olives - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Hot chocolate recipe | homemade hot chocolate | hot cocoa mix recipe

Vegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant Pot

Dry garlic chutney recipe | dry garlic powder | dry garlic chutney powder

Paneer hyderabadi recipe | hyderabadi paneer masala | paneer hyderabadi masala










olives vegetarian recipes

Recipe | Pear & Sharp Cheddar Grilled Cheese Sandwich

September 23 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Simple fall lunches--this is what I am in desperate need of right now. I’ve gotten bored of just about every single one of my go-to lunchtime options, so when noon rolls around, I find myself standing in front of the pantry, contemplating what I can do with lentils or jasmine rice. And then I just give up and have a handful of potato chips and some olives. (This is the point where you mentally insert a sad trombone sound.) Even though I blog about cooking, I really don’t like making big elaborate lunches. When I made pasta for myself two weeks ago, that was kind of a huge deal to me. I made pasta--for lunch! So I’ve been seeking out some easy, seasonal lunch ideas and I just happened to find a good one on Panini Happy: Granola-Crusted Pear and Almond Butter Panini. Being lazy about lunches, I didn’t do the granola-crusting (and I know I’m missing out, I’m sure of it!), but the pear and almond butter on a sandwich was delicious! One of my favorite fall snacks is pear slices topped with a little bit of cheese, so I decided that this would make a good sandwich too. […]

Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic

September 20 2019 VegKitchen 

Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic If candied sweet potatoes are too cloying for your palate, try them prepared in a savory rather than sweet way. This recipe, fragrant with garlic and thyme and studded with black olives, may change your mind about sweet potatoes if they’ve never been your veggie of choice. This recipe doubles easily for a larger crowd. The post Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic appeared first on VegKitchen.

Carrot and Broccoli Salad with Green Olives

September 9 2019 VegKitchen 

Carrot and Broccoli Salad with Green Olives Green olives, fresh herbs, and crunchy seeds embellish the pairing of baby carrots and broccoli for a simple, savory salad.This is the kind of salad that has good staying power, as long as you take care to cook the broccoli just until it’s barely tender-crisp and still bright green. It’s even better the next day, and is a nice little side  to include in your lunch. The post Carrot and Broccoli Salad with Green Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Baked Lentil Empanadas

September 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Lentils, cremini mushrooms, and pimento-stuffed olives give these baked empanadas flavor to spare. This recipe comes to us from chef Jodi Taffel , one of the finalists in the Western Foodservice Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 24 empanadas - 7 eggs - 1 cup yellow onion, roughly chopped - 1 cup sliced carrots - 1/­­2 cup diced celery - 8 oz sliced cremini mushrooms - 2 tbl olive oil - 1 tbl minced garlic - 2 tsp Kosher salt - 1 tsp cracked black pepper - 1/­­2 tsp paprika - 1 cup dry green lentils - 2 tsp dried tarragon - 4 cups vegetable stock - 1 cup martini olives (green with red pimentos), roughly chopped - 24 empanada wrappers - 2 tbl water, divided - 1/­­2 cup toasted garlic & avocado finishing oil   Directions 1. Submerge 6 eggs in a pot of water set over medium heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, cover with a tight fitting lid and let sit 12 minutes. Remove eggs and place in an ice bath. When cool enough to touch, peel and roughly chop. 2. While eggs are cooking, set a heavy bottomed soup pot over medium heat and sauté onion, carrots, celery and mushrooms the olive oil until softened. 3. Add the garlic, salt, pepper and paprika and cook 1 additional minute, or until fragrant. 4. Add the lentils and toss with the vegetables, then add the tarragon and stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. 5. Simmer 30 minutes, stirring every few minutes, or until lentils are tender and all the liquid has been absorbed (if lentils are still a bit crunchy after liquid is absorbed, add another cup of stock and continue to cook until they are tender). 6. Transfer lentil mixture to a large bowl and allow to cool 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 7. Fold eggs and olives into lentil mixture. 8. Working with 1 at a time, place 3-4 tablespoons lentil mixture in the center of each empanada wrapper. Dab your finger in water and moisten all around the outer edge of the empanada wrappers. Fold empanadas in half, seal the edges with the tines of a fork, and place on a parchment or silicone lined sheet pan. 9. Beat remaining egg with remaining tablespoon of water and paint the tops of the empanadas with it. 10. Bake 30-40 minutes, or until beautifully browned. 11. Remove empanadas from the oven and pain tops with finishing oil while still hot. The post Baked Lentil Empanadas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Caramelized Onion & Eggplant Puff Pastry Tart

