natural - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry

Aloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fry

Top 10 Vegan Restaurants in London

Kaju paneer masala recipe | kaju paneer curry | paneer cashew curry










natural vegetarian recipes

Cool Refried Bean Wraps

February 7 2020 VegKitchen 

Cool Refried Bean Wraps Serve these easy refried bean wraps for lunch with with stone-ground natural tortilla chips and some fruit; or for dinner, with baked potatoes or sweet potatoes (tortilla chips and salsa are welcome, too). They’re also a good companion to soups. These go really well with Potato, Corn, and Green Chile Soup, for example. The post Cool Refried Bean Wraps appeared first on VegKitchen.

How To Make Your Own Balsamic Ketchup

February 3 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I have a deep love and appreciation for ketchup. (You’ve seen my Cranberry Chipotle Ketchup recipe, right?) So naturally, when I saw that Heinz was introducing a ketchup made with balsamic vinegar, I decided that I needed to try it immediately. And then I found out it wasn’t available everywhere; it seemed the stores I frequent are not stores that carry it. Obviously, I had to try to make it myself. Obviously! I adapted this balsamic ketchup recipe from Serious Eats’ Homemade Ketchup. Are you ready to make ketchup? Let’s get started! You will need these things: 2 tbsp olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 (28 oz) can tomato puree 1/­­2 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp tomato paste 1/­­2 tsp kosher salt 1/­­2 tsp ground mustard 1/­­8 tsp ground cloves, for that certain je ne sais quoi (yes, the “quoi” in ketchup is cloves--of this, I am certain) 1/­­8 tsp allspice 1/­­8 tsp cayenne pepper Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until just beginning to brown, about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add minced garlic and cook an additional 30 seconds. Add the tomato […]

Dates and Nuts Bar

January 26 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Dates and Nuts Bar (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Dates and Nuts Energy Bar, Healthy Bar, All-Natural Nutritional Bar 2020 is the start of a new decade and like most people Im sure you have thought about eating clean and healthy. My next recipe is for any new year resolutions and is called Dates and Nuts Bar. This healthy gluten-free energy bar is also vegan and sugar-free. The bars have a great nutty texture that tastes so delicious. This yummy treat is so satisfying for any sweet cravings! Because we all live busy lives, these bars make great snacks because they are so easy to take on the go. You can even give them to your kids as an after -school snack. Because dates are so sweet, they provide the perfect natural alternative to added sugars. They are sure to be a hit with friends who are avoiding sugar but still crave something sweet. Try these bars as a healthy alternative to cookies and other sweet treats. You will feel amazing. Course Snack Keyword All Natural, Almonds, Badam Burfi, Besan ki barfi, Candy, Cocoa Powder, Coconut, coconut Ladoo, Cooking Video, Dates Bar, Delightful, Diabetic, Flax Seed Burfi, Flax Seeds, Gluten Free, Gourmet food, Home Made, Jain Food, Kids Friendly, Lunch Box, Natural Alternative, Nutritional Bar, Nutty, Quick And Easy, Sattvic Food, Snack, Sugar Free, Swaminarayan, Sweet, vegan, Walnuts Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 16 pieces Ingredients1 1/­­2 cup pitted dates cut into small pieces 2 Tbsp cocoa powder 1/­­3 cup coconut powder 1/­­3 cup flax seed meal 1/­­8 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 cup roasted Walnuts roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Almond roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Cashews roughly chopped 2 tsp sesame seeds 2 tsp pumpkin seeds InstructionsSoften the chopped dates in microwave for 30 seconds, doing this makes dates soft and easy to work. Blend the dates in the food processor until they become to the paste, this should take about 15 seconds. Add flex seed meal, and cocoa powder and salt to the food processor and blend it until all the ingredients incorporated. This should take about 15 second. Add the roasted and chopped nuts walnuts, almonds, and cashew nuts. Blended it until all the ingredients incorporated, but nuts should be still chunky this should take about 20 seconds of blending. Remove the mix from food processor, and make it into 2 balls, roll it into about 1/­­4-inch-thick, sprinkle the sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds to the rolled bar and lightly press the seeds, so they stay into the bars. Cut them into your desire shape. I decided to cut them in bars. NotesThese are some more healthy choice you would like to know Quinoa salad, Stuffed karela, Lentil Vegetable soup, Mango panna cotta The post Dates and Nuts Bar appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Glazed Baked Onions

