mush - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Apple Pie Overnight Oats

Boondi sweet recipe | mithi boondi | meethi boondi banane ki vidhi

Ridge gourd recipe | beerakaya curry | turai ki sabji | heerekai chutney & raita

Masala Bell Pepper Curry










mush vegetarian recipes

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions

October 7 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions This is the kind of food I crave when it feels like fall is really here to stay. Fried potatoes were a staple growing up in Russia, and wild foraged mushrooms were often cooked up with onions and served alongside potatoes similarly to this. The whole thing tastes kind of like a walk in the autumn woods. Frying the potatoes is a little fussy, but the resulting golden coins that are crispy on the outside and creamy inside are seriously worth it. We parboil the potatoes, which makes it infinitely easier to get them cooked through and crispy but not burnt when frying. I also love leaving the skins on the potatoes to not only skip a tedious step, but also because they turn nice and crispy from the frying. Hope you’ll give this dish a try one chilly fall evening! Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1½ lbs baby potatoes (any waxy kind) sea salt olive oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms or other mushrooms of choice - sliced 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary (optional) freshly ground black pepper handful of parsley or dill - chopped Instructions Put the potatoes in a pot, cover with water and salt well. Bring to a boil and boil until just cooked, 10-15 minutes. Drain the potatoes, let cool, and slice into ⅛ coins. Meanwhile, heat a large cast iron pan (or another non-stick pan) over medium heat and add enough oil to coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and rosemary, if using, stir once to coat in the oil, then let the mushrooms brown, undisturbed, for about 10-15 minutes. Once the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid they release evaporates, season them with more salt and black pepper, mix to coat. Remove the mushrooms and onions from the pan and set aside for now. Wipe the pan if needed. Add more oil to generously coat the bottom of the pan and turn the heat up to medium-high. Add about a third of the potatoes to the pan and season them with salt. The potatoes should cover the pan in one layer and shouldnt be too crowded. Fry the potatoes for about 5 minutes, until the undersides are golden and crispy, then flip and fry the other side for another 5 minutes, or until golden. Transfer the fried potatoes to a plate and continue frying the rest of the potatoes in batches. Add more oil between batches if necessary. Once all the potatoes are done, return them to the pan along with the mushrooms and onions, mix carefully until warmed back through. Serve the potatoes and mushrooms right away, sprinkled with parsley or dill. 3.5.3226 The post Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grilled Veggie Healthy Bowl (Air Fryer Recipe)