July 22 2019 Oh My Veggies 

There are a few ingredients that improve just about any dish you add them to: Truffle Oil Caramelized Onions Olives Roasted Red Peppers Basil Unfortunately, this Caramelized Onion & Eggplant Puff Pastry Tart does not have truffle oil. (Although I suppose if you really wanted to, you could add some. I mean, it’s a free country, right? Do what you want!) But! It does have caramelized onions, olives, roasted red peppers, and basil. It’s a veritable quadrifecta of deliciousness. After I made this Leek & Olive Tart from Rikki Snyder’s food photography blog, I had a leftover puff pastry sheet sitting in the freezer, just begging to be made into something awesome. My little finger eggplants have been producing like crazy, so I roasted two of those, along with a small rosa blanca eggplant from the farmers market, as a topping. Everything else was simply what I had in the refrigerator that needed to be used. With a thrown-together recipe like this, there’s usually a high failure rate (at least in my kitchen, there is), so I piled on the toppings and crossed my fingers. I try hard to make most of my recipes really easy, but this one does […]

Vegan Mediterranean Nachos with Shawarma Chickpeas, Tzatziki, Olives, Pita bread

June 19 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mediterranean Nachos with Shawarma Chickpeas, Tzatziki, Olives, Pita breadVegan Mediterranean Nachos with Shawarma Chickpeas, Tzatziki, Olives, Cucumber, warm toasted Pita bread. Great Appetizer for parties or potluck. Vegan Nutfree Recipe Jump to Recipe These Mediterranean inspired nachos are super easy to put together. They are refreshing and so delicious with the various textures and flavors. Some toasted pita bread, warm shawarma spiced chickpeas, veggies, olives or sun dried tomato, and a generous helping of tzatziki! You can also switch up the toppings with some hummus and tahini dressing. Add other veggies such as chopped juicy tomatoes and onions. These Nachos can be made gluten-free with glutenfree flatbreads or veggie chips. They also make a great summer meal. What do you like on your Pita Nacho Bowl!Continue reading: Vegan Mediterranean Nachos with Shawarma Chickpeas, Tzatziki, Olives, Pita breadThe post Vegan Mediterranean Nachos with Shawarma Chickpeas, Tzatziki, Olives, Pita bread appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Panzanella

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This classic Florentine salad of bread and tomatoes is ideal for a light summer meal. Until the twentieth century the salad was based on onions rather than tomatoes, but its evolution takes advantage of tomatoes when they’re at their best. This recipe come to us from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook by our friends at Meat Free Monday. Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox!   Serves 4 -  1/­­2 loaf ciabatta - 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 garlic cloves, 1 peeled, 1 crushed -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped flatleaf parsley - 1 tablespoon baby capers, drained - 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped - 1 small red onion, finely sliced -  1/­­2 cucumber, deseeded and cut into chunks - 2 celery stalks, finely sliced - 12 fresh basil leaves, ripped - 50g stoned black olives, halved - salt and freshly ground black   Cut the ciabatta in half and brush the cut sides with a little extra virgin olive oil. Heat a ridged grill pan or normal grill and toast the ciabatta until crisp and golden. Rub the peeled garlic clove over the cut sides of the bread, tear the bread into rough chunks and set aside. In a small bowl whisk together 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, the crushed garlic clove and the red wine vinegar. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the freshly chopped flatleaf parsley. In a large bowl, mix together the bread and baby capers, plum tomatoes, sliced onion, cucumber, sliced celery, basil leaves, and black olives, and toss with the dressing. Season to taste. The post Panzanella appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich

