mustard seed - vegetarian recipes

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mustard seed vegetarian recipes

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap

August 22 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Vegetable Cheela Rolls Vegetable Cheela Rolls is a healthy and delicious any-time meal. Cheela Rolls is a treat for people who are vegan and gluten free. Cheela is like a besan dosa, and can be used as a wrap and this cheela wrap with vegetables makes a wholesome meal. Cheela Rolls can be used as a snack and also for good a lunch box meal. For Cheela - 1 cup besan (Gram flour) - 2 Tbsp rice flour - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3/­­4 cup water (to make batter) - 4 tsp oil For Filling - 3 cup cabbage (thinly sliced) - 1/­­2 cup carrots (shredded) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (thinly sliced) - 2 tsp oil (Canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp sugar - 1 tsp lemon juice - Mix all the dry ingredients together, besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, and salt. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter, consistency of Dosa batter. Set aside. - To make the filling: Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds, as the seeds crack. Add cabbage, carrots, and bell pepper. Stir-fry for about one minutes add all the other ingredients, coriander powder, chili powder, salt, sugar and lemon juice. Stir- fry for about three to four minutes, vegetables should be still crisp. Turn off the heat. - To make the Cheele: Use a heavy skillet and place on medium-high heat. Test by sprinkling a few drops of water on it. Water should sizzle right away. - Pour about 1/­­4 cup of the batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a back of spoon. Starting from the center, spiral the batter outward evenly to form a circle. - When batter starts to dry, gently spread one teaspoon of oil over it. Wait about 30 seconds; flip the cheela using a flat spatula. - Press the cheela lightly all around with the spatula to make cheela cook evenly. Turn the cheela and in the center of the cheele put about 1/­­2 cup of stir-fry diagonally and roll it. - Vegetable Cheela Roll is ready to serve. I like to serve this with Mango Pickle or Cilantro Chutney. - Enjoy! In the ingredients, we need about 4 cups total of sliced vegetable (this includes the cabbage, bell pepper, and carrots) Suggestions Use or preferred vegetables and also works good with any leftover vegetables. The post Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo Lobia

June 23 2017 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo LobiaThis Coconutty Black Eyed Pea stew with Cauliflower and Potatoes is hearty and delicious. Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with vegetables. Saucepan Option. Gobi Aloo Lobia Vegetarian Black Eyed Peas Recipe. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free This simple Black eyed pea curry is perfect for a weekday dinner. Black Eyed Peas often get overlooked with the popularity of chickpeas. But these humble beans are smooth, delicious and cook much faster (and also cause less gaseous issues). This curry has simple spices and some coconut. Add vegetables of choice and put it in an Instant Pot, pressure cooker or saucepan and enjoy a hot flavorful curry over Naan, flatbread, or rice/­­grains. If you have sambhar masala blend, that goes really well in this stew. The dish is finished with a tempering of toasted cumin and curry leaves. You can leave the curry leaves out if you cannot find them and use cilantro instead. This Gobi Aloo Lobhia ( Chawli/­­Raungi) curry is easy, has a different flavor profile from the North Indian Black eyed Pea curry and is versatile. The toasty cumin and curry leaf tempering adds a fabulous finishing flavor to the dish. You can make the tempering in the IP itself and reserve some to use as garnish later. For variation use mustard seeds, Make it with other beans or chickpeas and play with the spices. Continue reading: Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo LobiaThe post Instant Pot Black Eyed Pea Curry with Cauliflower, Potato – Gobi Aloo Lobia appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Dahi Bhindi (Okra with Yogurt Gravy)

April 27 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Dahi Bhindi Dahi Bhindi is a great way to enjoy okra in tangy creamy sauce. Dahi Bhindi is simply delicious, and easy to make. This goes well with Jeera (Cumin) Rice, or roti-paratha. - 40 medium size okra (bhindi) (after cutting them in half it should be about 2 cups.) - 3 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 Tbsp besan (gram flour) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp Red Chili Powder - 1/­­4 tsp Turmeric Powder - 1 cup yogurt (dahi, curd) - 1 cup water (approximately) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - Wash and pat dry the okra and cut both ends, and cut them in about 1 inch pieces. I have used about 35 medium size okra after cutting, they are about 2 cups. - Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a frying pan over medium heat and stir fry the okra till they are tender. This should take about 7-8 minutes. - Take them out in a bowl and use the same pan for making gravy. - Heat 1 tablespoon oil, over medium heat. After oil is moderately hot add the cumin seeds, mustard seeds and asafetida as the seeds crack, turn down the heat to low. - Add the besan and stir fry for about 1 minute until it has light aroma, and is golden brown in color. Besan gives the thickness to gravy. - Add yogurt, turmeric, chili powder and coriander powder. Mix it well. And cook until the spice mix come together, and you should be able to see the oil leaving the sides of spice mix. This should take about 2-3 minutes. - Spice mix is ready add about 1/­­2 cup of water and salt, bring it to boil. Add okra and let it cook for 3-4 minutes, on low heat. Enjoy with plain white rice or any Indian flat bread, like Roti, Paratha, Puri     The post Dahi Bhindi (Okra with Yogurt Gravy) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion Raita

