national - vegetarian recipes

national vegetarian recipes

Hendrix College Serves Up First-Ever Hearty Meatless Monday Breakfast Spread

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

Hendrix College Serves Up First-Ever Hearty Meatless Monday Breakfast SpreadHendrix College , located just outside Little Rock, Arkansas, cooked up a hot plant-based breakfast idea worth sharing. Working with Meatless Monday, the dining hall served students a fully customizable and sumptuous oatmeal bar. To celebrate National Oatmeal Day on Monday, October 30th, Cindy Mosley, Associate Director and Dietitian of Dining Services, introduced the first-ever oatmeal bar on Meatless Monday, offering a medley of fresh and dried fruit, nuts, and other delicious toppings. Meatless Monday caught up with Cindy to discuss her decision to offer the oatmeal bar and hear the warm responses the dining hall staff received. What inspired Hendrix to hold a Meatless Monday Breakfast event? The last few years, our dining hall has been working with The Monday Campaigns to create events and ideas to encourage students to take a break from meat one day a week. The focus has been with lunch and dinner options - never for breakfast. I felt it was time to encourage some additional choices and find ways to encourage students to make whole grain choices. The observance of National Oatmeal day was the perfect time to stage it. I came up with the idea to implement a do-it-yourself oatmeal bar to provide a unique breakfast experience. Just by giving them one place to find all the toppings, students ended up eating three times the amount of oatmeal than normal. None of the items were new to our dining hall, but for one morning, they were all offered in one convenient location. What were the favorite toppings? Mixed berries, chocolate chips, and pecans! How did the students react? The response was positive! Students left comments like, Because of this bar, I like oatmeal now! and This is great! Can you do this everyday? After such an overwhelming response, whats ahead? In December, I plan to present a Gardein-inspired Meatless Monday during lunch to introduce new, plant-based dishes. Are you interested in introducing Meatless Monday to your organization, restaurants, K-12 school, university, hospital, local city government, or social media group? We can help to provide everything youll need to get started. Our free downloadable guides include simple steps to get going, engaging graphics, proven keys to success, and science-backed research from our partner, The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. You can also get in touch with us at info@meatlessmonday.com or contact us online here . Follow on Facebook , Twitter , and Instagram .   The post Hendrix College Serves Up First-Ever Hearty Meatless Monday Breakfast Spread appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney FoundationWere thrilled to announce Meatless Mondays new partnership with The National Kidney Foundation , the largest organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation and Meatless Monday are partnering to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets. Studies suggest that incorporating meatless options into an overall balanced diet can help promote kidney health. Meatless Monday provides an easy way to make this first step towards a healthier lifestyle by cutting out meat just one day a week, and diversifying diets through meatless choices. Through the partnership, Meatless Monday hopes to support individuals who are at-risk or who are experiencing kidney disease in making an important dietary change. Meatless Monday also strives to help all people learn about the many benefits of reducing meat consumption. Reducing consumption of red and processed meat and eating more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Kidney disease is more common than you might think! According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. See Meatless Mondays kidney-friendly graphics and materials Theyre free for use by all – individuals, organizations, hospitals, city leaders, universities, and more,for use across social media, online, and print. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for Meatless Monday recipes and news each week. The post Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based recipe is low in sodium and helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 7 - 1  tablespoon minced  Garlic - 1  tsp, leaves  Oregano – Dried - 1  teaspoon  Allspice - 2  lemon yields  Lemon Juice – Fresh - 1  cup, whole  Raw Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas - 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 1/­­2  cup chopped  Carrots - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Yellow Bell Pepper, Raw - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Red Bell Pepper, Raw - 3  large  Cucumber – Peeled - 1  cup  Couscous – Dry   1. In a large bowl, mix together chilled couscous, cucumbers, red pepper, yellow pepper, carrots, snow peas, and corn. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, All spices, dried oregano, minced garlic, and olive oil. The post Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cashew Butter vs Peanut Butter – Is There a Winner to This Battle?

October 11 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Vegans and vegetarians simply love their nut butter, and they have been debating long and hard about which nut butter is the healthiest and most nutritious. The central debate usually revolves around cashew butter vs peanut butter--though almond butter sometimes pops up in the debate as well. It might be disappointing to realize that there is no actual winner of the cashew butter vs peanut butter battle. Each tasty spread comes with its fair share of unique benefits and nutritional properties. The choice ultimately boils down to your own personal preference. Peanut Butter For most Americans--vegan and non-vegan--peanut butter is much more than just a tasty spread to put on their sandwich. Since Dr. Kellogg introduced the first batch more than a century ago, peanut butter has risen to the status of a cultural food icon. On top of that, the National Peanut Board helps ensure that there is plenty of healthy, allergy-free peanut butter for future generations. Peanut Butter Nutrition Unfortunately, the popularity of peanut butter has little to do with its nutritional benefits. Still, it is worth stressing that peanut butter can be very beneficial for your plant-based eating habits. Peanut butter mostly consists of healthy unsaturated fats […]

