olives - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Mirchi bada recipe | mirchi vada | how to make rajasthani mirchi bada

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Chocolate Bread Pudding

Dali toyi recipe | dal tove recipe | dal recipe – konkani style










olives vegetarian recipes

Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza

February 1 2019 VegKitchen 

Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza Olives add great flavor to this vegan spinach pizza. It features a generous helping of baby spinach; or, you can use baby arugula instead. Do try this with pepper jack or other spicy vegan cheese, which gives it a bit of a kick. Continuing reading Mixed Olives and Spinach Pizza on VegKitchen

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo

January 24 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo We had the most transcendent experience eating this simple, Italian peasant soup during our retreat in Abruzzo this past fall. We had just returned to our b&b from a beautiful mountain hike, where we foraged rosehips and mint, and everyone was very ready for lunch after that good dose of exercise and fresh air. Our hosts at the bed and breakfast served a homemade pasta e ceci (pasta and chickpea soup), and it really hit the spot with its coziness and simplicity. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. There will be lots of fun and useful cooking workshops with us, as well as visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary below, and book here! Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Abruzzo 2019 Retreat Sample Itinerary *details are subject to change /­­ all meals are vegan with a vegetarian option DAY 1 – Pick up in Rome at 1:30 PM, Piazza Bologna – Drive to Abruzzo – Unpack and relax – Aperitif and dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team DAY 2 – Morning yoga and meditation with our on-site certified yoga instructor – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration (different recipe every day) – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Time to relax, forest bathe, and hike the grounds after gua sha/­­acupressure appointments – Dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation DAY 3 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Foraging walk to gather herbs + medicinal jam and herbal tea workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Optional evening meditation DAY 4 – Morning yoga + sun gazing/­­A.M. sun therapy – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit to an olive grove with 600 year old trees + meditation and grounding in the orchard – Sample olive oil made with the olives from the grove + light picnic-style lunch – Plant-based cooking & meal planning workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 5 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Truffle hunting in Villa Santa Lucia – Truffle lunch in a locals home – Pasta-making workshop with an Abruzzo local + vegan cheese workshop with Golubka Kitchen – Pasta and vegan cheese dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 6 – Morning yoga and meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit a 200-year-old family-run winery + wine tasting and light lunch – Magic Moisturizer + homemade skincare workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Goodbye dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 7 – Breakfast – Head back to Piazza Bologna in Rome (12:30 PM drop-off) Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Let’s talk more about the soup! Pasta e Ceci is not a strictly Abruzzese dish, it’s made all over Italy, in slightly different variations. This recipe is inspired by the Abruzzo version. This soup completely blew us away with its ratio of simplicity to flavor. All the ingredients are very, very modest. You start out by making a good broth, with chickpeas and some aromatics. Then while the broth simmers, you make a very rustic, eggless pasta dough, which is then cut into short, flat noodles, called sagne pasta. The pasta then gets cooked right in the chickpea broth, and everything is served as a chunky soup, with plenty of olive oil and some spicy red pepper on top. There’s also an ingenious, crispy element that helps switch up the textures in the soup. Some of the fresh pasta gets toasted on a dry skillet, until it turns into crispy strips, that are then used to garnish every plate. It is so good. This is a great time to say that you can totally use store-bought pasta here! The eggless sagne pasta is easy to make, but it’s still much more of a project than just opening up a package and being ready to go (just skip the crispy pasta element). If you’re ever craving something resembling chicken soup from your childhood, this is a great, vegan version that still hits all of those comfort notes. Enjoy! Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 ribs celery - sliced in half 1 yellow onion - quartered, skin on 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 10 cups water sea salt black pepper 2 medium carrots - grated red pepper flakes - to taste handful chopped parsley - for garnish olive oil - for garnish fresh sagne pasta (recipe below) or about 12 oz dried store-bought pasta for the sagne pasta 1½ cups spelt, whole wheat, or sprouted spelt/­­wheat flour ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup purified warm water, plus more as needed Instructions to make the soup Drain and rinse the chickpeas. In a large soup pot, combine the chickpeas, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, and water. Bring up to a boil over high heat. Turn down the heat and simmer, covered, or until the chickpeas are cooked and tender (this might take up to an hour or even longer for older chickpeas). Make the pasta while the broth is cooking. Salt the broth well at the end. Remove the aromatics (celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves) with a slotted spoon and discard. Add black pepper to taste to the broth, along with the carrots and red pepper flakes. Bring everything up to a boil, then simmer for 10 more minutes, or until the carrots are cooked through. Meanwhile, heat a dry pan over medium-high heat. Add ¼ of the amount of the pasta to the pan and toast, stirring often, until the pasta becomes crispy. Use the crispy pasta to garnish the soup. Bring the soup back up to a boil, add in the rest of the pasta (recipe below) and cook for 30 seconds to 2 minutes, until al dente. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup, topped with crispy sagne pasta, parsley, and a drizzle of olive oil. If using dried store-bought pasta, cook it into the soup until al dente, and skip the crispy pasta step. to make the sagne pasta Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl with a fork. Make a well in the center and pour in the oil and water. Begin to mix with a fork, slowly incorporating the flour into the well of oil and water. When all the flour is mixed in, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead it for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. All flour takes on water differently, so add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if your dough seems dry. It should feel smooth, but not too wet, with no cracking. Form a ball with the dough and tightly wrap it in plastic wrap, or cover with a damp kitchen towel in the bowl. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Place the dough back on the well-floured work surface and knead it for another 10 minutes, until even more springy. Cut the dough in half and keep one half covered with a damp kitchen towel while you roll out the pasta. Keep your working surface well-floured. Roll one piece of dough at a time into a paper-thin sheet. Cut the rolled-out dough into the sagne pasta shape, about 1½ x ¼, using a pizza cutter or a knife. Transfer the pasta to a parchment-covered tray, sprinkled with plenty of flour to prevent sticking. Continue rolling out and cutting the rest of the dough. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Tomato Dahl with Gluten-Free Naan Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

