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paleo vegetarian recipes

Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan Doughnuts

July 16 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan DoughnutsVegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts Recipe. 1 Bowl or Blender. These baked gluten free doughnuts are amazingly soft and moist. They are Grain-free, Easy, Zesty. Use lemon or lime. Baked Vegan Doughnuts. Glutenfree Grainfree Soyfree Yeast-free Paleo Can be nutfree. I keep trying gluten-free baking on and off. Some recipes that I try from cookbooks turn out ok to a mess. Doughnuts are a difficult baking task esp if made gluten-free, as they are supposed to be soft, moist, airy and a bit chewy. These baked doughnuts come very close. And the best part is that they use a few ingredients(flour lemon, leavening, flavor), no xanthan gum, no rice flour, no oats, no grain!  I looked again to my Indian roots to make these doughnuts. Chickpea flour/­­besan makes a great dhokla, which is a steamed savory cake. It uses just 1 ingredient, chickpea flour and spices and some leavening and boom, you have a soft, moist cakey bread. I used a similar batter, added a bit of starch to hold the shape better, and some almond flour for texture and volume. You can easily make these without the almond flour. Just add more flour.  These doughnuts come out better with besan. Chickpea flour makes a stronger flavor and slightly less moist version. Yes they are not the same flour. Besan is flour of skinless brown chickpeas or chana dal and chickpea flour in the US is generally white chickpea /­­garbanzo bean flour. Besan is available online on amazon or in Indian stores(its very cheap in Indian stores). If you use chickpea flour, add more zest and dont store the donught longer than a few hours. The chickpea flour flavor gets more prominent. Lets get to these lemony bites! Continue reading: Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan DoughnutsThe post Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan Doughnuts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Exercisers: Make Your Own Fuel Food!

July 20 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Exercisers: Make Your Own Fuel Food! If you like to run, bike, hike or swim, then you know how well you feel and perform can be greatly affected by eating the right foods before, during, and after an intense workout or event. But you might be really, really tired of energy bars. If so, take a look at Matthew Kadeys new book, Rocket Fuel: Power-Packed Food for Sports & Adventure--in it, he shows how easily you can these snacks, smoothies and energy bars yourself. The benefits are huge:  You can tailor your power food to include ingredients you like and that meet your dietary needs, without the non-food additions that many commercial sports snacks and drinks rely on. And, youll save money. Tasty bars and smoothies As a registered dietitian who specializes in sports nutrition, Kadey understands what an athletes body needs, and offers lots of simple recipes like Millet Cherry Bars, Zucchini Bread Bites, Hot Chocolate Recovery Smoothie, Watermelon Slushie and others--real-food fuel, as he calls them. He uses ingredients like cacao nibs, chia seeds, almond flour and other nutrient-dense foods to make refreshingly flavorful snacks. This last point is key--Kadey is a long-distance cyclist who knows that we all get tired of eating the same gels and energy bars again and again, which can lead many to not eat enough. But keeping an even energy level during a game, bike ride, or long run, is essential for endurance. Something for Everyone In his book, foods Kadey categorizes recipes by when they can provide a needed fuel: before, during and after a major workout or competitive event. And Kadey indicates which recipes are diary-free, gluten-free, Paleo-friendly and vegetarian or vegan-friendly. Even if youre not a sports enthusiast, you can make any of these power-packed snacks for those times when you need an energy boost or food break--theyre good for you, tasty, and best of all, made in your own kitchen.