May 30 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich It seems like we come back every year with a bean salad idea similar to today’s buffalo chickpea variation (see this sandwich and this salad). Beans do so well when combined with all kinds of sharp, punchy ingredients, like pickled items, herbs, and spices. Dressed up like this, they make for a flavorful and satiating component to include in sandwiches, bowls, salads, etc. They last a while in the fridge, which makes them great for meal prep and generally for thinking ahead. This buffalo chickpea version features a balance of spicy, savory, sweet, and briny. It’s especially delicious in a sandwich format, but it can definitely be enjoyed a bunch of different ways. The chickpeas are mashed and dressed with buffalo sauce, lemon juice, mustard, etc., and bulked up with pieces of roasted red pepper, olives, red onion, celery, and dried cranberries (which provide perfect little pockets of sweetness). Most of the ingredients here are pantry items for us/­­things that we almost always have in the fridge, so this type of lunch-saver is always at an arm’s reach. Maybe that’s the case for you as well? We hope you’ll give this one a try :) Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich   Print Serves: around 6 sandwiches Ingredients 3 cups cooked chickpeas (2 15 oz cans) 3 roasted red bell peppers - cut into bite-sized pieces juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons to ¼ cup Buffalo hot sauce 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup olives and capers or just olives - chopped packed ¼ cup dried cranberries - chopped 1 large celery stalk - finely chopped ¼ of a red onion - finely chopped 1½ teaspoon garlic powder 1½ teaspoon onion powder handful of herbs of choice like dill, basil, parsley, chives - chopped salt and pepper - to taste Instructions Put half of the chickpeas and all of the roasted red pepper in a large bowl and mash with a masher until fairly smooth. Add the rest of the chickpeas and mash them in, leaving some pieces intact for texture. Add the lemon juice, hot sauce, mustard, olive oil, olives/­­capers, cranberries, celery, red onion, garlic powder, onion powder, herbs, and salt and pepper. Mix everything through, taste for salt and adjust if needed. You can also do all of the mixing in a food processor. Keep the buffalo chickpea salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve in sandwiches with fixings like lettuce, cucumber/­­tomato slices, or in salads, bowls, etc. Enjoy! Notes Buffalo hot sauce varies greatly in hotness from brand to brand, so taste as you go when you add it, until you have the desired level of heat. 3.5.3226 The post Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Green Beans & Mushrooms with Walnuts

May 10 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This Roasted Green Beans & Mushrooms recipe is one from my side dish arsenal. Side dish arsenal? Yes! It’s my collection of fast, effortless side dishes–things that can be thrown together quickly so when my main dish requires a little more work, I can make a side that’s pretty much hands-off. They’re also a little bit lower in calories, so they pair perfectly with heavier entrees. I’ve shared a lot of these recipes here already–Barbecue Zucchini Fries, Roasted Broccoli, and Roasted Cauliflower & Kalamata Olives are a few of my favorites. I make sides like this all the time–I used to rely on frozen veggies in such cases, but I’ve been working on building a collection of go-to recipes that take only a few more minutes than those frozen vegetables, but taste a million gazillion (actual number!) times better. This recipe really couldn’t be much easier–the most time-consuming part is trimming the green beans. (And trust me, if you’ve never had roasted green beans before, the 5 minutes of trimming and cutting is well-worth the effort.) Once you’ve cut the beans and mushrooms, you throw them onto a baking sheet with the walnuts, spray them with cooking spray, and 15 […]

