mustard seed - vegetarian recipes

mustard seed vegetarian recipes

Red Lentil Dal (Instant Pot Recipe)

October 2 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Red Lentil Dal (Instant Pot Recipe) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Red Lentil Dal - Instant Pot Red Lentil Dal is a washed and split Masoor Dal. It is a rich, healthy lentil packed with protein and serves as a great side dish for a meal. You can also serve this as a comforting lentil soup. This is an easy dish to make. I am in my seventies and surprisingly I had never cooked or tasted this lentil. About a month back we had dinner with our friend, where she served this red lentil for dinner. We loved it. I asked her how she cooked this dal. It tasted so good! After finding out which lentil she had used, I was genuinely surprised. I questioned myself: why havent I been cooking it? I see this red lentil in an Indian grocery store all the time but never thought I should try it. My friend, like me, was surprised when she found out that this was my first time trying this dal. She suggested this lentil for Alex (my husband) and explained that it will be good for him since it is easy to digest. After that dinner, I have made this dal many times. It is an easy, simple recipe and it tastes delicious. I serve this dal with roti, rice, and one dry vegetable (e.g. aloo methi). I thought I should share this recipe because now this dal has become a staple dish for us. Recently I have been using an instant pot instead of a pressure-cooker. It takes the same time as the pressure cooker, but the advantage is that you dont have to watch over it when it starts steaming or when it is time to turn off. You can take care of other things in the meantime. This recipe will serve 3. Course Soup Cuisine Indian Keyword Dal Fry, Diabetic, Gravy, Hare Krishna, Healthy, High Protein, Homemade, Jain Food, Low Cholesterol, Low Fat, No Garlic, No Onion, Roti, Sattvic Food, Split Lentil, Split Masoor, Swami Narayan Food, Temple Food, Vaishnava Food Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Ingredients 1/­­2 cup red lentils 1 Tbsp oil 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds 1/­­8 tsp asafetida 2 dry red chilies 1 Tbsp thinly sliced ginger 1/­­2 cup chopped tomato 1/­­4 tsp turmeric 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder 1 tsp salt 2 cup water InstructionsWash lentils changing water few times. I am using instant pot to make dal. Use the instant pot on sauté mode and add oil. After oil is moderately hot add cumin seeds, and mustard seeds, after the seeds crack, add asafetida, whole red chili and ginger stir for about a minute. Now take out the ginger and red chilies from oil and keep aside. We will use this later for garnishing. Next add tomatoes, turmeric, red chili powder and salt. Cook and stir until tomatoes are soft. Add dal and water, stir, and close the instant pot. Change the instant pot setting to pressure cooker mode. Cook for 14 minutes. Dal is done it should be soft. If needed add more water, dal should not be very thick. Dal will thicken as it sits. Make it more liquid than you want it to be. Take dal out in serving bowl and garnish with ginger and red chilies. Serve hot. The post Red Lentil Dal (Instant Pot Recipe) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce

May 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThis easy cauliflower chickpea and spinach sauté features a fragrant Mustard seed & Curry Leaf Sauce – an easy vegan meal that is ready in under 45 minutes. Packed with healthy cauliflower, creamy chickpeas, and superfood spinach in every bite.  Grain-free and gluten-free! Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a dish that is as simple as it is delicious! Could I possibly interest you in some cauliflower, chickpeas and spinach? And South Indian flavors! In my book, these ingredients are just about the greatest things ever. Toss them in a pan with a delicious mustard seed and curry leaf sauce and serve with quinoa, rice, or have it as-is and youve got yourself a simple dish that is sure to please. Toasted mustard seeds, Urad dal lentils, crisp curry leaves, and Sambhar masala add a fabulous complex flavor. An unexpected, sensational combination of simple ingredients that makes for a well-rounded recipe that is a must-try! You got your iron, you got your protein, you got your vitamins. Check, check, check.Continue reading: Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThe post Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam)

