organic - vegetarian recipes

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10 Vegan Chocolate Desserts You Must Try

Vegan Methi Chicken Curry Recipe (Instant Pot) Soy Curls in Fenugreek Onion Sauce

Cool Refried Bean Wraps

Recipe | Whole Wheat Chocolate Cherry Muffins










organic vegetarian recipes

10 Vegan Chocolate Desserts You Must Try

February 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether it’s Valentine’s Day or any day of the year, here are 10 must-try vegan chocolate treats. From nougat to tart, all around the world, you mustn’t miss out on these! Laduree – Los Angeles, California Get the Plaisir Sucré: which literally translates to Sweet Pleasure. Made with hazelnut biscuit, chocolate hazelnut ganache, and chocolate chantilly (a sweetened whipped cream), you’re sure to get your chocolate fix here. Ara Chocolat – Paris, France An award-winning bean-to-bar chocolate maker in Paris? Sign us up! Besides artisinal chocolates, find chocolate cake, chocolate mousse and hot chocolate. VeganWaf – Brussels, Belgium Have you been missing out on waffles since going vegan? Not anymore. Try this vegan and gluten-free waffle smothered in chocolate. La Gelateria del Barri – Santiago, Chile Vegan gelato, yes… you’ll find some chocolate gelato here - but did you know you’ll also find decadent vegan brownies? This shop is 100% vegan and, bonus, they don’t use gluten, soy, or added sugar. Vegan Heaven – Taipei, Taiwan Aiming to use organic and local ingredients, this charmingly colorful bakery will have something for everyone. For you chocolate lovers: there’s a dark chocolate tart that’s not to be missed. Fukafe – […] The post 10 Vegan Chocolate Desserts You Must Try appeared first on HappyCow.

Top 10 Healthy Vegan Restaurants in LA

January 29 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

January’s nearing an end – with all of the indulgent food over the holidays and into the New Year, you may be seeking some lighter fare. Luckily, the HappyCow app is here to help! Haven’t tried it before? Let’s have a mini-tutorial with one of the world’s most vegan-friendly cities: Los Angeles. Keep reading for a run-down of the top healthy vegan restaurants in LA.  Firstly, if you’re a regular HappyCow user and you don’t have the HappyCow app… what are you waiting for? (Visit this link to learn more about the download.) Second, using the app is easy. Simply open it up, select “Vegan”, “Vegetarian”, or “Veg-Options”, and then click on “Filters”. From here, you can search for a business by name, scan your radius, or sort options by distance, rating, alphabetical, price, or most reviewed. There are even options such as who has outdoor seating, who needs reservations, wheelchair accessibility, who accepts credit cards, and who has WiFi. Among selecting various cuisines and searching for store types (bakeries, hotels, food truck, etc.) you can scroll down to “Categories”. As you can see above, for this search we’ve selected gluten-free, organic, juice bar, macrobiotic, raw food, and salad bar. […] The post Top 10 Healthy Vegan Restaurants in LA appeared first on HappyCow.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Restaurant Highlight: Fourchette ? Bicyclette – Brussels

December 18 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM Tucked away in a calm little street, ideally located next to Place Saint Boniface, Fourchette ? Bicyclette is a unique place. This very tiny restaurant is owned by Alexandra Roshardt, a French expat who invites us into her kitchen to discover how healthy cuisine can be both exciting and nourishing. Alexandra has a real passion for culinary art. Her restaurant is where she gives free rein to her imagination, to create original dishes that make gourmet mouths water. Her cuisine is familial but sophisticated, she transforms simple ingredients or day to day recipes into elegant and almost gastronomic preparations. Her cuisine isnt exclusively for vegans, it is suited for anyone that enjoys eating healthy without compromising on flavour or quality. Quality is one of her strong values; she works with organic products sourced locally for the most part, and prepares everything herself in her open kitchen. She has dedicated her work to creating great lunch and brunch, and never opens at night. I guess she believes in the adage that says that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but Alexandra extends it to lunch and brunch! My advice for you is to go there for […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Fourchette ? Bicyclette – Brussels appeared first on HappyCow.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies Picture by VK Rees Makes 2 dozen Oatmeal cookies just remind you of home. If you come from a home that deprived you of chocolate chip cookies. Just kidding! These are gorgeous little clusters of oats studded with ruby cranberries. Crispy on the edges, chewy inside with a hint of spice.  Just the perfect thing for the holidays if you can forget about the war on Christmas and enjoy a cookie for a minute. This recipe is from Superfun Times. Notes ~ If you dont have pumpkin pie spice, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon and a pinch of cloves oughta do it! Ingredients 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, softened at room temp 1/­­3 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­3 cup granulated sugar 3 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk or your fave non-dairy milk 1 tablespoon organic cornstarch 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup all-purpose flour 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 1/­­2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­2 cups rolled oats 1/­­2 cup dried sweetened cranberries 1/­­2 cup chopped walnuts Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease 2 large baking sheets.  In a large mixing bowl, use a handmixer or strong fork to cream together oil and sugars. Mix in the vanilla. Add the cornstarch and milk, and mix until the cornstarch is dissolved.  Sift in the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix to combine. Add the oats, cranberries and nuts, and use your hands to form a stiff dough. Scoop cookies out with a tablespoon or server, using about two tablespoons of dough per cookie. Place about 2 inches apart. Flatten a little with your hand. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until edges are lightly browned. Remove from oven and cool for about 5 minutes then transfer to cooling rack to cool completely.

