olive - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Dal dhokla recipe | chana dal dhokla | vati dal khaman dhokla | lentil dhokla

Corn vada recipe | sweet corn vada | sweet corn garelu

Pithla (Besan Curry)

Aloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fry










olive vegetarian recipes

Pasta with Roasted Vegetables and Olives

February 10 2020 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Roasted Vegetables and Olives This easy and delectable dish combines roasted eggplant, peppers, and broccoli with pasta. It’s perfect for cool weather months, when you want something comforting yet not too heavy, with plenty of flavorful veggies. Serve with a big salad to which chickpeas or beans have been added, and a crusty bread. The post Pasta with Roasted Vegetables and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe

February 6 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls RecipeThis Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls – the perfect recipe for entertaining! These Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls are a great appetizer or fun alternative to regular pizza if you want to change things up and surprise your guests with something special yet familiar. You can eat them as-is or dip them into some homemade marinara or pizza sauce. Either way, theyre like a mini-trip to Italy! Super flavorful, packed with Mediterranean flavor and soft and pillowy on the inside. INGREDIENTS USED IN THESE VEGAN PIZZA ROLLS RECIPE AND SUBSTITUTIONS - The dough for the pizza rolls uses active dry yeast, water, flour and semolina as the main ingredients. - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - The filling is a flavorful combination of homemade vegan pesto and sauteed mushrooms, flavored with onion, garlic, and oregano.  I like to add some crushed red pepper,  for a bit of heat. The thick mixture tastes amazing and is not very chunky, making it easy to roll the dough up and slice it like cinnamon rolls. You can also some vegan cheese for that pizza feel. Optional but 100 % recommended. - As a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins. How to make this Vegan Pizza Rolls Recipe – Step by Step: Start with the pizza dough: 1. Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. 2. Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. 3. Cover the bowl and let it sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings while the dough is resting: 4. Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion, and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic, and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. 5. Make the vegan pesto if you haven’t made it already using this recipe.  6. Uncover the dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and make a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches. 7. Spread the pesto all over the rolled out dough. 8. Sprinkle the dough with the mushroom mixture. Top with some red pepper flakes for a bit of heat and sprinkle with vegan shredded mozzarella, if you like your rolls cheesy. 9. Roll the dough up into a roll, like when making cinnamon rolls, and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls using a sharp kitchen knife and place them in a greased baking dish. 10. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins.  Tip: Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if the middle does not still feel soft and doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. 11. Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and fresh basil if needed. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce What goes well with Pesto Pizza Rolls? But what can you serve alongside that delicious pizza that plays the perfect supporting role? What about some roasted greens – like green beans, caramelized brussels sprouts, asparagus or a light and a bright side salad? Can I make these Vegan Pizza Rolls ahead of time? Yes, these vegan pesto pizza rolls can be made ahead. Once sliced and placed in a baking dish, you can keep the rolls refrigerated overnight. Cover tightly and store. Remove from the fridge and let sit on the counter for an hour to warm and rise. Then bake and serve. To store them, place in the fridge for up to 5 days or freeze them in the back of your freezer for up to a month.   More vegan bread and rolls recipe from the blog: - Vegan Pizza Rolls - Sweet Potato dinner rolls - Pumpkin Cornbread - Pull-Apart Pizza Bread - Pumpkin Sage Biscuits - 100% Whole Grain Dinner Rolls - Gluten-free Jalapeno Pepperjack Biscuits GF - Gluten-free Garlic Dinner Rolls GF Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls This Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. - 3/­­4 cup warm water - 2 tsp active dry or instant yeast - 1 tbsp flour - 2 tbsp semolina flour - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 2 cups flour - 1 Tbsp olive oil (divided) Mushroom Mixture: - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­2 cup sliced onion - 7 oz sliced mushroom - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder Other Toppings - 4 tbsps vegan pesto (see notes ) Optional - fresh basil - vegan mozzarella (shredded) - red pepper flakes -  For the rolls: -  Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. -  Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. -  Cover and let the dough sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings: - Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. -  Make the pesto using this recipe if you haven't prepared it already. Assemble: -  Uncover the risen dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and shape it into a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches thick. -   Spread the vegan pesto all over the rolled out dough. -  Sprinkle the dough with the sauteed mushroom mixture. Add some red pepper flakes and vegan shredded mozzarella, if you want. -  Roll it all up and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls and place them in a greased baking dish. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins. Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if its not doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. -  Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and some fresh basil if you like. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - For a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins.     The post Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sautéed with fresh peas and lemon juice and then tossed with steamed fava beans, artichoke hearts and fresh baby spinach. This salute to spring veggies is made decadent when goat cheese and fresh mint are thrown in, all served atop a slice of toasted rye bread. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 4 - 2 1/­­2 cups fava beans - 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 small leeks, finely diced - 2 1/­­2 cups peas - zest & juice 1/­­2 lemon - 3.5 ounces baby spinach - 1 10 ounce can artichoke hearts, quartered - 3.5 ounces goat cheese*, crumbled - 6 slices rye bread, toasted - fresh mint, for garnish *Optional Steam or boil the fava beans for 3-4 minutes, or until just tender. Rinse under cold water and peel when cooled. Place 2 of the tablespoons of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the leeks and fry over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until soft. Add the fava beans and toss, coating in oil. Add the peas and continue to cook over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the peas are just tender. Add the lemon zest, artichoke hearts and baby spinach. Toss until well mixed and thoroughly heated through. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the crumbled goat cheese and toss to combine. Whisk the lemon juice with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Serve 1/­­4 of the fava beans and peas on top each piece of toasted rye bread. Drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil mixture and finish with a few fresh mint leaves. The post Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Udon Noodles with Spinach-Miso Pesto