September 24 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Grilled Veggie Healthy Bowl (Air Fryer Recipe) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Grilled Veggie Healthy Bowl "Grilled Veggie Healthy Bowl" is inspired by my daughter-in-law, who enjoys light, fresh, and healthy meals. She suggested I do this video after trying my recipe out. It's hard to believe something this healthy makes such a delicious and filling meal! In this recipe, I grilled asparagus, broccoli, bell pepper, zucchini, and cherry tomatoes. I then toss the grilled veggies with spiced chickpeas and a homemade ginger dressing. The ginger dressing definitely adds a kick to the flavor. This bowl is also pleasing to the eyes as it's filled with colorful vegetables and the chickpeas add some texture, in addition to protein! This dish vegan and gluten-free. This makes for a great lunch. Or you can serve this as a side dish or make a wrap using tortillas or flatbread. Recipe will serve 2 people. Course Salad Cuisine Indian Keyword Air Fryer Recipe, Diabetic, Gluten Free, Grilled Vegetables, Healthy, Healthy Bowl, Healthy Lunch, Home Made, Low Cholesterol, Lunch Box Meal, Masala Chola, Refreshing, Salad, Spicy Chickpea, Vegan Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people IngredientsFor Chickpeas15 ounce can of chickpeas 2 tsp oil 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­2 tsp roasted cumin seed powder 1/­­8 tsp black pepper 1 tsp finely chopped green chili 1 Tbsp shredded ginger 1 tsp lemon juice Vegetables8 cherry tomatoes 1/­­2 zucchini cut in four length wise 1/­­2 red bell pepper quartered seeds and ribs removed 1/­­2 yellow bell pepper quartered seeds and ribs removed 6 florets of broccoli 10 asparagus trimmed Use the vegetables to your choice Dressing1 Tbsp vinegar I am using rice vinegar 1 Tbsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp olive oil 1 tsp sugar 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­4 tsp black pepper 1 Tbsp ginger juice InstructionsPrepare the dressing mix all the ingredients together, vinegar, lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, salt, black pepper, and ginger juice set aside. You can prepare the dressing even a few days earlier. This is my go-to dressing and I make this extra, so it is always ready. Grilling the Vegetables: preheat the air fryer at 350-degree F. Spread the vegetables evenly on a tray, spray lightly with oil. Air fry for about 6 minutes. If you dont have air fryer grill the veggies in the oven or on the stove. Prepare the chickpeas, while vegetables are roasting, rinse the chickpeas few times changing the water. In a frying pan heat, the oil moderately, add chickpeas, stir fry for about 3 minutes. Chickpeas will catch some color. Add roasted cumin seed, black pepper, green chilies, ginger, and lemon juice cook and stir fry for about 2 minutes stirring occasionally, set aside. Chickpeas also can be prepared in advance. Toss the vegetables and chickpeas together and drizzle the dressing. NotesDo not overcook the vegetables, otherwise the vegetables will become too soft or mushy and will lose the colors. The post Grilled Veggie Healthy Bowl (Air Fryer Recipe) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pizza Quinoa Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms

August 24 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Pizza Quinoa Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms This Pizza Quinoa Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms recipe is perfect for Meatless Monday. Portabella mushrooms are stuffed with a pizza-flavored quinoa filling. Website Problems Were you trying to find something on my blog on Saturday and some strange, completely different site was on here instead?

Chickpea-Mushroom Soup with Tahini

August 10 2020 VegKitchen 

Chickpea-Mushroom Soup with Tahini The classic Middle Eastern team of chickpeas and tahini (sesame paste) is combined in this tasty, offbeat soup recipe. Serve with fresh whole wheat pita bread. Middle Eastern tabbouli salad and a steamed green vegetable would round this meal out nicely. The post Chickpea-Mushroom Soup with Tahini appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Lentil Mushroom Burgers

June 5 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Vegan Lentil Mushroom Burgers As I mentioned last week, things have been a little hectic around here lately with the additional work I’m doing for my book. Luckily, my cookbook is for a very specific type of cooking, so while there are some recipes I come up with for the book that I really want to post on my blog too, there are a lot of recipes I come up with for the blog that wouldn’t be a good fit with the book. But even still, I spend a lot of time trying to think up new recipe ideas.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegetarian Sweet Potato Bibimbap

May 18 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Photos by Rikki Snyder Bibimbap! Have you heard of it? You will love it! What exactly is bibimbap? Its a traditional Korean dish which translates to mixed rice (bibi = mixed, bap = rice). A variety of sautéed, raw, and pickled vegetables are served on top of white rice with a raw or over-easy egg and sliced meat. I took the Make it Meatless vegetarian approach to this bibimbap recipe by substituting roasted sweet potato slices for the meat. Sweet potatoes for meat? Does that sound like a strange substitution? I assure you, it works! The sweet potatoes are filling, flavorful, and add life to the meal. One of my favorite parts about this dish is how much variety goes into the bowl. You can pick and choose your favorite vegetables, and create a combination of raw and cooked vegetables with a tasty sauce. I went with sautéed shiitake mushrooms and sweet potatoes, which I served with raw shredded carrot, eggs, pickled cucumbers (I used store-bought, but I’ve linked to a recipe in the ingredient list if you can’t find them!), kimchi, and a gingery chili garlic sauce drizzled over everything. These bowls are so flavorful and satisfying that it took […]

