oily - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Badam ladoo recipe | badam laddu | badam ke laddu | almond ladoo

Lasooni palak recipe | lehsuni palak | palak lasooni | garlic spinach curry

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes

Quinoa Pancakes










oily vegetarian recipes

Rice Stick Noodle with Caribbean Gremolata

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

This squash and rice noodle with Caribbean gremolata hits all the right notes: sweet, tart, crisp, and spicy. Julienned squash, zucchini, carrots, and cooked rice noodles are quickly sautéed together with onions and sambal oelek (chili paste). The Caribbean gremolata -- made with a combination of crushed garlic, ginger, and minced cilantro -- is folded into the mixture just before serving. Top with some chili oil and youre ready to eat. This recipe comes from Chef Chris Dancesia, chef and co-owner of Nicks Bistro in Bradenton, Florida, and the winner of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 14 oz package of Rice Stick Noodles - 2 Zucchini - 2 Yellow Squash - 1 Carrots - 1 Red Onion - 3 Garlic Cloves - 2 Ginger, peeled - 2 Limes - 1 bunch Cilantro - 2 tbsp Sambal Oelek - 1 tbsp Coconut Oil - 2 tbsp Canola Oil - Chili Oil (Recipe below) - Salt and Pepper   Cook noodles according to directions on the package. I generally place noodles in a non-reactive mixing bowl for 5-7 minutes. The noodles should be al dente. Strain noodles and coat with canola oil to avoid sticking and transfer to a sheet pan or cookie sheet to cool. Using a mandolin julienne the (flesh only, no seeds) zucchini, yellow squash, and carrots lengthwise to match the rice stick noodles. Using a chefs knife, julienne the red onion as thin as possible, not more than 1/­­8 thick.   Gremolata: Crush and mince the garlic and ginger, transfer to a mixing bowl.  Rough chop the cilantro and add to garlic ginger mix. Zest Limes into bowl and mix.   In a large sauté pan over med to medium high heat add 1 tablespoon of coconut oil and 2 tablespoons of canola oil. Stir in Sambal Oelek. Add onions and sweat until translucent. Add carrots and cook until they just start to soften. Add zucchini and yellow squash and cook just until softened. Add rice stick noodles and mix. Add more canola oil to coat if pan gets too dry (the oil acts as the sauce in this dish). Fold in gremolata and lime juice (Approximately one lime). Season with salt and pepper.  Add more coconut oil if desired. This is where the dish can vary depending on individual palates.  The oil should coat the rice stick noodles without being over oily.   Chili Oil: Combine 3 tablespoons of Sambal Oelek, 1 tablespoon of coconut oil and 1 cup of canola oil in a sauce pan.  Heat over medium heat to incorporate flavors without the oil hitting smoking point.  Strain into non-reactive bowl and allow to cool.  Once cool, place in a squeeze bottle.   Plating: Place pasta on the center of a plate, drizzle chili oil on the plate around the pasta, garnish with a sprig of cilantro and lime wedge if desired. The post Rice Stick Noodle with Caribbean Gremolata appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

How To Make Banana Fruit Leather (without a dehydrator!)

January 11 2019 Oh My Veggies 

So I’ve made Raspberry Peach Fruit Leather. And then I made Mango Fruit Roll-Ups. But I’m not going to rest on my delicious fruit snack laurels! No! I’ve been floating around ideas and trying to think of something that would work during winter and then it hit me: banana fruit leather. So I made it and it was good. And then I made it again and it was still good. Good enough to share, in fact. Here’s how to make banana fruit leather without a dehydrator: Before you start, you will need 4 ripe bananas. You’ll need to pre-heat your oven to 175?F and spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray. (Don’t spray on too much–you don’t want oily banana fruit leather.) Peel your bananas and cut them into large chunks. Now you need to puree your bananas. I like using an immersion blender, but a food processor or regular blender is fine. Make sure there are no large banana pieces. It needs to be smooth! Try not to eat the puree. It’s delicious! It’s almost like banana pudding. (Okay, not really. But I try to convince myself it is.) Pour the puree onto your greased baking sheet. Hopefully […]

Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea

November 25 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

It was soon a year ago that we crammed Elsa, baby Isac, ourselves, our backpacks and a pram into a tiny campervan and drove around New Zealand. Our memories of green mountains, turquoise volcano lakes, enchanted forests, star-filled nights and sheep-covered fields are still vivid. Campervan life wasn’t super comfortable and our cooking wasn’t extravagant but it was the trip of a life time. We made this tea part of our evening routine while we were driving around the chillier south island of New Zealand. It was the perfect way to end the day after having driven for hours, taken mountain hikes and played on the windy sand beaches. Sitting on wobbly plastic chairs next to the car, watching the sunset and drinking this warm and soothing evening tea before going to bed. Oh happy memories! And with the first snow starting to fall here in Scandinavia, we have now begun making that tea again. Unfortunately our view isn’t that amazing here in our Stockholm apartment, but we close our eyes, take a sip and pretend that we have lush mountains behind our backs and a wild ocean dancing in front of us. Warm chamomile tea with honey is indeed a good sleep-aid. Chamomile is calming and honey is anti-bacterial. We kept a huge jar New Zealand Manuka with us in the van and it felt like such a luxury. Active Manuka honey is known for its medicinal properties. If you can’t find it or afford it, choose another unheated quality honey. Coconut oil is a true super food with a long list of health benefits, add it to your daily routine and always choose a cold pressed quality oil. It gives tea a round and rich consistency and leaves you more satisfied. It can however feel a little oily and unusual if you are not used to it, so I recommend starting with a little less. Turmeric, ginger and cinnamon add great flavour as well as immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea Serves 4 2 cups drinking water 2 tbsp dried chamomile in a tea bag or 2 chamomile tea sachets (organic if possible) 1 tbsp raw honey (Manuka honey if possible) or more to taste 1-3 tsp cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1 1/­­2 cup unsweetened plant milk of choice Bring water to a boil in a sauce pan. Turn off the heat, then add chamomile and let steep for 3-5 minutes. Discard the chamomile. Now stir in honey, coconut oil, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and milk. Taste and add more honey, coconut oil or spices if you prefer. Re-heat on low heat if needed. Enjoy!