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

Meat Free Monday Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary with #MFMCountMeIn Campaign

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meat Free Monday , launched by Sir Paul, Mary and Stella McCartney in 2009, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this month. Meat Free Monday is a global Meatless Monday partner mutually aligned on our mission to raise awareness and action around the benefits of meat consumption reduction. Meat Free Monday partners with celebrities, schools, businesses, restaurants and country organizers to encourage people to help slow climate change, conserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one meat free day each week. This month, Meat Free Monday is celebrating a decade of action and advocacy with a new campaign encouraging people to join the global meat reduction movement. They are launching #MFMCountMeIn anniversary campaign which aims to bring celebrities, businesses, not-for-profit groups, educational institutions and individual supporters together, to celebrate what people are doing on the meat free front and inspire even more people to get on board. Get in on the action: Join Meatless Monday and Meat Free Monday in promoting #MFMCountMeIn and #MeatlessMonday on your social media account. Post a photo or video showing your support and how easy it is to go meatless on Mondays. Think recipes, tips or shout out to the Meat Free Monday team. Dont forget to tag @MeatlessMonday and @MeatFreeMonday . We congratulate Meat Free Monday on their 10th Anniversary! We at Meatless Monday are thrilled to work with a great global partner in our joint mission to help reduce meat consumption around the world. With our combined strength, we can effectively raise awareness that cutting meat one day week can benefit personal health and the health of the planet. We look forward to the next decade of partnership and growth with Meat Free Monday. Sid Lerner, Founder & Chairman, Meatless Monday Q&A with Meat Free Monday Team How did Meat Free Monday first begin? The McCartney family has a long history of personal interest in sustainable food - from the Linda McCartney vegetarian food range to Pauls organic farm - but it was reading a 2006 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Livestocks Long Shadow, that crystallized in Paul, Mary and Stellas minds the global importance of making planet-friendly food choices. According to Livestocks Long Shadow, animal agriculture is one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global. On the basis of this alarming fact the family launched the Meat Free Monday campaign in June 2009. What is the goal of Meat Free Monday, who should participate, and why? Meat Free Monday aims to raise awareness of the detrimental environmental impact of animal agriculture and industrial fishing. The campaign encourages individuals, families, businesses, not-for-profit groups and educational institutions to help slow climate change, conserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one plant-based day each week. What trends or changes have you seen in the past 10 years regarding awareness and interest in meat reduction? Shopping habits have changed dramatically in the last ten years, with consumer demand leading to many new plant-based products now being available in shops and restaurants. According to research company Kantar World panel, 150 million more meat free dinners were sold in January 2019 compared with the same month the previous year. 21% of UK households have cut down on their meat intake, a shift due in part to campaigns like Meat Free Monday. What programs and campaigns is Meat Free Monday working on locally or globally? Meat Free Mondays aim is to raise awareness and inspire people to make a change in their diets from an easily achievable starting point. Over 3,000 UK schools currently participate in Meat Free Monday, as do local education authorities such as Edinburgh and Trafford. A key project is working with young people and expanding the campaigns schools programme. Could you share Sir Paul McCartney’s favorite meat-free recipe? One of Pauls favorite recipes is Super Vegetable Salad, which is featured in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Please see recipe here . A quick history of Meatless Monday Meatless Monday is global movement active in over 40 countries and regions and continues to grow. Meatless Monday was founded in 2003 by Sid Lerner in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In 2009, Ghent, Belgium, became the first non-U.S. city to go meatless. The same year, Paul McCartney introduced the U.K. to Meat Free Mondays, which has also continued to grow internationally.   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Meat Free Monday Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary with #MFMCountMeIn Campaign appeared first on Meatless Monday.