January 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for our next retreat in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Fall of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician and an on-site Yoga Teacher! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the fall :) Forage, Cook and Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (September 30th - October 6th, 2019) Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza

January 18 2019 VegKitchen 

Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza Using plenty of veggies makes this easy vegan broccoli pizza, embellished with mushrooms and sun-dried tomatoes, a nourishing meal. Serve a big salad with mixed greens and plenty of raw veggies, embellished with olives and chickpeas. Use as many of the shortcuts as you’d like, making this a super-quick preparation; I’ve provided from-scratch options for sauce and crust (even a gluten-free option! Continuing reading Broccoli, Mushroom, and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza on VegKitchen

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

December 2 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for two of our retreats in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Spring of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician (for one of the retreats) and an on-site Yoga Teacher (for both retreats)! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the spring :) 1) Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (May 27th - June 2nd, 2019) For the wellness enthusiast and vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie looking to relax and re-center. Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary 2) Forage, Cook & Yoga Retreat (June 4th - June 10th, 2019) For the vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie, who also enjoys daily yoga and meditation. Activities and Services will include: sampling the best of Abruzzo’s plant-based fare, truffle hunting, wine tasting, 600 year old olive grove visit and olive oil tasting, pasta-making class with Abruzzo locals, cooking classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging and cooking local edible plants, mountain hikes and visits to mountain villages, daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One-Pot Sicilian Couscous

November 6 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Pot Sicilian CouscousIsraeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this One-Pot Sicilian Couscous dish from One-Dish Vegan made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. One-Pot Sicilian Couscous Israeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this Sicilian-spiced dish made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 carrot, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 4 plum tomatoes, chopped or 1 can (14 ounces, or 400 g) of diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 teaspoon dried basil -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground saffron or turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground paprika - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1 1/­­4 cup (219 g) uncooked Israeli (pearl) couscous - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth -  1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - Salt - 1 jar (12 ounces, or 340 g ) of marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped -  1/­­2 cup (85 g) Kalamata olives, halved and pitted - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) fresh lemon juice - Freshly ground black pepper - 2 tablespoons minced fresh (8 g) parsley or (5 g) basil - Heat the olive oil or water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes to soften the vegetables. Stir in the tomatoes, dried basil, saffron, and paprika. Stir in the chickpeas, couscous, broth, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt to taste. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. - Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes longer or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Add the artichoke hearts, olives, and lemon juice and season with black pepper just before serving. Fluff the couscous with a fork. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post One-Pot Sicilian Couscous appeared first on Robin Robertson.