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo

January 24 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo We had the most transcendent experience eating this simple, Italian peasant soup during our retreat in Abruzzo this past fall. We had just returned to our b&b from a beautiful mountain hike, where we foraged rosehips and mint, and everyone was very ready for lunch after that good dose of exercise and fresh air. Our hosts at the bed and breakfast served a homemade pasta e ceci (pasta and chickpea soup), and it really hit the spot with its coziness and simplicity. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. There will be lots of fun and useful cooking workshops with us, as well as visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary below, and book here! Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Abruzzo 2019 Retreat Sample Itinerary *details are subject to change /­­ all meals are vegan with a vegetarian option DAY 1 – Pick up in Rome at 1:30 PM, Piazza Bologna – Drive to Abruzzo – Unpack and relax – Aperitif and dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team DAY 2 – Morning yoga and meditation with our on-site certified yoga instructor – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration (different recipe every day) – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Time to relax, forest bathe, and hike the grounds after gua sha/­­acupressure appointments – Dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation DAY 3 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Foraging walk to gather herbs + medicinal jam and herbal tea workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Optional evening meditation DAY 4 – Morning yoga + sun gazing/­­A.M. sun therapy – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit to an olive grove with 600 year old trees + meditation and grounding in the orchard – Sample olive oil made with the olives from the grove + light picnic-style lunch – Plant-based cooking & meal planning workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 5 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Truffle hunting in Villa Santa Lucia – Truffle lunch in a locals home – Pasta-making workshop with an Abruzzo local + vegan cheese workshop with Golubka Kitchen – Pasta and vegan cheese dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 6 – Morning yoga and meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit a 200-year-old family-run winery + wine tasting and light lunch – Magic Moisturizer + homemade skincare workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Goodbye dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 7 – Breakfast – Head back to Piazza Bologna in Rome (12:30 PM drop-off) Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Let’s talk more about the soup! Pasta e Ceci is not a strictly Abruzzese dish, it’s made all over Italy, in slightly different variations. This recipe is inspired by the Abruzzo version. This soup completely blew us away with its ratio of simplicity to flavor. All the ingredients are very, very modest. You start out by making a good broth, with chickpeas and some aromatics. Then while the broth simmers, you make a very rustic, eggless pasta dough, which is then cut into short, flat noodles, called sagne pasta. The pasta then gets cooked right in the chickpea broth, and everything is served as a chunky soup, with plenty of olive oil and some spicy red pepper on top. There’s also an ingenious, crispy element that helps switch up the textures in the soup. Some of the fresh pasta gets toasted on a dry skillet, until it turns into crispy strips, that are then used to garnish every plate. It is so good. This is a great time to say that you can totally use store-bought pasta here! The eggless sagne pasta is easy to make, but it’s still much more of a project than just opening up a package and being ready to go (just skip the crispy pasta element). If you’re ever craving something resembling chicken soup from your childhood, this is a great, vegan version that still hits all of those comfort notes. Enjoy! Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 ribs celery - sliced in half 1 yellow onion - quartered, skin on 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 10 cups water sea salt black pepper 2 medium carrots - grated red pepper flakes - to taste handful chopped parsley - for garnish olive oil - for garnish fresh sagne pasta (recipe below) or about 12 oz dried store-bought pasta for the sagne pasta 1½ cups spelt, whole wheat, or sprouted spelt/­­wheat flour ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup purified warm water, plus more as needed Instructions to make the soup Drain and rinse the chickpeas. In a large soup pot, combine the chickpeas, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, and water. Bring up to a boil over high heat. Turn down the heat and simmer, covered, or until the chickpeas are cooked and tender (this might take up to an hour or even longer for older chickpeas). Make the pasta while the broth is cooking. Salt the broth well at the end. Remove the aromatics (celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves) with a slotted spoon and discard. Add black pepper to taste to the broth, along with the carrots and red pepper flakes. Bring everything up to a boil, then simmer for 10 more minutes, or until the carrots are cooked through. Meanwhile, heat a dry pan over medium-high heat. Add ¼ of the amount of the pasta to the pan and toast, stirring often, until the pasta becomes crispy. Use the crispy pasta to garnish the soup. Bring the soup back up to a boil, add in the rest of the pasta (recipe below) and cook for 30 seconds to 2 minutes, until al dente. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup, topped with crispy sagne pasta, parsley, and a drizzle of olive oil. If using dried store-bought pasta, cook it into the soup until al dente, and skip the crispy pasta step. to make the sagne pasta Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl with a fork. Make a well in the center and pour in the oil and water. Begin to mix with a fork, slowly incorporating the flour into the well of oil and water. When all the flour is mixed in, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead it for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. All flour takes on water differently, so add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if your dough seems dry. It should feel smooth, but not too wet, with no cracking. Form a ball with the dough and tightly wrap it in plastic wrap, or cover with a damp kitchen towel in the bowl. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Place the dough back on the well-floured work surface and knead it for another 10 minutes, until even more springy. Cut the dough in half and keep one half covered with a damp kitchen towel while you roll out the pasta. Keep your working surface well-floured. Roll one piece of dough at a time into a paper-thin sheet. Cut the rolled-out dough into the sagne pasta shape, about 1½ x ¼, using a pizza cutter or a knife. Transfer the pasta to a parchment-covered tray, sprinkled with plenty of flour to prevent sticking. Continue rolling out and cutting the rest of the dough. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Tomato Dahl with Gluten-Free Naan Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza

January 18 2019 VegKitchen 

Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza Using plenty of veggies makes this easy vegan broccoli pizza, embellished with mushrooms and sun-dried tomatoes, a nourishing meal. Serve a big salad with mixed greens and plenty of raw veggies, embellished with olives and chickpeas. Use as many of the shortcuts as you’d like, making this a super-quick preparation; I’ve provided from-scratch options for sauce and crust (even a gluten-free option! Continuing reading Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza on VegKitchen

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

December 2 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for two of our retreats in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Spring of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician (for one of the retreats) and an on-site Yoga Teacher (for both retreats)! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the spring :) 1) Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (May 27th - June 2nd, 2019) For the wellness enthusiast and vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie looking to relax and re-center. Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary 2) Forage, Cook & Yoga Retreat (June 4th - June 10th, 2019) For the vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie, who also enjoys daily yoga and meditation. Activities and Services will include: sampling the best of Abruzzo’s plant-based fare, truffle hunting, wine tasting, 600 year old olive grove visit and olive oil tasting, pasta-making class with Abruzzo locals, cooking classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging and cooking local edible plants, mountain hikes and visits to mountain villages, daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One-Pot Sicilian Couscous