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From PlantsProfessional athletes use their bodies in incredible ways. Whether serving as a human bulldozer or striking a ball with colossal force, their bodies require loads of fuel in order to function as powerfully and efficiently as possible. And as the athletes prove below, fuel can come in many forms, and plant-based fuel has helped many achieve great things. Read on to see what this diverse bunch has to say about running on plants.   Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1 Champion I have plenty of protein in my diet and Ive gained muscle, and Im healthier and happier than Ive ever been. Wish I did it sooner. Five-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton, via Instagram , discussing the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet. According to Forbes, Hamilton was the world’s 12th highest-paid athlete in 2018 and is the highest-paid Formula 1 driver. Hamilton sites his concerns for the environment around climate change and animal welfare as his motivations for switching to a plant-based diet. He is vocal across his social media platforms about the benefits of plant-based eating and encourages his fans to also reduce meat in their diets.     Venus Williams, professional tennis player “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food], she told Health . “Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”       Derrick Morgan, American professional football player “Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part. I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself,” Derrick Morgan, NFL football player to ESPN . Morgan is a 100 percent plant-based athlete who has encouraged many of his Tennessee Titans teammates to join him in eating plant-based. He and many of the Titans players have also attributed improved energy, reduced inflammation and better performance to switching to a meatless diet.     Kyrie Irving, professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics I’ve been on more of a plant-based diet, getting away from all the animals [products], Irving told ESPNs Chauncey Billups . Irving also credits plant-based eating with giving him more energy and endurance, which helps him sustain a high performance level throughout games. So my energy is up, my body feels amazing.       Hannah Teter, American Olympian snowboarder “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally, Teter told HuffPost . My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”       Scott Jurek, American Ultramarathoner I grew up hating vegetables, eating meat and potatoes, he told GQ . When I was in college I started reading more about different diets and the vegetarian and vegan diets really came up quite a bit. As I worked in hospitals through physical therapy school it became clear to me that I needed to change my diet to avoid the health problems I was seeing. It was definitely a long-term decision rather than one made for short-term performance gains.       Jermain Defoe, English professional footballer I think Ive managed [to adopt veganism] successfully, he told the Guardian . I dont find anything hard to give up, as such, because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me. So, while getting in an ice bath isnt nice, I just think: You know what? Im going to do this and be rewarded. Its hard but in another way its easy because all I want to do is play well and score goals.       Tia Blanco, Puerto Rican professional surfer “I feel really great eating a plant-based diet and love the way it makes me feel physically and mentally, she said in an interview with Teen Vogue . Many of us know the effects of diet on one’s health, but fail to realize that diet plays a huge role in more than just your personal well-being.”         Austin Aries, American professional wrestler Im usually concerned with keeping my calories up to maintain my size, though I adjust my calories depending on if I need to bulk up or cut weight, he told Mens Journal . I try to limit my intake of things like soy, gluten, and overly processed foods. The easiest way to do this is by making sure Im eating a variety of different foods every day. This also ensures I am consuming all different types of plant-based protein to cover the full amino acid profile as well as my vitamins and nutrients.     JJ Redick, American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers During the season, my main focus is staying healthy and feeling strong, he said in an interview with Mens Journal .  Ive always had a leaner frame, so balancing my intake of protein, fat, and carbs is an important focus that guides my food choices. Ive found that incorporating plant-based protein items like Beyond Meat into my diet can deliver just as much protein, if not more, than some traditional meat items, while making me feel healthy, fit, and agile.       David Carter, American professional football player Football is a machismo sport, which is great, but everything can’t be machismo. On the field and at practice, yes, you can be machismo, but when it comes to diet, you need to have compassion for your body, he told NFL.com in an interview.         Barny du Plessis, British professional body builder and Mr. Universe winner I am the best Ive ever been. I feel fantastic, no aches, pains or niggles. No delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) after heavy sessions, du Plessis said in an interview with the Thinking Vegan . All my workouts are on fire; endurance and energy are awesome, strength and power are as good as I want them to be. I feel really healthy, fit, and buzzing with energy. I feel lighter, and not bloated, but Im still as heavy as I was when eating meat and animal products. Being leaner on more calories - thats always a good thing!     FREE ORGANIC GOYA FOR A YEAR Dont miss your chance to win ONE YEAR of FREE ORGANIC GOYA PRODUCTS! Meatless Monday has teamed up with Goya to promote their Dont Panic, Its Organic giveaway. Check out Goyas organic products and enter to win Goya goodness for a year . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post 12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Solo Bio Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Solo Bio Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Dumpling Ramen Bowls