April 8 2017 Vegan Richa 

Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion RaitaIndian Spiced Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion Raita. Use up the leftover rice or grains to make this quick spiced fried rice and serve with a simple warm Golden yogurt raita that is spiced with turmeric and mustard seeds. Ready in 30 Minutes! Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Indian Recipe This simple spiced rice works well for weekends or for quick weeknight meals. Use up the leftover rice or grains and the assorted vegetables in the fridge. I serve these with spiced turmeric raita. Raita is a kind of a dip made with yogurt which is salted and spiced with cumin or cayenne. Cucumber, onion, tomato or zucchini can be mixed into the yogurt for a fresh cool dip. For this raita, I added a tempering of mustard seeds and turmeric and thinly sliced onion. It tastes a bit like kadhi and is a warm version that works well in the still chilly weather.  For the Masala rice, chop up the veggies, toss in with spices like garam masala, and smoked paprika, ginger, garlic, and cook until just about done, fold in the rice or other grains, salt, lemon. Serve as a side with dals or curries or with this Golden yogurt dressing. Add some chickpeas with the veggies for heavier meal or serve with lentil or chickpea patties.  Make this with your favorite spices and let me know in the comments how it worked out!Continue reading: Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion RaitaThe post Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion Raita appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Broccoli Stir fry with Indian Spices – Broccoli Sabji

January 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Broccoli Stir fry with Indian Spices – Broccoli SabjiBroccoli Stir fry with Indian Spices – Broccoli Sabji /­­ Subzi with mustard seeds, coriander, fenugreek, turmeric and cinnamon. 1 pot, 20 mins.Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free South Indian Fusion Broccoli Recipe. Serve as a side, or with dal, or fill up a taco or wrap.  Its always fun to find more ways to incorporate veggies into everyday meals. Certain veggies are easy to fit into stir fries, roasted, sauces, curries or other preparations, while others not so much.  I keep trying to find ways to like Broccoli and I like it when it is not raw or blanched or in a big tree form Whether you have preferences like me or not, you will love this South Indian Style Shredded Broccoli Stir fry with mustard seeds, coconut and a great blend of spices. Broccoli is processed in a food processor to a coarse shred. Whole spices are tempered in hot oil, then onions caramelized with some ground spices, then broccoli and coconut mixed in and steamed. Serve as a side with Dals or Indian curries or an Indian spread, or make wraps or burrito with this broccoli with some spiced chickpeas or other beans. The shredded broccoli is somewhat like broccoli rice, but spiced to get an amazing flavor profile.  Continue reading: Broccoli Stir fry with Indian Spices – Broccoli SabjiThe post Broccoli Stir fry with Indian Spices – Broccoli Sabji appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Brown Chickpea Coconut Curry – Kadala Curry

December 27 2016 Vegan Richa 

Brown Chickpea Coconut Curry – Kadala CurryKadala Curry – Bengal Gram or Kala Chana Curry with Coconut and Spices. Brown Chickpea Coconut Curry from South India (Kerala). Serve with rice, appams, dosas or make a bowl with roasted veggies and grains. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Indian Recipe Brown Chickpeas – Kala Chana or Bengal Gram are the earthier nuttier cousin of white chickpeas. White Chickpeas or Garbanzo beans are generally more easily available. Brown Chickpeas have slowly started getting the shelf spots they deserve in many stores now. These beans are hardy and have high fibre, protein and iron content. These beans cook quickly when pressure cooked. If the beans are old, they will take a long time if cooking in a saucepan.  This Kadala Curry has brown chickpeas that have been cooked to tender in a Pressure Cooker or Instant Pot or Saucepan. The sauce uses onion, ginger, garlic, tomatoes, coconut and spices that would make a kerala garam masala(spice blend from the state of Kerala). The curry is finished with a mustard seed tempering and served with rice or flatbreads from the southern Indian region. I serve the curry as a soup by itself, or over rice or as a part of a bowl with veggie sides and sliced radishes or cucumbers. It has an amazing flavor profile. Do try it and let me know how you like it in the comments. Kala chana is also the bean which makes up Besan while the Garbanzo beans make chickpea flour. They are slightly different and behave differently depending on the use.  Continue reading: Brown Chickpea Coconut Curry – Kadala CurryThe post Brown Chickpea Coconut Curry – Kadala Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Quinoa Upma Recipe – Quinoa with Spices, Carrots and Peas

July 5 2016 Vegan Richa 

Quinoa Upma Recipe – Quinoa with Spices, Carrots and PeasQuinoa Upma Recipe. Indian Savory Breakfast or Side with Quinoa with mustard seeds, toasted cashews, carrots and peas. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this post. Upma is a savory breakfast with veggies, spices and quick cooking forms of grains such as coarse semolina (hot wheat cereal), rice cereal, or rice flakes. Upma is usually served as breakfast or snack. With whole grains, it also can be served as a side like a pilaf.  Today’s Upma recipe uses Quinoa.  Temper the spices in hot oil, cook the onions and toast the cashews, add other veggies, add washed quinoa, water and salt and cook until done. You can also use cooked quinoa or millet and mix in the cooked and spiced veggies. Upma is can be made dryer if served as a side or wetter to serve on its own. Add a dash of lemon or dress it with a chutney or ketchup if it feels too dry. To make it with semolina or rava, roast the rava with the veggies for 7 to 8 minutes and add 2 cups hot water instead of room temperature water. Continue reading: Quinoa Upma Recipe – Quinoa with Spices, Carrots and PeasThe post Quinoa Upma Recipe – Quinoa with Spices, Carrots and Peas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegetable Roti