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based Diet

August 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based DietExcerpted from The Plant-Based Journey: A Step-by-Step Guide for Transitioning to a Healthy Lifestyle and Achieving Your Ideal Weight* by Lani Muelrath (BenBella Books (C) Sept. 2015, reprinted by permission). See the pre-order promotion for this book, and enjoy bonuses!  The workplace and travel both bring up the question of restaurant dining. Restaurant menus, it seems, are designed to thwart your best-laid plans for healthy eating. Oil, butter, and cheese are slammed into everything imaginable to increase food seduction, pushing you to keep eating. Is it any wonder Julia Childs cookbooks are such big sellers? Put gobs of butter in anything and it will taste good. When it comes to restaurant menus, here are a few simple strategies for navigating the options. How to Put a Restaurant Plate Together Restaurants listed as vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods may be friendly houses of food for your journey--but then again, perhaps not. Vegetarian implies no meat products; vegan items are devoid of all animal products. Vegetarian and vegan, however, do not necessarily mean healthy. They dont tell you anything about how the food is prepared, how much fat or sugar is added to the fare, or--in the case of vegetarian--even if dairy products or eggs are used. That doesnt mean these restaurant venues arent workable; it just means that you will need to be specific about exactly what you want when ordering. The best strategy is to do an internet search on the restaurants menu--and even make a phone call in advance to inquire about options. Detect which items on the menu might be most plant-eater friendly. Most restaurants have a dinner salad on the menu. When ordering your salad, clearly underscore what you do want: lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, cucumber--any and all raw vegetables. Next, politely be specific about what you do not want on your salad--cheese, eggs, bacon, meat chunks, anchovies--Ive been surprised by every one of these on one occasion or another. Dont be afraid to use the words allergy or doctor if it will help. Mention no croutons as well--they are usually fried in oil and often cheese saturated. Finally, ask for dressing on the side. You can also say no dressing and ask for a shaker of vinegar, which many restaurants serve with salads. You want the waiter or waitress to be your friend, and as you are asking them to go out of their way a bit for you, being gracious is a smart move. More and more often, veggie burgers are being featured as sandwich or entrée menu choices. Ask that yours be baked and not fried, and ask for ketchup and mustard instead of mayo or butter on the bun. If there is a vegetarian sandwich listed, simply ask that yours be served without mayo, cheese, or butter. If not, you can probably order a custom sandwich. In addition to salads and veggie burgers, your best restaurant bet might be in the sides section of the menu, where you will often find baked potatoes and other vegetables. If you dont see it listed, ask about the vegetable of the day, often served with the restaurant entrées as part of the main menu--frequently asparagus, green beans, or broccoli. You can ask that your serving be steamed and prepared without frying or oily dressing. If you say low fat, all bets are off as to how butter-drenched your plate will arrive, so be specific. Fruit salads are usually either in the sides or listed somewhere else on the menu; clarify to serve without yogurt or cheese. Breakfast is usually easy because oatmeal is almost always on the menu. Ive started to have increasing good luck with asking for soy milk or almond milk on the side, too. Our recent stop at a Mexican eatery is an example of getting good choices at restaurants. On the face of it, the menu looked like a dietary disaster. But I know I can pull together something pretty good at most Mexican restaurants--as long as they have a batch of beans cooked sans lard. I had phoned ahead about the beans, so I knew that they had two pots of beans in the kitchen: one of them plain boiled pintos. When we arrived, I knew exactly what to do. I ordered a big bowl of the boiled beans, a stack of soft, fresh corn tortillas, garden salad without dressing, extra bowls of salsa (for dressing and for my tacos), and some lime or lemon wedges. When it all arrived, I created multiple tacos by piling the beans, greens, and chunky house salsa on the corn tortillas. Combined with the greens and tomato on the salad, I crafted a hearty lunch. If the only in-house beans had been cooked in a pot of lard, I would have simply passed on beans in my tacos and done just fine with the