March 29 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Dumpling Ramen Bowls In our house, were crazy about ramen bowls.  Theyre one-dish meals that are healthful, versatile, and easy-to-make. What’s not to love? The cheapest and easiest noodles to use in ramen bowls are the eponymous ramen noodle bricks that you can find in any grocery store for about 20 cents each. (Just be sure to throw away the seasoning packet — nasty stuff in there!) When I have rice noodles on hand, I use them instead of the ramen noodles, and Ive also been known to use leftover linguine or angel hair pasta. For the broth, you can go with adding a regular vegetable soup base (I like Better than Bouillon brand) or even miso paste to water.  Were tom yum soup fanatics, so more often I will season my broth with a great tom yum soup base I found that contains no animal products. The vegetables and other ingredients you add to your bowls are only limited by your imagination (or, more accurately, whats in your fridge).  Usually I add some diced extra-firm tofu (sautéed when I have the time, or just simmered with everything else when Im in a hurry).  Ive also been known to add pieces of vegan sausage (as I did here) as well as meatballs when I have them on hand. I add whatever veggies I have on hand, whether fresh or frozen. These bowls are also a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables. One of my favorite additions to ramen bowls are Asian dumplings.  I live in a rural area, so until recently, if I wanted Asian dumplings, Id have to take a road trip to a city with an Asian market. But the nice people at Nasoya sent me samples of their organic Nasoya Vegan Dumplings to try for this post. I’m also happy to report that my local Food Lion now carries these dumplings (they’re in the fresh produce section next to the tofu), so I can now enjoy organic vegan dumplings anytime!  Click here for coupons to give them a try — they’re available in two flavors - Tofu Vegetable and Thai Basil Vegetable. Below is my recipe for Dumpling Ramen Bowls.   They can be made super-quickly if you use the simmer-everything-together method, or you can take a few extra minutes to saute some of the ingredients separately (such as the dumplings) and add more flavor to the final result. I especially like to use my electric wok when I make these bowls because I find that it makes it easier, whichever method I use.   Heres a recipe using my preferred method in which I saute a few of the components first:  Dumpling Ramen Bowls 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil 1 package Nasoya Vegan Dumplings 1 1/­­2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 cups water 2 teaspoons vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base 2 packages ramen noodles or rice noodles 1/­­2 cup shredded carrots 2 cups fresh baby spinach or baby bok choy 1 cup cooked broccoli florets (or other cooked vegetable, optional 2 diced vegan sausage links or 1 cup diced extra-firm tofu, optional Sriracha, to taste, optional Thai basil leaves or cilantro, optional garnish Black sesame seeds, optional garnish Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the dumplings and stir-fry until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.  Add a splash of water, if needed to keep the dumplings from sticking. Remove the dumplings from the wok, and set aside. Reheat the wok or skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes to brown nicely and soften.  Remove the mushrooms from the wok and set aside.  Bring the the water to a boil in the wok or medium saucepan. Stir in the soup base until blended. Add the ramen noodles, carrot, and remaining soy sauce and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Divide the noodle mixture into large soup bowls, arranging the carrots and spinach on top of the noodles.  Return the dumplings and mushrooms to the wok and heat until hot.  Arrange the dumplings and mushrooms on top of the noodles, next to the spinach and carrots.  Add the cooked broccoli and vegan sausage and stir-fry for a minute to heat through.  To serve, drizzle each bowl with sriracha, if using.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Garnish with basil or cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. Makes 2 to 4 servings   NOTE: For the quick, no-oil, Simmer-Everything-Together Method, use the above ingredients (except the oil) and proceed as follows: Heat the water in a large saucepan.  Add the soy sauce and vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base and bring to a boil.  Add the Nasoya Vegan Dumplings and return the water to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the ramen noodles, mushrooms, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles and dumplings are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, and spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Stir in any additional cooked veggies, tofu, or other ingredients, as desired. Divide the soup into bowls, arranging a few of the dumplings on top of each serving.  Drizzle with a little sriracha, if desired. Garnish with a few Thai basil or cilantro leaves and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. The post Dumpling Ramen Bowls appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce

December 16 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce Its no secret. I love tofu.  I use it all the time to make everything from lasagna to cheesecake. Tofu scrambles are a weekly ritual at my house. I even like to dice and bake it to serve it as an appetizer with a flavorful peanut sauce or a zesty sriracha-laced sauce that Ive come to refer to as my 3-2-1 Sauce. The sauce is named after the proportions of its three simple ingredients: 3 parts mayo, 2 parts chili sauce, 1 part sriracha:  3-2-1! If you happen to have some lime juice and cilantro on hand, a bit of each can only improve this flavorful sauce.  I like to serve the dipping sauce on the side, but you can also make extra sauce and toss the tofu in the sauce, then serve it over rice. The nice people at Nasoya were kind enough to send me coupons for their tofu. The tofu I use for this recipe is Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu. Im thrilled that my supermarket now carries it because it saves so much time - no more tofu-pressing needed! Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce For the Tofu: 3 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 pound Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu For the Sauce: 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Thai Sweet Chili Sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce Optional: squeeze of lime juice; minced fresh cilantro For the tofu: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Set aside. Combine the cornstarch and spices in a large plastic zip lock food bag and shake to mix well. Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch cubes and add them to the bag with the seasonings.  Close the bag and shake to coat the tofu. Spread the coated tofu in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet, keeping the tofu pieces separate from each other.  Bake for about 20 minutes, turning once about halfway through. For the sauce: In a small bowl, combine the mayo, chili sauce, sriracha, and a squeeze of lime juice, if using.  Stir to mix well. Sprinkle with a little minced fresh cilantro, if desired. To serve: When the tofu is done baking, transfer it to a plate and serve with the sauce on the side for dipping. The post Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Quinoa Pancakes