December 16 2019 VegKitchen 

Glazed Baked Onions Slow-baking onions gives them a mellow sweetness. This is good with naturally sweet Vidalia onions or red onions, but ordinary yellow onions will do just as well. This makes a nice side dish for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner. The post Glazed Baked Onions appeared first on VegKitchen.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based RecipesWere all familiar with the four basic tastes -- sweet, salty, sour, and bitter -- but umami, the mysterious fifth taste, remains an enigma. Umami is responsible for giving foods their deep, savory flavor. When used properly, umami adds a pleasant richness to plant-based meals, balances the natural bitterness of nutrient-dense vegetables, and simplifies cooking by reducing the need for salt and other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Umami can be found in everything from corn, tomatoes, and mushrooms to aged cheeses, nori and soy sauce. While its easy to find foods that contain umami, its not always as simple to coax that savory flavor out of them, which is why umami remains an underutilized culinary tool in many home kitchens across America. Thats why the team at Meatless Monday was so thrilled to work with Yondu Vegetable Umami to develop a free, downloadable e-cookbook complete with umami-rich plant-based recipes. When scrolling through the recipes, youll see the breadth and versatility of this one simple ingredient. But tasting is believing. For starters, try this super simple 3-Minute Veggie Soup , which includes aromatic leeks, sugary snap peas, cool slices of fennel, and a couple of tablespoons of vegetable umami. At only 54 calories per serving, its a nice, light way to open a meal. Catering to a crowd? Pulse together a creamy Minted Pea and Walnut Dip in a matter of minutes. Have some leftover cauliflower? A spattering of chili flakes and lemons zest, along with a drizzle of olive oil and umami will transform this simple vegetable into a Quick Roasted Cauliflower worthy of any restaurant menu. To celebrate the cookbook release, Yondu is giving away 50 free bottles of their vegetable umami. All you have to do is click the link HERE and sign up, but move quick -- its first come first serve. And if you missed the giveaway, Yondu is also offering a coupon code for 50% off your order! Use code: 50umamimeals.   Download your free copy of the e-cookbook HERE and click over to Amazon to purchase a bottle of Yondu, $8.99 (lasts quite a while). Thanks to Yondus vegetable umami, you can effortlessly add a richness to any of your Monday meals. Need more inspiration? Check out Yondu.Us for more recipes. Tag @MeatlessMonday and @Yondu.USA in your umami food posts and share the e-cookbook link with friends and family to inspire easy Meatless Monday meal ideas. The post The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Celebrate Family Meals Month by Making Meatless Monday a Family Affair

September 2 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Family Meals Month by Making Meatless Monday a Family Affair Getting your whole family to join you for Meatless Monday is wonderful, but sometimes kids may not be eager to try new fruits and vegetables or experiment with new foods. However, if they are involved in cooking, research shows that kids are more likely to try foods. The Kids Cook Monday , another Monday Campaigns initiative, encourages families to set aside Monday nights for cooking and eating together as a family. The Kids Cook Monday website provides family-friendly recipes, perfect for Meatless Monday, as well as a free downloadable e-cookbook, The Family Dinner Date Cookbook . Each recipe features a fun format that divides cooking tasks into those kids can do by themselves, those they can do together with an adult, and tasks adults should handle. When kids pitch in making meals, theyre proud of their accomplishment and excited to eat the food theyve helped to make.  Cooking together also provides a natural time for discussing the impact that food choices have on our bodies and the environment.  The more educated kids are about food, the more open theyll be to healthy, sustainable food choices. Theres no better time to make Meatless Monday a family activity than September, which is Family Meals Month. Family Meals Month is a nationwide event aimed at supporting families in enjoying more meals together. The best part is the time youll be spending together preparing the meals. The time you share chatting as you cook together becomes even more important as they reach adolescence and move into those tricky teenage years. The family that cooks together, eats together. Families eating together leads to positive things. Research from Columbia Universitys National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse suggests that kids who eat family dinners get better grades in school, develop better communication skills, and are less likely to try drugs.  In addition, the American Academy of Pediatrics found that kids who ate dinner with their family regularly were less likely to be obese. Meatless Monday can improve personal health and the health of the planet.  Sharing it with your kids by cooking and eating together may also help improve the health of your family. Learn more about how to cook with your family in the upcoming Kids Cook Monday Twitter chat for Family Meals Month on September 9 from 2-3 PM EST. Follow @KidsCookMonday and #KidsCookFamilyMeals on Twitter to join in! Learn more at KidsCookMonday.org . If you cook a meatless meal with your family, wed love to see us. Tag us @MeatlessMonday and @KidsCookMonday on social media. The post Celebrate Family Meals Month by Making Meatless Monday a Family Affair appeared first on Meatless Monday.