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout

August 28 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day CookoutWere approaching Labor Day weekend here in the United States. Labor Day is traditionally thought of as the end of summer, even though summer doesnt officially end for another few weeks. Much like Memorial Day and Independence Day, this holiday is usually commemorated with backyard barbecues and picnics in the park. I love to celebrate with salads, sandwiches, seitan ribs, grilled vegetables, and skewers. Ive put together a menu of vegan Labor Day recipes that are perfect for your weekend cookouts. 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout One of the great thing about this Pantry Pasta Salad recipe is that the portion size is easy to adjust. To increase the volume, cook an entire pound of pasta and add additional pantry goodies, such as olives, roasted red peppers, or pine nuts. This colorful Roasted Sweet Potato Salad is both a nice change from regular potato salad and an unusual way to serve sweet potatoes. Almond butter provides a creamy richness to the dressing and toasted almonds add crunch. A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly Cilantro-Jicama Slaw. These lip-smacking vegan BBQ Seitan Ribs are messy and fun to eat. Enjoy them with potato salad and coleslaw. Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches. I love the jerk-spiced sides at my favorite Jamaican restaurant, the vegan-friendly Nice Mile in Asheville, North Carolina, but these Jamaican Jerk Vegetable Skewers satisfy my cravings when I’m home. A popular Thai appetizer, satays are usually made with meat, but there are lots of plant-based ingredients that are idea candidates for this skewered and sauced treat. These grilled satays are made with eggplant. These tasty Spice Rubbed Vegetable Skewers are a crowd pleaser whether plated individually or heaped on a platter and served on a buffet. The version of Romesco sauce in this Grilled Vegetables with Almond Romesco Sauce uses a fraction of the olive oil thats in the traditional Spanish sauce. Vary the fruit you use to make these Grilled Fruit Satays with Pineapple-Coconut Peanut Sauce according to the season and your preference - bananas, apricots, and peaches are good choices. The post 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Chickpea Flour Omelets

July 31 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chickpea Flour OmeletsInspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. Chickpea Flour Omelets Inspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. - 1 cup cold water - 1 cup chickpea flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 tablespoon lemon juice or dry white wine - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 cup finely chopped scallions ((green onions)) - 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley or other fresh herb of choice - 4 teaspoons grapeseed oil or cooking oil spray - In a bowl, food processor, or blender, combine the water, chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, salt, garlic powder, baking powder, mustard powder, black pepper, and turmeric and whisk or blend until smooth. Stir in the scallions and parsley. Allow to stand and thicken for 5 to 10 minutes. The mixture should resemble pancake batter. If it is too thick, add a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the batter is pourable. - Add 1 teaspoon of oil to an 8-inch nonstick skillet or spray it with cooking spray. Heat over medium heat. When the skillet is hot, pour or ladle about 1/­­3 cup of the batter into the hot skillet and move the skillet to spread it evenly in the pan. Cover tightly and cook until the bottom is lightly browned and there are little holes on top, about 4 minutes. Carefully loosen it with a very thin spatula. Flip and cook for another 3 minutes. Transfer the omelet to an ovenproof platter, cover, and keep warm in the oven while you cook the remaining omelets. Continue to made more omelets until all of the batter and filling are used. Serve hot. Loaded Frittata (Variation) Preheat the oven to 400°F. Add 1 cup total of the following ingredients (in any combination) to the omelet mixture: - Chopped pitted Kalamata olives - Soft, minced sun-dried tomatoes - Chopped roasted red bell pepper - Sautéed chopped spinach or thinly sliced zucchini - Sautéed sliced mushrooms - Shredded vegan cheese Transfer the omelet mixture to an oiled ovenproof skillet or pie plate and smooth it evenly into the pan. Bake for about 30 minutes or until firm and lightly browned along the edges. Remove from the oven and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes before serving. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.     The post Chickpea Flour Omelets appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Vegan Paella from the Pantry