November 26 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Quinoa Pancakes photo by VK Rees Makes 8 pancakes I put this recipe on Instagram awhile ago so maybe you’ve already made them and know that they are AWESOME! The only reason I put quinoa in my pancakes is for the crunch. Not for the extra protein, I get plenty of that elsewhere, and not just to level up my vegan, Im already level 10. The crunch just gives me life. It also makes the pancakes so very pretty. The quinoa should be cooked al dente for the best experience. And I like red quinoa for the prettiest contrast. First make sure your quinoa is cooked according to package directions and then fully cooled. Maybe do that the night before so you’re ready to go in the morning? Wow, you planned that well. This recipe is from I Can Cook Vegan. Notes ~ To cool quinoa quickly without overcooking it, spread onto a baking sheet and place in the refrigerator. ~ Dont use an electric mixer for the batter. Overmixed pancakes tend to result in a dense pancake. I use a dinner fork to get everything mixed. ~ You have to let the batter rest for ten minutes or so. The vinegar and the baking powder need to react with each other and the gluten needs to settle in and rest. ~Dont crowd the pan. Even in my big cast iron, I dont make more than two pancakes at once. ~ Dont use too much oil in the pan. It will result in a tough exterior. A very thin layer of oil is what you want and a spray can of organic coconut oil works perfectly for this. ~ Preheat the pan for a good ten minutes. I use cast iron and put it on moderate low heat (right around 3 on my stovetop), but you will probably need to adjust a little to get the temp just right. Remember, the temp is not set in stone. Lower and raise in tiny increments as needed. Even turning the dial 1/­­4 inch can result in big changes. ~ Use a measuring cup (with a rounded bottom if possible) to scoop out the batter. And remember to always spray the cup between pancakes, to prevent sticking. 1 cup cooked red quinoa, cooled completely 1 1/­­2 cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­4 cup unsweetened almond milk (or fave non-dairy milk) 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup water 3 tablespoons canola oil 1/­­2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Directions First make sure your quinoa is cooked al dente according to package directions and cooled. Then proceed with the recipe. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Measure the milk into a measuring cup. Add the milk, vinegar, water, oil and vanilla to the well in the dry ingredients. Stir with a fork until a thick, lumpy batter forms. That should take about a minute. It doesnt need to be smooth, just make sure you get all the ingredients incorporated. Fold in the quinoa. Preheat the pan over medium-low heat and let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Lightly coat the pan in oil. Add 1/­­3 cup of batter for each pancake, and cook for about 4 minutes, until puffy. Flip the pancakes, adding a new coat of oil to the pan, and cook for another 3 minutes or so. Pancake should be puffed up, and golden brown. Rest pancakes on a large plate loosely covered with tin foil until ready to serve with lots of maple syrup and butter! To reheat, place pancakes in on a baking sheet covered with tin foil in a  300 F degree oven for 5 minutes or so.

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie

November 23 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie photo by Kate Lewis Makes a 9-inch Pie Pumpkin Pie just got lighter, airier and way, way easier! Aquafaba (that’s cooked chickpea liquid) fluffs up as you puree literally every single ingredient together in the blender. So while it works, you can lean against the kitchen counter scrolling through Instagram and giggling at all the sillyheads that are still using eggs. Come on, it’s 2020, get with the program. But anyway, this pie is full of ginger and spice and everything nice; simply put it tastes the exact way you want pumpkin pie to taste. It also sets beautifully as you can see from those luscious fork marks. Long story short: cancel any other pies and get this on your table. Notes ~You will need 1/­­2 a cup of aquafaba. I highly recommend aquafaba from an organic can of chickpeas. That is what we tested it with and it worked beautifully! Homemade aquafaba will give you varying results in flavor and texture so experiment some time but if you’re new to this just buy the can. I am sure you will figure out some way to use those chickpeas. ~More about that can! I would suggest a 28 oz can because then you won’t need to scrape the bottom of a small can to make sure you get that full 1/­­2 cup. ~For crusts, you can use one off this site, or a storebought one, or a gluten-free crumb crust or whatever you want. No need to parbake. ~If you are using a high-speed blender (like Vitamix) then put it on a low setting. 2 sounds good. If it’s a regular old blender, do a 5 or 6. Ingredients 3 cups pumpkin purée 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (see notes) 2 tablespoons coconut oil at room temp 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Pinch of ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked and chilled Directions - Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add the pumpkin, maple syrup, aquafaba, coconut oil, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and salt to a blender. Blend for about 3 minutes (less if using a high-speed blender), until light and fluffy. It should increase by 20 percent to 25 percent in volume. - Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake for about an hour, until the top is crackly, the filling is a little jiggly in the center and pulling away from the sides slightly. - Let cool for about 30 minutes at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Slice and serve with whipped cream!

Restaurant Highlight: The Judgy Vegan In Brussels:

October 27 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Do you feel that veganism isnt about eating salads or being on a diet? Do you love a big burger overloaded with sauce, and feel that dessert is part of your everyday routine? Then you should definitely visit the Judgy Vegan in Brussels. Located in the center of the city, on a cute little street of the Marolles district, the Judgy Vegan is the very first restaurant to exclusively serve vegan food in Brussels. Julie, Nastasia and Céline are three friends that decided to create this project a few years ago. They met in a university group for animal rights, and from that friendship was born the idea of creating a vegan cafe–a cozy place where people could meet, talk, unwind and enjoy plant-based comfort food. Today, it is only Julie that runs the establishment. She based her menu on her favorite food that she ingeniously transformed into vegan recipes. She wants to prove that vegan food can be tasty, heart-warming and a not so complicated diet to follow. Her products are sourced locally and are fair-trade. She even has a small counter where she sells a selection of organic products carefully chosen to support her values and ecological engagement. […] The post Restaurant Highlight: The Judgy Vegan In Brussels: appeared first on HappyCow.