May 12 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Vegetable Roti If you ever talk to anyone who’s been to Sri Lanka… and especially if you talk to someone from Sri Lanka, just mention Vegetable Roti and you’ll see their face light up. It’s practically impossible not to have tried them, and it’s even less likely to not love them! They are made and enjoyed pretty much everywhere in Sri Lanka, from North to South and East to West, coast to countryside to hill country. It’s also one of those classics, that despite their popularity, you just almost never find outside of the homeland. Unless you make them yourself… or have someone make them! Most of the few, good Sri Lankan and South Indian restaurants that I’ve found in Europe and North America don’t have stuffed roti quite like the original. One exception is in the delicious and awesome Tamil and Sri Lankan neighborhood in Paris, near the La Chapelle metro stop. That’s actually probably where I first had them, and got to try Sri Lankan food for the first time, many years ago. Since it’s so hard to find Vegetable Roti outside of Sri Lanka, and I (unfortunately) can’t just teleport myself to the island paradise whenever I want to, I was determined to make a convincing, authentic recipe. And when making my Sri Lanka vegan cookbook (with recipes inspired by the 10 weeks I spent exploring the island) there was no question about it. I knew I had to include a Veg Roti recipe! After watching roti being made at least 50 different times by street vendors and in restaurant kitchens, taking lots of notes, studying the technique, making my own recipe wasn’t that difficult. To be honest, making roti dough takes some practice and experimentation. It’s important to let it sit for at least an hour in a moderately warm place. And I always start with less water and very gradually add more. Learning how to get just the right texture and springiness for the dough is like with any bread-making. I refined this recipe over several weeks, had it tested by a dozen friends before publishing it in the cookbook, and continue to use it whenever I want to make vegetable roti: at home, for dinner parties, cooking classes, as a picnic snack, etc. Vegetable Roti are Sri Lankan “Short Eats” What’s a Short Eat? Simply put, snacks and appetizers and street food. There is a rich culture in the Sri Lankan tradition of grabbing a few snacks from the street vendors, hole-in-the-wall snack shops, neighborhood take-out bakery, and mobile bakery tuk-tuks. In addition to the classic roti, Short Eats also include all the many fried rolls, vada, baked snacks, bread and much more. Short Eats are typically enjoyed between meals or as a small meal - on the way to work, on the bus, on the train, at the office, wherever and kind of whenever. They’re everywhere and make a quick breakfast. Or small lunch. Or a mini-dinner, before - or even in place of - a big dinner. The bakery tuk-tuks drive around in the morning and evening - often with their trademark ice cream truck melodies playing funny variations of Für Elise. Yes, really. It’s awesome, and for the rest of your life you’ll start drooling when you hear Beethoven. Vegetable Roti stuffed with potatoes, carrots & leeks recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA makes 4 to 6 /­­ time 45 min + roti dough: - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) flour (all-purpose /­­ type 550) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) water - 2 Tbs vegetable oil - Combine flour and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add water and 1 Tbs oil. Mix with fork and knead with hands until smooth and elastic, 3-5 min. If batter sticks to hands, knead in more flour. If too dry, add slightly more water. - Add another 1 Tbs oil and knead another 5 min. - Separate into 4 to 6 pieces. Knead and form into balls. Lightly coat balls with oil and place on plate, cover with plastic wrap. Allow to sit in a warm (not hot) place for 1 hour. vegetable filling: - 2/­­3 cup (80 g) leeks or spring onions or 1 medium onion finely chopped - 1 medium (80 g) carrot peeled, grated or finely chopped - 1 large (140 g) potato peeled, grated or finely chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil - 1/­­2 tsp black mustard seeds - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 5-6 curry leaves and/­­or 1/­­2 tsp curry powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 3-4 Tbs water (more as needed) - Heat oil in a large pot or pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. When they start to pop (20-30 sec), add ground coriander, black pepper, chili powder (or paprika), and curry leaves and/­­or curry powder. - Add leeks (or onions), grated carrot and potato, turmeric, salt. Cook partially covered, gradually adding water, stirring and mashing regularly, until vegetables are soft, 7-10 min. Remove from heat. - Uncover dough. Briefly knead a ball. On a greased surface, press flat and roll out or continually flip and stretch to form a long, wide strip. Wrapper should be almost 3 times as long as it is wide and about 1/­­8 in (3 mm) thick. Knead some oil into each dough ball if too firm and not stretching easily. - Spoon about 3 Tbs filling onto one end. Fold over repeatedly in triangles until sealed. Transfer to lightly greased plate and continue for others. - Heat a large, heavy frying pan on medium high heat. Place filled triangles on pan and press down lightly. Fry on both sides, until brown spots appear, 3-5 min each side. Arrange standing up on edges, pressing down lightly and leaning together to brown edges, 2-3 min each end. - Continue for all rotis. Serve with chili sauce, chutney, or eat plain. Making Sri Lanka Streetfood superstars: Vegetable Roti! homemade dough, spicy potato filling. I ate these almost every day during my 10 weeks in Sri Lanka. Recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke -- SRI LANKA #vegancookbook #srilanka #vegetableroti #streetfood #whatveganseat #lotusartichoke A video posted by Justin P. Moore (@lotusartichoke) on Sep 7, 2015 at 7:35am PDT The post Vegetable Roti appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Subzi with Turmeric, Cumin and Mustard Seeds

April 12 2016 Vegan Richa 

Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Subzi with Turmeric, Cumin and Mustard SeedsPan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Subzi with Turmeric, Cumin and Mustard Seeds. Easy Spiced Brussels Sprouts. Serve in a bowl with Dal and Rice or as a side. Vegan gluten-free Soy-free Indian Recipe.  Here is another quick side to add to your bowl. Brussels Sprouts pan roasted with whole cumin and mustard seeds, turmeric and garam masala, then finished with sesame seeds, lemon and cilantro. The tempered spices add an amazing flavor profile to the sprouts. If you don’t have whole seeds, use ground spices. Add more os less sesame seeds. Add some fresh or dried coconut.  Brussels Sprouts is another one of those veggies where I want to do more with it other than roasting it in the oven. I’ve added it to curries and Dal, caramelized it with maple + spices and more. This version is a simple Brussels Sprouts Subzi (Indian dry veggie side), which is simply spiced but packs a ton of flavor. Serve as a part of your favorite buddha bowl, or Indian meal bowl with Dals or curries and Rice/­­ flatbread.  Whats your favorite way to serve up Brussels Sprouts?  Continue reading: Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Subzi with Turmeric, Cumin and Mustard SeedsThe post Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Subzi with Turmeric, Cumin and Mustard Seeds appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Feel-Good Chili with Everything (cooking to help heal--isn't that what all cooking is anyway?)