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes

May 18 2020 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food DishesAnimal products -- whether beef, pork, chicken, dairy or seafood -- are often thought to be necessary for a balanced diet, and, as a result, these ingredients have typically played a prominent role in home cooking.  But meat is not required for good health or good food, and the characteristics that make our favorite meals special -- the texture, the flavor, the spice -- can all be easily replicated with plant-based ingredients. Swapping out meat for plant-based protein enables you to find the essence of a dish and really consider why that BLT is so refreshing and tasty or how that peanut satay finds the right balance of spicy, nutty, and sweet. Because its usually not the animal protein that makes a dish unique or exquisite, but rather the harmony of ingredients and specific techniques that make for the best eating. Below is a list of classic comfort meals that have had their meaty ingredients swapped out for plant-based alternatives. Try a few this Monday, and gain a new appreciation for your favorite foods. Cauliflower Buffalo Wings Capture the spicy kick of Buffalo wings without the bones (and the chicken). This super simple recipe for cauliflower Buffalo wings is a definite crowd pleaser. No need to wait for gameday, whip up a batch this Monday.   Chickpea Meatloaf Meatloaf is the iconic comfort food, a centerpiece of many family meals. But you can easily recreate the tang and texture of meatloaf sans the meat. This recipe for vegan meatloaf from Nora Cooks uses a base of chickpeas to mimic the density and richness of traditional meatloaf. Photo & Recipe: Nora Cooks Grilled Portobello Mushroom Burgers with Garlic Mayo You wont be missing ground beef after tasting this grilled portobello burger . The mushrooms are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender. When served, they are loaded up with sweet grilled red onions and savory garlic and chive mayonnaise. Lentil Bolognese Everyone loves one-pot cooking. Swap out ground beef for lentils in this hearty recipe for lentil Bolognese from Tasty. Serve over pasta or zucchini noodles. Photo & Recipe: Tasty     Mushroom Stroganoff Impress an Eastern European mother-in-law or stubborn eater with this cozy and comforting (and completely plant-based) version of beef stroganoff. Mimic the flavor, texture, and creaminess of beef stroganoff by using succulent baby portobello mushrooms, soy sauce, and your favorite brand of plant-based sour cream. Try this mouth-watering recipe for mushroom stroganoff from Vegan Huggs . Photo & Recipe: Vegan Huggs Quinoa Chili Fries Sometimes youve just got to cave to what you crave, but this recipe for quinoa chili fries doesnt have to be a guilty pleasure. By baking your own French fries and making your own chunky vegetarian quinoa chili, youll still feel light as air even after eating second helping.   Seitan Peanut Satay The perfect balance between nutty, spicy, and sweet: enter the seitan satay with spicy peanut sauce. Swap out traditional chicken breast for oven-roasted seitan; you wont be able to tell the difference. Follow this yummy recipe from seitan peanut satay from Sunnyside Hanne . Photo & Recipe: Sunnyside Hanne   Tempeh BLT Crisp, clean, and classic, who doesnt love a BLT? Marinating the tempeh overnight in a mixture of apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, liquid smoke, maple syrup, and spices gives it the flavor of bacon, while baking it in a hot oven recreates its crisp-yet-chewy texture. Check out this recipe for a tempeh BLT from The Curious Chickpea and get ready for next weekends brunch. Photo & Recipe: The Curious Chickpea Vegetable Paella Paella is known for its copious amounts of seafood, chicken, and chunks of chorizo, but you can replicate the delicate flavors of Spanish paella with roasted red peppers, artichokes, kalamata olives, and a variety of spices. Try this tasty vegetable paella from Cookie and Kate . Photo & Recipe: Cookie and Kate   Veggie Meatballs You wont miss regular meatballs after youve tried these better-for-you veggie meatballs . Featuring hearty lentils, mushrooms and walnuts, this recipe is sure to hit the spot next time a meatball craving hits. Serve with your favorite pesto or marinara sauce with some sautéed broccoli rabe, pasta, or polenta with spiraled greens.     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking

