconut oil 1/­­4 cup unrefined brown sugar (demerara or muscovado) 1/­­4 cup maple syrup 2 cups old-fashioned oats (glutenfree, if necessary) 1/­­2 cup cashews, coarsely chopped 1/­­4 cup (hulled) sesame seeds 1/­­4 cup coconut flour 1/­­2 cup coconut flakes 2 tbsp. chia seeds 1 tsp. finely grated orange zest (or: lemon zest) 1/­­3 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­3 tsp. bourbon vanilla 1/­­3 tsp. sea salt (don't forget the salt!)   1/­­2 cup dried papaya, coarsely chopped (or other dried fruits such as mango or pineapple) INSTRUCTIONS  Preheat oven to 140°. Melt coconut oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Transfer to a bowl and whisk in brown sugar and maple syrup. Set aside. Combine oats, cashews, sesame seeds, coconut flour, coconut flakes, chia seeds, orange zest, cardamom, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl; drizzle in reserved coconut oil mixture and toss to combine. Spread out granola on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet and bake, tossing occasionally, until golden brown, 40-50 minutes (mixture may will still look wet but will dry as it cools). Let granola cool on baking sheet, then break into clusters. Mix in papaya. Store airtight at room temperature. Serve granola with milk (oat milk or cashew milk works pretty well here), organic plain yogurt or snack it right from the jar.

Contest 2014 July Winners

August 8 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

Contest 2014 July WinnersI was happy to see many entries for July. I went through all of them and these are the five most complete and best recipes. Below are the winners this month and the top five entries. Congratulations to all participants: 1st Place: Tropical Papaya-Chia Pudding by Shreya Sinha 2nd Place: Papaya Berry Kulfi by Amy Raymond Congratulations to both of you!! Tropical Papaya-Chia Pudding by Shreya Sinha Papaya Berry Kulfi by Amy Raymond Layered Papaya and Raspberry Mousse by Namratha Fruit Delight Cake by Joy Papaya Berry Halwa by Anasuya Thank you to everyone else that also participated in the contest: - Purnima - Manisha Gupta - Shruti Soumya Panigrahi - Kavita Kolli - Manik K - Gayatri Potluri - Smita Kothari - Mathusha - Ankita Agarwal - Nekath Patel - Sushma - Jagruti Vyas - Girija Janakiraman - Alice - Shweta Maheshwari - Arthi Viswanathan - Werdelicious - Kitchenqueen - Joy - Binky - Sree - Bhavani - Prachi Agarwal - Indira - Riya Jain - Bhavesh Jaglan - Jamie - Swati Jain - Ruchi - Palak - Henriette Faber - Kayal Kalidass - Premisha Saviour - Vrinda Mahesh - Priyanka Basu - Saijusadanandan - Madhuri - Anusha - Nisha - D. Dhayalan - D. Dhinakaran - Arumuga Priya Shanmugavel - Sonam - Lovey - Yelena - Shilpa Rajput - S.geeth Priya - Subathra - Sudhamani - Hina - Anasuya - Prachi Gupta - Kanchana Iyer - Anu Saxena The post Contest 2014 July Winners appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

How to Eat for Allergy Relief

May 27 2014 Vegetarian Times 

How to Eat for Allergy Relief Spring Salad with Hemp-Nut Clusters and Blueberry Dressing   If you want some allergy relief this season, start by taking a good look at your plate. Is it full of fruits and veggies at every meal? It really should be, because the best remedy for seasonal allergies might be in these plant-based foods. Fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and grains contain an enormous variety of nutrients that work together to keep you healthy even during the onslaught of seasonal allergies. Drink lots of water (preferably with fresh lemon), make sure you eat a balanced plant-based diet full of the foods below, and expect a happier allergy season. Spice it up with cayenne pepper. It contains capsaicin, a compound that has the power to ease congestion and inflammation, and boost your immunity. Its also incredibly easy to add to meals. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on prepared meals, add it to dressings and sauces, or drink it in a hot tea with ginger. Try these spiced roasted nuts for an allergy-fighting snack. Are omega-3s the new anti-histamines? Omega-3 fatty acids are known for their anti-inflammatory prowess, and that ability to fight inflammation is also responsible for lowering histamine response. Less sinus inflammation means less suffering from allergies. Omega-3-rich foods include ground flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts, and hemp seeds; sprinkle them on salads and in smoothies. If you eat a whole foods plant-based diet, youre probably getting a good amount of vitamin C. This antioxidant is known for its role in keeping us healthy during cold and flu season, and it can also protect us from foreign invaders during allergy season. Some excellent sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, papaya, red bell peppers, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. Red Pepper-Carrot Soup     —— Jenné Claiborne is passionate about helping women adopt and maintain a plant-based diet so they can improve their energy, lose weight, and feel their very best. Founder of The Nourishing Vegan, a New York-based personal chef service, she is also the creator of Sweet Potato Soul, a vegan food blog that features recipes, tips, and cooking videos. In 2013, Jenné launched the 21-Day Vegan Blueprint, an interactive online program that takes the guesswork out of becoming vegan. Follow Jenné on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Melon Medley Salad with Citrus-Ginger Dressing

May 2 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

Recipe submitted by Mir Afroze Ali The sweet fruits combined with the spiced, citrussy, tangy ginger syrup dressing are immensely refreshing. Scooped into small balls of eye-catching colors and served in the melon shells, this definitely makes the prettiest of fruit salads and it really does taste as good as it looks! Ingredients: - 1/­­2 of a medium sized watermelon, preferably seedless - 1 medium sized honeydew melon - 1 medium sized canteloupe /­­ galia melon /­­ charentais melon - 1/­­2 of a large firm and ripe papaya (optional) - 1 large firm and ripe mango (optional) - For the dressing: - 1/­­3 cup water - 1/­­4 cup sugar - 1 teaspoon ground ginger /­­ 1 inch piece fresh ginger, finely grated - 2 tsp fennel seeds - 1/­­2 cup orange juice - 2 teaspoons dried mint leaves /­­ 2 tablespoon chopped fresh mint - 2 teaspoons grated lime zest Method Prepare the fruits: - Cut the melons into neat halves and scoop out the flesh using a fruit baller. Scoop out as many neat balls as possible and then scrape off the rest of the melon flesh with a knife. Set aside the empty shells. - Halve the papaya without peeling and similarly scoop out the fruit into as many neat balls as possible. - Peel the whole mango without cutting and again scoop out the flesh into balls - Toss together the fruits, cover and refrigerate until serving time. Make the dressing: - In a small saucepan add the water, sugar, ginger and fennel seeds and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook till the mixture is reduced to half and syrupy. Set aside to cool completely. - Add the orange juice, mint and lime zest to the cooled syrup and mix well. If possible chill the syrup in the refrigerator before serving. Serve: - In a large bowl, toss together the fruits and the syrup dressing to coat well. If desired, reserve some syrup to serve on the side. - Place the salad in any of the empty melon shells (make sure to pour in all the juices and syrup) and garnish with fresh mint. - Enjoy this delicious and healthy fruit salad ! Related RecipesFruit FiestaBeet salad with Mango dressingFruit ChaatArugula And Melon SaladBean Sprouts Salad Spring RollSlice SaladTropical Spring Salad with Mango Orange DressingRefreshing Spring Fruit SaladSpicy Coconut LemonadeCucumber Salad


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