November 6 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Pot Sicilian CouscousIsraeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this One-Pot Sicilian Couscous dish from One-Dish Vegan made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. One-Pot Sicilian Couscous Israeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this Sicilian-spiced dish made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 carrot, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 4 plum tomatoes, chopped or 1 can (14 ounces, or 400 g) of diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 teaspoon dried basil -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground saffron or turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground paprika - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1 1/­­4 cup (219 g) uncooked Israeli (pearl) couscous - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth -  1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - Salt - 1 jar (12 ounces, or 340 g ) of marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped -  1/­­2 cup (85 g) Kalamata olives, halved and pitted - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) fresh lemon juice - Freshly ground black pepper - 2 tablespoons minced fresh (8 g) parsley or (5 g) basil - Heat the olive oil or water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes to soften the vegetables. Stir in the tomatoes, dried basil, saffron, and paprika. Stir in the chickpeas, couscous, broth, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt to taste. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. - Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes longer or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Add the artichoke hearts, olives, and lemon juice and season with black pepper just before serving. Fluff the couscous with a fork. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post One-Pot Sicilian Couscous appeared first on Robin Robertson.

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout

August 28 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day CookoutWere approaching Labor Day weekend here in the United States. Labor Day is traditionally thought of as the end of summer, even though summer doesnt officially end for another few weeks. Much like Memorial Day and Independence Day, this holiday is usually commemorated with backyard barbecues and picnics in the park. I love to celebrate with salads, sandwiches, seitan ribs, grilled vegetables, and skewers. Ive put together a menu of vegan Labor Day recipes that are perfect for your weekend cookouts. 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout One of the great thing about this Pantry Pasta Salad recipe is that the portion size is easy to adjust. To increase the volume, cook an entire pound of pasta and add additional pantry goodies, such as olives, roasted red peppers, or pine nuts. This colorful Roasted Sweet Potato Salad is both a nice change from regular potato salad and an unusual way to serve sweet potatoes. Almond butter provides a creamy richness to the dressing and toasted almonds add crunch. A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly Cilantro-Jicama Slaw. These lip-smacking vegan BBQ Seitan Ribs are messy and fun to eat. Enjoy them with potato salad and coleslaw. Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches. I love the jerk-spiced sides at my favorite Jamaican restaurant, the vegan-friendly Nice Mile in Asheville, North Carolina, but these Jamaican Jerk Vegetable Skewers satisfy my cravings when I’m home. A popular Thai appetizer, satays are usually made with meat, but there are lots of plant-based ingredients that are idea candidates for this skewered and sauced treat. These grilled satays are made with eggplant. These tasty Spice Rubbed Vegetable Skewers are a crowd pleaser whether plated individually or heaped on a platter and served on a buffet. The version of Romesco sauce in this Grilled Vegetables with Almond Romesco Sauce uses a fraction of the olive oil thats in the traditional Spanish sauce. Vary the fruit you use to make these Grilled Fruit Satays with Pineapple-Coconut Peanut Sauce according to the season and your preference - bananas, apricots, and peaches are good choices. The post 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives

August 30 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives Make a simple vegan eggplant pizza special by adding fresh tomatoes and olives to the topping. It’s a perfect pizza to make on cool summer evenings, though you can enjoy it year round as long as you can find decent tomatoes. Use tomatoes that are ripe yet firm, and dense and fleshy rather than seedy. The post Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

4 Simple Watermelon Side Dish Ideas

July 5 2019 Oh My Veggies 

It’s almost the end of summer. Watermelon is cheap and at its peak of deliciousness, so when you see a ginormous watermelon at the farmers market for $4, you buy it. And then you realize that you have a LOT of watermelon on your hands. What are you going to do with it? (Oh, and by you, I mean me. That was me that bought the ginormous watermelon.) Well, here’s your answer: 4 simple watermelon side dish ideas. They’re healthy and easy too! Kalamata Olives & Basil Okay, I know most people would be inclined to add feta to this. Well, I don’t like feta! Toss some cubed watermelon with fresh basil leaves and some halved kalamata olives. If you’re a fan of sweet-and-salty, you will love this salad. Mint & Lime Juice Squeeze fresh lime juice over watermelon slices and sprinkle with coarsely chopped mint leaves and a few pinches of sea salt. Watermelon slices never tasted so good! Cilantro & Jalapeno The perfect side dish for taco night! Seed and mince a jalapeno and chop some cilantro, then toss it with cubed watermelon and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Sprinkle with a dash of salt (I […]