December 19 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Paella from the PantryThis vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. The quickest way to get it on the table is by having cooked rice on hand. If you have cooked rice in the freezer, it defrosts quickly in the microwave. You can also substitute a quick-cooking grain such as quinoa, if you prefer. Paella from the Pantry This vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 3 cloves garlic cloves, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 pinch saffron threads or ground annatto or turmeric, for color - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1 28-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked chickpeas, or 1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 2 1/­­2 to 3 cups cooked rice - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1 6-ounce jar roasted red bell pepper, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup sliced pimiento-stuffed green olives - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley - Heat the oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Stir in the broth, saffron, paprika, bay leaf, oregano, red pepper flakes, and tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium. Season with salt and pepper to taste, cover, and simmer for 8 minutes. Stir in the peas, chickpeas, cooked rice, artichoke hearts, roasted red bell pepper, olives, and parsley. Cook 3 to 5 minutes longer, stirring gently, to heat through. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Vegan Paella from the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Rosemary, Basil And Tomato Focaccia Bread

September 28 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Doesn’t this bread look absolutely devine? The Avant Garde Vegan has done it again with this new recipe video showing how to make a delicious focaccia bursting with flavors. Rosemary, basil, tomatoes, olives, chilli flakes….an amazing combination of toppings. Gaz stresses that you can be as creative as you want when selecting your own toppings though, as that is part of the beauty of making bread! The possibilities are literally endless. After you watch this video we know you will be as inspired as we are to run to your kitchen and create some amazing focaccia bread of your very own. Nothing better than the smell of fresh bread baking right?? Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Rosemary, Basil And Tomato Focaccia Bread appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Mega Veggie Vegan Chili

July 31 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Mega Veggie Vegan Chili My husband’s birthday was last Friday, and I thought I’d be sharing his birthday cake (a carrot cake) with you rather than veggie chili, but in cooking (as in all things) it doesn’t pay to take things for granted. The cake was not a success. It sank in the middle and was only edible because vegan cakes have no eggs, so eating it wouldn’t poison us. My husband actually liked it, but I can’t share a recipe that doesn’t work even when I think I know how to fix it. I’ll be working on that recipe later, when I’ve gotten over the disappointment. But his birthday did lead to a recipe, however indirectly. In our family, the birthday person gets to choose where to eat, and D chose to go to Mellow Mushroom for the vegan version of their Mega Veggie pizza: thick crust, red sauce, artichokes, broccoli, mushrooms, peppers, olives, dripping with gooey vegan cheese. It’s the kind of food I don’t cook, so you can see why he requested it on his special day.(...) Read the rest of Mega Veggie Vegan Chili (706 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | 11 comments Post tags: Eat-to-Live, Pressure Cooker, Soy-free The post Mega Veggie Vegan Chili appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley

July 27 2017 VegKitchen 

Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley Now that I have a garden, though its theme is more overgrown than Italian, I’m finding a lot of inspiration from a wonderful cookbook titled My Italian Garden by Viana La Place. Its filled with simple, fresh vegetable recipes, most of which are vegetarian, and many of which are vegan or can be made so with minor […] The post Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley appeared first on VegKitchen.