May 4 2020 Meatless Monday 

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based CookingCulinary secrets exist, and they can elevate your cooking from good to give-me-seconds. Dinner may never be the same after you start adding a tablespoon of smooth peanut butter to your chili, a splash of soy sauce to your tomato sauce, or a touch of vinegar to soups and stews. When it comes to improving the taste, texture, and flavor profile of your meatless dishes or recreating plant-based versions of animal-based ingredients, its all about knowing the right techniques. Maybe your tofu Buffalo wings didnt come out crispy because you forgot to press the tofu, or your kale not as tender because you didnt massage the leaves. Sure, these suggestions may seem minor, but they can dramatically affect the outcome of a recipe. As we are all doing more home cooking, take a look at the list below and see how you can incorporate these cooking hacks into your next Meatless Monday meal. Add a Spoonful of Peanut Butter to Chili It might sound crazy, but the secret to many award-winning chili recipes is a heaping amount of smooth, creamy peanut butter. The subtle hint of sweet paired with the peanuts inherent nuttiness is enough to balance out the spice and acid of vegetarian chili.   Press Tofu for Crispy Wings Removing the moisture from tofu allows it to get nice and crispy, an important step if youre baking, pan frying, or cooking up Jamaican jerk tofu tacos . To properly press tofu, line a plate with paper towels or clean kitchen towel and place the block of tofu on top. Place another layer of paper towel on the tofu block and apply something heavy -- book, cutting board, pan -- on top. Let it press for at least 20 minutes, replace the paper towels and let it rest for another 10 minutes for extra an extra chewy meaty texture. Massage Kale for Tender Salads Kale needs some TLC to become, well, tender. To break down the tough fibers, rip the leaves off the rib (or stem), add to a bowl, coat with some olive oil, and knead them (as if you would bread dough) for around four minutes. Add them to a Mediterranean salad for a quick weeknight meal. Blend Cauliflower for an All-Purpose Cream Sauce Add richness, depth, and creaminess to any dish with this magic, all-purpose cauliflower sauce . To make this simple sauce, boil cauliflower spears until tender. While boiling, sauté sliced garlic in olive oil until fragrant. Drain the cauliflower and scrape all of the garlic-infused oil into a blender and blend until smooth. Photo Source: FoodieWithFamily Refrigerate Coconut Milk for Easy Whipped Cream Simple, easy, and decadent, refrigerating a can of coconut milk overnight results in a thick and creamy whipped topping for desserts, waffles, or coffee. Add some vanilla extract and powdered sugar for some extra flavor and sweetness.         Freeze Bananas for Nice Cream The best kept secret that every plant-based eater knows about, frozen banana soft serve will change the way you think about dessert. Simply peel a few bananas, throw them in the freezer, and blend them up with some frozen fruit the next day. Maybe add a splash of lemon juice, nut butter, or a sprinkle of maple syrup if so inclined. Photo Source: Detoxinista   Use Avocado in Place of Butter With a one-to-one ratio, you can use avocado to replace butter in most baked goods and desserts. And while avocado wont impart a noticeable flavor, you can also avoid butter by using a non-dairy butter substitute (also a one-to-one ratio).         Make Your Own Plant Parmesan Cheese Parmesan elevates anything from pastas and risottos to soup and roasted vegetables. Recreate the sharp umami flavor of Parmesan with a combination of nutritional yeast, walnuts (or cashews), salt, and garlic powder. Give the mixture a couple of pulses in the food processor and youre good to go. Photo Source: MinimalistBaker Customize a Creamy Tofu Herb Dip Tofu comes in all different types and textures. Blend soft silken tofu together with salt and fresh herbs -- basil, parsley, chive, cilantro, rosemary -- for a quick and easy dip for crudité. Add some avocado or a splash of citrus to round out the flavor. Photo Source: CrowdedKitchen   Finish Cooking Pasta in Sauce for a Creamier Consistency   Contrary to the instructions on the box, pasta should actually be slightly underdone when you drain it. After draining, immediately toss the pasta into the simmering sauce for another two minutes. This helps the pasta absorb the sauce, but it also releases the starch within the pasta, giving the sauce a creamier consistency.       Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post 10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Pesto-Roasted Veggie Sandwiches