How to Roast Summer Vegetables

June 17 2019 Oh My Veggies 

We’ve listed the most common summer veggies here along with instructions for preparation and approximate cooking times. You can season these vegetables with salt and pepper alone, or use our suggested additions to fancy things up a little. All of these veggies should be roasted on rimmed baking sheets. We like to coat them with non-stick cooking spray or olive oil from a mister too because sometimes vegetables have a tendency to stick even after being tossed in olive oil. Most additions can be added either before or after the vegetables are done roasting, although garlic is usually best when added before, while tapenades, basil, cilantro, parsley and marinara sauce are best added after. Summer Squash (Zucchini, Crookneck Squash, etc.) Start by: Trimming ends, cutting into thick slices and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 400 degrees for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: Pesto and pine nuts, fresh herbs, garlic, balsamic vinegar, sun-dried tomato tapenade. Tomatoes Start by: Cutting into 1-inch pieces and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 375 degrees for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: A few pinches of brown sugar, garlic, capers, kalamata olives, […]

Black Bean Salad with Tomatoes, Olives, and Croutons

June 10 2019 VegKitchen 

Black Bean Salad with Tomatoes, Olives, and Croutons This easy and appetizing bean and tomato salad adds color and crunch to any meal. Use gluten-free croutons if need be, or replace with sautéed cubes of prepared polenta. It’s delicious with grain dishes and pastas, or simple quesadillas or soft tacos. The post Black Bean Salad with Tomatoes, Olives, and Croutons appeared first on VegKitchen.

Fantastic Falafel

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

These flavorful patties are fun served family style. Letting everyone have the opportunity to assemble their own distinct creation is an excellent way to inspire kids to enjoy their food. If you like your falafel slathered with a savory spread, consider adding either hummus or eggplant dip to your offerings. For a super-simple tahini sauce option, whisk some water, a tablespoon at a time, into 1/­­2 cup tahini until it reaches the desired consistency, then season to taste with garlic powder, a squeeze of lemon juice, and salt. This recipe comes to us from OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet , by Suzy Amis Cameron. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the falafels - 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 onion, chopped - 4 garlic cloves, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 4 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1/­­2 cup whole wheat flour - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 1 teaspoon salt - For serving - 6 whole wheat pitas - 12 butter lettuce leaves - 1 cup chopped tomatoes - 1/­­4 cup chopped red onion - 1/­­4 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped - 1 cup chopped cucumbers     In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, chili powder, and turmeric. Cook until the onion softens, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer the onion to the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add the chickpeas, flour, parsley, cilantro, and salt. Pulse until smooth, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl. With a clean paper towel, wipe out the pan you used to cook the onion. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Using a tablespoon measure, carefully place heaping scoops of the falafel mixture in the skillet. Do not overcrowd the pan (six at a time is ideal). Cook the falafel until golden brown and crispy, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked falafel to a baking sheet and cover loosely with foil. Repeat with the remaining falafel mix, adding 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil to the pan before each batch. Serve the falafel family style and let each person build their own sandwich by topping their pita with the falafel and lettuce, tomato, onion, olives, and cucumber as desired.   The post Fantastic Falafel appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza

February 1 2019 VegKitchen 

Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza Olives add great flavor to this vegan spinach pizza. It features a generous helping of baby spinach; or, you can use baby arugula instead. Do try this with pepper jack or other spicy vegan cheese, which gives it a bit of a kick. Continuing reading Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza on VegKitchen

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

January 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for our next retreat in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Fall of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician and an on-site Yoga Teacher! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the fall :) Forage, Cook and Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (September 30th - October 6th, 2019) Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Epic Travel Salad