daddojanam recipe | andhra style curd rice | bagalabath

August 15 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

daddojanam recipe | andhra style curd rice | bagalabathdaddojanam recipe | andhra style curd rice | bagalabath with step by step photo and video recipe. curd rice has been the staple of many south indians for many ages. naturally there has been many variations to this basic recipe which varies with the demography and also the purpose it is made. one such traditional variation is the andhra style daddojanam recipe which is specifically made in temple and served as prasadam. The post daddojanam recipe | andhra style curd rice | bagalabath appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Green Tiger In Chiang Mai, Thailand

July 8 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

There are so many wonderful things about Thailand, and even more so in the northern city of Chiang Mai. One of those things is a Green Tiger. Tucked in a quiet alley inside the quaint Old City of Chiang Mai, the Green Tiger House, and its plant-based Reform Kafé, is a peaceful oasis that awaits you, where you can enter a delightful world. Many hotels have various free amenities, and even a pool, but Green Tiger goes further with solar-heated water, energy-saving LED lights, natural body care products, and an area for used books and magazines. And there is outstandingly friendly service, who is ready to help you with whatever you need -- and even some things you didnt yet know you needed! Green Tiger House isnt just remarkable because its a fully plant-based hotel. Green Tiger House and Reform Kafé stand on their own merits as truly excellent places to stay and eat at, regardless of your diet. Reform Kafé serves both Thai and Western food, including khao soi, Chiang Mais delectable signature dish, as well as scrumptious curries, stir fries, pad thai, and soups, in addition to sandwiches, veggie burgers, and pasta, plus salads, smoothies, fruit and vegetable […] The post Green Tiger In Chiang Mai, Thailand appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Banana Bread Protein Pancakes

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

The comforting flavors of cinnamon spiced banana bread are reinvented for morning in these fruit flapjacks. Strawberries, blueberries and raspberries are given a touch of extra sweetness when glazed in agave nectar to top these hearty pancakes. This recipe comes to us from Lindsay of Naturally Lindsay. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 For the Banana Bread Protein Pancakes: - 2 bananas, mashed - 1 1/­­4 cups unsweetened almond milk - or - 1 1/­­4 cups nonfat milk - 1 teaspoon vanilla - 1 tablespoon canola oil - 1/­­2 cup whole-wheat flour - 1/­­2 cup all purpose flour - 2 tablespoons hemp protein powder* - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 tablespoons baking powder - 1 teaspoon baking soda - pinch of salt For the Agave Glazed Fruit Topping: - 1/­­2 cup strawberries, sliced - 1/­­2 cup blueberries - 1/­­2 cup raspberries - 3 tablespoons agave nectar *found in health food stores or the health section of most grocery stores.   To make the Banana Bread Protein Pancakes: Preheat a griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Blend the mashed bananas, milk, vanilla and canola oil together in a small bowl until only a few chunks of banana remain. Whisk the whole-wheat flour, all purpose flour, protein powder, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt together in a large bowl. Create a well in the middle of the dry ingredients. Pour the banana milk mixture into that well and stir together. Add a little more milk if you prefer your pancakes thin. Prepare the preheated griddle or frying pan with a light coating of nonstick cooking spray or oil. Drop 1/­­4 cup of batter per pancake onto the griddle. Cook 3-5 minutes on the first side, or until bubbles start to form. Flip and cook 1-2 minutes on the other side, or until the pancake is cooked through. To make the Agave Glazed Fruit Topping: Place the sliced strawberries, blueberries and raspberries together in a medium bowl. Toss with the agave nectar until all the fruit is thoroughly coated. To complete the Banana Bread Protein Pancakes: Top each pancake stack with a generous portion Agave Glazed Fruit and enjoy. The post Banana Bread Protein Pancakes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Bio Solo Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Bio Solo Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Tomato Tortellini or Ravioli Salad