Best Vegan Restaurants - Phoenix

September 27 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - Phoenix The food scene in Phoenix has had an underwhelming reputation for a long time, but that reputation is changing at a breakneck speed. Over the last decade, Phoenix has become well-known for its restaurants. No other city in Arizona can offer as much variety when it comes to dining out. All the staples of Southwest cuisine are present--including Sonoran Mexican dishes--but Phoenix’s restaurants and cafés serve a number of international dishes as well. Asian cooking has also become popular among Phoenicians. Discover Some of the Best Vegan Restaurants in Phoenix, AZ There is a growing demand for vegan cuisine all across Arizona. In response, Phoenix offers a wide selection of vegan and vegetarian cooking. It can be hard to decide where to start, so here are twelve of the best vegan restaurants Phoenix has to offer. 1. Vegan House We start the lineup with a utilitarian eatery located on West Adams Street. Vegan House also offers delivery and takeout. If youre in the mood for vegan seafood, consider the hot pot that features plant-based shrimp and fish. The clay pot vegan shrimp is delicious as well. The most popular dishes are the veggie rolls and the summer rolls in this […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - Phoenix appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

A Veg Village In Thailand

December 20 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

I heard about it the way one might hear about secret caves, fountains of youth, lost civilizations -- through the veg grapevine. I had already visited the vegetarian cities of Haridwar and Rishikesh in India, having thoroughly enjoyed myself there while basking in the delicious compassion of vegetarianism, so I knew I had to go to Ban Phra Baht Huay Tom while in Thailand. About two and a half hours south of very veg-friendly Chiang Mai (in Lamphun Province, Li District, Na Sai Subdistrict, near beautiful Mae Ping National Park), the vegetarian village of Ban Phra Baht Huay Tom is actually a small town laid out in a grid pattern, unusual for Thailand. It is also unusual in that the town is mostly populated by Karen (Paka-Kyaw), one of the Hill Tribe minority ethnic groups of the country, mostly Buddhist, and Thai is typically their second language, with very little English spoken. I speak very little Thai and my attempts to speak it were sometimes literally laughed at, which was not an unprecedented happening for me. I was the only foreigner in town and had the exquisite temple with inside mirrors, large golden chedi with tinkling bells, handicraft center with […] The post A Veg Village In Thailand appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meatless Monday Challenges High School Chefs to “Go With Grains” for C-CAP Recipe Contest

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Challenges High School Chefs to “Go With Grains” for C-CAP Recipe ContestMeatless Monday continues to help aspiring young chefs get their shot at success! The Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) has announced this years recipe contest to give high school students a chance to win a scholarship and develop their talents as budding chefs. Courtesy C-CAP The Go With Grains Meatless Monday recipe contest will challenge student chefs to develop a meat-free recipe that puts the spotlight on different kinds of grains. The panel of celebrity judges will choose the winner based on originality, flavor, healthfulness, ease of preparation, and writing ability. While learning important culinary skills with the help of their teachers, juniors and seniors in underserved communities will also learn about the environmental impact of plant-based cooking. Chef Marcus Samuelsson, a C-CAP board co-chair, will be one of the judges on the star-studded panel. Were thrilled to announce the stellar line-up of chefs on the panel that will judge this years recipe contest. Through this annual contest, culinary students receive guidance from their teachers on recipe writing and development and are able to showcase their talent of creating meatless recipes. The other judges include Rich Landau, a pioneer of modern plant-based cooking and the chef/­­co-owner of Philadelphias Vedge; Maria Loi, executive chef of Loi Estiatorio in New York City and a global ambassador of Greek gastronomy; Brother Luck, a C-CAP alumnus and the chef/­­co-owner of Four by Brother Luck in Colorado Springs; and Nicole Langone Scarangello, another C-CAP alumnus who is the director of menu management for the New York City Department of Education School Food. C-CAP is a national organization that focuses on bringing culinary education and training opportunities to students in underserved communities. Along with Meatless Monday, C-CAP helps young chefs learn about smart ways to cook that will not only guide their careers but encourage a new wave of responsible, sustainable cooking to the culinary industry. One national grand prize winner will receive a scholarship of $5,000 and six regional winners will win $2,000 scholarships. Winners are expected to be announced in the spring of 2018. Meatless Monday wishes all the participants good luck! The post Meatless Monday Challenges High School Chefs to “Go With Grains” for C-CAP Recipe Contest appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake

October 21 2017 My New Roots 

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Boil the kettle and make a cup of tea folks, this is going to be a big one! First of all, I have to begin this post by saying THANK YOU. My New Roots is officially 10 years old and I couldnt have done it without your support, enthusiasm, and full-on LOVE for this little blog. And especially after the last couple of posts when I really opened up about my recent struggles, I felt so supported, and saw that so many of you did as well. It reminded me of the strong community that this has become, and the power of people when they come together with a common goal of true wellness. If you had told me an entire decade ago that my deeply passionate, unabashedly nerdy, and nearly ignored internet musings would end up turning into a full-on career, brand, cookbooks, online classes, app, poster shop and retreat company I never, ever would have believed you. But reading my first post again, it’s just as relevant today as ever, eerily almost as if I had written it last week. I guess I had a strong vision in mind and just kept trucking, kept trusting, that it would resonate with someone. But here we are, a third of my life later, and it’s not just someone, but so many of you. And all of my dreams continue to be born and manifest because of you. That offhanded suggestion from an old boyfriend who thought I could use an outlet for all that health talk I kept spewing, was really onto something. Thanks, dude. Secondly...and this is really big news...I am moving back to Canada! Yes, after nine years of delicious life in Copenhagen, my old roots are pulling me home and I am so very ready. This whole thing has been in the works for a few months now, but I didnt really feel like putting it out there until it was real. Well lemme tell ya, when putting my familys life in 50 boxes and shoving them into a shipping container, shiz got real, real fast. What a crazy feeling it is, and totally overwhelming with all the emotions that relocating your entire life is. So, if things have been (and continue to be) quiet around here, its because Ive been sorting through all the details that an international move entails. I send my gratitude for your patience. The next chapter of my life will be completely different from the last, that is for sure. To change things up dramatically, my family and I will be living out of the city in fact, near-ish to Toronto, where I am originally from. I knew that I would end up living in the country at some point, but not so soon! It was more a when I retire kind of thing. But funny what happens when you have kids and they need s-p-a-c-e, your priorities seem to shift to accommodate the little ones. Plus, I feel the need to be on the ground again (Ive been living in a fourth-floor apartment for nine years now!), so we bought a house to get closer to earth in every sense, plant a garden, lay in the grass - our own grass - and enjoy the quiet and safety of a little community. Im really excited for everything that is to come, and feeling so grateful for the divine unfolding. But will I miss Copenhagen? Obvi. This city, and my home here, is where I have spent my entire adult life. The walls of my beloved kitchen that my husband and I built ourselves, have held space for two cookbooks, online classes, countless dinner parties, bleary-eyed breakfasts, and even the birth of our son for crying out loud! And although My New Roots began in Toronto, it flourished here and truly became something on Danish ground. The Scandinavian culture has had a profound influence on me, my aesthetic, and how I see the world now. Having Europe at my doorstep with all its history, architecture, fine arts, culture, and attitude has been an enormous privilege and deeply inspiring. And can we talk about the light? Oh the light! How my camera and I will miss the very special way the sun slants here. Its unlike anything Ive seen before. Anyway, I promise to keep you all posted as we leave one fabulous country for the next. I wont have a working kitchen for some months, but Ill stay as active as I can on Instagram so you can keep up with my kitchen renovations...I know youll want to see all that house porn. Tee hee. Okay, now for the main event. I MADE A CARROT CAKE. Successfully. It is delicious. I feel like I have finally achieved one of my biggest culinary goals ever, and its so appropriate that we celebrate ten years of this blog with a recipe that has challenged me for nearly as long. If you remember back to when I used to post giant layer cakes for my birthday, I ran into trouble in 2013, when I attempted three different versions, which all failed, and ended up making nut butter sandwiches instead. Since then, the headcount has continued to rise, yet some ridiculously stubborn part of me wont give up. In the past Ive almost always used spelt flour for baking, and if any of you have tried one of my famous layer cakes, youll know this has worked well. I was after the same crumb that you can achieve with wholegrain spelt, but wanted the cake to be gluten-free, so I started by using an all-purpose gluten-free flour. It was a total disaster. The cake turned out gummy and inedible, and the frosting, which I tried to make with cooked quinoa (dont ask) was just weird. The next route I tried was with almond flour, since Ive been eating a more low-grain diet for the past few months and I wanted the cake to reflect that. Before testing it out, I assumed that almond flour would make things really dense and heavy, but lo and behold it creates a crumb that is so fluffy, and really gives this feeling of deep satisfaction. Im obsessed. The only thing that I dont like about almond flour is the high price, and the fact that almonds are a very water-intensive crop to grow. But, this is a cake after all, therefore a special treat, therefore not something you have all the time. The initial carrot cake experiments with almond flour were good, but borderline too rich. Plus, since Id ditched the quinoa frosting idea and knew Id be taking the cashew road, I felt like a nut frosting on top of a nut cake was just, well, too nutty. To reconcile my relationship with coconut flour, I cut the dry ingredients with a tad to see what would happen. Not only was the cake just as good, but the texture was better