January 4 2019 My New Roots 

The Epic Travel Salad   When I saw the number, I couldnt believe it: 29 hours. It was undoubtedly going to be one of the longest travel days of my life. Ive been to Bali twice before, but always from Copenhagen, which is about half the distance from Toronto. I almost gave it a second thought since spending that amount of time sitting upright just felt like it might end me, but the retreats were booked, and there was no backing out! I knew what would get me through, and that was food. Lots and lots of delicious, nourishing, consciously-created food. I always always make a point of preparing meals for traveling, since eating mini, microwaved mystery munch seriously kills my vibe. Plus, the amount of calories in one of those airplane trays is barely enough to get me through one romcom and you know that Im watching at least five in a row. When youre about to face any length of time on an airplane, there are a few things to take into consideration. First, fill your snack pack with foods that are hydrating: cucumbers, romaine, bell peppers, carrots, apples, oranges, celery, berries, grapes, and melon. Depending on where youre traveling to, it can help to have the fruits and veggies already prepared or sliced, since some countries wont let you bring in whole fruits and veg, but they will let you bring them in if they look ready to eat. It sounds nonsensical, but it works! I love having huge vegetable salads with lentils and /­­ or whole grains to keep me full too, since I have a tendency to stress-eat when Im in transit and will totally mow down a bag of chips if theyre put in front of me (okay, sometimes I also eat those chips, and that is okay too, but I notice that it always prolongs my jetlag). For other filling munchies, I like my almond flour cookies, nuts like pistachios or walnuts, and granola – especially crossing so many timezones, which requires breakfast-y things. Veggie sticks are also nice, light fare that keep my crunch cravings under control.     As you can see from the photo, I bring my food in reusable containers, use washable wooden cutlery and a straw, all of which are convenient to have once Im at my destination to use for my own cooking and storage. I also always have my 800-ml water bottle with me when I travel. Ive mentioned it in previous posts, but it begs repeating: jetlag is exacerbated by dehydration, and drinking about half a liter (16 oz.) per hour of flight will make such an immense difference, you may never experience jetlag again. I used to suffer terribly from exhaustion for days post-travel (which really ruined my trip when it was a short one), and now its no big deal. I arrive, wait until a mildly appropriate time to go to bed, and wake up feeling about as normal as one could hope to. Yes, youll have to make friends with the flight attendants, since they are the keepers of the water, but go visit them at the back of the plane every so often for a refill, treat them like humans, and youd be amazed at how accommodating and helpful they are. Make sure you fill your bottle before landing as well, since you never know how long it will take for you to get through customs, baggage claim and the taxi line. It always pays to have hydration close at hand. Avoid the plane food if you can, since it is overly salted and often has added sugar. Our taste buds are actually less receptive at high altitudes, due to low air pressure, low humidity, and high levels of white noise. Yup - that is an actual thing. The way our brains interpret flavour signals is impaired, therefore, things taste different, so airlines pump up the levels of salt and sugar in their food to make them taste the way they would at ground level. If you ate that travel-sized chicken or pasta at your dining room table youd be surprised at how exaggerated the flavours were.     Why is this the most epic travel salad? Because its got All. The. Things. Rich, hearty beets, protein-rich and satiating lentils, so its filling, but its not going to leave you feeling stuffed. And because of that whole flavours-being-less-powerful-at-high-altitudes thing, I endeavoured to add as many potent tastes as possible. Lemon, pomegranate, parsley, cumin seeds, and olives are like flavour fireworks that you can safely ignite at 30,000 feet. There is a Middle Eastern vibe going on for sure, and the multitude of textures tick every single box. You dont want your mouth getting bored while youre hurtling through the sky, and this combination will ensure that each bite is a surprise party. Olives that come without their pits are often mushy and less flavourful, so I always opt to remove them myself, or leave them in until I eat them. The problem with leaving the pits in the olives in this situation, is finding a place to put them on your teeny table real estate (the airsick bag is a great option, just sayin...and yes, Ive really thought of everything). If you do want to remove them beforehand, its easiest to do so by smashing the olive with the flat side of a knife blade, then simply pulling the pit out. You can roughly chop the olives from there. If you dont have any black lentils, Du Puy or French lentils work just as well, with green and brown lentils as a passable fallback. I dont dig these types of lentils in salads since they tend to be water-y and dilute the flavour of the dressing, but if it keeps you from making a special trip to the store, by all means just use them. And normally I wouldnt include alliums in a plane salad since your neighbours might give you the stink eye when you pop open your lunch box, but Ive tempered their potency by pickling them ever-so-slightly. This is done in the same container that youre going to put your salad in, preceded by mixing up the dressing right in there too. Easy peasy! I guess I should mention that this salad is not just delicious on a plane - its also fabulous enjoyed at ground level. Perfect for road trips, picnics, school or office lunches, just make sure you make it the day before so that all the ingredients are cool. If you travel with this salad on the warm side, it could spoil in transit.     