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar

March 30 2016 My New Roots 

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar Being a recipe developer means grocery shopping almost every day. On my way out the door I always ask my husband if he would like anything from the store, and more often than not he says: a treat, please. Now, he doesnt mean a lovely bag of blood oranges or a pint of juicy strawberries - he means a chocolate bar. Not a healthy chocolate bar. A low-vibe, sugar-laden, not-real-food chocolate bar. But I do not judge him. I just buy the thing and pick my battles (toilet cleaning and garbage disposal rank higher on my list). Recently, standing near the cash register and cruising the candy bars like a very reluctant weirdo, I actually experienced a pang for one myself. That rich and total over-the-top decadence is not something I am often drawn to, but for whatever reason the Snickers and the Twix bar spoke to me like long lost friends. And that was the exact moment I decided that I was going to makeover my two favourites with the best whole food ingredients I could find, that would deliver both total satisfaction and nutrients. A healthy chocolate bar to end all healthy chocolate bars. Could such a dream be realized? Oh yes, the universe loves us and wants us to be happy. The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar is three tasty parts. First, the bottom biscuit layer inspired by Twix, is a mildly sweet, vegan and grain-free cookie made with coconut flour. It is crisp when it comes out of the oven, but goes pretty cake-y once it is combined with the other ingredients. Delicious nonetheless, and a pretty important counter-point to all the richness of the other layers. Second, the caramel-and-nut layer inspired by Snickers, but with a twist: instead of just using dates in the caramel, I balanced out the sweetness by adding a healthy dose of hazelnut butter. Wowzers. This was a very delicious decision. The caramel became far more complex, rich-tasting, and it is essential to note that this would make a fantastic spread or topping all on its own. If you do not have hazelnut butter, I recommend almond or cashew in its place (click here for instructions on how to make your own nut butter). Instead of using peanuts, I used roasted hazelnuts to sink into the top of the caramel for awesome texture and crunch - almonds could also be used here. Lastly, each bar is enrobed in luscious, raw, dark chocolate. I usually use coconut oil in my raw chocolate recipes, but after reading the (incredible!) new cookbook Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman I was convinced that using solely raw cacao butter was the way to go. It delivers a crisper finish and creamier texture. If you want to make things simpler and faster, feel free to use a ready-made bar of chocolate in this recipe instead of making your own. Raw chocolate is of course the healthier choice, but if youre pressed for time or ingredients, this is a good shortcut to take. Coconut Flour Power! With so many diets and lifestyles focusing on gluten-free and grain-free eating, coconut flour is wonderful option for many people. Made entirely from dried coconut flesh that is pulverized into a soft, fine powder, coconut flour is a nutrient-dense alternative that is increasingly available at health food stores and even supermarkets. Score! There are several benefits of coconut flour, my favourite being that it is remarkably high in protein and fiber. Translation: super filling and satisfying! It is low in sugar and digestible carbohydrates, and scores low on the glycemic index, so it a perfect choice for paleo eaters and diabetics. Its also nut-free and non-allergenic. The flavour of coconut flour is slightly coconut-y, but not overwhelmingly so. I like it in things like these chocolate bars where there are many other strong tastes going on that overshadow the taste of the flour. If you want to compliment and enhance the flavour of the flour, use coconut milk as the liquid portion of a baked good. Seriously yummy. Whats the catch I can hear you asking. Well, there are a few downsides to using coconut flour, mainly due to its density, dryness, and lack of elasticity. Its certainly not a flour to experiment with if youre looking to replace wheat flour for instance, as the two behave completely differently (that goes for using coconut flour in place of almost any other flour, whether grain, seed, or nut-based). Coconut flour is also crazy-absorbent and needs quite a large proportion of liquid to solid to avoid crumbly results (I’ve read the comments below and it seems like a lot of you are struggling with this factor!) Most recipes Ive found online remedy this by using a lot of eggs, but I used applesauce and flax seeds instead with good results. Once you get the correct ratio down its pretty easy to work with, but Ive learned the hard way that its best to use tried and true recipes with this finicky ingredient! Back to the candy bars. Which are insane. These truly colossal creations have everything you could ever want: tasty cookie, ooey gooey chewy caramel, crunchy roasted nuts, divinely rich chocolate, and tiny salt kisses. I am so darn proud of this recipe, and I cant believe that such a decadent thing can exist without making me feel lousy after eating it. In fact, Ill go so far as to say that I feel colossally healthy after eating one. Or two. Stop looking at me like that.     