May 27 2019 VegKitchen 

Tomato Tortellini or Ravioli Salad Theres something really satisfying about filled pastas like tortellini or ravioli, especially now that there are several vegan varieties to choose from. Combined with summers ripe tomatoes and basil, they are the basis of a delicious main dish salad. Look for them in the freezer section of natural foods stores. The post Tomato Tortellini or Ravioli Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless Monday

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless MondayWant to add new tastes and techniques to your Meatless Monday repertoire? Weve compiled some of our favorite, meatless cookbooks to offer a little inspiration. In the list, youll find endless ways to liven up your meals: Whether youre an Instant Pot fanatic or want to finally put your extensive spice collection to use, youre bound to find something that sparks joy below.   The Complete Vegan Cookbook: Over 150 Whole-Foods, Plant-Based Recipes and Techniques The Natural Gourmet Center compiled pages upon pages of satiating recipes that can help you up your plant-based cooking game using whole foods and local ingredients. The book is teeming with techniques that explain how to transform animal-free foods into divine dinners like a pro, along with seasonal-driven recipes thatll have even the most skeptical diner forget about the meat. Find it on Amazon .     Mostly Plants: 101 Delicious Flexitarian Recipes from the Pollan Family The Pollan Family -- Tracy, Dana, Lori, and Corky -- have been producing inspiring recipes for years that follow Michael Pollan’s famous food advice -- Eat food, not too much, mostly plants. In Mostly Plants, their new, flexitarian-focused cookbook, the Pollan Family shows how vegetables can shine when theyre at the center of the meal rather than a side. Most of the recipes in these pages can be cooked up in 35 minutes or less, and many can be easily modified for any dietary need. Find it on Amazon .     Veg: Easy and Delicious Meals for Everyone Chef Jamie Olivers newest cookbook, which will be released on August 22, 2019, celebrates tasty and simple food that, as Oliver puts it, just happens to be meatless. Beyond its very viable recipes, the book shares cooking hacks and tricks thatll help any level chef become more comfortable in the kitchen. Find in on Amazon .       Dinner for Everyone: 100 Iconic Dishes Made 3 Ways -- Easy, Vegan, or Perfect for Company Mark Bittman shares 100 straightforward recipes in his new cookbook that can feed a group filled with all types of dietary needs. Every recipe can be modified to appease the palate of any guest, making this cookbook an essential manual for anyone tasked with the challenge of feeding a vegan and a carnivore at the same time. Find it on Amazon .     Vegan Instant Pot Cookbook: 500 Simple Plant-Based Recipes to Feel Better. Ultimate Pressure Cooker Vegan Cookbook for Beginners and Pros Healthful eating doesnt have to be hard or time-consuming. The Instant Pot has gained a cult following for its quick, dump-and-bake technique. Mary Goodrich proves through her recipes that plant-based food works just as nicely with the convenient cooking gadget. Whether youve been obsessed with your Instant Pot forever or you want to see what all the buzz is about, this extensive recipe book will serve you well. Find it on Amazon .       Food Is the Solution: What to Eat to Save the World--80+ Recipes for a Greener Planet and a Healthier You The easiest thing a person can do to combat climate change is to eat less meat. Matthew Prescott, the senior food policy director of the Humane Society, incorporated this philosophy into his first cookbook, which is equal parts educational and drool-inducing. Let this book guide you in changing the way you feed yourself and the way you think about food. Find it on Amazon .     The Indian Vegetarian Cookbook Indian food is a staple for many plant-based eaters because there are so many flavorful, meatless recipes integral to Indian cooking. Pushpesh Pant makes Indian cooking accessible to western readers while maintaining the integrity of whats so good about Indian food in the first place. Vegetables are anything but boring, but if you needed convincing, this book should do it. Find it on Amazon .       OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet Suzy Amis Cameron is a mom of five, so she understands how important it is for meals to be effortless and kid-friendly. The author is the founder of the MUSE School in California, where Meatless Monday is implemented. This book will help any parent make meatless meals that their children will love, and also offers great wisdom around why eating meatless is so crucial in the first place. Find it on Amazon .       Heirloom Kitchen: Heritage Recipes and Family Stories from the Tables of Immigrant Women Without immigrants, thered be nothing good to eat. Anna Francese Gass, who migrated to the U.S. from Italy as a young girl, recognizes the importance of immigrant women cooks through her own experience growing up in the U.S. Her new cookbook serves as a record of history; in it she collects and preserves her Italian mothers recipes so that they can be enjoyed by generations to come. And they are simply timeless. Find it on Amazon .       Masala Mamas: Recipes and Stories from Indian Women Changing Their Communities Through Food and Love This incredible story is peppered with recipes from the Masala Mamas -- 16 women who live in the Kalwa slum in India whove dedicated their lives to cooking up hot and nutritious meals for school children who often cant afford much to eat. All proceeds from this cookbook support the Masala Mamas in their mission. Find it on Amazon .     Have a favorite cookbook that deserves to be on the list? Let us know about it on our Facebook page . And for even more recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery . The post 10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies Makes 2 dozen Just like most 8 year olds, peanut butter chocolate chip has always been my comfort cookie. It takes only about 10 of these to make all my problems go away. These are about as peanutbuttery (yes that’s a word) that I could get them without them turning into a big old spoonful of peanut butter. This recipe is from Superfun Times. But it had a different pic! Notes ~Use creamy natural peanut butter for these. The only ingredients should be peanut butter and salt. If you use something else I bet they’d still be good, but I can’t guarantee it, so just listen to me and follow the directions for once in your life. Ingredients 3/­­4 cup refined coconut oil softened at room temperature 3/­­4 cup creamy natural peanut butter 1/­­2 cup granulated sugar 1/­­2 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­4 cup unsweetened almond milk, or preferred non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 1/­­2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.  In a large mixing bowl, use electric mixers to beat together oil and peanut butters. Beat in the sugars until fluffy. Add the milk and vanilla. Sift in 3/­­4 cup of the flour along with the cornstarch, baking powder and salt. Beat until smooth. Add the chocolate chips then use your hand to mix the batter the rest of the way, until well combined.  Place about 2 tablespoons of batter on the trays, a few inches apart. Lightly flatten with your hand. Bake for about 10 minutes, until golden on the edges. Let cool on baking sheets for a few minutes, then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.