April 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) I have been wanting to do a video it should be easy and more versatile, ingredients maybe you have in your pantry. Utttapam a South Indian popular dish. Traditionally Uttapam is made with rice and lentil batter, which can be a long process, soaking, grinding then fermenting the batter. Rava Uttappam, on the other hand is instant and easy to make, with a variety of vegetables of your choice. It tastes delicious also can be served for breakfast, as a snack or for dinner. Rava Uttapam will be enjoyed by all ages. Uttapam is like a thick Dosa or Spicy pancake topped with vegetables. If you are serving this as a traditional Uttapam serve this with sambar and coconut chutney. But Rava Uttapam can be served with any chutney or condiment. Many times, I prefer this as a light dinner and enjoy with sprinkling samber powder, giving a traditional touch. The other reason I wanted to do this recipe as I said before I wanted to do the recipe more versatile you can use this batter for making Idli, because Rava Idli can be used for making so many recipes. I have many related recipes on my website like Masala Idli, Idli Manchurian. This recipe will serve 4. Course Breakfast, Snack Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Bhartia Khana, Bread Uttapam, Coconut Chutney, Halwa, Healthy, Homemade, Idli, Jain Food, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Quick And Easy, Rava Dosa, Samber, Savory Pancake, Sheera, Snack, South Indian Cuisine, Swami Narayan, Vegetarian, Video Recipe Prep Time 20 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients1 cup sooji coarse, semolina 1/­­2 cup yogurt curd, dahai 1/­­2 cup cabbage finely chopped 1 cup bell pepper finely chopped (capsicum, shimala mirch) 1 cup tomatoes finely chopped, remove the seeds 1 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped 2 tsp ginger shredded, adrak 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ENO fruit salt For Seasoning1 Tbsp oil 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds rai Also need2 Tbsp oil to cooking InstructionsIn a bowl mix sooji, salt, green chili, ginger, cilantro, cabbage, yogurt, and add water as needed batter should be little thicker than dosa batter. In a small bowl heat the oil over medium heat, oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds as seeds crack add to the batter, mix it well. Let the batter set aside for at least 15 minutes. Add Eno Fruit Salt to the batter just before you are ready to make Uttapam and mix well. The mixture will begin light and foaming. Heat the skillet over medium heat and lightly grease the skillet. Pour about 2 large spoons of batter and spread consistency should be of thick then dosa. Sprinkle about 2 tablespoons of bell pepper and tomatoes press it lightly into the batter. Pour about 1 teaspoon of oil around uttapam and cover it and let it cook for about 2 minutes and turn them over, uttapam should be golden brown from bottom making crisper, and top should be cooked well but not brown. Uttapam should be cooked over low medium heat. Uttapam is ready to serve. I like to sprinkle lightly samber powder to add extra flavor. NotesServing suggestions - You can serve the Rava Uttapam with sambar, coconut chutney or your choice of condiment. Additional Notes - Adding tomatoes and bell pepper gives a traditional look to Uttapam. - I add green chilies and cilantro in the batter to keep the colors better. - You can choose your choice of vegetables like shredded carrots, finely chopped green beans, corn, finely chopped spinach (these are the veggies I have tried). - Do not cook on high heat, uttapam will not cook through. - If I am making Uttapam to serve as a starter I make the uttapam in small sizes, otherwise make it in about 7-inch diameter. What size you want to make it is your choice. The post Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi)

August 20 2019 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi)Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas! Patta Gobi subzi. This Cabbage Curry is made in a pressure cooker. Quick Cabbage stir fry side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Braised Cabbage Recipe.  Jump to Recipe This Easy Indian Cabbage stir fry is the perfect way to use up that head of cabbage sitting right there waiting to be used. Finely chopped or shredded cabbage, braised with a tempering of whole spices such as mustard seeds and flavored with garlic and turmeric. Just a few flavors meld into a delicious cabbage side that you can serve with flatbreads or rice and a side of curry or dal. Change up the whole spices to cumin seeds, add some garam masala or add some coconut and ground coriander for variation. This Indian Cabbage and peas is made in an instant pot, so you don’t need to stand around and stir the cabbage every once in a while. Stove top option is in notes. Lets make this!Continue reading: Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi)The post Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Aam Ki Dal (Toor dal With Raw Mango)

May 12 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Aam Ki Dal (Toor dal With Raw Mango) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aam Ki Dal - Toor Dal with Raw Mango - Instant Pot Kacche Aam Ki Dal is a very simple dal recipe but delicious. This is Toor dal with raw mango. The tanginess of raw mangoes gives a delicious flavor to dal. Today I am using Instant Pot, thats what I have been using instead pressure cooker.  - 1 cup toor dal (arhar dal) - 1/­­2 cup raw mango (peeled and cut into small pieces) - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 3 cups water Seasoning - 2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 8 curry leaves - 1 tbsp green chili (cut into small pieces) - 2 dry red chilies - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder -  Wash dal changing water few times.  - Put dal with 2 cups water into instant pot and add salt, turmeric, and mango. Close the cover and cook on high heat for 8 minutes. Recently I have been using instant pot instead pressure-cooker. It takes the same time as pressure cooker advantage is you dont have to watch over when it starts steaming and when it is time to turn off. You can take care other things. - After dal is done it should be soft. If needed add more water, dal should not be very thick. Dal will thicken as it sits. Make it more liquid than you want it to be. seasoning -  Heat ghee in a small saucepan. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the ghee; if it cracks immediately, the oil is ready. Turn off the heat, add the cumin seeds, and mustard seeds. When they begin to crack, add the asafetida, curry leaves, and green chilies. Stir for a few seconds. Add red chili powder and 1 tablespoon of water to prevent the spices from burning. Pour spice mix chaunk over hot dal, before serving. Notes, I have been using instant pot instead of pressure-cooker. Many people think it is a time saver, no it takes the same time as pressure cooker,  but it is hassle free you start and do other things you need to do, no watching over. it is also easy to clean. The post Aam Ki Dal (Toor dal With Raw Mango) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri)