Print recipe     The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar Makes 16 bars Coconut flour cookie bottom 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 175g coconut flour 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml unsweetened applesauce 2 Tbsp. ground flax seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml coconut oil, melted 2-3 Tbsp. maple syrup, as needed Date and nut caramel 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 325g pitted soft dates 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml nut butter (I used hazelnut) seeds of 1 vanilla bean 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Roasted nuts 3/­­4 cup /­­115g raw hazelnuts or almonds Raw chocolate coating 8.8 oz. /­­ 250g cacao butter (not coconut butter or coconut oil) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150g raw cacao powder 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml maple syrup pinch of sea salt Note: raw chocolate can be substituted with two 3 1/­­2 oz. /­­ 100g bars of dark chocolate (minimum 70% cacao). Directions: 1. Start by making the cookie bottom. In a small bowl stir the applesauce and the ground flax together. Set aside and let gel for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. In a large bowl sift together the coconut flour and sea salt. Stir in the melted coconut oil, two tablespoons of maple syrup, the applesauce-flax mixture and blend until the mixture holds together when pressed. If not, add the remaining tablespoon of maple syrup and stir to combine. 2. Line a brownie pan with baking paper and firmly press the mixture into the pan, especially around the edges. Place in the oven and bake for 12-15 minutes until the edges are beginning to turn golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool at room temperature. 3. Lower the oven temperature to 300°F/­­150°C. Spread the nuts out in a single layer on baking sheet and roast for 20-30 minutes until fragrant and slightly darker in colour (a good way to check is to cut one in half and check the colour in the center. Instead of cream, it should be golden). Remove from oven and let cool completely. If you are using hazelnuts, rub them together to remove as much of their skins as possible. Roughly chop and set aside. 4. Make the nut caramel. Add the pitted dates to a food processor and blend until creamy. Add the nut butter, vanilla bean, and sea salt. Taste and adjust according to your tastes. 5. Spread the nut caramel in an even layer over the cooled cookie bottom. Cover the caramel with the chopped toasted nuts, and press them down so that they are slightly sunken, reserving a few for garnish. Place the pan in the freezer to firm up for at least 4 hours (frozen bars are easier to cut and coat with chocolate). 6. Prepare the chocolate. Melt the cacao butter in a double boiler over barely simmering water. Remove from heat, stir in the maple syrup and salt, then sift in the cacao powder. Whisk together until smooth. 7. Remove the brownie pan from the freezer and pull up the edges of the baking paper to remove the filling. Place on a cutting board and slice into 16 equal bars. 8. Roll each bar in the melted chocolate, then pick up using a fork, allowing most of the excess chocolate to drip off. Set on a wrack and let harden. Take remaining chocolate and drizzle across the width of the bar to create a design (this step is optional, but it makes the bars look really beautiful). While the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle with remaining hazelnuts and let set. Place all bars in the freezer to firm up. Store in an airtight container in the freezer, and remove 10-15 minutes before serving. (Note: these are okay outside of the freezer, but if you’re using raw chocolate they will be relatively soft if left at room temperature). I hope you guys find as much satisfaction in this recipe as I have. Its pretty rad to have a stockpile of candy bars in your freezer for when the urge strikes, and to keep you out of the chocolate aisle on your next trip to the store! For the record, if you see me there, Im buying treats for my husband...since Im really bad at sharing. Show me your candy bars on Instagram: #MNRchocolatebars The post The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar appeared first on My New Roots.