Restaurant Highlight: Full Circle Coffee In Ghent, Belgium

October 18 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Ghent is the Belgian city for plant-based eaters. The charming historical town has an exciting culinary scene that pleases every foodie–especially the vegans that dont usually find that many options when it comes to eating out. Along the canals, the old medieval flemish houses remind you of the fascinating history that constitutes the richness of Ghent. Most of the architecture remains intact and is remarkably well preserved and restored. The city has created a magical blend between history and comfort of living. Many talented chefs, conceptual cuisine and high end restaurants are to be found when you stroll around the old center. In the treasure hunt for vegan restaurants, we found a charming little cafe that is completely dedicated to serving plant-based products. Full Circle Coffee is the first 100% plant based coffee bar in Belgium. They are specialized in filtered coffee, they work with small plantations, and they roast their coffee grains themselves in the workshop by Koffie Mortier. Their mission is to offer a quality coffee that respects the environment and the populations living on the harvest of the coffee grains. To support this mentality, everything is of natural origin–you drink your latte with plant milk, you savor […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Full Circle Coffee In Ghent, Belgium appeared first on HappyCow.

Restaurant Highlight – Rasoterra In Barcelona, Spain

September 17 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

No veggie burger, no pizza and no wraps? What do you offer then? Rasoterra isnt a typical vegetarian restaurant, this is precisely why it has deserved the title of best vegetarian restaurant in Barcelona. Dont expect to find veggie burgers, burritos or salad bowls. You will only get creativity and art in the form of healthy dishes. Surprising compositions made of the best local ingredients–that is their leitmotiv. They approach a plant-based cuisine with the eyes of a real gourmet and the skills of a master chef. As a gastronomic bistro, their mission is to reinvent the vegetarian and vegan cuisine and prove to the world that this cuisine is everything but boring. They want to be part of the local Slow Food chapter and that is why the kitchen uses organic, local and seasonal products with which they continuously reinvent their menu. Tucked away in the historical Gotico district of Barcelona, Rasoterra is a high end restaurant that provides a unique experience to its visitors. Decorated with taste, the relaxed light-filled dining room combines contemporary arts with natural materials and little details brought back from here or there that makes the atmosphere cozy and welcoming. Chiara, Daniele and Guillem […] The post Restaurant Highlight – Rasoterra In Barcelona, Spain appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