The Epic Travel Salad

January 4 2019 My New Roots 

The Epic Travel Salad   When I saw the number, I couldnt believe it: 29 hours. It was undoubtedly going to be one of the longest travel days of my life. Ive been to Bali twice before, but always from Copenhagen, which is about half the distance from Toronto. I almost gave it a second thought since spending that amount of time sitting upright just felt like it might end me, but the retreats were booked, and there was no backing out! I knew what would get me through, and that was food. Lots and lots of delicious, nourishing, consciously-created food. I always always make a point of preparing meals for traveling, since eating mini, microwaved mystery munch seriously kills my vibe. Plus, the amount of calories in one of those airplane trays is barely enough to get me through one romcom and you know that Im watching at least five in a row. When youre about to face any length of time on an airplane, there are a few things to take into consideration. First, fill your snack pack with foods that are hydrating: cucumbers, romaine, bell peppers, carrots, apples, oranges, celery, berries, grapes, and melon. Depending on where youre traveling to, it can help to have the fruits and veggies already prepared or sliced, since some countries wont let you bring in whole fruits and veg, but they will let you bring them in if they look ready to eat. It sounds nonsensical, but it works! I love having huge vegetable salads with lentils and /­­ or whole grains to keep me full too, since I have a tendency to stress-eat when Im in transit and will totally mow down a bag of chips if theyre put in front of me (okay, sometimes I also eat those chips, and that is okay too, but I notice that it always prolongs my jetlag). For other filling munchies, I like my almond flour cookies, nuts like pistachios or walnuts, and granola – especially crossing so many timezones, which requires breakfast-y things. Veggie sticks are also nice, light fare that keep my crunch cravings under control.     As you can see from the photo, I bring my food in reusable containers, use washable wooden cutlery and a straw, all of which are convenient to have once Im at my destination to use for my own cooking and storage. I also always have my 800-ml water bottle with me when I travel. Ive mentioned it in previous posts, but it begs repeating: jetlag is exacerbated by dehydration, and drinking about half a liter (16 oz.) per hour of flight will make such an immense difference, you may never experience jetlag again. I used to suffer terribly from exhaustion for days post-travel (which really ruined my trip when it was a short one), and now its no big deal. I arrive, wait until a mildly appropriate time to go to bed, and wake up feeling about as normal as one could hope to. Yes, youll have to make friends with the flight attendants, since they are the keepers of the water, but go visit them at the back of the plane every so often for a refill, treat them like humans, and youd be amazed at how accommodating and helpful they are. Make sure you fill your bottle before landing as well, since you never know how long it will take for you to get through customs, baggage claim and the taxi line. It always pays to have hydration close at hand. Avoid the plane food if you can, since it is overly salted and often has added sugar. Our taste buds are actually less receptive at high altitudes, due to low air pressure, low humidity, and high levels of white noise. Yup - that is an actual thing. The way our brains interpret flavour signals is impaired, therefore, things taste different, so airlines pump up the levels of salt and sugar in their food to make them taste the way they would at ground level. If you ate that travel-sized chicken or pasta at your dining room table youd be surprised at how exaggerated the flavours were.     Why is this the most epic travel salad? Because its got All. The. Things. Rich, hearty beets, protein-rich and satiating lentils, so its filling, but its not going to leave you feeling stuffed. And because of that whole flavours-being-less-powerful-at-high-altitudes thing, I endeavoured to add as many potent tastes as possible. Lemon, pomegranate, parsley, cumin seeds, and olives are like flavour fireworks that you can safely ignite at 30,000 feet. There is a Middle Eastern vibe going on for sure, and the multitude of textures tick every single box. You dont want your mouth getting bored while youre hurtling through the sky, and this combination will ensure that each bite is a surprise party. Olives that come without their pits are often mushy and less flavourful, so I always opt to remove them myself, or leave them in until I eat them. The problem with leaving the pits in the olives in this situation, is finding a place to put them on your teeny table real estate (the airsick bag is a great option, just sayin...and yes, Ive really thought of everything). If you do want to remove them beforehand, its easiest to do so by smashing the olive with the flat side of a knife blade, then simply pulling the pit out. You can roughly chop the olives from there. If you dont have any black lentils, Du Puy or French lentils work just as well, with green and brown lentils as a passable fallback. I dont dig these types of lentils in salads since they tend to be water-y and dilute the flavour of the dressing, but if it keeps you from making a special trip to the store, by all means just use them. And normally I wouldnt include alliums in a plane salad since your neighbours might give you the stink eye when you pop open your lunch box, but Ive tempered their potency by pickling them ever-so-slightly. This is done in the same container that youre going to put your salad in, preceded by mixing up the dressing right in there too. Easy peasy! I guess I should mention that this salad is not just delicious on a plane - its also fabulous enjoyed at ground level. Perfect for road trips, picnics, school or office lunches, just make sure you make it the day before so that all the ingredients are cool. If you travel with this salad on the warm side, it could spoil in transit.     Maybe its a bit strange to have a travel salad as the first post of the year, but Im a bit tired of the whole new year, new you rant. People expect me to talk about cleansing or detoxing in January, and although Im all for reflecting and re-evaluating ones lifestyle choices, Im a bit bored of the narrative saying that the first day of the new year is the time to atone for all our dietary sins. Why do we need a specific day to act as a reason to start treat ourselves well? If there a New Years resolution to pull out of this post, it should be to resolve to make yourself delicious food when you go anywhere. Avoid the overpriced convenience food, no matter how healthy it is, since nothing sold in a package will ever compare to the freshness, or high-vibrational energy of food youve lovingly prepared for yourself. Case closed! If you’d like more travel food recipes, tips, and inspiration, check out my two previous articles here and here.       Print recipe     The Epic Travel Salad Makes enough for 2-3 meals Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 170g dry black /­­ beluga lentils, soaked overnight if possible 2 1/­­2 pounds /­­ 1200g beets 1 shallot, sliced into rings 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt zest and juice of 1 large organic lemon 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g pumpkin seeds 1 tsp. honey (vegans sub with maple syrup) 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pomegranate seeds heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g olives, with pits 1 cup /­­ 25g parsley 1/­­2 tsp. flaky salt, or more to taste 1 small head romaine lettuce Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place whole beets (with the skin on) on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for around 45-60 minutes, until you can easily insert a sharp knife into the center (baking time depends on the size of your beets). Remove from oven, let cool completely, then slip the skins off. Slice into bite-sized batons. 2. While the beets are roasting, cook the lentils. Drain and rinse well (if youve soaked them overnight), and place them in a pot, cover with plenty of fresh water, and bring them to a boil. Reduce to simmer, place a lid on the pot, and cook until tender (about 15-20 minutes if youve soaked them, a little longer if you havent). Salt the lentils a few minutes before theyre done - if you salt them at the beginning of cooking, the skins will be tough and theyll take longer to soften. Drain and rinse lightly. Set aside. 3. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the dressing. Slice the shallot into very thin rings, then place them in the container that youre going to use to store the salad. Add the salt and combine them well. Wait about 2 minutes, then add the lemon zest, juice and apple cider vinegar (these ingredients will lightly pickle the shallots, plus act a as a base for your dressing). 4. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant, set aside to cool. Without washing the pan, toast the pumpkin seeds until fragrant and popping, then set aside to cool. 5. Back to the dressing: whisk in the honey and olive oil. Add the prepared beets, lentils, pomegranate seeds, olives, parsley, toasted cumin seeds, pumpkin seeds and flaky salt. Fold to thoroughly combine. Taste and add more salt if necessary (remember that the ingredients will absorb some salt while marinating, and that it will taste milder in the air). 6. You can either chop the romaine lettuce up and place it on top of the salad (dont mix it in - it will get totally mushy), or you can leave the head whole and peel off the leaves and use them as little salad boats. If youre going for the latter, wrap the washed head in beeswax cloth to keep it fresh. The Wild Heart High Spirit Retreats are starting tomorrow, and I cannot wait to embrace each of the women who have traveled from every corner of the earth to join us here in Bali. We are going to eat the most delicious food, practice yoga, dance, laugh, learn, and celebrate the joy of being alive together! We have one space left for the second week, so if youre interested in joining us in tropical paradise, please visit our site for more information. Peace and blessings for an abundant, healthy, vibrant year ahead. Thank you for being here. I love you. xo, Sarah B The post The Epic Travel Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad

November 30 2018 VegKitchen 

Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad This colorful main dish salad featuring sweet potato, quinoa, and corn is simple to prepare, yet has a festive companys coming look. It makes a bountiful accompaniment to vegan quesadillas. If you can cook the sweet potatoes and quinoa ahead of time, this will come together in a flash when you want to serve it. Photos by Evan Atlas.   Serves: 6 2 medium-large sweet potatoes 2 cups cooked and cooled quinoa (use red, tan, or tricolor quinoa; start with 3/­­4 cup uncooked) 2 cups cooked fresh or thawed frozen corn kernels 2 scallions, thinly sliced 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley or cilantro, or more, to taste Several fresh oregano leaves, finely chopped, or 1 teaspoon dried Natural bottled vinaigrette, or homemade Basic Vinaigrette, as needed Juice of 1/­­2 to 1 lime (2 to 4 tablespoons), to taste Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Baby arugula or mixed baby greens, as needed 1/­­2 cup black olives, preferably cured and pitted 1 cup red or yellow cherry tomatoes, halved Scrub or peel the sweet potatoes and cut into 3/­­4-inch chunks. Place in a large saucepan with about an inch of water. Cover and steam over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until done but still firm, about 8 to […] The article Composed Sweet Potato, Quinoa, and Corn Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Kitchen-Sink Capellini