March 6 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Feel-Good Chili with Everything (cooking to help heal--isn't that what all cooking is anyway?) I needed to spend the entire afternoon in the kitchen. It began like all chili making endeavors: a glug of oil, spoonfuls of cumin, coriander, some mustard seeds, cumin seeds, turmeric, salt and the pile of veggies I had carefully spent the last half hour chopping and mincing. I literally just kept pulling out veggies from the crisper and methodically went through them with the knife: zucchini, onion, carrot, garlic, green pepper, celery. Then poured in a can of black beans and a can of kidney beans, then two cans of tomatoes--one sauce, one diced. And finally, added a bag of my favorite vegan crumbles (Beyond Beef). With the aroma of cumin and my heavy-handed scoops of some favorite chili blends (okay, it's Penzey's), my kitchen began to heal my soul.  Low and slow--the way all chili should be cooked, the way all souls should heal.  Quickly, while one eye was on the pot of chili, I whipped up a batch of brownies, too.  It seems lately with the job and all, my time in my most favorite place has been shrunken to minutes of chopping or re-heating here and there rather than immersing myself in a beloved recipe and lingering over my cookbooks. Pulling a homemade meal from scratch is relegated to weekends only. Today, I wanted a lingering, good-smelling pot of chili to make the house feel like a home. Like it felt before I jumped head first into this full-time work stuff.  I will be honest and say I have doubted my ability to handle such an enormous change in my life from the minute I walked into this. Last week made me question this journey even more.  I made an urgent trip to Chicago to be with my sister.  On the phone was someone saying through tears, "It's me." Over and over again. I had no idea who the "me" was. It was my sister. I was completely taken aback and stunned and all the other words you can find to describe shock. I had to calm down and listen to what she was trying to tell me, because for a minute, I thought she was hurt.  Turns out, someone was hurt, in fact, someone hurt so much, they were no longer here.  The pain in my sister's voice, the tears in my own eyes--burning, we both wept uncontrollably. Neither one of us understanding much of what the other said for the first few minutes. Then clarity. Then composure. Then I said I'd be there in the coming days. (For timing, it could not have been worse as DH had to catch a plane for NYC and this trip could not be negotiated. Don't ask.) The story as it relates to "the call" is too difficult to re-count. The sad truth, however, is that no matter what you think or see someone presenting to "the world", i.e., FB or blogs or what-have-you, you are NOT getting the full picture. Never. Ever. I have gone through the postings, my sister and I seeing the smile, the family, the friends. We both offering guesses as to when the moment of serious doubt may have crept in? Wondering whether anyone else could have seen, sensed or guessed.   How could this have happened? The sad truth is no one could have, and we'll never know. It struck so close to home--our father's grief so deep we can barely reach him.  And my sister and I realizing that this moment is one with which she and I could have easily lived through ourselves had she not changed (six years ago last Thursday). Not that any one's personal struggles and overcoming them is any greater or less than someone else's, it's just that in this particular instance no one was able to help. Though it was not for lack of trying.   Someone helped my sister, someone saved her. She saved herself. She was saved.  Saved. Saved. Still here. Still my sister.  I have had six more years with my sister. Six years longer. Six years happier. Six years strong.  This separation from my family, this five hour drive/­­forty-five minute plane trip is too long, too far away.  I am very homesick. Now more than ever. I think how lucky I am to have the small family left that I do have. It is a gossamer thread in that it consists of only three--my husband, my sister and our dad--the dad who adopted me, who is now almost seventy-five, and having to manage through a grief so strong, we don't know how he'll survive.  Back to reality tomorrow. But meantime, DH and I went for a long walk yesterday as I shared all the stories of the trip home I could, trying to scrape together in my recounting of how such a thing could have possibly occurred.  I find solace in re-telling. I don't know, maybe it's a woman thing. But the telling of this has helped me in some way put this piece of grief somewhere else for the time being. As anyone who has experience with death will tell you, time heals. It surely does. But it is a healing that is unique to each individual it touches.  Finding comfort and taking care of each other. And coming home. . . Finally a reminder of what I miss when I'm gone. 

Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free

February 16 2016 Vegan Richa 

Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free Stuffed Parathas used to be a favorite breakfast, lunch or evening snack when growing up. There was always some dough in the fridge, so it was matter of grating or mashing some veggies or other fillings, cooking them slightly if needed, and using as stuffing. Parathas are generally served with Indian pickles which commonly use raw mango, lime, chilies or vegetables preserved in an oil base with spices such as mustard seeds, fennel, fenugreek seeds,salt etc. These pickles are available in Indian stores or online. The stuffed flatbreads can also be used anywhere where you use flatbreads, as a side with curries or soups, or with a dip.  These Broccoli parathas have shredded broccoli and chickpeas with spices stuffed into a wheat dough. Use other cooked beans or lentils of choice and other spices of choice for many variations. The process of making the dough and rolling it out seems tedious, but it gets easy with practice. For a gluten-free paratha, see my book for the chia flatbread dough that works well for making stuffed flatbread or use this Sweet Potato gluten-free flatbread dough or use any chapati/­­roti dough of choice.  These flatbreads have the veggie stuffing inside them. You can also add the veggies directly in the dough while kneading like this Squash flatbread- Lauki Paratha. Do you like stuffed flatbreads? What is favorite stuffing?  Continue reading: Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-freeThe post Broccoli Chickpea Stuffed Flatbread – Broccoli Paratha Yeast-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe

May 17 2017 Vegan Richa 

Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeIndian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Chaas Recipe. Masala chaas. Savory Non Dairy Yogurt Drink with Mint, cumin and ice cubes. Indian Summer Beverage. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe We’ve all had some or the other type of lassi which is a sweet yogurt drink, where yogurt is blended with flavors (mango, rose, plain) and sugar/­­sweetener and some chilled water or ice. Lassis are a perfect summer drink. Chaas/­­ chaach /­­Mattha is an equally loved Indian Beverage for summer. Chaas is a savory spiced drink which is made with thin buttermilk. Chaas is great for the summer to hydrate as well as helps digestion.  Traditionally chaas is either made with the leftover water after making butter from cream, or from sour yogurt. This version uses almond milk yogurt to make a savory summer drink. A bit of lemon and kala namak adds some sourness. Refreshing and Summery. You can make your own non dairy yogurt at home. See Recipe notes.  South Indian version of Chaas called Neer Mor and it has cilantro, curry leaves, green chile that gets blended into the yogurt mixture. The serving is then garnished with a tempering of mustard seeds.  Try this Chaach with your favorite plain non dairy yogurt and let me know how it turned out!Continue reading: Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas RecipeThe post Indian Spiced Buttermilk Drink Vegan Chaas Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant

May 4 2017 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant I steered toward cozy, comfort food last night. My kitchen provides a respite for the chaotic world outside the door, and in our own personal lives. With my Spice Tiffin and my mother's vintage copper bottom pot at hand, I was able to whip up a wonderful, aromatic, flavorful, smooth not too-spicy-but-just-right curry. I added a touch of coconut milk to the dish just before serving. There's something magical about the addition of coconut milk to curries. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's a fine balance of how the flavors meld together before and after--the after being much, much better. This dish took me about 30 minutes give or take. I used my new favorite cookbook for inspiration: America's Test Kitchen Vegan for Everybody.  The first step in any cooking direction I take when it comes to making curry is to add spices to warm oil. I always include brown mustard seeds. They impart a tart component that, once cooked down, evolve into a creaminess. Well, to my mind they do. Then you add a bit of this and that from the spices you see here. My general ratio is more of the Sweet Curry spice to the rest (I get mine at Penzey's)--and I add based upon my preferred tastes for the evening. I wanted a garam masala boost to this dish: warm cinnamon and cloves permeate this on the front end, but once I added in my second favorite curry seasoning: The Now Curry (again, from Penzeys), it came together very nicely. My motto in curry is: More is Better. I keep tasting until I find the right heat, flavor combo. Taste. Taste. Taste. I only needed half an eggplant for this. I find I dislike the taste of eggplant heavy flavor. I bet that's why I love the addition of coconut milk to this curry. The flavor boosters go in next: minced fresh ginger, garlic and onion (diced, not minced). Then the other veggies I have on hand: eggplant, sweet potato, some green pepper, a handful of green beans. It then is up to you as to whether or not you want to add a can of diced tomatoes. I usually do. I had a splash of veggie broth left over from the other night, and about a half cup of it was added, plus a little water. Then I added about a third of a cup of coconut milk and that's when the flavors really did their thing.  We are experiencing our second flood in our community in fifteen months. I look at the map of the rest of the country and it's as if there is the vortex here in the middle that keeps circling around our state just daring us to keep dry. The photos above were taken on our single sunny day we had on Tuesday as the waters on the Meramec River began rising.  She hates this weather.  Meantime, I baked more vegan chocolate chip cookies. My End of World plan for survival.  Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant 3 T. olive oil 1 T. vegan butter 1" minced fresh ginger 3 garlic cloves minced 1 onion diced 1 t. brown mustard seeds 2-3 t. curry powder 1/­­2 t. tumuric powder 2 t. garam masala salt and pepper to taste 1 medium sweet potato cut into half moons 1 green pepper chopped 1/­­2 medium eggplant chopped into 1/­­2" pieces 1 can chickpeas 1/­­2 cup green beans 1/­­2 cup or more veggie broth 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup lite coconut milk Over medium heat, add oil and spices. When mustard seeds begin to pop, add the rest of the veggies. Simmer for about five minutes. Add remaining ingredients and allow to simmer together about 20 minutes. Taste as you develop the flavor. If mixture becomes too thick, add more broth or coconut milk. Serve over rice.  

Spiced Smashed Potatoes with Mustard Ginger Tempering

April 26 2017 Vegan Richa 

Spiced Smashed Potatoes with Mustard Ginger TemperingIndian Spiced Smashed Potatoes with Mustard Ginger Tempering. Bonda like Samosa is a spiced potato snack. These smashed potatoes are topped with Bonda style tempering of ginger, chile, turmeric and mustard seeds. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe.  There are many many ways potatoes are used in Indian cuisine especially for snack options. Samosa is one of the popular snack. Bondas, Vada pav, Cutlets, patties, stuffed potato balls, mashed potato and chutney sandwiches, dabeli, masala pav, many chaat options and on and on. Most use long processes and often are deep fried. These Baked Smashed potatoes need just about 20 minutes active time and no frying! All the flavors, less work and a great looking dish! Bonda (mashed potato fritters) are somewhat like samosas. They are bites of mashed potatoes that have been spiced with a tempering /­­tadka of mustard, ginger, turmeric & chile. The potatoes are rolled into bite size balls which are dipped in chickpea flour batter and fried (generally gluten-free if the restaurants use only chickpea flour). You can find a recipe for Baked Aloo bonda in my Indian Kitchen book.  I use the Bonda tempering as a dressing on these smashed potatoes. Depending on the spices used, these would be Bonda Smashed potatoes or Samosa smashed potatoes or just Indian Smashed potatoes. Love potatoes? Love Samosas or other Indian spiced snacks? Then make these addictive Crispy Spiced Smashed Potatoes! Serve these with a dash of lemon juice or with Mint Chutney or Tamarind Chutney.  Continue reading: Spiced Smashed Potatoes with Mustard Ginger TemperingThe post Spiced Smashed Potatoes with Mustard Ginger Tempering appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup

February 27 2017 Veganpassion 

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup Millet is one of my favorite cereal species. All-round talent, delicious and clean I could eat it all the time. From my morning muesli until my evening patty. I really love millet. And that's why millet is my favorite veggie of the month. Enjoy! Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup millet 1 3/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1 black Spanish radish or 1 kohlrabi 2 carrots 1 onion 1/­­4 cup + 1 tsp. chickpea flour 2 tbsp. dairy-free milk salt, pepper nutmeg, cumin mustard seed olive oil Cook millet in vegetable broth for about 15 minutes. Shred carrots and radish and cut onions into cubes. In a mixing bowl, mix together millet, veggies, chickpea flour and dairy-free milk and spice everything. Form 12 pattys and roast them in olive oil on each side. Additionally: 2 romaine lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber Pumpkin Ketchup 4 tbsp. vegan parmesan 1 garlic clove salt, pepper 1 tsp. agave syrup 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. water 1 tbsp. olive oil Was lettuce and cucumber and cut into pieces. Blend parmesan, garlic, spices, agave syrup, vinegar, water and oil in a mixer. Best dressing ever! Serve some lettuce and dressing on four plates and serve everything with 3 millet pattys. Serve with pumpkin ketchup.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Who says Halloween has to be all about candy? These savory stuffed pumpkins are the perfect autumn treat. Filled with millet, jalapeno, nuts, coconut and curry, they’re perfect for guests or a quiet evening in. This recipe comes to us from Robin Asbell. Serves 6 - 3 small sweet dumpling squash or mini pumpkins (about 13 oz/­­370 g each) - 1 tsp canola oil - 1/­­2 cup/­­60 g chopped onion - 1 tbsp minced peeled fresh ginger - 1 tsp black mustard seeds - 1 medium jalape?o, chopped - 1 tsp whole cumin seeds - 1 tsp ground coriander - 1/­­4 tsp ground turmeric - 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 cup/­­50 g millet - 1/­­2 cup/­­120 ml coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g raw cashews - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g whole almonds, toasted - 2 tbsp shredded unsweetened coconut Preheat the oven to 400° F/­­200° C/­­gas 6. Cut the squashes in half from the stem to the tip, or if you are using pumpkins that sit flat, cut off the tops as shown in the photo above. Scoop out the seeds and place them cut-side down on oiled baking sheets/­­trays. Bake for 10 minutes (they will not be completely cooked). Take the pans out and flip the squash halves over. When they have cooled, use a spoon to cut into the flesh, loosening it in spots but leaving it in the shell. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F/­­190° C/­­gas 5. In a 2-qt/­­2-L saucepan, heat the oil and add the onion, ginger, and mustard seeds. Sauté over medium-high heat until the onions are golden, about 5 minutes. Add the jalape?o, cumin, coriander, turmeric, and cinnamon and stir until they are fragrant. Add the millet and stir to coat, then add the 1/­­4 cup/­­60 ml water, the coconut milk, and salt and bring them to a boil. When it boils, cover the pan and turn the heat to low. Cook until the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the nuts, then stuff the mixture into the squashes. Sprinkle each with 1 tsp of coconut. Bake the squashes until the filling is set and bubbling and the squashes are easily pierced with a knife, about 20 minutes. Let them cool slightly before serving. The post Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe

May 13 2016 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeTurmeric Lemon Rice Recipe. 10 minute Golden Rice with turmeric, lemon and mustard seeds. Indian Lemon Rice. Use cooked brown rice, quinoa, millet or couscous or cauliflower rice for variation. Easy side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this post.  This super easy flavorful rice is a great side with simple dals, veggie curries or anything really. I posted a bowl with the Mango Dal, Bengali Veggies with the turmeric rice last week and got many requests for the turmeric lemon rice recipe. So here goes.  TGIF! Make this 10 minute lemony turmeric rice. Or use other cooked grains or cauliflower. I usually use Basmati Rice or a mix of white and brown basmati. Add veggies along the way or just make the plain rice and serve in a bowl of choice. Curry leaves are available in Indian Stores or online on amazon. The fresh leaves can be frozen for months in an airtight container. Use fresh or frozen right out of the freezer.  Heat the oil. Once the oil is hot, add mustard seeds and let them really start to pop. If the mustard seeds don’t pop, they don’t release their amazing flavor into the food. This is one of the reasons, people often want to add more spices and flavors to the food, esp Indian food, as it feels like there isn’t enough in the dish. If the recipes call for roasting the spices with or without oil, the spices need to be roasted well for the flavor to really bloom into the dish.  See video below and notice those popping mustard seeds! Continue reading: Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeThe post Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari Recipe