and I liked the flavor the coconut flour provided. We are friends again. The Cashew Coconut frosting for this cake is what Canadians would affectionately call a twofer. Bahahaha! (I really do amuse myself). For everyone else out there, in long form, this refers to a two-for-one deal. You can make this recipe once, but have the frosting come out two ways depending on its temperature. Pretty groovy, eh? If you use the frosting right after making it, it will be loose and glossy, almost glaze-like. If you prefer a traditional-style frosting that is thicker and stiffer, all you need to do is put the mixture in the fridge overnight to achieve this consistency. I chose to go with the room temperature version since I hadnt really worked with it like that before. It provided a more even layer, but its also a little harder to control. Either way its delicious, so dont worry about making the wrong choice...there isnt one! The flavour is major: Im talking soooo cream cheese-like that even I was confused. If youre not feeling the chunky carrot cake vibes, please look away now, because the cake of my dreams is loaded with pineapple, walnuts, and bursting with warm spice and citrus zest. I went to town! Instead of using questionably-edible canned pineapple, I used the dried, unsweetened version from the health food store. This stuff ain’t cheap, but again, cake splurge. If you cant find pineapple like this, dates, raisins, dried figs or apricots would also be good, but Id skip the soaking step. Instead of walnuts you could use pecans, macadamias, or even pumpkin seeds. Altogether this carrot cake is moist, decadent, and satisfying with so many layers of flavour and texture that just wont quit. Ive learned a lot in the past decade, and this cake is an expression of that. Its something to be proud of, and something to share. Thanks for sticking by me while I worked out the kinks…now its time to celebrate all the things!     Print recipe     Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 60g dried, unsweetened pineapple, plus more for garnish if desired 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g lightly packed grated carrots (about 3 medium) 1 cup /­­ 100g walnuts, plus more for garnish if desired 3 cups /­­ 300g almond flour (not almond meal) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 100g coconut flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup /­­ 250ml eggs, at room temperature (about 4-5 large eggs) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml odourless coconut oil, melted 1 cup /­­ 250ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (try to find organic, if possible) Cashew Coconut Frosting: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g raw cashews, soaked for 4 hours 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml coconut cream from the top of a can of coconut milk 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Pour just-boiled water over the dried pineapple (do not soak the pineapple youre using for garnish). Preheat the oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Lightly grease two 7 /­­ 18cm spring form cake pans with coconut oil. 2. Wash carrots well and grate them on a box grater. Set aside. Roughly chop the walnuts. 3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, salt cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. 4. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. 5. Drain the soaked pineapple and squeeze with your hands to remove excess liquid. Roughly chop. 6. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to combine. Zest the orange and lemon into the bowl. Add the carrots, soaked pineapple, and chopped walnuts and fold to incorporate. 7. Spoon roughly half of the batter into one of the prepared cake pans, then add the remaining batter to the second one. Place in the oven in the middle rack and set the timer for 40 minutes. Cakes are ready when they are golden brown and pass the toothpick test (bake for longer if necessary, up to one hour - cover cake with aluminum foil if you need to bake for longer so that the top doesnt burn). Remove cakes from the oven and let cool completely. 8. While the cakes are baking, make the frosting. Drain and rinse the cashews. Add them to a high-speed blender along with the other ingredients (you can use a normal blender or food processor, but the frosting wont be as smooth). If the frosting is too thick, add more coconut cream or a teeny bit of water and blend again. Chill in the fridge (frosting can be made one day ahead if you want it to be thicker). 9. To frost and decorate, spread a generous amount of frosting over one half of the cake. Carefully lay the second half on top, and spread remaining frosting over the top and on the sides. Decorate with remaining dried pineapple and walnuts, if desired. Serve and enjoy! Cake will keep for 5 days, covered in the fridge. Who knows what the future holds - the world seems so crazy these days - but I do know that I still have steam in me to keep going with this heart project, if youre all still up for reading and cooking from it. Words cannot describe my gratitude for you, allowing me to pursue my biggest dreams and expose my shadowy bits as well. I hope you know how much I love you. I truly do. Here’s to another ten years… xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Okay friends, there are still a couple spaces left for the next Wild Heart High Spirit retreat in Portugal! Its this November 5-11, hosted at the ridiculously beautiful Sublime Comporta hotel (guys, Ive been there and this place is NEXT LEVEL). I will be teaching cooking classes outside in the organic garden (pictured above!) and giving nutrition seminars daily, with yoga and movement classes twice a day with my dear friend and deeply talented friend, Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates. The kitchen is exclusively making My New Roots recipes for the week, so we can all enjoy these meals without having to lift a finger. Enjoy your private pool, open spa, horseback riding on the beach, bonfire nights and dancing under the stars. Come and get inspired to live your best life! Well show you how. Click here for more info, and see you in magical Portugal! The post Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake appeared first on My New Roots.

Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017

August 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017Nashville, Tennessee recently hosted the annual conference of the National Association of College & University Foodservice. The three-day event convened over 1,000 college and university campus dining professionals and industry partners for inspirational learning, idea and product sharing, collaboration, and peer-to-peer networking. Many of the 334 exhibitors promoted their plant-forward services and products. Cherry Dumaual, PR & partnerships director for The Monday Campaigns, attended the conference and networked on behalf of Meatless Monday. She had the opportunity to visit booths, attend interest sessions and talk with foodservice dining directors, chefs, and product representatives about trends in meat reduction and plant-based menus. Food Management magazine held a roundtable session attended by foodservice dining directors including Bernie Chung-Templeton of Bryn Mawr College. A liberal arts college with about 1,300 undergraduate students, Bryn Mawr ranked number 10 on Princeton Review’s 2017 list of Best Colleges for Food. Chung-Templeton said that Bryn Mawr implemented Meatless Monday around seven years ago: There has always been a demand for meatless entrees that are delicious and nutritious. We created a Mostly Meatless station, which we modeled after looking at Meatless Monday materials. We don’t take meat away but introduce additional meatless options both at this station and on the standard menu to provide more meatless opportunities and to showcase how meatless can be tasty and good for you. Chung-Templeton said that this fall will see the launch of an evolution of Meatless Monday, a plant-based, totally meatless, local, organic, sustainable, ethical, health-forward concept. She shared examples of their vegan dishes. Meatless Monday dishes at Bryn Mawr Cherrys first stop in the exhibit hall was the Humane Society of the United States Meatless Monday booth. Ken Botts, food and nutrition director for HSUS, shared his insights and observations on the direction of campus dining: The conversation of how to create delicious plant-based menus is top of mind for the college and university foodservice operators. This demand is being driven by their students for a variety of reasons; health, spirituality, sustainability and animal welfare. The plant-based conversation was once a trend but in 2010 it started becoming the norm, and now it is here to stay. The folks who attended NACUFS were looking for resources to develop plant-based menus and NACUFS delivered! Cherry and Ken Botts at the HSUS Meatless Monday booth Other stops focused on tasting samples of new, delicious, nutritious plant-based food products. Erik Henry, foodservice director at Bushs Beans, drew in attendees samplings of their new hummus, which the brand will launch on campuses in August. Asked about Meatless Monday, Henry said, If people would take one day a week to simply eat plants, theyll realize it makes them feel good. Erik Henry promoting the new Bush’s Beans hummus Danny OMalley, sales manager for Beyond Meat, offered his take on Meatless Monday which he believes is a great transitional day to motivate omnivores and carnivores to try plant-based foods like Beyond Meats products. Danny O’Malley offers Beyond Meat samples Cherrys final stop was the Pinnacle Foodbooth where Suzanne Tenuto tempted attendees with flavorful Gardein meatless meatballs, describing them as meatless, well done. She added: Adding Gardein meatless meatballs to a Meatless Monday menu makes for a quick and easy spaghetti and meatball dish or sub sandwich. Meat lovers wont know the difference. Suzanne Tenuto with Gardein’s meatless meatballs Nashville was truly the perfect backdrop for NACUFS, where plant-based initiatives and campaigns were part of the biggest growing food trends on campus. The post Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017 appeared first on Meatless Monday.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat From left: Greg Lofts, Martha Stewart Living Magazine; Joan Zimmer, Premium Peanut; Xiaoran Liu, Harvard School of Public Health; Karl Zimmer, Premium Peanut;  Cherry Dumaul, Meatless Monday; Karen Weisberg, National Culinary Review & Culinology The 21st Peanut Institute Annual Media Retreat in Napa Valley brought together nutrition and food science experts from the Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham & Womens Hospital, and University of Georgia. They shared the latest research about peanuts with attending media from 17 print and online publications. In addition to the latest peanut research findings, the attendees learned about the global growth of Meatless Monday and examples of how some of the 40-plus countries in the movement are using peanuts in their cuisines. Attendees also tried out their culinary skills at the kitchens of the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone. Peanut Institute members joined the media representatives in teams to cook up various meatless recipes with a variety of peanut flavorings. In terms of the top three takeaways from the Peanut Institute Retreat, they are: 1. Peanuts have more protein than any other nut, which helps keep you satisfied between meals. They also have 19 vitamins and minerals, and an abundance of bioactive compounds. Research shows that the unique package of nutrients found in peanuts helps reduce the risk of heart disease, and even the risk of death. 2. There are 100,000 miles of blood vessels in the body and research shows that eating peanuts can help keep them healthy. A study performed by Penn State shows that the bioactives, protein and arginine in peanuts helps keep arteries flexible after a high fat meal. Peanuts are particularly high in arginine, an amino acid that helps keep blood vessels flexible and healthy. This is important for all age groups and especially athletes. 3. Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, an internationally recognized sports nutritionist and author discussed the benefits of peanuts and peanut butter for athletic performance. Peanut butter is one of the best sports foods around; it is a great pre- or post-workout snack, and is loved by the NBA and other athletes. The high protein content in peanuts helps repair muscles while the arginine helps keep blood vessels open. All participants of The Peanut Institute’s annual nutrition and culinary retreat  at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in Napa Valley, CA The post Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