Maybe its a bit strange to have a travel salad as the first post of the year, but Im a bit tired of the whole new year, new you rant. People expect me to talk about cleansing or detoxing in January, and although Im all for reflecting and re-evaluating ones lifestyle choices, Im a bit bored of the narrative saying that the first day of the new year is the time to atone for all our dietary sins. Why do we need a specific day to act as a reason to start treat ourselves well? If there a New Years resolution to pull out of this post, it should be to resolve to make yourself delicious food when you go anywhere. Avoid the overpriced convenience food, no matter how healthy it is, since nothing sold in a package will ever compare to the freshness, or high-vibrational energy of food youve lovingly prepared for yourself. Case closed! If you’d like more travel food recipes, tips, and inspiration, check out my two previous articles here and here.       Print recipe     The Epic Travel Salad Makes enough for 2-3 meals Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 170g dry black /­­ beluga lentils, soaked overnight if possible 2 1/­­2 pounds /­­ 1200g beets 1 shallot, sliced into rings 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt zest and juice of 1 large organic lemon 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g pumpkin seeds 1 tsp. honey (vegans sub with maple syrup) 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pomegranate seeds heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g olives, with pits 1 cup /­­ 25g parsley 1/­­2 tsp. flaky salt, or more to taste 1 small head romaine lettuce Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place whole beets (with the skin on) on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for around 45-60 minutes, until you can easily insert a sharp knife into the center (baking time depends on the size of your beets). Remove from oven, let cool completely, then slip the skins off. Slice into bite-sized batons. 2. While the beets are roasting, cook the lentils. Drain and rinse well (if youve soaked them overnight), and place them in a pot, cover with plenty of fresh water, and bring them to a boil. Reduce to simmer, place a lid on the pot, and cook until tender (about 15-20 minutes if youve soaked them, a little longer if you havent). Salt the lentils a few minutes before theyre done - if you salt them at the beginning of cooking, the skins will be tough and theyll take longer to soften. Drain and rinse lightly. Set aside. 3. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the dressing. Slice the shallot into very thin rings, then place them in the container that youre going to use to store the salad. Add the salt and combine them well. Wait about 2 minutes, then add the lemon zest, juice and apple cider vinegar (these ingredients will lightly pickle the shallots, plus act a as a base for your dressing). 4. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant, set aside to cool. Without washing the pan, toast the pumpkin seeds until fragrant and popping, then set aside to cool. 5. Back to the dressing: whisk in the honey and olive oil. Add the prepared beets, lentils, pomegranate seeds, olives, parsley, toasted cumin seeds, pumpkin seeds and flaky salt. Fold to thoroughly combine. Taste and add more salt if necessary (remember that the ingredients will absorb some salt while marinating, and that it will taste milder in the air). 6. You can either chop the romaine lettuce up and place it on top of the salad (dont mix it in - it will get totally mushy), or you can leave the head whole and peel off the leaves and use them as little salad boats. If youre going for the latter, wrap the washed head in beeswax cloth to keep it fresh. The Wild Heart High Spirit Retreats are starting tomorrow, and I cannot wait to embrace each of the women who have traveled from every corner of the earth to join us here in Bali. We are going to eat the most delicious food, practice yoga, dance, laugh, learn, and celebrate the joy of being alive together! We have one space left for the second week, so if youre interested in joining us in tropical paradise, please visit our site for more information. Peace and blessings for an abundant, healthy, vibrant year ahead. Thank you for being here. I love you. xo, Sarah B The post The Epic Travel Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad

November 30 2018 VegKitchen 

Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad This colorful main dish salad featuring sweet potato, quinoa, and corn is simple to prepare, yet has a festive companys coming look. It makes a bountiful accompaniment to vegan quesadillas. If you can cook the sweet potatoes and quinoa ahead of time, this will come together in a flash when you want to serve it. Photos by Evan Atlas.   Serves: 6 2 medium-large sweet potatoes 2 cups cooked and cooled quinoa (use red, tan, or tricolor quinoa; start with 3/­­4 cup uncooked) 2 cups cooked fresh or thawed frozen corn kernels 2 scallions, thinly sliced 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley or cilantro, or more, to taste Several fresh oregano leaves, finely chopped, or 1 teaspoon dried Natural bottled vinaigrette, or homemade Basic Vinaigrette, as needed Juice of 1/­­2 to 1 lime (2 to 4 tablespoons), to taste Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Baby arugula or mixed baby greens, as needed 1/­­2 cup black olives, preferably cured and pitted 1 cup red or yellow cherry tomatoes, halved Scrub or peel the sweet potatoes and cut into 3/­­4-inch chunks. Place in a large saucepan with about an inch of water. Cover and steam over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until done but still firm, about 8 to […] The article Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.


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