Plan a Summer-Turned-Fall Vegan Dinner Party

September 16 2015 VegKitchen 

Plan a Summer-Turned-Fall Vegan Dinner PartyThe dinner party is a staple of the season. September and October are just starting to blend into fall. Youre enjoying the last of grilling season, chilly evenings and changing leaves. Whether youre throwing a party to welcome autumns arrival or to celebrate a birthday or milestone, heres a handful of fresh, vegan ideas for your soiree. Decor Galore Invitations Go green with email invitations. Paperless Post has beautiful fall favorites. And Greenvelope lets you customize with RSVP options and even embedded Google Maps. Tablescape Use a burlap table runner or placemats as your base. For a summer-gone-fall look, try a festive flower arrangement from FTD as the centerpiece and place soy candles on the runner, or opt for tall candlesticks to fill out the look. For a deeper-into-fall feel, arrange pumpkins, squashes and other gourds with colorful leaves along the burlap runner. Or arrange edible bouquets — include veggies and herbs like lettuce, kale and chives. Dinnerware As an alternative to your dinnerware, you might opt for a night of no dishes. Check out this line of single-use dinnerware from VerTerra . Its made entirely of fallen palm leaves and is 100 percent biodegradable, so it is very sustainable.  Foodie Frenzy Sometimes creating a dinner party menu that can satisfy everyone’s taste buds, vegan or not, can be challenging. And you want to make sure there is enough variety for those with other dietary restrictions or preferences. Whip up a combination of food so everyone will have an option but dont overdo it. A few options will suffice. Starters Start with a salad. This zucchini and mushroom pilaf is fall in a bowl. Sweet and savory all in a serving. Image: oh she glows We also love the roasted winter salad bowl from Oh She Glows. Mix hearty potatoes and quinoa with green beans, kale, green onions, pepitas and avocado. Its festive, uses seasonal veggies and is filling for those who are both vegan and gluten free. Add a squash for a slightly different fall flavor. Not quite ready to give up summer? Make up a black bean corn salsa , like this one. Serve it with crudites or corn chips. Main Course Image: The Healthy Family & Home For the main course, consider a veggie burger as a last hurrah for the grilling season. Veg Kitchen presents five vegan burger recipes to chose from. Offer lettuce-wrap style burgers as an alternative to buns for those looking to limit carbs or avoid gluten. If your grill is already cleaned up and stored for the season or you just prefer to keep it indoors, bake up something like this spaghetti squash casserole . Full of anti-inflammatory ingredients, its paleo-friendly, vegan, gluten-free and delicious. This dish will suit almost everyone. Dessert And now, for what everyone looks forward to most: dessert. Its time to use those seasonal fruits for warm fall sweets. Consider this grain-free apple crisp . Its a crunchy combo of coconut sugar and nuts, with the dashing flavor of lemon and cinnamon on apples. If youd rather something chilled, try basil-cinnamon peaches for a delightful bridge between seasons. Want to go decadent? Whip together a vegan classic cheesecake . The Food Network has a dairy-free, egg-free recipe thats made with tofu. Its just as creamy and delicious as the original recipe, so guests, vegan or not, will be sure to enjoy it. Wine Wine goes through a fining process which often entails the use of animal products. For this reason, not all wine is vegan. To find vegan selections, check out the wine recommendations from The Kitchn . If youre making veggie burgers, pair them with a dry white wine like the 2009 Bonny Doon Ca’ del Solo Albari?o ($16). The spaghetti squash dish calls for a subtle red -- a pinot noir or cab -- we suggest Kawarau Estate Pinot Noir 2008 ($29). And for dessert, crack open a bottle of Sandeman Fine Ruby Port ($14). Beyond all the planning and details, tablescape and delicious vegan food, be sure you sit back and enjoy the company. Its truly the life of the party. Lauren Topor is a multimedia journalist, freelance writer and editor. She earned her journalism degree from Arizona State University and has been writing professionally for more than five years. Lauren covers food news and the fun stuff happening around Phoenix, AZ for Thrillist. She also writes about fitness and health as a contributor to MoveItMonday.

On Toast: 8 Simple Ways to Enjoy a Slice of Bread

August 19 2015 VegKitchen 

On Toast: 8 Simple Ways to Enjoy a Slice of BreadDespite the gluten-free trend, and apart from the Paleo phase, toast seems to be making a comeback. Judging by a spate of magazine spreads and books on the subject, it’s once again considered the best thing since sliced bread. Here are 8 simple vegan toast toppings that make a quick route to a snack, breakfast, or lunch. Use whole-grain bread to boost nutrition; and of course, there are plenty of decent gluten-free breads out there if that’s your preference. No need for recipes; just some good ideas, a few minutes, and a spreading knife. Photos by Evan Atlas. Savory toast toppings Clockwise from top left: - Vegan cream cheese and sliced olives - Avocado mashed with lemon juice, and sunflower seeds - Vegan mayonnaise, sliced tomatoes, and sliced basil - Hummus and roasted red pepper Sweet toast toppings Clockwise from top left:  - Peanut butter, sliced banana, and shaved chocolate - Any nut butter (sunflower butter shown here), sliced apple, and cinnamon - Vegan cream cheese and strawberries (drizzle with maple syrup, optional) - Vegan buttery spread, raisins, and cinnamon - Here are more easy vegan Snacks and Dips.

The Veganizer: How To Get Meat Off The Menu!