May 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I never need an excuse to go to our local French bakery. I might go there to get something for a meal, but I won’t leave without a tarte tatin or eclair. The bakery is owned and operated by a French family, so the food and the accents really make you feel like you’re in Paris and not Wisconsin. (Oh, how I wish I was in Paris and not Wisconsin.) Anyway! In seeking new and different ways to use pesto, I wanted to do something sandwichy. Yes, it’s a word! Sandwichy! I bought a crusty loaf of sourdough bread from aforementioned bakery, and then yellow squash, zucchini, and portabella mushrooms from the grocery store. I had pesto, Parmesan cheese, and an onion on hand. Because roasting is pretty much my default way of preparing vegetables, I thought I’d marinate the veggies in a pesto and olive oil mixture and then throw them in the oven until they got all caramelized and delicious. If you prefer grilling your vegetables, that would work too, of course--I mean, basically the idea is to cook the vegetables before putting them on the sandwich, you know? These sandwiches are bound to become a weekend staple […]

Mixed Mushroom Rice

April 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Those who like mushrooms usually stay with one kind but here the three types of mushrooms make this an exceptional recipe. This dish was created by Chef Nishant Chaube, influenced by a similar Chinese recipe. Recipe and photo from Phaidon’s The Indian Vegetarian Cookbook, by Pushpesh Pant. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 6 cups (50 fl oz/­­1.5 liters) mushroom stock/­­vegetable stock - 2 cups (14 oz/­­400 g) long-grain rice - 2 cups (5 oz/­­150 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced -  1/­­3 cup (1 oz/­­25 g) oyster or button mushrooms, sliced -  1/­­4 cup ( 1/­­4 oz/­­10 g) dried morels -  1/­­4 cup (2 fl oz/­­60 ml) sesame oil - 1 cup (3 oz/­­80 g) shallots or scallions (spring onions), sliced - 4 tablespoons peeled and chopped fresh root ginger - salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste   Directions: In a large pan, bring 4 cups (1 3/­­4 pints/­­1 liter) of mushroom/­­vegetable stock to the boil, seasoning with salt to taste, add the rice and cook for 20-25 minutes, until al dente. Drain and set aside. Heat the remaining stock in a separate large pan, add the shiitake, oyster (or button) mushrooms, and morels and cook for about 7-8 minutes over medium heat, simmering until the stock has reduced to a thick, sauce-like consistency. Meanwhile, heat the sesame oil in a skillet (frying pan) and fry the shallots or scallions (spring onions) and ginger over medium heat for 2 minutes, then add to the mushroom sauce. Stir the rice into the sauce, mix well, cover, and simmer over medium-low heat for 5-7 minutes, season and remove from the heat. The post Mixed Mushroom Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spaghetti LoMein