Restaurant Highlight – Rasoterra In Barcelona, Spain

September 17 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

No veggie burger, no pizza and no wraps? What do you offer then? Rasoterra isnt a typical vegetarian restaurant, this is precisely why it has deserved the title of best vegetarian restaurant in Barcelona. Dont expect to find veggie burgers, burritos or salad bowls. You will only get creativity and art in the form of healthy dishes. Surprising compositions made of the best local ingredients–that is their leitmotiv. They approach a plant-based cuisine with the eyes of a real gourmet and the skills of a master chef. As a gastronomic bistro, their mission is to reinvent the vegetarian and vegan cuisine and prove to the world that this cuisine is everything but boring. They want to be part of the local Slow Food chapter and that is why the kitchen uses organic, local and seasonal products with which they continuously reinvent their menu. Tucked away in the historical Gotico district of Barcelona, Rasoterra is a high end restaurant that provides a unique experience to its visitors. Decorated with taste, the relaxed light-filled dining room combines contemporary arts with natural materials and little details brought back from here or there that makes the atmosphere cozy and welcoming. Chiara, Daniele and Guillem […] The post Restaurant Highlight – Rasoterra In Barcelona, Spain appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie Dogs

July 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie DogsJuly 17th is National Hot Dog Day and the perfect time to try a delicious plant-based version of Americas classic summertime food. There are plenty of tasty meatless hot dog options available. Weve rounded up some of the most popular options, all of which are packed with tons of plant-based protein and taste.   Photo: Field Roast   Field Roast - (21 grams of protein) These hot dogs go by frankfurters and get their flavor from fresh garlic, fresh onions and Field Roasts own traditional blend of spices. Reviewers acclaim these fancy hot dogs have a texture that feels like a real meat hot dog and doesnt taste like fake meat. Do a taste test with your friends and family to see if they can tell the difference.       Photo: Tofurky     Tofurky - (17 grams of protein) Made with organic tofu and lots of flavor, this long-time veggie dog favorite has been described as having nearly the same texture as meat hot dogs but with a bit more spice. Who says tofu is bland?         Photo: Beyond Meat   Beyond Meat - (16 grams of protein) OK, a bit of a cheat. These are technically plant-based sausages, but hey, they fit on a hot dog bun. Beyond Meat is getting its fair share of press lately, and for good reason. They are popping up in global fast food chains, have tons of adoring fans and have been dominating the stock market with their recent IPO.       Photo: Lightlife     Lightlife - (7 grams of protein) Another plant-based hot dog on the list that has been around awhile. Which means people like them. And with only 50 calories per serving, they will fill you up, without weighing you down.             Photo: Morningstar Farms   Morningstar Farms - (7 grams of protein) Morningstar Farms products have been vegetarian staples for years. So theyve perfected the art of meatless cuisine. The texture for these veggie dogs is great, appealing to both vegetarians and carnivores alike. Insider tip, the hot dogs are a bit small for standard buns, so you might want to double the veggie dog fun to fill up the bun.     Let us know your fave. On June 17th post your favorite veggie hot dog using #NationalHotDogDay #MeatlessMonday and @MeatlessMonday Want more veggie inspiration? Weve got tons of plant-based recipes on our site. Check them out here. Head over to the Meatless Monday Summer Cookout Pinterest Board, where youll find plenty of tasty, plant-based BBQ ideas. The post Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie Dogs appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Brioche Bagels