April 2 2015 Happy Cow veggie blog 

On August 1, 2014 I convinced my omnivorous husband and business partner that his Paleo organic meat-mecca restaurant, GustOrganics, absolutely needed to go plant-based.   On March 2, 2015 GustOrganics […]

6 Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

August 10 2014 VegKitchen 

6 Health Benefits of Apple Cider VinegarContributed by Kris Gunnars, originally printed on Authority Nutrition, reprinted with permission. For centuries, vinegar has been used for various household and cooking purposes. It is also an ancient folk remedy, claimed to help with all sorts of health problems. The most popular vinegar in the natural health community is Apple Cider Vinegar. It is claimed to lead to all sorts of beneficial effects... some of which are supported by science. This includes weight loss, lower blood sugar levels and improved symptoms of diabetes. Here are 6 health benefits of apple cider vinegar, that are supported by scientific research. 1. Apple Cider Vinegar is High in Acetic Acid, Which Has Potent Biological Effects Vinegar is made in a two-step process, related to how alcohol is made (1). The first step exposes crushed apples (or apple cider) to yeast, which ferment the sugars and turn them into alcohol. In the second step, bacteria are added to the alcohol solution, which further ferment the alcohol and turn it into acetic acid... the main active compound in vinegar. In French, the word vinegar actually means sour wine. Organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (like Braggs) also contains mother, strands of proteins, enzymes and friendly bacteria that give the product a murky, cobweb-like appearance. This is what it looks like: Some people believe that the mother is responsible for most of the health benefits, although there are currently no studies to support this. Apple cider vinegar only contains about 3 calories per tablespoon, which is very low. There are not many vitamins or minerals in it, but it does contain a tiny amount of potassium. Quality apple cider vinegar also contains some amino acids and antioxidants. Bottom Line: Apple cider vinegar is made by fermenting the sugars from apples. This turns them into acetic acid, the active ingredient in vinegar. 2. Acetic Acid is a Potent Antimicrobial and Can Kill Some Types of Bacteria Vinegar can help kill pathogens, including bacteria (2). It has traditionally been used for cleaning and disinfecting, treating nail fungus, lice, warts and ear infections. However, many of these applications have currently notbeen confirmed by research. Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used vinegar for wound cleaning over two thousand years ago. Vinegar has been used as a food preservative, and studies show that it inhibits bacteria (like E. coli) from growing in the food and spoiling it (3,4, 5, 6). If youre looking for a natural way to preserve your food... then apple cider vinegar could be highly useful. There have also been anecdotal reports of diluted apple cider vinegar helping with acne when applied on the skin, but I didnt find any research to confirm this so take it with a grain of salt. Bottom Line: The main substance in vinegar, acetic acid, can kill bacteria and/­­or prevent them from multiplying and reaching harmful levels. It has a history of use as a disinfectant and natural preservative. 3. Apple Cider Vinegar May Lower Blood Sugar Levels, Which is Very Useful For Diabetics By far the most successful application of vinegar to date, is in patients with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by elevated blood sugars, either in the context of insulin resistance or an inability to produce insulin. However, elevated blood sugar can also be a problem in people who dont have diabetes... it is believed to be a major cause of ageing and various chronic diseases. So, pretty much everyone should benefit from keeping their blood sugar levels stable. The most effective (and healthiest) way to do that is to avoid refined carbs and sugar, but apple cider vinegar may also have a powerful effect. Vinegar has been shown to have numerous benefits for insulin function and blood sugar levels: - Improves insulin sensitivity during a high-carb meal by 19-34% and significantly lowers blood glucose and insulin responses (7). - Reduces blood sugar by 34% when eating 50 grams of white bread (8). - 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bedtime can reduce fasting blood sugars by 4% (9). - Numerous other studies, in both rats and humans, show that vinegar can increase insulin sensitivity and significantly lower blood sugar responses during meals (10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15). For these reasons, vinegar can be useful for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, or those who want to keep their blood sugar levels low to normal for other reasons. If youre currently taking blood sugar lowering medications, then check with your doctor before increasing your intake of apple cider vinegar. Bottom Line: Apple cider vinegar has shown great promise in improving insulin sensitivity and helping to lower blood sugar responses after meals. 