April 21 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) Achari Mathries, is a traditional staple snack in North India. They are usually served with spicy pickles, but in this recipe I have added mango pickle spices in the dough instead to add a tangy flavor to the mathri itself. With my family, mathries are a must have while travelling, and now with Achari Mathri, we no longer need the pickle, so it becomes one less thing to carry.  - 2 cup all purpose flour (planin flour, maida) - 1/­­2 cup fine sooji (samolina) - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp dry ginger powder (saunth) - 1/­­4 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds crushed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 2 tsp red chili flake (adjust to taste) - 4 Tbsp oil - 3/­­4 cup lukewarm water (use as needed) -  Mix all the ingredients except the water. Add the water little at a time, kneading into a firm dough.  Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. Prick them with a fork all over the rolled dough, so the Mathries do not puff when frying, and Mathries stay crisp. -  Divide the dough into 3 equal parts. Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into about 12-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. -  Take a cookie cutter and cut them in rounds. I am using 2-1/­­2 inch cookie cutter. Use the size and shape to your choice. -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Make sure to place just enough mathris in the oil it should be easy to turn them. Fry the mathris until both sides are light golden-brown. This should take about 7-8 minutes. Tip - Achari Mathries can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers.  - If the mathries are cooked on high heat, they will be soft. - You will also enjoy Gulab Jamuns, Besan Ki Burfi, Plain Mathri The post Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Plant-based meat replaces lamb in this flavorful meatless take on traditional Moroccan Kefta. This recipe comes to us from Chef Patricia Washuta, Director of Culinary Services, Executive Chef, and Certified Dietary Manager, at Gentry Park Orlando . Chef Washuta cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Chef’s note: This is a vegan and gluten free dish. I use a little Quinoa flour to help keep the Kefta to bind when making a large batch.   Serves 4 - Ingredients - 16 oz. Impossible Burger(R) (or Beyond Burger(R)) - 1 tablespoon coriander mint chutney (recipe below) -  1/­­4 cup tamarind date chutney (recipe below)   - Coriander Mint Chutney - 1/­­8 cup fresh mint* - 2 cups cilantro -  1/­­4 cup onion -  1/­­2 teaspoon toasted coriander seeds - 1 tablespoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger - 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 2-3 tablespoon water or as needed to make the chutney of a pesto consistency - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds toasted - 1 Tablespoons diced jalape?o - Salt and pepper to taste - *Use up to 1/­­2 cup, depending on your preference for mint in savory dishes.   - Tamarind Date Chutney - 1/­­2 cup tamarind paste - 1 cup dates pitted - 1 cup apple juice - 2 c water or vegetable stock -  1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1 Tablespoon Garam Masala -  1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon fresh ground ginger - 1 teaspoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 cup coconut milk solids - 1 teaspoon Coconut oil   - Carrot Achar - 1 pound carrots - 1 Tablespoon whole cardamom pods - 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorn - 1 each cinnamon stick - 3 each bay leaves -  1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds -  1/­­2 cup Late Harvest Riesling Vinegar (or sweet vinegar) - 1 cup water -  1/­­4 cup honey -  1/­­4 cup white vinegar - 1 whole cucumber   Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 375° F. 2. Mix defrosted Impossible Burger(R) or Beyond Burger(R) with one tablespoon of the mint chutney (see below). Roll the mixture into round keftas (oblong meatballs). 3. Place keftas on greased on a baking sheet, and bake at 375° F for 8-10 minutes. 4. Serve with tamarind chutney (see below. 5. Plate with carrot achar (see below).   Coriander Mint Chutney 1. Toast coriander seeds. 2. Cut the stems away from the cilantro and discard stems. 3. Pull the mint from the stems. 4. Place all ingredients in food processor and blend until consistency of pesto. 5. Add a small amount of water to gain the consistency desired.   Tamarind Date Chutney 1. In a saucepan, heat the coconut oil and add spices, garlic, ginger, apple juice, water/­­vegetable stock, dates, and tamarind paste. 2. Cook on a low heat, stirring constantly. 3. Remove from heat and strain the paste through a fine screen to remove any unwanted tamarind seed debris. 4. Add the coconut solids or a small amount of coconut milk. 5. Season with salt to taste.   Carrot Achar 1. Peel carrots and use a mandolin to cut into long thin strips. 2. Lightly toast the spices in a dry pan over medium heat. 3. Wrap the spices in a cheese cloth to create a spice sachet. 4. Mix water, sugar, salt, and vinegar. 5. Add the spice sachet and bring the mixture up to a simmer. 6. Before the mixture starts to boil, remove from heat and add the fresh carrots. 7. Let stand for 1 hour. 8. Place in a container and chill. 9. Leave the spice sachet in the liquid for best flavor. The post Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hyderabadi Bagara Baingan