fresh corn tortillas, tomatoes, green salad, and house salsa. Big Chain Bites When it comes to the fast-food chains, a little creativity can get you some eats in a pinch. The problem is all the mystery ingredients. Careful scrutiny usually uncovers dairy products, eggs, or oils on the lists of what, on the face of it, may appear to be plant-friendly fare--such as beans and veggie burgers. Ingredients seem to also be in a constant state of flux. You cant always trust that the servers are in the know when it comes to ingredients, so its worth checking with management or headquarters online if you want to get the facts. The best resource I have found on fast-food restaurant menus is listed at Urban Tastebuds, which has ferreted out and listed Forty-Eight Vegan Chain Restaurant Menus--the closest thing to plant-based currently available. See the list at www.urbantastebuds.com/­­43-vegan-chain-restaurant-menus -every-vegan-needs-know. The list starts with Atlanta Bread Company and runs all the way through Wendys. Each listing is linked to a page elaborating upon which items can be ordered without animal products. Keep in mind that it doesnt add the processed food filter, so items may include oils and other processed products. Fast-food meals are best left as last-resort options. Still, its nice to know where you might be able to find emergency fare. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles What about the challenges posed by airplane and other long-distance travel? The tips regarding workplace readiness may be all you need. Yet travel involving greater distances and extended chunks of time presents its own set of challenges. This year my husband and I took five trips involving international travel. Add to that the dozen or so excursions made in country for speaking engagements, and were talking about lots of hours logged on planes, in airports, and even a boat or two. The same pack-and-plan system works for all of them. Scout the Location in Advance The first thing I do for airplane travel is some reconnaissance regarding food options at the destination. First stop is the internet, where Ill search the hotel or rental location for nearby plant-food-friendly options, such as a produce market, a natural foods store, or a familiar chain--places where Ive found a good meal in the past, and where I know I can replenish my travel food stash. I then search the area for restaurants under the categories of vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods. A search at www.happycow.net can often turn up several appropriate vendors for eats in urban areas. Outbound Its easy to prepare and pack food when you are heading out on plane travel. Heres an example of how I do it. With an international junket coming up in a few days from this writing--in addition to the in-transit needs of spare clothing and a toothbrush--Ill pack in my carry-on the following: four hummus sandwiches, two peanut butter sandwiches, four apples, cold baked potatoes, peeled carrots, sugar snap peas, and a couple of baggies of rolled oats along with some dried fruit, nuts, and seeds. All of these easily pass at airline security--Ive never had a question asked yet. This food cache translates to two substantial meals for both my husband and me. The hummus sandwiches are eaten first due to their perishable nature. The carrots and snap peas will serve as filling and fibrous portable fare--instant salad, just not in the usual bowl. The peanut butter sandwiches pass the durability test and Ive served them good as new-- though slightly reshaped depending on the rigors of travel--up to forty-eight hours later. The apples last indefinitely. So do the nuts and seeds. Potatoes are best eaten within a few hours, depending on the heat to which your luggage is exposed, but Im always impressed by the way these hold up. The rolled oats can be emptied into a cup, covered with water, and after a few minutes of soaking, ready to eat. If your fruit stockpile has run out, you can find apples, bananas, and other fruit at most airports, even in the coffee shops. Another option for carry-on is soups-in-a-cup that simply require hot water. Let them sit, and in five minutes you can have split pea or black bean soup. Inbound Returning from a destination creates a slightly different situation because you dont have the luxury of being able to stock up from home. If youve been staying with friends or family, a house rental, or a hotel with a fridge, you can pack fruit and durable sandwiches for the return trip. Rolled oats, dried fruit, and nuts packed as part of your outbound preparations can hitch up with airport salads and fruit for sustenance. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Birkeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake}