April 15 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Spaghetti LoMein In our small town, the most vegan-friendly food available has been the local Chinese take-out restaurant.  Sadly, they closed down during this pandemic. To satisfy our cravings, I’ve included a few stir-fries in my menu rotation.  One of our favorites is Spaghetti Lo Mein.  (I make it with spaghetti because most traditional lo mein noodles contain egg and are therefore not vegan.) This recipe is quite versatile.  Use fresh veggies if you’ve got them, but frozen veggies work quite well too. The last time I made them I used frozen bell pepper strips and substituted sliced zucchini for the mushrooms.  Use what you’ve got! Here’s the recipe from my quarantine-friendly cookbook, Cook the Pantry: Spaghetti Lo-Mein If you are using leftover cooked pasta, steam the broccoli for 3 to 5 minutes. If you dont have fresh vegetables on hand for this recipe, substitute frozen stir-fry vegetables, cooked according to package directions. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. -  8 ounces spaghetti noodles - 2 cups broccoli florets - 2 tablespoons tamari or other soy sauce - 3 tablespoons cup hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 1 teaspoon sriracha (optional) - 1/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons dry sherry (optional) - 1 tablespoon neutral-tasting oil such as grapeseed oil - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips - 2 cups sliced mushrooms - 1 carrot, shredded - 1/­­3 cup sliced scallions - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 cup reconstituted Soy Curls  or diced extra-firm tofu or seitan (optional) Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender.  About 3 to 5 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, add the broccoli. Drain the pasta and broccoli and set aside. While the pasta is cooking, combine the tamari, hoisin, sesame oil, and sriracha, if using.  Add the water and sherry, if using. Mix well and set aside. Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, bell pepper, mushrooms, carrot, scallions, and ginger. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 3 minutes.  Add the Soy Curls, if using and stir to combine.  Stir in the reserved noodles and the sauce mixture, and gently toss to combine until heated through.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Makes 4 servings The post Spaghetti LoMein appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Mushroom Spinach Pasta

March 8 2020 Vegan Richa 

Creamy Mushroom Spinach PastaA quick recipe for vegan mushroom and spinach pasta that is ready in under 30 minutes. Loaded up with sautéed balsamic mushrooms and fresh spinach, all tossed in a heavenly creamy cashew sauce. Jump to Recipe I have been on a major pasta spree lately. Having made this Vegan Spinach Artichoke Pasta Bake about 7 times last month, I felt it was time to throw another creamy vegan pasta dish into the mix. This creamy vegan mushroom spinach pasta! It rivals any fancy pasta dish you can find on an Italian restaurant menu. But without the cream, and with all the cozy and comforting flavors you crave in pasta. This recipe for spinach pasta is a quick and easy vegan weeknight dinner that is creamy, garlic-rich, and simply fun to slurp up with your family. The cooked pasta is coated in a creamy, slightly cheesy, velvety cashew sauce that can be made in a blender within minutes. To take this to the next level of pasta deliciousness, were adding sautéed balsamic mushrooms for a boost of umami and fresh spinach for a touch of color. Continue reading: Creamy Mushroom Spinach PastaThe post Creamy Mushroom Spinach Pasta appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad

June 24 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad We make potato salads pretty much every week in the summer. To me, they are the perfect food – satisfying, packable for the beach or picnics, and the recipe is easy to change according to what we have on hand. Today’s recipe has been our favorite version as of late. I love adding French lentils to a potato salad to make it more satiating/­­into a complete meal if needed, plus their flavor and texture is great. Another thing I like to include is a green vegetable: asparagus, green beans, or zucchini like in this recipe. For the dressing, I think that a mustardy vinaigrette is always a great move for most potato dishes, and we make a simple one for this salad. Hope you’ll give this version a try this summer! Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup French lentils sea salt 1½ lbs yellow baby potatoes or fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1 medium zucchini - sliced into half moons 1 shallot - minced 1½ tablespoons Dijon mustard (or half Dijon and half grainy mustard) zest and juice from 1 lemon 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons olive oil a few large handfuls of dill and/­­or other herbs of choice - chopped Instructions Add the lentils to a medium saucepan, cover them with about 1 inch of water and salt well. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to a simmer and simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until tender but not mushy. Add the potatoes to a soup pot, cover with water, salt well, and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil the potatoes for 15-20 minutes, until tender. Add the zucchini to the pot with the potatoes at about the last 3 minutes of cooking, to quickly blanch it. Drain the lentils and potatoes/­­zucchini once cooked (you can drain everything into one colander). While the lentils and potatoes are cooking, prepare a big bowl for the potato salad. In the bottom of the bowl, combine the shallot, mustard, lemon zest and juice, vinegar, a generous pinch of salt, and plenty of black pepper, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add the drained lentils, potatoes, and zucchini to the bowl with the dressing and mix to combine. Let cool for a few minutes, then mix in the herbs. Serve right away or refrigerate in an airtight container until ready to serve. 3.5.3226 New Ebook! This ebook is a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of these vibrant, weeknight meals. Click Here to Buy   The post Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1