January 29 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Hyderabadi Bagara Baingan (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Hyderabadi Bagara Baingan Bagara Baingan is a popular Hyderabadi dish. It is made with small eggplants that are cooked in a rich masala curry. Hyderabadi baingan is the perfect dish to serve to guests with a sophisticated palette because of the mixture of nutty spices. - 12 small Indian Eggplant (if they are not available, use Japanese eggplant and slice them in long 8 long pieces) - 2 Tbsp oil (to stir fry the eggplants) For Spice Mix - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds (mathi) - 1 Tbsp coriander seeds (sabut dhania) - 10 cashews crushed (kaju) - 1 Tbsp sesame seeds (til) - 2 Tbsp coconut powder (gola) For Gravy - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­2 tsp black mustard seeds (rai) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp sugar - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp tamarind paste - 2 tomatoes (cut them in small pieces will make 1-1/­­2 cup puree) - 1 tsp chopped ginger - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro for garnish -  Make a slit into eggplants, but not cutting them into half. If you are using Japanese eggplant slice them in 8 long pieces. - Heat the oil in flat frying pan over low medium heat and stir-fry eggplant rotating occasionally till they are tender not mushy. Set them aside. - For the spice mix take all the ingredients, cumin seeds, fenugreek seeds, coriander seeds, cashews, sesame seeds, coconut powder and grind them in fine powder. Set aside. - Blend tomatoes and ginger together to make into fine puree. Set aside. - Heat the flat frying pan over low medium heat, I am using the same pan I stir fry the eggplants. When oil is moderately hot add the mustard seeds as they crack turn off the heat. Add all the spices asafetida, turmeric, red chili powder and dry spice mix stir for about 2 minutes, all the spices should be roasted. - Add tomato puree, sugar, salt and about 1 tablespoon of tamarind paste. Stir fry the gravy until mix become little thick and start leaving the oil from sides. Add 1/­­2 cup of water and bring it boil. - Add the eggplant spreading in the frying pan, stir gently cover the pan lower the heat to low and let it simmer for about 7-8 minutes stirring occasionally. -  Eggplant should be soft and tender not mushy and coated well with the spices. Adjust the gravy thickness to your choice. Add the cilantro stir gently. The post Hyderabadi Bagara Baingan appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

Pulses are eaten for breakfast in many cultures around the world, but its rare to see peas on a breakfast menu in the U.S. This recipe will change that! Savory split yellow peas are paired with rich coconut milk for a satisfying porridge that makes for a great way to start your day. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 5 - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds (optional) - 1 white or yellow onion, diced - 2 large or 4 small carrots, peeled and diced - 2 teaspoons grated or minced ginger (or 1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger) - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups yellow split peas - 4 cups water - 1/­­2 cup coconut milk (canned, not boxed) - 1 tablespoon lime juice   Heat the coconut oil in a Dutch oven or a medium sized pot over medium high heat. Add the mustard seeds, if using, and allow them to cook until they start to pop. Stir in the onion and carrots. Saute the vegetables for 8-10 minutes, or until they’re very soft and the onions are clear, adding a tablespoon or two of water if the vegetables start to stick. Stir in the ginger, turmeric, cumin, coriander, salt, and pepper. Add the split peas and water and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for 35-40 minutes, or until the split peas are tender. Check the split peas a few times to stir them and make sure they’re not sticking to the bottom of the pot; if they’re very thick, stir in a half cup of water. Once the split peas are very tender, stir in the coconut milk and lime juice. Check seasoning and adjust salt, pepper, lime juice, and turmeric to taste. Serve with rice and toppings of choice. Leftover porridge will keep for up to 6 days in an airtight container in the fridge. The post Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle)

September 2 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Lal Mirch Ka Achar, Red Chili Pickle Red Chili Pickle is a delightful way to spice up any meal. Indian meals are generally served with a variety of condiments, of which pickles are the most common. This one is a rather hot and spicy pickle, not for the timid palette by any means. - 10 whole red chili (jalapeno or cayenne) - 3 Tbsp coriander (dhania) - 1-1/­­2 Tbsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 1 tsp fenugreek seed (dana methi) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds (peele sarso) - 1 tsp nigella seeds (kalongi) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 Tbsp salt - 3 Tbsp oil, I prefer mustard oil (can use olive oil) -  Wash and dry the chilies and cut the chilies in 1/­­8-inch pieces. - Combine coriander, fennel, fenugreek seeds, mustard seeds, and nigella seeds roast them over low heat for 1-2 minutes till spices becomes aromatic. Grind coarsely. - Heat the oil on medium heat, after oil is very turn off the heat and let it come to the room temperature. Set aside. - Mix the roasted spices, salt, mango powder, and turmeric to the red chilies, and mix it well. Pour oil over the mixture and mix well. - Keep the pickle in a glass jar. Let the jar sit two days at room temperature or few hours in direct sunlight. Pickle is ready to serve.  Chili Pickle will be good for a week at room temperature or keep in the refrigerator up to one month. Suggestion For a milder pickle, remove the pepper seeds, or sometimes chilies are not hot then add some red chili powder. The post Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap

August 22 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Vegetable Cheela Rolls Vegetable Cheela Rolls is a healthy and delicious any-time meal. Cheela Rolls is a treat for people who are vegan and gluten free. Cheela is like a besan dosa, and can be used as a wrap and this cheela wrap with vegetables makes a wholesome meal. Cheela Rolls can be used as a snack and also for good a lunch box meal. For Cheela - 1 cup besan (Gram flour) - 2 Tbsp rice flour - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3/­­4 cup water (to make batter) - 4 tsp oil For Filling - 3 cup cabbage (thinly sliced) - 1/­­2 cup carrots (shredded) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (thinly sliced) - 2 tsp oil (Canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp sugar - 1 tsp lemon juice - Mix all the dry ingredients together, besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, and salt. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter, consistency of Dosa batter. Set aside. - To make the filling: Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds, as the seeds crack. Add cabbage, carrots, and bell pepper. Stir-fry for about one minutes add all the other ingredients, coriander powder, chili powder, salt, sugar and lemon juice. Stir- fry for about three to four minutes, vegetables should be still crisp. Turn off the heat. - To make the Cheele: Use a heavy skillet and place on medium-high heat. Test by sprinkling a few drops of water on it. Water should sizzle right away. - Pour about 1/­­4 cup of the batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a back of spoon. Starting from the center, spiral the batter outward evenly to form a circle. - When batter starts to dry, gently spread one teaspoon of oil over it. Wait about 30 seconds; flip the cheela using a flat spatula. - Press the cheela lightly all around with the spatula to make cheela cook evenly. Turn the cheela and in the center of the cheele put about 1/­­2 cup of stir-fry diagonally and roll it. - Vegetable Cheela Roll is ready to serve. I like to serve this with Mango Pickle or Cilantro Chutney. - Enjoy! In the ingredients, we need about 4 cups total of sliced vegetable (this includes the cabbage, bell pepper, and carrots) Suggestions Use or preferred vegetables and also works good with any leftover vegetables. The post Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe

May 17 2017 Vegan Richa 

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeIndian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Chaas Recipe. Masala chaas. Savory Non Dairy Yogurt Drink with Mint, cumin and ice cubes. Indian Summer Beverage. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe We’ve all had some or the other type of lassi which is a sweet yogurt drink, where yogurt is blended with flavors (mango, rose, plain) and sugar/­­sweetener and some chilled water or ice. Lassis are a perfect summer drink. Chaas/­­ chaach /­­Mattha is an equally loved Indian Beverage for summer. Chaas is a savory spiced drink which is made with thin buttermilk. Chaas is great for the summer to hydrate as well as helps digestion.  Traditionally chaas is either made with the leftover water after making butter from cream, or from sour yogurt. This version uses almond milk yogurt to make a savory summer drink. A bit of lemon and kala namak adds some sourness. Refreshing and Summery. You can make your own non dairy yogurt at home. See Recipe notes.  South Indian version of Chaas called Neer Mor and it has cilantro, curry leaves, green chile that gets blended into the yogurt mixture. The serving is then garnished with a tempering of mustard seeds.  Try this Chaach with your favorite plain non dairy yogurt and let me know how it turned out!Continue reading: Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeThe post Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pithla (Besan Curry)

February 9 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Pithla (Besan Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Pithla (Besan Curry) Pithla is a variation of Kadhi. Kadhi is made in many ways. In North India, Kadhi is made like a thick soup with pakoras dumplings. Another popular variation is Gujarati Kadhi, which is sweet and sour and made watery with a soup-like consistency. When first time I had gujrati Kadhi, I thought it was yogurt hot and spicy drink, and enjoyed very much, still my perception has not changed. Pithla, however, is thick in consistency. Sometimes I call this is Besan Ki Sabji. This is a quick and easy recipe to make. Pithla is made with few ingredients. It's also gluten-free and vegan. Traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). Pithla is a complete and satisfying meal. I always thought that Pithla was a dish from the state of Bihar. Whenever we visited our grandparents in Bihar, we would make sure to enjoy this dish. However, I've heard from friends that Pithla is also a popular dish from the state of Maharashtra. Regardless of where this dish originates from, it is one of my favorites! My mom was from Bihar and my dad was from North India. We always lived in North India. My mom's cooking was a mix of traditional Bihari and North Indian food. For me, North Indian cooking tends to be more spicy while Bihari dishes are more simple. My mom tried to adopt elements from both Bihar and North India in her dishes. Her unique blending of the foods from these very different parts of India kept her and my dad both happy. I have fond memories of enjoying Pithla. Even today, when I visit my sisters in India, they will make sure they make the dishes we used to enjoy with our mom. Of course, Pithla was one of many dishes we enjoyed! We would gather around for lunch and reminisce about our old memories while enjoying delicious Pithla served with rice. It truly is comfort food at its best! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Besan Kadhi, Bihari Kadhi, Cooking Video, Curry Recipe, Gatte Ke Kadhi, Gluten Free, Gujrati Kadhi, Homemade, Jain Food, Maharashtrian Dish, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Panjabi Kadhi, Quick And Easy, Satvik Food, Swaminarayan, vegan, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients1 cup besan Bengal gram flour 2 Tbsp oil 1 tsp cumin jeera 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­2 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1 tsp salt 1 1/­­2 tsp mango powder aam choor 2 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped, hara dhania 4 cup water For Garnishing2 Tbsp ghee clarified butter, this is optional 1/­­4 tap red chili powder InstructionsIn a bowl add the 1-1/­­2 cups of water slowly to besan to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). Open the heat on medium high, oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds to oil seeds should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, turmeric, and chili powder to oil, stir and turn off the heat. Add the besan batter and open the heat to medium heat. Keep whipping the batter and batter will start thickening. Add salt and keep adding the water slowly and keep mixing about 2-1/­­2 cups of water. After Pithla comes to boil besan will start splattering. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and let it simmer for about 5 to 8 minutes. Pithla will become thick, add chopped cilantro and mango powder mix and let it cook for 2 more minutes. Pithla should be quite thick in consistency thats why sometimes I will call Pithla Besa ki Sabji. Pithla is served hot before serving, traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). And sprinkle of red chili powder. If you are vegan skip ghee, clarified butter. NotesServing suggestions: Serve Pithla with Rice, Roti, Kurkuri Bhindi. The post Pithla (Besan Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Chana Masala