4. There Are Some Studies Showing That Apple Cider Vinegar Can Help With Weight Loss Given that vinegar lowers blood sugar and insulin levels, it makes sense that it could help you lose weight. Several human studies suggest that vinegar can increase satiety, help you eat fewer calories and even lead to actual pounds lost on the scale. Vinegar along with high-carb meals can increase feelings of fullness and make people eat 200-275 fewer calories for the rest of the day (16, 17). By reducing calorie intake, this should translate to reduced weight over time. A study in obese individuals showed that daily vinegar consumption led to reduced belly fat, waist circumference, lower blood triglycerides and weight loss (18): - 15mL (1 tablespoon): Lost 2.6 pounds, or 1.2 kilograms. - 30mL (2 tablespoons): Lost 3.7 pounds, or 1.7 kilograms. However... keep in mind that this study went on for 12 weeks, so the true effects on body weight seem to be rather modest. That being said, just adding/­­subtracting single foods or ingredients rarely has a noticeable effect on weight. Its the entire diet/­­lifestyle that counts... you need to combine several effective methods to see results. Overall, it seems like apple cider vinegar may be useful as a weight loss aid, mainly by promoting satiety and lowering glucose and insulin levels. But it wont work any miracles on its own. Bottom Line: Studies suggest that vinegar can increase feelings of fullness and help people eat fewer calories, which can lead to weight loss. 5. Apple Cider Vinegar May Have Some Benefits For Heart Health Cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke) is currently the worlds biggest cause of death (19). It is known that several measurable biological factors are linked to either a decreased or increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Several of these risk factors have been shown to be improved by vinegar consumption... but all of the studies were done in rats. These rat studies showed that apple cider vinegar can lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels (20, 21). Apple cider vinegar may also contain the antioxidant chlorogenic acid, which has been shown to protect LDL cholesterol particles from becoming oxidized, a crucial step in the heart disease process (22, 23). There are also some studies showing that vinegar reduces blood pressure (a majorrisk factor) in rats (24, 25). Unfortunately, what works in animals doesnt always work in humans. The only human evidence is an observational study from Harvard showing that women who ate salad dressings with vinegar had a reduced risk of heart disease (26). But this type of study can only show an association, it can not prove that the vinegar caused anything. Bottom Line: Several animal studies have shown that vinegar can reduce blood triglycerides, cholesterol and blood pressure, but this needs to be confirmed in human studies. 6. Vinegar May be Protective Against Cancer Cancer is a terrible disease, characterized by uncontrolled growth of cells. There is a lot of hype online about the anti-cancer effects of apple cider vinegar. Some studies have shown that vinegar can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors (27, 28, 29, 30) However, all of the studies on this were done in isolated cells in test tubes, or rats, which proves nothing about what happens in a living, breathing human. Additionally, most of the studies were done on rice vinegar, not apple cider vinegar. That being said, some observational studies (which dont prove anything) have shown that vinegar ingestion is linked to decreased esophageal cancer in China, but increased bladder cancer in Serbia (31, 32). Overall... it is possible that apple cider vinegar may help to prevent cancer, but it is definitely premature to make any recommendations based on the current research. Bottom Line: Some studies in test tubes and rats have shown that rice vinegar can slow the growth of cancer cells and shrink tumors. Side Effects, Dosage and How to Use it There are a lot of wild claims about apple cider vinegar on the internet. Some say that it can increase energy levels and have all sorts of beneficial effects on health. Unfortunately ... many of these claims are not supported by science. Of course, absence of proof isnt proof that something isnt happening and anecdote often ends up becoming supported by science down the line. That being said, I wouldnt hold my breath waiting for more studies, since research on natural health products like these are both few and far between. From the little evidence available, I think that apple cider vinegar may be useful and is definitely a good candidate for some self-experimentation if youre interested in it. At the very least, apple cider vinegar seems to be safe. There are no side effects noted with normal consumption. The best way to incorporate it into your diet is to use it in your cooking... for salad dressings, and that sort of thing. Some people also like to dilute it in water and drink it as a beverage. Common dosages range from 1-2 teaspoons (5-10 mL) to 1-2 tablespoons (15-30 mL) per day. Definitely dont go above that, because excess consumption may have harmful effects. It is also possible to take it in pill/­­tablet form, but I dont recommend that because a 2005 study showed that the true vinegar content of these supplements was highly questionable (33). There is also a report of a woman having an apple cider vinegar tablet stuck in her throat, which led to esophageal burns. It is recommended to use organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar with the mother. Braggs seems to be the most popular option, which is available on Amazon* with tons of interesting testimonials and reviews that are fun to browse through. Apple cider vinegar also has various other non-health related uses like hair conditioning, skin care, dental care, pet use and as a cleaning agent (to name a few). These can be highly useful for people who like to keep things as natural and chemical-free as possible. At the end of the day, apple cider vinegar appears to be very healthy. Its not a miracle or a cure-all like some people seem to believe, but it does clearly have some important health benefits, especially for blood sugar and weight control. This article was originally published on Authority Nutrition. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing! - Read more about ACV in How does Apple Cider Vinegar Help You Lose Weight? - Here are lots more natural health topics on VegKitchen’s Nutrition page.  