June 12 2019 Vegan Dad 

Brioche Bagels I recently saw brioche bagels at the grocery store and, quite frankly, they looked terrible. I was pretty sure I could make a vegan version that was so much better than whatever Loblaws was peddling. I was right! These are tender and absolutely delicious toasted with jam, or as a sandwich. They are the perfect addition to any brunch or lunch. The recipe is a Reinhart adaptation and mashup. You can also make two 1 lb sandwich loaves if that is more your thing.  INGREDIENTS Makes 8 large bagels Sponge - 2.25 oz bread flour - 8 g instant yeast - 4 fl oz lukewarm plain soy milk Dough - 2 oz cooked sweet potato - 4.5 fl oz plain soy milk (cold), or aquafaba* - 14.75 oz bread flour - 1 oz sugar - 1.25 tsp (10 g) salt (or generous .25 tsp (4 g) if using salted butter) - 4 oz vegan butter, at room temperature** Poaching Liquid - enough water the fill your pot about 1.5 high - 1 tbsp baking soda - 1 tbsp brown sugar * I did not find any difference between soy milk or aquafaba in a blind taste test. **You need a butter that will firm up when cold. I used home-made and Melt with great results. METHOD 1. Whisk together the sponge ingredients in a stand mixer bowl until smooth. Cover and let rise for 45 mins. 2. Blend together sweet potato and milk (or aquafaba) with an immersion blender in a small container (I use a pyrex 1 cup liquid measuring cup) until very smooth. Whisk into the sponge. 3. Add the flour, sugar, and salt, Use the dough hook to bring the ingredients together into a rough dough. Make sure all the ingredients are incorporated. Let rest for 5 mins. 4. With the dough hook running on medium speed, add the vegan butter about 2 tbsp at a time, waiting for it to be incorporated into the dough before adding more. The dough will start out tough but will soften as it takes on more fat. 5. Once the butter is incorporated, knead the dough for 5-7 mins, or until smooth.  6. Shape into a ball, place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and let rise for 60 mins.  7. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball.  8. Line a large baking sheet with lightly oiled parchment paper. 9. Pinch though the centre of the ball with your thumb and forefinger, then shape into a ring. (I find this method best because the final bagel is delicate and this allows it to withstand the poaching process without breaking apart).  10. Place the shaped dough rings on the prepared sheet, mist with oil, cover with plastic wrap, and immediately refrigerate for 8 hours, or overnight. The bagels will have risen and firmed up in the cold. 11. When you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Get the poaching liquid simmering in a large pot.  12. Add as many bagels as will comfortably fit in your pot (usually four), top side down (they should float). Poach for no more than 30 seconds, then flip over. Poach for no more than 30 seconds more, then transfer back to the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining bagels. 13. Bake for 8 mins, then rotate the pan. If the bottoms of the bagels are browning too much, you can at this time place the baking sheet on top of an empty baking sheet to insulate the bottom. Bake for another 6-8 mins until golden.  14. Let cool and serve!

Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Bio Solo Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Bio Solo Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Black Bean and Avocado Salad with Oranges or Mango

May 24 2019 VegKitchen 

Black Bean and Avocado Salad with Oranges or Mango Black beans, diced mango, and avocado taste heavenly together in this delicious salad. Fresh, perfectly ripe mangos are best, of course, but they’re not always in season and occasionally unreliable. Once in a while I like to take the guesswork out of mangos and use canned (organic), which is akin to using canned pineapple--you know exactly what you’re going to get. The post Black Bean and Avocado Salad with Oranges or Mango appeared first on VegKitchen.

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless OptionsWhether youre in it for the love of the game or the delectable ballpark eats, baseball season is in full swing. In 2019, stadiums are offering more meatless options than ever before: From the Impossible Burger to falafel-packed pitas to meat-free Philly cheesesteaks, theres no shortage of tasty ways to fill up at the concession stands. Find a few notable favorites below. Photo Credit: Beyond Meat Dodger Stadium Burgers and hot dogs are ballpark staples, and now meatless options are, too, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Find the Impossible Burger topped with herb mayo, lettuce, tomato and onions at Field Section 47 and Reserve section 29, according to Eater . Beyond Meat is also available, in the form of a Dodger Sausage , at Field 10, Loge 133, and Reserve 4.   Citi Field Mets fans can whet their appetites at the Goya Burrito Bar (Section 414), where they can choose from bean, rice and veggie burritos, bowls, or nachos, Eater reported. In the mood for something else? Youre in the right place, as AM New York highlighted. Score a margarita pizza cupcake (Jim Beam Highball Club on the Promenade),  Shake Shacks Portobello Shroom Burger (Section 140, Field Level Concourse), a veggie taco at El Verano Taqueria (Section 139, Field Level Concourse), or a veggie dog at Hain Celestial Gluten Free & Organic Stand (Section 105).   Globe Life Park Stadium The Texas Rangers provide their fans with a meatless haven at Globe Life Park Stadium . The Ballpark Vegan (near section 16) serves up a variety of meatless eats, including a Beyond Burger topped with vegan cheese, street tacos loaded with Beyond Meat crumbles and vegan chili.   T-Mobile Park If you have tickets to a Seattle Mariners home game, come hungry ! Find the seemingly ubiquitous Impossible Burger at Lil Woodys Burger & Shakes (at the Pen). This version is built the old fashioned way, topped with chopped onion, diced pickle, tomato, lettuce, ketchup and mayo. Hit It Here Café (Right Field Hit It Here Terrace) serves a fully vegan Beyond Burger, which is paired with vegan Just Mayo. At The Natural (Section 105), Beyond Meat is served in the form of a sweet and spicy sausage. Here you can also order avocado toast - not yet a ballgame staple, but whos to judge? At Paseo (Edgars Cantina and Edgars Home Run Porch), you can chow down on the Tofu Delight Sandwich, which features sautéed organic tofu with garlic aioli, caramelized onion, cilantro, pickled jalape?o and romaine lettuce, all served on a toasted baguette.   Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium boasts tons of meatless dining options. At Bareburger (section 132), choose between the Beyond Sausage sandwich, avocado bites or the Changeup Burger (Impossible Burger, pickled red onions, spinach, guacamole, spicy pico de gallo on a sprout bun). At the Toyota Terrace (in the right field bleachers), try a crispy buffalo cauliflower bun thats served with celery slaw and creamy bleu cheese. If youre craving something sweet, its important to know theres a Ben & Jerrys Scoop Shop located in Sections 125 and 318.   Oracle Park The three-time World Champion San Francisco Giants are winners in more ways than one: Their stadium food options are truly trophy-worthy. The venue hosts a culinary garden behind the centerfield wall, from which two restaurants source fresh produce like kale and avocado. Beyond an assortment of fresh veggies, there are tons of meatless meals available here. The Garden Table offers an Impossible beef-based chili, and the standard Impossible Burger is available at Derby Grill outposts. Guests can go beyond classic ball game fare with the rice bowl (baby bok choy and baked tofu) or the noodle bowl (roasted eggplant, wok-seared bell peppers, crispy tofu) at Fongs , located on the second floor promenade.   Citizens Bank Park Grammy Award-winning musician Questlove has certainly upped the Philadelphia Phillys cool factor. Launched at the end of March 2019, the teams Citizens Bank Park is now serving Questloves Cheesesteak , a meatless riff on the citys iconic dish made with - you guessed it - Impossible Meat (Sections 108 and 120). In addition to the new menu item, plant-based meals can be found at Shake Shack, the first sit-down Shake Shack in a sports venue (near the Third Base Gate) and at Harry the Ks Broadcast Bar and Grille, which is serving up curry cauliflower lettuce (Left Field Gate).   Did we miss one your meatless stadium faves? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Want to bring Meatless Monday to your local stadium or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador today ! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mango Lassi Chia Pudding + Giveaway