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

The chana bean, or chickpea, is a staple of the Maharashtrian diet, used in a variety of forms and variations. This Chana Masala is considered by many to be the most popular curry in India. In fact, this is one of the dishes that the women in the Masala Mamas collective make for the children in the Love2Learn school in Kalwa every week. The recipe is fairly straightforward to make, though you have to remember to soak the beans overnight. This recipe is full of aromatic Maharashtrian flavors and has a nice spicy kick. Serve with chapattis or over rice, the way the children love to eat it. This recipe is by Ranjana Ramchandra Gaiakwad and is from the cookbook Masala Mamas. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 Ingredients: - 1 1/­­4 cup/­­ 250 gr dry chickpeas, soaked overnight in a generous amount of water -  1/­­2 tsp/­­ 2.5 ml baking soda -  1/­­2 tsp/­­ 2.5 ml turmeric - 2 Tbsp. /­­ 30 ml neutral oil - 2 tsp/­­ 10 ml whole cumin seeds - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml mustard seeds - 4 fresh green chili peppers, chopped - 2 tsp/­­ 10 ml fresh curry leaves - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml asafoetida (hing) - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml finely chopped ginger - 2 tsp/­­ 10 ml garam masala - 2 tsp/­­ 10 ml ground coriander - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml turmeric - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml cumin - 1 tsp/­­ 5 ml red chili powder - Salt to taste   Drain the soaked chickpeas and rinse well in a colander. Fill  a  medium  or  large  saucepan  with  6  cups  of  water,  along  with  baking  soda  and  and  turmeric.  Bring to a boil, and add the soaked chickpeas.  Cook  for  1  1/­­2   hours,  or  until  chickpeas  are  thoroughly  cooked. When the  chickpeas  are  done,  heat  oil  in  a  frying  pan  over  medium    Add cumin,  mustard,  chili  peppers,  curry  leaves,  hing,  and  ginger,  and  cook  until  fragrant,  around  3-4  minutes. Add the cooked chickpeas. Stir until the chickpeas are coated with spices.  Add  garam  masala,  coriander,  turmeric,  cumin  and  red  chili  powder  and  mix    Sauté  over  medium  heat  for  a  minute  and  add  salt  to  taste. Serve over rice or with chapattis. The post Chana Masala appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Aam Ki Dal - Toor dal With Raw Mango - Instant pot

May 12 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Aam Ki Dal - Toor dal With Raw Mango - Instant pot (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aam Ki Dal - Toor Dal with Raw Mango - Instant Pot Kacche Aam Ki Dal is a very simple dal recipe but delicious. This is Toor dal with raw mango. The tanginess of raw mangoes gives a delicious flavor to dal. Today I am using Instant Pot, thats what I have been using instead pressure cooker.  - 1 cup toor dal (arhar dal) - 1/­­2 cup raw mango (peeled and cut into small pieces) - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 3 cups water Seasoning - 2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 8 curry leaves - 1 tbsp green chili (cut into small pieces) - 2 dry red chilies - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder -  Wash dal changing water few times.  - Put dal with 2 cups water into instant pot and add salt, turmeric, and mango. Close the cover and cook on high heat for 8 minutes. Recently I have been using instant pot instead pressure-cooker. It takes the same time as pressure cooker advantage is you dont have to watch over when it starts steaming and when it is time to turn off. You can take care other things. - After dal is done it should be soft. If needed add more water, dal should not be very thick. Dal will thicken as it sits. Make it more liquid than you want it to be. seasoning -  Heat ghee in a small saucepan. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the ghee; if it cracks immediately, the oil is ready. Turn off the heat, add the cumin seeds, and mustard seeds. When they begin to crack, add the asafetida, curry leaves, and green chilies. Stir for a few seconds. Add red chili powder and 1 tablespoon of water to prevent the spices from burning. Pour spice mix chaunk over hot dal, before serving. Notes, I have been using instant pot instead of pressure-cooker. Many people think it is a time saver, no it takes the same time as pressure cooker,  but it is hassle free you start and do other things you need to do, no watching over. it is also easy to clean. The post Aam Ki Dal – Toor dal With Raw Mango – Instant pot appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Sabudana (Tapicoa) Bhel, Chaat