Perfect Pickle: Grillo’s Vegan, All-Natural Pickles

September 8 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Perfect Pickle: Grillo’s Vegan, All-Natural PicklesPhoto Courtesy Grillo’s Pickles Besides Grillos Pickles being vegan, all-natural, gluten-free, paleo, and kosher — theyre just plain good. Varieties include: Italian and Hot Italian (in both spears and chips) and Sweet Bread & Butter in chips (which are the perfect size for our Black Bean and Edamame Sliders and our Smoky Baby Portobello Sliders). Founder Travis Grillo starting selling spears -- two for $1 -- out of a wooden cart on the Boston Common. He made them by night using an old family recipe. After generating buzz on the Common, Whole Foods and the Boston Red Sox approached him about creating professional partnerships. Pickle Prep The pickles are made simply, with old-school Italian recipes. Only natural ingredients are used: water, distilled white vinegar, salt, dill, garlic, and grape leaves. For the hot variety, habanero and jalape?o peppers are added. For the sweet, they add red peppers, yellow onion mustard seed, celery seed, turmeric, and a pinch of all-natural sugar. The grape leaves actually act as a natural preserver, thus avoiding the use of chemicals and preservatives such as calcium chloride and sodium benzoate, which are found in most pickle products. They opt not to ferment these pickles; they believe theyre freshest and crispest the way they make them. Pickle Pairing We asked the Grillos Pickles team to pick all-star recipes that would go great with their pickles: Carrot Fritters with Dill-Yogurt Sauce -- Weve had success mixing our Italian dills with anything that heavily features carrots, and weve also made a yogurt-based dip with the dill chips. I think adding some sliced/­­chopped dills to this sauce would yield awesome results. Red Quinoa Zucchini Burger -- The Italian dill chips would add a nice zest, and the HOT Italian chips would provide a good bite. I would personally add the hots; Ive done so to veggie burgers many times. Sweet-and-Sour Baked Tofu Sandwich -- The sweet bread & butters would give a refreshing sweet flavor, while still maintaining the crunch of the cabbage.