Socca Pizza with Pesto and Mushrooms

July 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Socca Pizza with Pesto and MushroomsSocca Pizza with Pesto and Mushrooms. This Chickpea Flour Pizza Crust is gluten-free, grain-free! Vegan Socca Pizza with veggies and chimichurri or pesto. GF soyfree Recipe. Easily made nut-free. Jump to Recipe Socca, a type of thin unleavened pancake, flatbread made with chickpea flour, is naturally gluten-free and grain-free and can easily be used as a pizza base. The Socca Bread needs just 2 main ingredients, chickpea flour and water. Just mix, and cook a bit on the skillet or bake. Then add your favorite toppings and bake again. I top it with pesto or chimichurri and veggies. You can also add some vegan cheese if you like. Add other toppings such as microgreens before serving. Easy, protein filled and delicious!Continue reading: Socca Pizza with Pesto and MushroomsThe post Socca Pizza with Pesto and Mushrooms appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread Gluten-free

July 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread Gluten-freeEasy Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread. Savory Gluten free Vegan Chickpea flour flatbread. 1 Bowl 5 Ingredients. Vegan Grain-free Soyfree Nutfree Recipe. Jump to Recipe What is Socca? Socca is a type of thin unleavened pancake, flatbread or crepe made with chickpea flour. It has other names in various regions of France and Italy (farinata, Panisse) and can be made thin or thick with various flavor additions. It is naturally gluten-free and grain-free and can easily be used as flatbread or pizza base. Similar preparations are also found in other cuisines with variations in methods of cooking and forms. Chickpea flour is an amazingly versatile and worldy ingredient! Socca Bread needs just 2 main ingredients, chickpea flour and water. I add salt, rosemary, pepper flakes for flavor and cook it on a skillet or bake. I prefer the skillet version. It is easier, and quicker and you can adjust the thickness and crispyness as you prefer. Slice up the socca and serve with dips or just olive oil. Or top with pesto or chimichurri and veggies and bake for a pesto pizza. Chickpea flour is generally available in grocery stores.

Meat Free Monday Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary with #MFMCountMeIn Campaign