April 8 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Sabudana (Tapicoa) Bhel, Chaat (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Sabudana (Tapicoa) Bhel, Chaat Sabudana Bhel this is a delicious appetizer or also can be served with afternoon tea. Sabudana Bhel or I like to call this chaat is an elegant looking dish, that will sure to impress all your family and friends. For Sabudana – Tapioca - 1/­­2 cup sabudana (tapioca, use the larger pearls) - 2 tsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - pinch turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - few drops lemon juice For Serving - 1 cup potato (boiled peeled and cut into small cubes) - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup peanuts (roasted and crushed) - 2 tsp chaat masala - 1/­­2 cup aloo lacha (check existing recipe) - 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney (check existing recipe) -  Wash sabudana (tapioca) changing the water 2-3 time and soak with one cup of water, soak 8 hours or more. Sabudana will become all most four time in volume and will be soft. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if seed cracks right away oil is ready. Add cumin seeds and mustard seeds after seeds crack add turmeric, lower the heat to low. Add sabudana, and salt. Keep stir frying until sabudana becomes translucence, looks like pearls. This should take about another 4-5 minutes. Stir gently and making sure tapioca doesnt get sticky and stuck to each other. Turn off the heat, and drizzle 3-4 drops of lemon juice and stir. - Transfer sabudana to a wide bowl stir for few minutes with fork making sure sabudana pearls are separated and not sticky. Serve the sabudana at room temperature. - Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt and green chilies to cubed potatoes, mix it well and set aside. - Assembling the Sabudana Bhel, in a serving platter spread the cooked sabudana, sprinkle the roasted peanuts, over peanuts sprinkle the potatoes, then aloo lacha, some more peanuts and drizzle the chutney. Suggestion, this is a easy recipe, you can prepare every thing in advance, cooked sabudana can be refrigerator for up to a week. Aloo Lacha and tamarind chutney can be stored for months.   The post Sabudana (Tapicoa) Bhel, Chaat appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Turmeric Cauliflower Rice Recipe

February 21 2019 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Cauliflower Rice RecipeLemony Turmeric Cauliflower Rice. Easy Side with any meal. 1 Pot 15 Min Lemon Cauliflower Rice with mustard seeds and garlic. Vegan Glutenfree Grainfree Nutfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe  You all love this Turmeric Lemon rice as a side not just with Indian Meals, but with other meals as well. I decided to lighten it up with cauliflower rice and the result is this light, fluffy, golden, gorgeous, vibrant, lemony Turmeric Cauliflower Rice! Grate the cauliflower using the many methods listed below, Lightly cook with turmeric, lemon and spices. Fluff and done! You might have a hard time keeping some for the actual meal. You have to try this Fluffy Vibrant Golden Cauliflower Rice! Continue reading: Turmeric Cauliflower Rice RecipeThe post Turmeric Cauliflower Rice Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Weekday Cauliflower Dal

November 15 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Weekday Cauliflower DalWe had a little vote on instagram the other day, asking which recipe we should post on here next. I was absolutely convinced that these Peanut Butter & Jam Chocolate Cups would be the winner. But there was instead a surprisingly large majority asking for a cauliflower dal. I suppose most of you just want to cozy up with warm food that hugs the belly right now. And that is exactly what this is. A belly hugger and a particularly simple recipe that doesn’t require any fresh herbs or unusual ingredients. Just a handful of pantry staples and a little trick for a flavor packed topping. We’ll teach you more about the recipe and the topping in a bit. But before we do that, we wanted to show you this video that we made. It is part of a new mini series that we are doing on on youtube where we travel around Sweden to source local ingredients and cook with friends. In this episode we took the train to the west coast to pick apples with Linda Lomelino and then she bakes a classic Swedish Apple Cake. Fun times! Luise was quite nervous about releasing this because she speaks in front of the camera more than she has done before, so please give her a little extra love. We have two more episodes coming before this year ends. Back to the dal. If you are not familiar with the name, it is essentially an Indian Lentil Soup. We have been sharing a few different dal recipes on here and in our books and this is a mix of them all. It is not our fanciest version but instead something that you can make on any given weekday. A dal is one of those recipes that you learn once and then know and cook for the rest of your life. I promise. I have been making varieties of this soup since I moved to my first apartment and learned how to cook. All ingredients are easy to find and can basically go into the sauce pan at the same time. If there is one thing that you should give a little extra attention, it is to use a good curry spice blend. The use of spices can vary in curries, we particularly love a version that includes ground fenugreek. But you can use any curry mix that you like. If you have some mustard seeds, coriander seeds and/­­or cardamom seeds in your spice cabinet, you can grind them into your curry blend to boost it with extra flavor. Because freshly grounds seeds/­­spices always taste more. The trick When we were on Sri Lanka a couple of years ago, we learned a dal trick from a local woman. After having cooked lentils and spices into a pretty good dal, she put another pan on high heat, added ghee and more spices to it and, when super fragrant, she stirred them into the soup. Adding those warm spices and butter last minute just boosted the soup and made it insanely flavorful. For this recipe we use a similar method for garlic and mustard seeds that we then wilt down spinach into. You can stir down the spinach into the dal, but we instead serve it as a topping (because our kids prefer it without the spinach). We normally add toasted pumpkin seeds on top as well but didn’t have any at home this time. Weekday Cauliflower Dal  Serves 4 Notes: You can either serve the soup chunky or mix it smooth with a hand blender. Our favorite way is to just give it a super quick whizz with the blender to make it a little creamier and yet keeping texture from the cauliflower and potatoes. If you want it a little sweeter and creamier, you can replace 400 ml /­­ 14 oz of the water/­­stock with a tin of coconut milk. We don’t add chili to it because of our kids but that can obviously also go in along with the curry. 3 tbsp coconut oil or butter/­­ghee 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp ground curry spice blend 1/­­2 tbsp mixed mustard seeds, coriander seeds and cardamom seeds (or just add 1/­­2 tbsp extra ground curry) 1 large chunk (5 cm /­­ 2 inches) fresh ginger 1 cauliflower (approx 500 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb) 3 potatoes, coarsely diced 200 g /­­ 1 cup red lentils 2 soft dates, pitted and mashed 1 litre /­­ 4 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tsp apple cider vinegar   Garlicky spinach 2 tbsp coconut oil 2 tsp mustard seeds 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2-3 handfuls spinach   Tomato salad 10 cherry tomatoes 2 tsp olive oil 1 tsp apple cider vinegar salt & pepper Make the Cauliflower Dal: Heat coconut oil, onion and garlic in a large saucepan on low/­­medium heat. Add the curry, grind the extra spices in a mortar and add those as well (or just add more curry). Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it smells fragrant, but be careful so the spices do not burn. If it feels too dry add a spoonful, or more, of water. Break the cauliflower into florets and chop the stem finely. Peel the potatoes and dice them into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch bits. Add both to the sauce pan along with the lentils and dates. Stir and sauté for about a minute before adding water or stock. Let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are starting to dissolve and the cauliflower florets are tender. Stir carefully (if you want the cauliflower florets to stay intact) a few times. Add apple cider vinegar and salt to taste. Give the soup 2-3 pulses with a hand blender (if you like, see note above). Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt (coconut yogurt or regular yogurt) and top with garlicky spinach and tomato salad. Make the Garlicky Spinach: Heat coconut oil in a skillet. Sauté mustard seeds and garlic on low/­­medium heat until golden and fragrant. Add spinach and turn off the heat. Stir until wilted. Ready for serving. Make the Tomato Salad: Cut the tomatoes in halves and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, vinegar salt and pepper and toss to combine. Serve on top of the dal for a fresh zing of flavor.