VRIK Second Anniversary and Table of Contents

May 19 2017 Vegan Richa 

VRIK Second Anniversary and Table of Contents Has it been 2 Years since book release already. Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen is my first book. That and all the amazing Indian Vegan Recipes in it will always be dear to my heart. Many of you send me messages asking if Malai Kofta or gluten-free Naan etc are in the book. Yes they are! The TOC is visible on Look Inside in Amazon, but the search probably doesn’t work well. So on this second anniversary, here is the Table of Contents of all the Chapters of the Book! 150 Recipes and most are not on the blog. Use the Browser’s search function to find a recipe you are looking for or just browse through them. Interspersed in the list of recipes are a few of my favorite reviews. I am always amazed at how well it has been received (best seller since the launch) and so many people are cooking so much from it! If you like the book, please do leave a review on amazon with your favorite recipes and experiences so far! See other retailers US and International at the end of the post. And while you are here, also get the second one at preorder price   This website and the book would not be there without all the love and trust I get from you. I am so grateful. Thank You! I will be selecting 2 comments from the post to send signed copies to (US and Canada). Comment by May 26.  Continue reading: VRIK Second Anniversary and Table of ContentsThe post VRIK Second Anniversary and Table of Contents appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Crispy Tofu Sandwiches with Ginger Peanut Sauce

October 12 2018 Oh My Veggies 

I have a thing for magazines. People always say that print is dead and that the internet has replaced magazines and newspapers. Well, clearly these people do not know me. Because I will take a print magazine over the internet any day. There’s something about magazines that gives me a warm, fuzzy feeling inside. It’s probably because I grew up reading magazines. My grandma subscribed to just about every publication under the sun–Cosmopolitan, Allure, Good Housekeeping, Lucky. But my favorite were the tabloids. Once a week, my grandparents would drop off a big shopping bag full of old magazines for my mom to read and I’d immediately rifle through them, pull out The National Enquirer, and bring it up to my room. I was quite possibly the only third grader who knew all about Jessica Hahn or that Kitty Dukakis was drinking rubbing alcohol before her stint at Betty Ford. And when I grew up, it was kind of fitting that I was a periodicals librarian. For a while, at least. Although I still love tabloids, most of my magazine subscriptions are food-related now. If it’s a magazine and it involves food, you can bet I probably get it delivered […]

Friends of the Earth Report Highlights Meatless Monday in Climate-Friendly School Food Study

October 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Friends of the Earth Report Highlights Meatless Monday in Climate-Friendly School Food StudyMeatless Monday is thrilled to be part of the solution for a healthier school lunch and a healthier planet. Meatless Monday is thrilled to be part of the solution for a healthier school lunch and a healthier planet. Friends of the Earth (FOE), a U.S. based international network of environmental organizations, recently published an extensive food and agriculture report on refining Americas school lunch program, Scaling Up Healthy, Climate-Friendly School Food. The FOE report makes it clear, the foods we eat make a difference. The report cited adoption of Meatless Monday as a high-impact practice for K-12 schools to implement climate-friendly foodservice. FOE gives a snapshot of how one school district in California saved money and helped the environment by implementing a meat-reduction school lunch program. Over a two-year period, Oakland Unified School District*: o Saved $42,000 o Saved 42 million gallons of water or enough water to fill 63 Olympic-sized pools o Made a 14% reduction in the carbon footprint of its entire purchases, the equivalence of 15,000 trees or 1.5 million fewer miles driven Get Meatless Monday Going in Your Community If reading about the success of Meatless Monday has you wondering how to get involved, consider becoming a Meatless Monday Ambassador in your school, organization, or community. We have everything you need to get Meatless Monday started in your K-12 school . Join a worldwide movement committed to making a huge impact on school lunches for student health and the health of the planet. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! *Hamerschlag, K., Dalton, J., and Kraus-Polk, J. 2018. Scaling up Healthy, Climate-Friendly School Food. Page 9 and Page 8. Friends of the Earth. https:/­­/­­1bps6437gg8c169i0y1drtgz-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2018/­­09/­­Climate-Friendly-Food_­Full-Report.pdf The post Friends of the Earth Report Highlights Meatless Monday in Climate-Friendly School Food Study appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International EventOn Monday, September 24, Slow Food, the global grassroots organization, will highlight Meatless Monday with celebrated chefs at Terra Madre Salone de Gusto, one of the biggest international events devoted to food. Slow Food was founded in 1989 to inspire individuals and communities to change the world through food that is good, clean and fair for all. The global Slow Food movement is creating dramatic change in more than 160 countries. Now, Slow Food and Meatless Monday have partnered to provide a weekly platform to highlight the delicious taste, diversity and rich cultural heritage of plant-based cuisine around the world. At the Taste Workshop, Peggy Neu, president of Meatless Monday, will share the exciting story of the growth of the Meatless Monday Movement . Shell also introduce two celebrated chefs who will showcase imaginative plant-based recipes. Chef Drew Deckman, restaurateur and culinary consultant based in Baja, California, received a Michelin Star for his work and was acknowledged as a Rising-Star Chef when he was in Germany. Hell thrill taste buds with his Grilled Bread and Raw porcini salad with Parmesano Reggiano. Jennifer Jasinski, a James Beard Foundation award winner for Best Southwest Chef owns and runs several restaurants in Denver, Colorado. Shell refresh palates with her Chilled Beans Vinaigrette, Yellow Watermelon and Jimmy Nardello Jam. For more about Meatless Monday at Terra Madre, visit: https:/­­/­­www.slowfoodusa.org/­­meatless-monday-at-terra-madre The post Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black beans and sweet potatoes are a perfect pair and this taco recipe amps up their flavor with mushrooms, avocados and high-impact seasonings like chipotle powder and bitter orange marinade (often found in the international aisle). This recipe comes to us from Maribel of Food 4 Thought NYC. Serves 4, 2 tacos each - 1 can of black beans, rinsed - 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced - 1 cup of diced bella mushrooms - 1 cup shredded cabbage - 1 avocado, sliced - 1/­­2 red bell pepper, chopped - 1 bunch fresh cilantro, cleaned and trimmed - 8 white corn tortillas - 2 tbsp. of olive oil, separated - 2 large cloves of garlic, minced - 1 tbsp. of tomato paste - 1 tbsp. of naranja agria (bitter orange) marinade (substitute lime juice if unavailable) - 2 tsp. of salt, separated - 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne - 1 tsp ground chipotle powder - 1/­­2 tbsp. dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder - Freshly ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with foil, add sweet potatoes, 1 tbsp. of oil, 1 tsp of salt, cayenne, and freshly ground black pepper; mix well. Place sheet in oven and bake for approximately 20 minutes or until potatoes are golden and tender. While potatoes are baking, heat remaining oil in a skillet over medium flame. Cook the minced garlic for 1-2 minutes, but be careful not to burn them otherwise youll end up with a bitter flavor. Add mushrooms and red peppers, stirring occasionally for 3-5 minutes. Once the veggies have softened, throw in the rinsed beans along with the paste, salt, chipotle, oregano, garlic powder, and black pepper. Mix everything together and allow it to cook for 8-10 minutes. About halfway through, add the bitter orange marinade (or lime juice). Remove from heat. Make sure you have all of your taco toppings ready on the side for easy prep. Turn on a burner to low-medium flame. Working with one tortilla at a time, carefully place it over the flame using tongs. Once you see the edges darken and it puffs up in the center, then flip it over. Cook each side for about 1-2 minutes. Place on serving plate. Spoon about 1 tbsp. of black bean and mushrooms, along with 1 tbsp. of sweet potatoes on each tortilla. Top with sliced cabbage, avocado, and a small handful of cilantro. Squeeze a bit of lime juice on top if you have it, or just enjoy it as is. The post Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrating 100 Years Since the First National Campaign to Go Meatless