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches

July 12 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches Sm?rrebr?d - an open-faced rye sandwich that is piled high with toppings - is one of the most essential dishes in the Danish culture, most commonly eaten for lunch instead of a warm dish. Traditionally, many of the toppings involve poultry, fish and meat, but here we are showing a few of our vegetarian favourites along with some more contemporary versions. The recipes aren’t as specific as usual since sandwiches rarely call for detailed instructions. We merely hope to open your senses and get you inspired to try something else than just a regular butter and cheese sandwich. This is also a fun way to do a buffet. Bake or buy a good quality sourdough rye bread (or paleo bread for a flour free option). Then prepare a table with as many toppings as you can come up with and let every guest build their own open-faced sandwich. New potatoes & pickled onion sandwich We love a good ol’ potato sandwich with mâche lettuce, mayo, quick pickled red onions, chives and dill. Use new potatoes if they are in season and remember that you don’t need to peel them, just rinse to remove any dirt and place whole into a pan of lightly salted water, bring to the boil, simmer for about 10-15 minutes or until tender. Then drain and leave to cool. Here is how we make our own quick pickled red onion: Mix 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) rice vinegar or white wine vinegar with 1 tsp honey and 1/­­2 tsp salt and 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds or cumin seeds. Then we slice up 1 red onion thinly and pour boiling water over the slices before placing them in a jar with the vinegar. After 30 minutes it already tastes divine. Creamy curried egg salad sandwich This creamy curried egg salad is so typical Danish. We serve it on rye bread with small cherry tomatoes, chives and alfalfa sprouts. It can get a little messy when you eat it, but don’t let that intimidate you. Here is how you make the egg salad: Place 4 eggs in a pan and cover with water, bring to the boil and set the timer for 8 minutes, lower the heat and let simmer. After 8 minutes, remove from the heat and place under running cold water. When the eggs are cold, crack and peel. In a bowl, stir together 2 tbsp mayo, 2 tbsp yogurt (or more mayo instead), 1 tsp curry powder and a pinch of salt. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Now chop the boiled eggs and gently fold them into the curry dressing. Avo & Za’atar The new queen of open-faced sandwiches and also one of the most popular subjects on instagram. Avocado is not a traditional Danish sm?rrebr?d toppings but always a welcome addition to our table. The key to this rye recipe is to use really ripe avocados. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone, scoop out the avocado flesh with a spoon and slice very finely. Place each half on two slices of rye bread and give each avo a gentle mash with your hand. We have served this open-faced avo sandwich with thin slices of radishes and a sprinkle of our favourite spice Za’atar. Red bell pepper & Rosemary spread Lots of people have been asking us for a plant based spread to use on sandwiches. This popular recipe from our first book is one of our favourites. Apart from putting on a sandwich, it’s also great as a side to most dishes or together with pasta or zoodles. Here is how we make our spread: Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Cut 3 large red bell peppers in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking tray. Roast for 40 minutes until slightly charred. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Add 2/­­3 cup (75 g) sunflower seeds, a pinch of cayenne and a pinch of salt to a frying-pan and toast for a few minutes on medium heat. Peel the skin from the peppers, chop and put in a blender. Add the sunflower seeds, 2 tbsp lemon juice and 2 sprigs rosemary and purée on high speed. Put in an airtight glass jar. Will keep in the fridge for up to two weeks. Hazelnut butter & Strawberries Not all our sandwiches are savoury. This is a modernised version of the classic peanut butter & jam sandwich. Hazelnut butter, sliced strawberries, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, a sprinkle of bee pollen and some fresh basil. Delish! Buy nut or seed butter in stores or make your own (try this recipe).

US News Releases ‘Best Diet’ Rankings for 2015

January 19 2015 Meatless Monday 

US News Releases ‘Best Diet’ Rankings for 2015US News & World Report just released their 2015 diet rankings and no, the Cookie Diet did not win this year. Nor did Paleo, Flat Belly, or South Beach.  And the Biggest Loser wasnt the big winner (it finished 9th overall.)   The panel of diet and nutrition experts considered 35 programs and ranked them in 7 categories such as Best Heart-Healthy Diets, Best Weight-Loss Diets, and Easiest Diets to Follow.  The winner in both Best Diet for Healthy eating and Best Overall Diet: The DASH diet. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (hypertension is the medical term for high blood pressure.)  Developed by The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) it edged out the TLC Diet and the Mayo Clinic Diet.  Studies show DASH can lower blood pressure, which if too high, can trigger heart disease, heart failure, and stroke.  The diet also showed favorable results in areas like lowering bad cholesterol and preventing diabetes. Many of those benefits will be familiar to fans of Meatless Monday.  And, no surprise, in addition to having you go easy on salt the DASH diet emphasizes plenty of grains, vegetables, and fruits.  It also recommends less meat than the average American is accustomed to eating. In fact, eating less meat is something winning diets in several categories had in common, from Best Heart-Healthy Diets to Best Diabetes Diets.   Looking at the winners you also see a focus on eating more fruits and vegetables and exercising regularly. An entire category is dedicated to Plant-Based diets.  The winner:  The Mediterranean Diet .  It earned high marks in all areas of assessment from being nutritionally sound to helping you lose weight (though it wasnt designed to be a weight loss diet.) It also allows for a glass or two of wine per week (plant-based people should still get to have some fun.)  The next highest finishers in the Plant-Based category were the Flexitarian diet and the Ornish diet. User-friendliness was one of the factors experts considered in their rankings.  The easier a diet is to follow, the better the odds of sticking to it.  On that score, Meatless Monday would rank at the top.  You cant get much more simple than, One day a week just dont eat meat.  And while Meatless Monday is a movement rather than a diet, it also confers many of the benefits of the more structured plans.   That may be why its a winner for so many people worldwide. The post US News Releases ‘Best Diet’ Rankings for 2015 appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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