Baked Vegetable Idli

October 21 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Baked Vegetable Idli (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Baked Vegetable Idli Baked vegetable Idli makes for a healthy and delicious appetizer or side dish. They are very eye-catching and great to present at a gathering for guests to pop into their mouth. They are the perfect addition to any menu because they are so easy to make. Idlies have a unique texture because they are soft but also slightly crisp on the bottom. Baked vegetable idli are best served with coconut chutney if served as an appetizer or with sambar if served with the main meal. - 1 cup coarse sooji (semolina) - 1/­­2 cup yogurt (dahi, curd) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (finely chopped, capsicum, I am using green and yellow for color) - 1 green chili (finely chopped) - 1 piece ginger (finely grated) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (chopped, hara dhania) - 1 cup water (as needed) - 1 tsp ENO (fruit salt) - 1 tsp salt For Seasoning - 1 Tbsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds (rai) -  Preheat the oven at 350 degrees (F). - Seasoning: heat the oil moderately in a saucepan. Add mustard and cumin seeds, as the seeds crack turn off the heat and set aside. - I am using mini cupcake tray, will make 24 idli, oil it and set aside. - Mix sooji, salt, yogurt, and water (as needed) to make a pancake-like batter. Set aside for at least 30 minutes. - Add the vegetables bell pepper, carrots, ginger, green chili, and cilantro. Add the seasoning and mix. The batter thickens as the semolina absorbs the water. At this point, add a little more water if it is too thick. - Add Eno Fruit Salt to the batter and mix well. The mixture will begin foaming. Immediately begin pouring into the cupcake tray. Place the tray in oven. - Bake the idlies for five minutes, then lay over the aluminum foil. Bake it again for 15 minutes. Idlies should be lightly brown from the sides. - Cool for few minutes before removing each individual idli. They should come out easily and not stick to the tray. The idlis should be spongy, and light golden color from the sides and bottom. Notes:  First, I baked the idlies without covering, then after 5 minutes I covered the Idlies, if you dont cover Idlies, they will be dry and will lose the softness and texture. you can prepare Idlies 2-3 days in advance, after they cool of refrigerate them in air tight container. Before serving heat the Idlies in microwave for about two minutes. Idlies will be soft. Baked vegetable idli are best served with coconut chutney if served as an appetizer or with sambar if served with the main meal. The post Baked Vegetable Idli appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo Lobia

June 23 2017 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo LobiaThis Coconutty Black Eyed Pea stew with Cauliflower and Potatoes is hearty and delicious. Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with vegetables. Saucepan Option. Gobi Aloo Lobia Vegetarian Black Eyed Peas Recipe. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free This simple Black eyed pea curry is perfect for a weekday dinner. Black Eyed Peas often get overlooked with the popularity of chickpeas. But these humble beans are smooth, delicious and cook much faster (and also cause less gaseous issues). This curry has simple spices and some coconut. Add vegetables of choice and put it in an Instant Pot, pressure cooker or saucepan and enjoy a hot flavorful curry over Naan, flatbread, or rice/­­grains. If you have sambhar masala blend, that goes really well in this stew. The dish is finished with a tempering of toasted cumin and curry leaves. You can leave the curry leaves out if you cannot find them and use cilantro instead. This Gobi Aloo Lobhia ( Chawli/­­Raungi) curry is easy, has a different flavor profile from the North Indian Black eyed Pea curry and is versatile. The toasty cumin and curry leaf tempering adds a fabulous finishing flavor to the dish. You can make the tempering in the IP itself and reserve some to use as garnish later. For variation use mustard seeds, Make it with other beans or chickpeas and play with the spices. Continue reading: Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo LobiaThe post Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo Lobia appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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