January 3 2020 VegKitchen 

Udon Noodles with Spinach-Miso Pesto This fusion pasta dish--the Asian flavor of miso with the peppers, tomatoes, and olives of Italian cuisine--makes a luscious meal all year round. It’s good served warm or even at room temperature. Serve with a bountiful salad of greens and tomatoes. The post Udon Noodles with Spinach-Miso Pesto appeared first on VegKitchen.

Recipe | Roasted Tofu with Tangerines & Olives

December 27 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I’m not a huge fan of tofu. Although many people dislike the texture, for me it’s more the taste. The main virtue of tofu, according to tofu lovers, is its lack of flavor. This lack of flavor gives tofu its versatility--you can use it in a variety of dishes, from soups to pastas to desserts. But for me, I definitely do taste tofu. Or, at least, I taste that stanky flavor of the water tofu sits in at the supermarket. Blech! So when I make anything involving tofu, it’s absolutely imperative that I get every last bit of stanky tofu water out. I’ve tried just about every method for doing this, but I’ve finally settled on using a tofu press. While it’s more expensive than the old cast-iron-frying-pan-and-soup-cans method, it’s much more effective. When you press all the tofu water out, the tofu can better absorb the flavors you add to it. And if you don’t get all the water out, the tofu is too saturated to absorb sauces and other ingredients. This recipe is adapted from Everyday Food’s Roasted Chicken with Tangerines and Olives. Although the tangerines and olives have strong flavors, the sauce is much more subtle, making […]

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who doesnt love roasted Brussels sprouts these days? These cruciferous veggies have gone from hated to adored over the past couple of years. And the chief reason is the discovery that these petit choux (small cabbages) roast up so nicely. This easy roasted recipe calls upon maple syrup, balsamic vinegar, cranberries, hazelnuts, red onions, and rosemary to really bring on the flavor. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 8 - 2 pounds Brussels sprouts  - 1 red onion, sliced  -  1/­­2 cup hazelnuts, halved  - 1 cup whole fresh or frozen cranberries (or 1/­­2 cup dried)  - 2 tablespoons olive oil  - 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup  - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar  - 1 garlic clove, minced  - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika  - Salt and pepper (if desired, optional)  - 3 twigs fresh rosemary, chopped coarsely (or 1 teaspoon dried)   Preheat oven to 375 F.   Trim ends of Brussels sprouts and slice them in half. Arrange evenly on a baking sheet. Arrange onion slices, hazelnuts, and cranberries over Brussel sprouts and toss together gently. In a small dish, mix together, olive oil, maple syrup, vinegar, garlic, smoked paprika, and salt and pepper (if desired). Drizzle vinaigrette over vegetables, sprinkle with rosemary, and toss with tongs to distribute. Place in top rack of oven and roast until gold brown, about 35-40 minutes. The post Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cheese Sauce