May 4 2016 Vegan Richa 

Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari RecipeBengali Mixed Veggies – Chorchori /­­ Charchari Recipe. Cauliflower Potato Green Beans Peas with Bengali (Eastern Indian) Spices. Panch Phoron Phulkopi Recipe. Easy Veggie Side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this Post.  Panch phoron is the name for Bengali 5 spice. Bengal is a state in Eastern India and is famous for its own specialties and cuisine. Rasgullas, Sandesh and other dairy sweets, fish, rice, mustard seeds and mustard oil and spice blends specific to the regional cuisine. 5 whole spices are mixed and stored as Panch Phoron and use whole or ground in many dishes. This simple veggie side has the 5 spices, some turmeric, heat and a dash of water or broth and cooked until done. Gobi Aloo Bengali Style. Make this and serve with the 6 ingredient Mango Dal or other Dals or serve in wraps like Gobi aloo Wraps with chutneys and crunchy lettuce.  This recipe has no onion and garlic, but still has that onion+garlic flavor. The flavor comes from nigella seeds and asafetida. Nigella seeds are not as commonly used in some regional cuisines in India. You will find them stuck on Naans, or added to spice blends or pastes esp marinade pastes. They are also used in Ethiopian cuisine. They are a whole spice, so definitely get some as the seeds will last a long time.  Continue reading: Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari RecipeThe post Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mango Rice

March 10 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Mango Rice Mango rice is just one style of South Indian rice dishes among many different variations. Mango rice has a very unique flavor due to the tartness of the mangoes, the sweetness of the coconut, and the heat of the chilies all being mixed together. This is a simple but flavorful and satisfying light lunch! Ingredients: For Rice - 1 cup long grain rice, I am using basmati rice - 1 tablespoon oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 cups water For mango seasoning - 2 cups raw mango peeled and shredded - 3 tablespoons oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds, rai - About 10 curry leaves - 2 tablespoons peanuts - 2 tablespoons roasted chana, optional - 1 tablespoon ginger sliced, adrak - 2 green chili seeded and sliced lengthwise - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric, haldi - 1/­­4 teaspoon red chili powder - 1 teaspoons salt - 1/­­4 cup coconut freshly shredded, I am using frozen shredded coconut - 1 tablespoon sugar - 2 teaspoons lemon juice, use as needed Method - Wash and soak the rice in about 3 cups of water for at least 15 minutes. - Drain the rice. In the sauce pan cook, the rice with 2 cups of water, salt, and oil over medium high heat, bring rice to boil then turn the heat to low, cover the pan and cook rice for about 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Note: Cooked rice expands to about 4 times its original size, so be sure to use the proper size pan. - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat, oil should be moderately hot, add mustard seeds. - When the seeds cracks add peanuts, and roasted chana, stir fry for one minute until peanuts are lightly brown. - Add green chili, curry leaves, and ginger, stir for few seconds. - Next add coconut, mango, sugar, salt, turmeric, and red chili mix it well and cook over low heat for 3-4 minutes until mango is just tender, do not overcook the mango. - Gently fold the rice with mango and turn off the heat. Mango rice is ready to serve. - Turn off the heat if needed drizzle some lemon juice.   You will  also like some more rice dishes.  they are easy to make  good for lunch box as a complete meal.  Yogurt Rice, Chickpea Pulav, Quinoa Vegetable Pilaf Enjoy! The post Mango Rice appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung

February 18 2016 My New Roots 

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung Where do I even begin? I guess Ill start by saying that I feel like I am waking up from the most spectacular, flavourful, technicolour dream. Sri Lanka deeply touched me, from its incredible landscape, beautiful people and of course, the food. The food! The food. When I was first invited by Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts to go on a food tour of Sri Lanka, I was a bit uncertain - to be honest, I didnt know anyone who had visited Sri Lanka before, and I especially had no idea what the cuisine was like. I assumed that it was probably very much like Indian, but what I discovered is that it has its own totally distinctive flavours and cooking techniques. Sri Lankan people are very passionate about their food and the culture around it. From my perspective, they seemed especially connected to the earth and the bounty that springs year-round from their incredibly fertile land. Many of the worlds spices are grown on the island, so you can imagine how rich and complex their traditional dishes are. Sri Lankan food is also hot. Like, crazy hot. Chilies play a dominant role in everything from curries to relish and are accompany every meal of the day - even breakfast. An interesting way to start your morning, I might add, is being startled awake by an explosive plate of food. And with coconuts quite literally dripping from the trees everywhere you look, the backbone of many Sri Lankan dishes, both savoury and sweet, is coconut water, milk and flesh. Heavenly. And a welcome antidote to all that chile. Rice and curry is a Sri Lankan staple, and in fact the word food there is synonymous with this combination. Happily for me, there are countless vegetarian and vegan options to choose from. My favourites were jackfruit curry (mindblowing!), cashew curry (yes, a whole pot of cashews cooked in coconut milk), wingbean curry, mung bean curry, eggplant curry, lentil curry, and pumpkin curry. But my favourite curry of all? Beetroot curry. Surprising, eh? The first time I was offered this dish, I kind of thought that it was an accommodating east-west mashup or something, but no! Its a thing. And a wildly delicious thing at that. I never imagined combining beets and coconut before, but it works incredibly well. The earthiness of the beets contrasts perfectly with the sweetness of the coconut milk, and the beets are neither crunchy or mushy, but a perfectly balanced succulent-tender texture that pairs so well with rice. The other major love affair I had in Sri Lanka was with all the little side dishes that come with the curries themselves: sambol and mallung (or mallum). Sambol is like a relish, typically based on freshly shredded coconut (but not always), with a featured vegetable, along with chilies and lime. Pol sambol (coconut sambol) is ubiquitous and served at every meal I can remember. It varies in spiciness from table to table, but more often than not I couldnt eat more than a couple teaspoons with my curry - which was already insanely hot enough, thank you. Mallungs are “green dishes” made with cabbage, kale, broccoli, beans or other leafy veg. These are always cooked without any oil, and instead use just the heat of the pan and a little bit of water to steam the vegetable – a groovy technique in my opinion. Spices are used in mallung as well, and vary from recipe to recipe. They can be served warm or at room temperature, almost like a lightly cooked salad. Curry leaves are an essential ingredient in Sri Lankan food. Many people are confused by this name because they associate curry with a spice blend, and assume that curry powder must then come from dried and ground curry leaves. In truth the word curry vaguely refers to a dish prepared with spices, but means very little to Indian or South Asians, where curries originate. Curry powder is largely a Western creation, and should in fact be referred to as masala, meaning a spice mix. Most curries in Sri Lanka rely on whole spices, not ground or pre-mixed ones, so that the cook can balance flavours according to his /­­ her tastes. Anyway, back to the curry leaves. Small, dark green and glossy, they are deeply aromatic with a distinctive savoury-smoky scent that is difficult to describe. And no, they dont smell like curry powder - weve already established that. They can be difficult to find fresh here in Copenhagen (and I would imagine, many places in the world!), but dried ones are available at most ethnic grocers or specialty shops. With about half the pungency of fresh curry leaves, the dried ones are an okay substitute if thats all youve got, but do try and seek out some fresh ones - youll never look back! Plus, if you find them fresh, you can easily freeze them until your next curry. It was very difficult to decide what kind of Sri Lankan dish I would post first (oh yea, theres more to come...) but I chose beetroot curry and kale mallung because they are both relatively seasonal here in Denmark, and because I think that both of these recipes take us out of our comfort zone with familiar veggies, and make use of entirely unique cooking techniques. Youll find both applications totally surprising, I guarantee that, and I hope that they inspire you to make curry out of things you wouldnt normally, or try an oil-free, steamy stir-fry. Yum town. There is so much complexity and diversity to Sri Lankan food and I am forever inspired. I cannot wait to go back to this enchanted island to explore, and eat, once again.     Print recipe     Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry with Kale Mallung Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1.3 lbs /­­ 600g red beetroots 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 tsp. black mustard seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 20 dried curry leaves curry leaves (or 1 sprig fresh) 2-3 small green chilies, finely chopped 1 cinnamon stick 1 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for finishing 1 14 oz. /­­ 400ml can full-fat coconut milk juice of 1 lime large handful of cilantro 4 portions of cooked red or brown rice (red is more traditional) 1 batch Kale Mallung (recipe to follow) lime wedges to serve Directions: 1. Peel beets and cut them into matchsticks. Chop onions, slice garlic. Set aside. 2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, melt coconut oil. Add the mustard seeds, stir, and let cook for a couple minutes until they begin to pop (be careful that they do not burn!). Add the coriander, curry leaves, chilies, and cinnamon, stir well, and cook for one minute until fragrant. Add the onion and salt, stir to coat and cook until the onions are translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir and cook one minute. Add beets and coconut milk, bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover (make sure that the liquid is simmering very lightly, not boiling. Boiling over high heat will cause the coconut milk to split). Cook until the beets are tender, about 15-20 minutes. 3. While the curry is cooking, wash and roughly chop the cilantro. 4. To finish the curry, squeeze in the lime juice, stir, and add more salt to balance the flavours. Add cilantro and serve immediately over rice with the kale mallung and extra lime wedges. Kale Mallung Serves 3-4  Ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml coconut water 4 cups /­­ 130g shredded + packed kale 1 small red onion 1 tsp. ground cumin 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for garnish 1 green chilli, if desired Juice of 1/­­2 lime, plus extra for garnish Directions: 1. Combine desiccated coconut and coconut water in a small bowl and let soak for about 30 minutes. 2. Slice onion in thin sections. Mince chili. Wash kale and spin dry. Remove any tough ribs, stack leaves and cut into thin ribbons. Set aside. 3.In a large, dry pot over medium heat, add the onions, salt and cumin. Stir often, letting the onions soften in the pan. Add a couple tablespoons of the liquid from the soaking coconut if the pot becomes too dry (reserve as much liquid as you can, however). After about 8-10 minutes, add the kale and the coconut mixture. Stir to coat, and quickly cover the pot with a lid so that the kale steams inside. Wait just 30-60 seconds – the kale is ready when it is bright green and tender. Remove from heat and squeeze in the lime juice. Season to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts for making this incredible trip possible!   The post Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung appeared first on My New Roots.

Peanut Chutney

February 9 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Peanut Chutney Peanut chutney is a delicious condiment that compliments many South Indian dishes such as dosa, idli, and Medu Vada. This chutney also makes a great spicy spread for sandwiches. I often use this as a dip with pita chips. This is a quick and easy recipe to make! This recipe will serve 6. Ingredients: - 1/­­2 cup raw peanuts - 2 tablespoons oil - 8 whole dry red chilies - 1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, til - 1/­­4 teaspoon asafetida, hing - 1/­­4 teaspoon fenugreek seed, mathi - About 10 curry leaves - 1 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons tamarind paste - About 1 cup of water Method - Heat the oil in a small frying pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds, as mustard seeds crack add whole red chilies, and peanuts stir-fry them for about 2 minutes. - Lower the heat to low. Add fenugreek seeds. Sesame seeds, asafetida, and curry leaves stir for about 30 seconds. Take out 4 red chilies, set aside. - Add tamarind paste, and salt mix it well. Add one cup of water. Turn the heat to medium, cook for about 2 minutes. Turn off the heat and let it cool off to room temperature. - Grind the peanut mixture to a smooth but not make it paste. - Check the salt and pepper add more if required. Enjoy! The post Peanut Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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