September 10 2015 seitan is my motor 

Birkeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake}Thank you, Vegan Month of Food, for giving me the opportunity to put another recipe with poppy seeds on my blog! Poppy seeds are blue and that is today’s Vegan MoFo promt. And I cannot tell you how much I love poppy seeds. I love them so much that I’ll scoff at those lemon poppy seed muffins you probably like, because they don’t contain more than homeopathic doses of my favourite seeds. I am going for 100 % poppy seeds instead! This recipe is from a Danish baking book I bought while visiting Copenhagen (maybe two years ago?). The book was bigger and heavier than a luxury edition of the bible. That and the pretty pictures lured me into buying it. Bagebog by Claus Meyer has a lot of interesting recipes, and while some of them might be considered as Danish or at least Scandinavian, most seem to be international. So I am not sure about the authenticity of this birkeskage. Something similar might be served to you in many Eastern European countries, and even in German bakeries you can find Mohnkuchen varieties. I am still calling it Danish because it’s from a Danish book written in Danish! Smart, hm? The original recipe called for 4 eggs but those were easily replaced by both soy yoghurt and aquafaba. I made some more alterations, so that new recipe doesn’t have very much to do with the original version anymore. I have never tasted the original, obviously. But my version is a wonderfully moist and aromatic poppy seed cake with a delicate shortbread crust. Print Birgeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake} IngredientsFor the crust 80 g (1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) refined coconut oil (softened) 2 tablespoons sugar 150 g (1 1/­­4 cups) all-purpose flour For the topping 80 g (1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) refined coconut oil, softened 175 g (3/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) sugar, divided 120 g (1/­­2 cup) sweetened soy yoghurt 180 g (1 1/­­4 cup) ground poppy seeds (Grind them in a small coffee mill. Make sure the mill is suitable for grinding oily seeds.) 45 g (1/­­4 cup) semolina 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) chickpea brine from a can juice from half a small lime InstructionsPreheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Grease a rectangular pan (18 x 28 cm or 7 x 11 inch) and set aside. To make the crust, beat coconut oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Add sugar and mix until a crumbly dough forms. Make sure the fat is incorporated completely. Press the dough into the pan and place in the fridge. To make the topping, beat the coconut oil and 125 g sugar (1/­­2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) until fluffy. Add yoghurt, poppy seeds, and semolina and beat until smooth. Combine chickpea brine, remaining 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar, and lime juice in a second bowl. Beat until stiff peaks form. (I use a handheld blender. It takes about 5 minutes with this one, but beating time can be longer or shorter.) Fold the chickpea brine mixture into the poppy seed mixture until everything is smooth. Remove the pan from the fridge and pour topping over the crust. Smooth down the topping and bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool completely before serving. This cake tastes best straight from the fridge where you can store it for several days. NotesAdapted from a recipe in Claus Meyers Bagebog. (Birkeskage, p. 246.) Lindhardt og Rindhof 2012 (K?benhavn). 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­birkeskage-danish-poppy-seed-cake/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com By the way, I did not skip yesterday’s promt “most retro recipe”. I made something and posted it on Instagram! I chose westfaelische Quarkspeise, which is a dessert made with German (or westfalian) Pumpernickel. Pumpernickel is a popular bread in the North of Germany. Most traditional versions are flourless and very different from what you might be used to in Northern America. It’s made with sourdough starter and whole rye berries or cracked rye, salt and water. That’s it. No molasses or sugar. It’s baked at a very low temperature for a very long time (around 24 hours). That way all the sugar present in the wheat berries caramelises and gives this rye bread the dark brown colour and a slightly sweet taste. Pumpernickel has a very unique texture that is chewy and al dente and still it melts in your mouth. Using the bread for desserts is super retro to me. These days it cannot compete with chia seeds, goji berries, or quinoa. Westfälische quarkspeise is a layered dessert made with toasted pumpernickel crumbs, chocolate shavings, quark (a cream cheese like curd cheese), and canned cherries. I used an online recipe and cheated big time when it came to the quark. But my version with whipped soy cream was just as good and since I also added some Kirschwasser, it was almost like a quick Black Forest dessert, especially since the pumpernickel goes just as well with cherries as chocolate!    

How to Freshen Up Skin with Cleansing Grains

January 13 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Freshen Up Skin with Cleansing Grains Looking to freshen up rough, drab winter skin? When ground into a fine powder, grains such as rice, oats, quinoa, and millet make for gentle cleansers that leave skin supremely smooth. Plus, cleansing grains mild sloughing action may aid in restoring skins glow. Using exfoliators made with grains helps get rid of dead cells, which allows your skin to reflect the light better and makes it more radiant, explains Patricia Farris, MD, a dermatologist and clinical associate professor at Tulane University. Naturally rich in antioxidants, grains could also assist in keeping skin vibrant. Oats, for instance, might boost overall skin health by fighting inflammation (a key culprit in acne and sagging complexions), Farris says. In fact, research suggests that certain antioxidants found in oats may ease inflammation when applied to the skin. Farris does advise against reaching for cleansing grains more than once or twice a week. You have to be careful not to overdo it, since too much exfoliation can strip away surface oils to the point where your skin ends up dry and irritated, she cautions. Another reason to choose cleansing grains: theyre an eco-friendly alternative to scrubs made with plastic microbeads, which wash down drains and spill into waterways, threatening turtles, fish, and seagulls that ingest the bits of plastic. Easy-Peasy Oatmeal Scrub: For a homemade grains-based facial slougher, DIY Face Masks and Scrubs author Stacy Karen recommends mixing 2 teaspoons ground oats, 1 teaspoon wheat germ or cornmeal, and 1 1/­­2 teaspoons water or cooled chamomile tea. After massaging the scrub onto your skin, wash off with warm water and a face cloth. Product Picks Zatik Cleansing Grain for Normal/­­Oily Skin ($10/­­2 oz.) Bellaroma Pineapple Enzyme & Quinoa Cleansing Grains ($22/­­4 oz.)


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