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meat Free Monday , launched by Sir Paul, Mary and Stella McCartney in 2009, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this month. Meat Free Monday is a global Meatless Monday partner mutually aligned on our mission to raise awareness and action around the benefits of meat consumption reduction. Meat Free Monday partners with celebrities, schools, businesses, restaurants and country organizers to encourage people to help slow climate change, conserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one meat free day each week. This month, Meat Free Monday is celebrating a decade of action and advocacy with a new campaign encouraging people to join the global meat reduction movement. They are launching #MFMCountMeIn anniversary campaign which aims to bring celebrities, businesses, not-for-profit groups, educational institutions and individual supporters together, to celebrate what people are doing on the meat free front and inspire even more people to get on board. Get in on the action: Join Meatless Monday and Meat Free Monday in promoting #MFMCountMeIn and #MeatlessMonday on your social media account. Post a photo or video showing your support and how easy it is to go meatless on Mondays. Think recipes, tips or shout out to the Meat Free Monday team. Dont forget to tag @MeatlessMonday and @MeatFreeMonday . We congratulate Meat Free Monday on their 10th Anniversary! We at Meatless Monday are thrilled to work with a great global partner in our joint mission to help reduce meat consumption around the world. With our combined strength, we can effectively raise awareness that cutting meat one day week can benefit personal health and the health of the planet. We look forward to the next decade of partnership and growth with Meat Free Monday. Sid Lerner, Founder & Chairman, Meatless Monday Q&A with Meat Free Monday Team How did Meat Free Monday first begin? The McCartney family has a long history of personal interest in sustainable food - from the Linda McCartney vegetarian food range to Pauls organic farm - but it was reading a 2006 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Livestocks Long Shadow, that crystallized in Paul, Mary and Stellas minds the global importance of making planet-friendly food choices. According to Livestocks Long Shadow, animal agriculture is one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global. On the basis of this alarming fact the family launched the Meat Free Monday campaign in June 2009. What is the goal of Meat Free Monday, who should participate, and why? Meat Free Monday aims to raise awareness of the detrimental environmental impact of animal agriculture and industrial fishing. The campaign encourages individuals, families, businesses, not-for-profit groups and educational institutions to help slow climate change, conserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one plant-based day each week. What trends or changes have you seen in the past 10 years regarding awareness and interest in meat reduction? Shopping habits have changed dramatically in the last ten years, with consumer demand leading to many new plant-based products now being available in shops and restaurants. According to research company Kantar World panel, 150 million more meat free dinners were sold in January 2019 compared with the same month the previous year. 21% of UK households have cut down on their meat intake, a shift due in part to campaigns like Meat Free Monday. What programs and campaigns is Meat Free Monday working on locally or globally? Meat Free Mondays aim is to raise awareness and inspire people to make a change in their diets from an easily achievable starting point. Over 3,000 UK schools currently participate in Meat Free Monday, as do local education authorities such as Edinburgh and Trafford. A key project is working with young people and expanding the campaigns schools programme. Could you share Sir Paul McCartney’s favorite meat-free recipe? One of Pauls favorite recipes is Super Vegetable Salad, which is featured in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Please see recipe here . A quick history of Meatless Monday Meatless Monday is global movement active in over 40 countries and regions and continues to grow. Meatless Monday was founded in 2003 by Sid Lerner in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In 2009, Ghent, Belgium, became the first non-U.S. city to go meatless. The same year, Paul McCartney introduced the U.K. to Meat Free Mondays, which has also continued to grow internationally.   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Meat Free Monday Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary with #MFMCountMeIn Campaign appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Solo Bio Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Solo Bio Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Cabbage, Apple, and Raisin Slaw

May 17 2019 VegKitchen 

Cabbage, Apple, and Raisin Slaw This colorful and naturally sweet slaw is a medley of cabbage, apples, and raisins with an appealing crunch. It’s great for everyday as well as holiday meals. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Cabbage, Apple, and Raisin Slaw appeared first on VegKitchen.

Tomato Tofu Scramble

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

Crumbed tofu gets a golden yellow glow thanks to a spoonful of turmeric in this vegan take on scrambled eggs. We pair tofu with tomatoes, but it can be cooked up with almost any vegetable, such as leftover roasted potatoes, sautéed mushrooms, or roasted bell peppers. For a fluffier scramble, we recommend pressing the tofu prior to crumbling it to remove excess water--this takes about 20 minutes of inactive time. If youre in a pinch, you can skip the pressing step for a less defined, slightly softer-textured scramble. This recipe comes to us from the The Complete Vegan Cookbook , by the Natural Gourmet Center with Alexandra Shytsman and Rebecca Ffrench. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 pound firm tofu, drained - 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped - 2 tablespoons pine nuts - 1 garlic clove, minced -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes - 1 large ripe tomato, seeded and diced - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (from 1 to 2 limes) - Whole-wheat toast, to serve (optional) Line a plate with paper towels and place the tofu on top. Place another paper towel on the tofu then top with another plate. Weigh it down with cans or pie weights for 20 to 30 minutes to remove excess water, draining off the water periodically. Using a fork or your hands, crumble the tofu into small bits. Heat a medium skillet over medium heat, add the oil, and heat until it just starts to shimmer. Add the onion and cook until just softened, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the pine nuts, garlic, cumin, turmeric, and red pepper flakes, and continue to cook until fragrant, about another 2 minutes. Stir in the crumbled tofu, tomato, salt, and lime juice. Increase the heat to medium-high and cook until the tofu is heated through, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Divide among plates and serve. Reprinted from The Complete Vegan Cookbook: Over 150 Whole Foods, Plant-Based Recipes and Techniques by the Natural Gourmet. Copyright (C) 2019 by Natural Gourmet Cookery Corporation. Photographs copyright (C) 2019 by Christina Holmes. Published by Clarkson Potter/­­Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. The post Tomato Tofu Scramble appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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