December 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cheese Sauce This classic cheese sauce is extremely simple to make, and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. Save Print Vegan Cheese Sauce Serves: 1 cup   Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cup Yukon potatoes, peeled and quartered ⅓ cup carrots, diced ¼ cup nutritional yeast 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp unsweetened almond milk 1 tsp lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp vinegar ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp cumin Instructions Put the potatoes and carrots in a pot and cover with water. The post Vegan Cheese Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy photo by Joshua Foo, styling by me Feeds about 10 Let’s face it. The most important thing at the holiday table is going to be mashed potatoes. Hot on its heels is going to be gravy. So why mess around with anything less than the creamiest, fluffiest, lushest most dreamy taters? The secret here is twofold: Fold 1) Ingredients. Lots of cashew cream and buttery coconut oil. And fold 2) Method: whipping it all to high heaven with a hand mixer. You incorporate air, plus remove all the clumps without overmixing. No one will be able to resist these! The gravy I’ve used here is akin to a white pepper gravy. Thick and creamy with a lil’ kick. It starts with a roux (that’s toasted flour and oil to you, bub) for a deep sultry flavor and velvety thickness. It’s a really nice customizable recipe in that if you want to make it a mushroom gravy you can certainly add sautéed mushrooms before or after blending. If you want to make it a sausage gravy chop up some sausages and add them at the end. And so on! These recipes are from Superfun Times. Ingredients For the potatoes: 5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/­­2 inch chunks 3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours (if you have a high speed blender soaking is not necessary) 3/­­4 cups vegetable broth, at room temp 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, at room temp 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt Fresh black pepper Thinly sliced chives for garnish, if desired For the gravy: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 teaspoons dry rubbed sage Several dashes fresh black pepper 3 cups vegetable broth, plus additional for thinning 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 3 cups cooked navy beans (2 15-oz can, rinsed and drained) 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce Salt to taste For the gravy: Directions Place potatoes in a pot and submerge in cold water by about an inch. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt into the water. Cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, drain cashews and place in a blender with vegetable broth and blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. If you have a high speed blender this will take about a minute. In a regular blender it will take around 5 so give your blender a break every now and again. Back to the potatoes, once boiling, lower heat to a simmer, uncover and cook for about 12 minutes, until fork tender. Drain potatoes, then place back in the pot. Do a preliminary mash with a potato masher, just to get them broken up. Add half of cashew mixture, coconut and olive oil, salt and pepper and mash with a potato masher until relatively smooth and no big chunks are left. Now comes the creamiest part. Add the remaining cashew mixture, mix it it, then use a hand blender on high speed to whip the ever loving life out of them. They should become very smooth, fluffy and creamy. Taste for salt and pepper along the way, transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with chives and serve! Preheat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, sage and black pepper (I like a lot of black pepper in this) and cook for about 3 minutes more. While that is cooking, stir the flour into the broth until dissolved. If you have an immersion blender, then add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the saucepan. Blend immediately and lower the heat to medium. Stir the gravy often for about 10 minutes while it thickens. Use broth to thin as necessary.  If you are using a regular blender, add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the onion and the other stuff from the pan to the blender. Puree again until no big chunks of onion are left. Add back to the pot and stir often over medium heat to thicken. Once the gravy thickens, reduce the heat to low. Now you can decide exactly how thick you want it by whisking in extra broth, anywhere from 1/­­2 cup to 3/­­4 cup. Cook for about 10 more minutes to let the flavors deepen, stirring occasionally, adding broth as necessary. Taste for salt. Keep gravy covered and warm until ready to serve.

How To Make Your Own Balsamic Ketchup

February 3 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I have a deep love and appreciation for ketchup. (You’ve seen my Cranberry Chipotle Ketchup recipe, right?) So naturally, when I saw that Heinz was introducing a ketchup made with balsamic vinegar, I decided that I needed to try it immediately. And then I found out it wasn’t available everywhere; it seemed the stores I frequent are not stores that carry it. Obviously, I had to try to make it myself. Obviously! I adapted this balsamic ketchup recipe from Serious Eats’ Homemade Ketchup. Are you ready to make ketchup? Let’s get started! You will need these things: 2 tbsp olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 (28 oz) can tomato puree 1/­­2 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp tomato paste 1/­­2 tsp kosher salt 1/­­2 tsp ground mustard 1/­­8 tsp ground cloves, for that certain je ne sais quoi (yes, the “quoi” in ketchup is cloves--of this, I am certain) 1/­­8 tsp allspice 1/­­8 tsp cayenne pepper Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until just beginning to brown, about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add minced garlic and cook an additional 30 seconds. Add the tomato […]