March 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango Lassi Chia Pudding + Giveaway We have such an exciting giveaway for you today! We recently interviewed Sana Javeri Kadri, founder of single origin spice collective Diaspora Co. on our self-care series and fell in love with Sana and her mission. We were also lucky to get to try their organically farmed, heirloom turmeric and can safely say that it’s next level in every way. It looks like dusted gold and tastes incredibly potent, like the freshest powdered spice we’ve ever tried. We’re so happy to host a giveaway for a Diaspora Co. turmeric subscription here today. Yes, not just a one time thing but a whole subscription, with a turmeric delivery every 3 months! We also had so much fun coming up with a recipe using the turmeric. This Mango Lassi Chia Pudding is such a decadent and nourishing breakfast. It’s based on toasted coconut-cashew milk and is full of warming spices, as well as sunny notes of fresh, sweet mango. Read on for the giveaway details and the recipe. Chia pudding is so fun to make because it’s infinitely customizable. We love making an extra creamy nut milk for chia pudding and spicing it up with different fruit, sweeteners, and/­­or powders. For this recipe, we make a toasted coconut and cashew milk, blended with turmeric, cinnamon, and cardamom, as well as fresh mangoes (in season right now and so sweet!) and dates. It then gets mixed with the chia and that’s it – you’re all set with an exciting breakfast for the next couple of days (or maybe even the whole week, this recipe makes quite a bit). We’ll be doing a little Instagram Stories demonstration for how to make this pudding later today, too. Hope you’ll give it a try :) G i v e a w a y :  To enter to win one subscription to Diaspora Co. turmeric (turmeric delivered to you every 3 months), leave a comment here telling us what kind of content you find most useful from us – savory recipes, sweet recipes, meal plans, interviews, natural self-care recipes, etc. or just your favorite way to enjoy turmeric if you’re new, until April 3rd, 2019. We love hearing your feedback! Giveaway is open to USA, Canada, Australia, and the UK.  Mango Lassi Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup desiccated coconut ½ cup untoasted cashews - soaked in water for 30 min-1 hour 5-6 dates - pitted 1 tablespoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon turmeric seeds from 4-5 cardamom pods pinch of sea salt black pepper 2 ripe Champagne (Ataulfo) mangoes - peeled and pitted 3½ cups purified water ¾ cup chia seeds Instructions Head a medium pan over medium heat. Add the coconut and toast, stirring constantly, until the coconut turns a caramel color. Remove from heat right away. In an upright blender, combine the toasted coconut, cashews, dates, vanilla, cinnamon, turmeric, cardamom, a pinch of sea salt, a few grinds of black pepper, mangoes, and water. Blend on high until very smooth. Add the chia seeds to a large bowl and pour the blended mixture over. Whisk the chia seeds in for a good minute, you should see the pudding start to thicken right away. Keep whisking the pudding every 10 minutes or so, until all the chia seeds bloom and the mixture turns a good pudding consistency - about 30 minutes. Distribute the pudding among jars and store in the refrigerator or serve right away. The pudding tastes really good garnished with plant yogurt, coconut flakes, and/­­or more mango slices. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Mango Lassi Chia Pudding + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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