January 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen-Sink CapelliniAs the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious Kitchen-Sink Capellini, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation.   Kitchen-Sink Capellini As the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious pasta dish, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation. - 8 ounces capellini or angel hair pasta - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 garlic cloves, finely minced - 2 14-ounce cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 16-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed - 1/­­3 cup oil-packed or reconstituted sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved - 4 cups baby spinach or 1 cup chopped frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed (optional) - 2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­4 cup toasted pine nuts or chopped walnuts - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain the pasta in a colander. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, toss to coat, and set aside. - In the same pot in which you cooked the pasta, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Stir in the diced tomatoes, cannellini beans, artichoke hearts, olives, spinach (if using), basil, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat until hot and well combined, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved pasta and toss gentle to combine and heat through. Serve hot sprinkled with the pine nuts. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Kitchen-Sink Capellini appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is a superstar. With no gluten yet high in protein, its a perfect grain. Its also sneaky, making sure it touches just about every ingredient in the salad so that with every forkful you get a sprinkling or more of quinoa. Hey! it says, You cant ignore me! And who would want to? Here it blends perfectly with honey, dill, fruity olive oil, briny olives, sweet cherry tomatoes, earthy roasted peppers, and creamy, crumbly feta cheese. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian.  Makes 4 servings - 1 cup red quinoa - 1 pound red bell peppers, sliced thin - 1 pound yellow bell peppers, sliced thin - 1/­­4 cup honey - 1/­­3 cup olive oil - 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved - 4 ounces crumbled feta cheese - 3 tablespoons chopped dill - 1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped Kalamata olives - 1/­­2 cup arugula - Salt and pepper - Olive oil Bring a large pot of water, 2 to 3 quarts, to a boil and add a touch of salt. Pour in quinoa and boil for 6 to 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit for 3 minutes, then drain. While quinoa is cooking, heat a sauté pan on high heat. Add peppers to the pan and cook for 1 minutes. Toss and cook for another minute. Turn off the heat and add a touch of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss for 30 seconds. Let sit in the pan for 2 minutes, and then transfer to a plate to cool. Mix the honey and olive oil in a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, feta, dill, parsley, and olives. Toss to combine. Once peppers have cooled to close to room temperature, add to the large bowl along with the arugula and quinoa. Season with salt and pepper and an additional drizzle of olive oil to bring everything together. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 32-33. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Stuffed Avocados with Corn and Olives

September 20 2017 VegKitchen 

Stuffed Avocados with Corn and Olives Individual avocado cups, studded with corn and crisp vegetables, are an easy alternative to an ordinary salad, or a nice first course. Double the recipe if youd like everyone to have two halves rather than one, in which case it can almost be a main-dish salad, especially if you pair it with a bean salad, […] The post Stuffed Avocados with Corn and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cheesy Pull Apart Pizza Bread

July 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Cheesy Pull Apart Pizza BreadCheesy Pull Apart Pizza Bread. Pizza Monkey bread for parties or light meal. Add roasted veggies, olives, mushrooms to make into a pizza bake. Vegan Soy-free Recipe.  These Pizza Rolls are super easy and a great snack to interest and engage everyone at the party. I use my 20 minute pizza dough, divide and roll it into mini dinner roll size balls. Place them in a pie pan, then drizzle a mozzarella style cashew cream from my Pizza Dip (which you must try! its GF), some pizza sauce, more of the mozzarella cream, basil and peppers and bake! The cashew mozzarella cream thickens during baking. The baked rolls are coated with thick creamy cheese sauce, pizza sauce and other toppings if added before baking. They can be pulled out with all the pizza goodness and served.Continue reading: Cheesy Pull Apart Pizza BreadThe post Cheesy Pull Apart Pizza Bread appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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