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives

January 13 2020 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives This quick and nourishing year-round pasta recipe calls for chard, kale, or spinach, but you can use a combination or even substitute broccoli rabe or mustard greens. My personal favorite in this dish is chard, as it’s so good in the Italian-style trio of pasta with greens and legumes. Just add a colorful salad and you’ve got a meal. The post Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cauliflower Mash

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted until brown, then blended with Greek yogurt and vegetable broth for a flavorful, creamy cauliflower puree. This cauliflower mash can be served on the side in place of mashed potatoes and offers a healthy dose of the vitamin K! This recipe is from Ashley of Sprout. Serves 4 - 1 head cauliflower, cut into 1 inch florets - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup plain Greek yogurt - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth, divided - whole wheat breadcrumbs, for garnish - fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil. Season with the salt and pepper. Spread the florets onto a baking sheet in 1 layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges of the cauliflower are deep brown. Transfer the roasted cauliflower florets to a blender. Add the yogurt and 1/­­2 cup of the vegetable broth to the blender. Blend until smooth. If cauliflower mash seems too thick, add a little more vegetable broth, 1 tablespoon at a time until the mash has reached desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide into 4 portions, sprinkle each with breadcrumbs and parsley. Enjoy! The post Cauliflower Mash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Happy New Year Hoppin John

January 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Happy New Year Hoppin John If it’s January 1st, it must be time for Hoppin’ John.  I love the tradition of making black-eyed peas with rice and collards so much!  I first discovered it when we moved to Charleston SC from Pennsylvania in 1983.  It’s been a New Year’s Day tradition ever since.  Most people serve the collards on the side, but I love to combine them. I sometimes add diced tomatoes just because. My favorite way to serve them is topped with vegan sour cream, Tabasco, sliced jalapenos, with cornbread on the side. I like to cook the collards and black-eyed peas a day in advance and then add them to the rice on New Year’s Day. Here is my basic recipe (and more photos of Hoppin’ John variations from previous years).  Happy New Year to all my friends. I wish you all the best in 2020! Hoppin John with Collards 1 tablespoon olive oil or 3 tablespoons water 1 sweet yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup long-grain brown rice 2 cups  vegetable broth or water Salt 3 cups cooked or 2 (16-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 3 cups chopped cooked fresh or frozen collard greens, well drained 1 (14-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained (optional) 1 teaspoon Liquid Smoke 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, plus more to serve 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Vegan sour cream, to serve Sliced pickled jalapenos (optional)   Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and broth or water and bring to a boil. Add salt to taste (the amount of salt needed depends on the saltiness of your broth or if you use water). Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 30 minutes.  About 10 minutes before the rice is tender, stir in the cooked black-eyed peas, the cooked chopped collards, tomatoes (if using), Liquid Smoke, Tabasco, and black pepper. Add more salt, if needed. To serve, spoon into bowls and accompany with vegan sour cream, jalapenos (if using) and Tabasco at the table. Here are pics of two other favorites from my Hoppin’ John gallery: Made in a slow cooker with a cornbread topping…. and Hoppin’ John Collard Rolls…. (serve with Tabasco-Sour Cream)… The post Happy New Year Hoppin’ John appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is marinated in lime juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano and cayenne pepper. The tempeh is grilled and accompanied by bell peppers and red onions in this Tex-Mex treat, perfect for a quick weeknight meal. This recipe comes to us from Allison of Nourish Network. Serves 5 - 1/­­3 cup and 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided - 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 2 garlic cloves, grated - 2 8-ounce packages soy tempeh - 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - salt and black pepper, to taste - 8 6-inch corn tortillas   Cut the tempeh into 1/­­4 inch by 2 inch strips. Place 1/­­3 cup of the olive oil with the lime juice and soy sauce in an 8 inch dish. Season with the cumin, oregno, cayenne pepper and garlic. Combine 1/­­3 cup oil, juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano, cayenne and garlic in an 8-inch dish. Add tempeh, tossing to coat thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for 2-12 hours, stirring occasionally. Heat a large cast-iron grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush pan with oil. Add half of tempeh to pan. Cook for 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes more. Place in a warm bowl and repeat with the remaining tempeh. Place the onion and bell pepper with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the bell pepper and onion to pan used to cook the tempeh. Cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the bell pepper and onion is tender and fragrant. Heat the tortillas directly over the flame of a gas stove or in a dry nonstick pan. Place 2 tortillas on each plate. Top evenly with tempeh and bell pepper mixture and enjoy. The post Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Artichoke hearts, leeks, and green beans are roasted in the oven to a crispy perfection and are then topped with a sprinkling of pistachios and pomegranate seeds. With such a combination of flavors and textures, no two bites will ever be the same. This recipe comes to us from Joy Bauer’s book Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats . Photo credit: Lucy Schaeffer. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped (or 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder) -  1/­­2 teaspoon kosher salt -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 4 to 5 cups fresh green beans - One 14-ounce can quartered artichoke hearts, drained, rinsed, and patted dry - 2 or 3 leeks, sliced and cleaned (use only the white and pale green parts) - Nonstick oil spray -  1/­­2 cup pomegranate seeds -  1/­­2 cup roasted pistachio nuts, shelled   Preheat the oven to 425°F. Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Add the green beans, artichokes, and leeks. Stir to coat evenly. Mist a baking sheet with oil spray and spread the mixture on the sheet in a single layer. Roast for about 20 to 25 minutes or until the vegetables are slightly browned and crispy. (I think theyre extra delicious when the edges get super crisp!) Remove from oven and garnish with the pomegranate seeds and pistachios. The post Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes

December 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes   Meatless Monday has created our dream-team celebrity chef meatless holiday menu, featuring a plant-based take on traditional recipes created by Bobby Flay, Gordon Ramsay, Giada de Laurentiis, Martha Stewart, Rachael Ray, Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and Carla Hall. From our kitchen to yours, please click the links below to enjoy these delicious, decadent, jaw dropping, and, of course, festive plant-based holiday recipes.   Appetizers Artichoke Arancini Wild Mushroom & Pomegranate Salad Cannellini & Kale Soup Sides Lemon Smashed Potatoes Persimmons & Roasted Chicories  Grilled Brussels Sprouts & Hazelnut Vinaigrette Entrees Epic Veg Lasagne Beet Wellington Stuffed Squash  Desserts  Sumptuous Chocolate Cake Deconstructed Vegan Pecan Pie Vegan Apple Pie   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This pasta dish is fall in a bowl! While there is quite a bit of peeling and chopping involved, the final result is so worth it. You can find prechopped butternut squash in most stores these days, so feel free to take advantage of that time-saver if you wish. The subtle sweetness of the sauce pairs beautifully with the roasted vegetables. If you have picky eaters who wont eat some of these veggies, feel free to leave them out and double up on the ones they like. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 5 - For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: - 1 cup (140 g) peeled and chopped butternut squash - 1 cup (130 g) peeled and chopped carrots - 1 cup (110 g) peeled and chopped parsnips - 1 cup (88 g) halved Brussels sprouts - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­8 teaspoon black pepper   - For the Pasta: - 16 ounces (455 g) penne pasta (gluten-free, if desired) -  1/­­2 cup (123 g) pure pumpkin purée (NOT pumpkin pie filling) - 1 cup (235 ml) lite coconut milk - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup -  3/­­4 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil (optional)   For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Toss the vegetables in a large bowl with the olive oil, thyme, salt, and pepper. Spread out onto the prepared baking sheet in an even layer. Roast for 15 minutes, stir, and roast for 10 to 15 more minutes until the vegetables are tender and browning on the sides.   For the Pasta: Meanwhile, cook the penne according to package directions. Be sure to salt your cooking water well. When your pasta and vegetables have about 10 minutes cooking time left, whisk all the sauce ingredients in a large skillet over medium heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 5 to 10 minutes until thickened a bit.   Add the cooked pasta and roasted vegetables to the skillet with the sauce and toss well to coat. Add the olive oil, if using. Season with extra salt and pepper, if desired. The post Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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