December 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

At Meatless Monday, there is a reason to celebrate every week by promoting plant-based food as a way to save the planet. But in 2017, Meatless Monday had even more reason to celebrate: this year marks 100 years since the first national campaign to encourage people to go meat-free. While the original mission has evolved into something addressing todays concerns, the message has stood the test of time! In the video below, the Meatless Monday team and founder discuss the history of Meatless Monday and how it still makes an impact after 100 years. The idea of giving up meat one day a week originated in the fall of 1917 when the United States was trying to feed its citizens in the homeland as well as troops fighting abroad in World War I. It was sold as a patriotic way to support soldiers by making a simple sacrifice one day a week. Cookbooks focused on meat-free meals became a staple for housewives cooking for their families. Communities banded together to grow fruits and vegetables in Victory Gardens and learned that produce could play a starring role on the dinner table. Now, with that one day a week officially designated to Mondays, the mission of Meatless Monday has turned to saving the entire planet. By reducing meat consumption by one day a week, greenhouse gas emissions will decrease, which will reduce our carbon footprint - that is, if everyone can pitch in and get on board the way they did during WWI! Now that Meatless Monday has campaigns around the world, the impact of eating a more plant-based diet can affect the health of the planet and the people living on it. Make a difference going Meatless Monday! The post Celebrating 100 Years Since the First National Campaign to Go Meatless appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday in New York City Schools News Roundup

October 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday in New York City Schools News Roundup Yesterday’s news that Meatless Monday was coming to 15 New York City schools had the media buzzing! New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio took the stage with a group of very excited NYC kids to make the announcement. We’re thrilled to see the good news shared by local and national outlets: Students dine on all-veggie menus as Meatless Mondays hit some city schools – CBS New York Meatless Mondays coming to 15 school cafeterias in Brooklyn – Spectrum News NY1 Brooklyn schools testing meatless Mondays – New York Post 15 Brooklyn public schools to offer all-veggie lunches on Meatless Mondays – New York Daily News Some NYC schools to only offer vegetarian meals on Mondays – Fox 5 Meatless Mondays coming to 15 New York City schools – Washington Post Major Win! 15 Brooklyn Schools Are Going Meatless on Mondays - and So Is Mayor de Blasio – One Green Planet NYC Announces Meatless Monday Pilot Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity – Mercy for Animals Fifteen New York City schools to adopt Meatless Monday – Fern’s AG Insider NYC Mayor Institutes Meatless Mondays at 15 Schools – VegNews 15 US schools take Meatless Monday pledge – LIVEKINDLY Want Meatless Monday to come to your school? Download our free K-12 Foodservice Guide to get more information. The post Meatless Monday in New York City Schools News Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice

September 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried ricecorn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice with step by step photo and video recipe. chineese cuisine recipes are one the popular cuisine internationally. most of the recipes are derived from rice and noodles which is served with stir fired vegetables and meat. one such popular rice recipe is fried rice recipe which can be developed with many variation. one such variation is sweet corn fried recipe which is not only easy to prepare, but tastes amazing. Continue reading corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Many Health Benefits of Sprouts

June 27 2017 VegKitchen 

The Many Health Benefits of Sprouts Have you heard? The National Cancer Institute, a member of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, recommends consuming 5 portions of fresh fruits and vegetables everyday. And they recommend sprouts as a good way to help you achieve that goal. We’ll explore the many healthy benefits of sprouts here; they’re also easy to grow at […] The post The Many Health Benefits of Sprouts appeared first on VegKitchen.

Reducetarian Summit Brings Together Advocates to Decrease Meat Consumption

May 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

Reducetarian Summit Brings Together Advocates to Decrease Meat Consumption From left to right: Stephanie Töwe, Greenpeace; Heather Coleman, Oxfam America; Tobias Leenaert, ProVeg International; Peggy Neu, Meatless Monday; Eillie Anzilotti, Fast Company The first ever Reducetarian Summit was held last weekend at New York University. The goal of the Reducetarian Summit, organized by Brian Kateman, founder of the Reducetarian Foundation, was to unite prominent environmental, health and animal protection nonprofits with leading foodservice and food technology companies to create a more equitable, sustainable and compassionate food system. Panels covered wide-ranging topics from the role of chefs and foodservice companies in offering delicious plant-based meals to policy and behavioral strategies to encourage the reduction of meat consumption. Meatless Monday, one of the earliest and most popular initiatives, was well represented. Peggy Neu, president of the Monday Campaigns, spoke on a panel that focused on the opportunities and challenges of reducing meat consumption globally. In addition, Becky Ramsing, senior program officer from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, shared the latest science on the health and environmental impact of reducing meat. David Yeung, founder of Green Monday, talked about social entrepreneurship and his efforts in Hong Kong and globally to promote a one-day-a-week vegetarian diet. Becky Ramsing (right) speaks on a panel with (from left) Sharon Nunez (Animal Equality), Maryn McKenna (Author of Superbug), and Dawn Moncrief (A Well-Fed World) Sid Lerner, founder of Meatless Monday, was in attendance along with Or Benjamin, campaign manager of Meatless Monday Israel. Interested in learning more about becoming a Reducetarian? Check out the book The Reducetarian Solution. It features 70 insightful essays from influential thought leaders on how reducing your meat consumption can transform your life and improve the life of the planet. The book also includes 40 delicious recipes from bestselling cookbook author Pat Crocker and has plenty of practical tips for reducing meat in your diet. The post Reducetarian Summit Brings Together Advocates to Decrease Meat Consumption appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday   The global travels of Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury inspired him to write the ultimate kitchen companion on vegan cooking, Vegan: The Cookbook. It features 450 delicious recipes from more than 150 countries. But before Jean-Christian delved into the world of vegan cuisine, he received a startling wakeup call - a heart failure, twice. Years of running several restaurants at the same time, 16-hour work days and a poor diet had finally caught up with the French-born chef. After a few months of recovery, he visited a detox center that specialized in healthy food, fresh smoothies and juices. This enlightening experience transformed his diet and lifestyle. Interestingly, this is the same idea behind Meatless Monday - eating plant-based foods to improve your health. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.   Vegan: The Cookbook - for vegans, non-vegans and omnivores Jean-Christian promotes vegan foods, cooked with fresh ingredients, as a way to keep healthy, age gracefully and prevent many common diseases. His new cookbook offers recipes to satisfy all tastes, representing the cuisines of France, Greece, Italy, Vietnam, China and India. In addition, he explores less familiar fare, such as flavorful dishes from Timor and Papua New Guinea. There is no reason why vegan food cant be as delicious as non-plant-based cuisine. International Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury In 2007, Jean-Christian Jury opened his first vegan restaurant, La Mano Verde, in Berlin, Germany. He received an award for Best Vegan Restaurant on the Planet and was listed as one of Germanys 500 Best Restaurants (Der Feinschmecker 2015-2016).   Expert Guidance, Step by Step For his new cookbook, Jean-Christian specifically crafted his recipes for accuracy and ease of use. He intentionally selected ingredients that are readily available and provides simple step-by-step instructions as well as prep time and cooking time. To help you plan your meal, his book is neatly organized into chapters that cover Starters, Salads, Soups, Main Courses, Grains and Beans, Pasta and Noodles, and Desserts.   Get a Taste of Jean-Christian Jurys New Recipes To whet your appetite, heres a delectable sampler of five recipes found in the Vegan: The Cookbook. Go on and pick your favorite. At Meatless Monday, heres the one we cant wait to try.   Five-Spice Stir-Fried Soba Noodles The post Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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