May 27 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 Our new ebook is here! It’s a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of the meals within. We’ve been working on this project since last summer, and it’s so exciting to finally share it with you. We spent a lot of time putting every recipe through a weeknight filter, streamlining the ingredients and techniques and much as possible without sacrificing flavor. We are in love with every recipe, and we hope that they’ll bring some ease and joy to your weeknight dinners and beyond. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Click Here to Buy Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan and can be gluten-free if needed - Staple Red Lentils with Crispy Coconut and Chili Oil - Creamy Tomato Pasta - Baked Tofu with Crispy Kale - Cauliflower, Tomato and Chickpea Stew - Portobello and Red Lentil Bolognese - Sweet Potato Nachos - Cauliflower Caesar Salad with Chickpea Croutons - Weeknight Chili - Zucchini Mac & Cheese - Zaatar-Roasted Vegetables and Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce - Saag Tofu - Quinoa Pilaf with Lemony Green Beans - Cold Nut Butter Noodles - Maple-Mustard Baked Tempeh and Broccoli Bowls - Brothy Coconut Turmeric Noodles - Ratatouille-ish Summer Stew - Creamy Polenta with Smoky Mushrooms and Chickpeas - The Coziest Rice and Beans - Braised Lentils with Mushrooms, Leeks and Potatoes - Minestrone with Rosemary Walnuts - Coconut Rice - Coconut Bacon - Knife Salsa Verde - Cashew Crema - Cheesy Cashew Dust Click Here to Buy The post New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook

May 19 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook Im very happy to announce that my new cookbook, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook, launches in less than three months. And the timing couldn’t be better as more people than ever are moving away from eating animals. If you’re new to a plant-based diet (or even if you’re not) chances are you’ll be asked the same question I’ve been asked since going vegan over thirty years ago: Where do you get your protein? The short answer, of course, is From plants! A longer answer (along with 85 delicious protein-packed recipes) can be found in The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook.  The recipes in this book provide maximum plant-based protein, along with all the other nutrients that plant foods contain. The book also contains lots of helpful information and charts along with stunning photos by Jackie Sobon. THere are recipes for everything from appetizers to desserts, including: - Two Bean Nachos - Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing - Bean and Beet Burgers - Plant-Powered Club Sandwiches - Tacos with Creamy Sriracha-Lime Slaw - Tofu Ramen Bowls - Super Shepherds Pie - Pasta and White Beans with Spinach-Walnut Pesto - Chickpea Piccata with Mushrooms - Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh - Super Frittata - Everything Avocado Toast with White Beans and Roasted Tomatoes - Blueberry Chia Pudding - Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie BONUS! The book is available not for pre-order and if you pre-order before August 11, 2020, my publisher will send you additional bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following e-mail address: plantproteinrev@quarto.com and theyll send you the bonus recipes. Soon, when someone asks how I get my protein, I can give them a copy of The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook and say, I get my protein from plants. Dont you? The post The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sweet Potato Bibimbap

May 18 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Photos by Rikki Snyder Bibimbap! Have you heard of it? You will love it! What exactly is bibimbap? Its a traditional Korean dish which translates to mixed rice (bibi = mixed, bap = rice). A variety of sautéed, raw, and pickled vegetables are served on top of white rice with a raw or over-easy egg and sliced meat. I took the Make it Meatless approach to this bibimbap by substituting roasted sweet potato slices for the meat. Sweet potatoes for meat? Does that sound like a strange substitution? I assure you, it simply works! The sweet potatoes are filling, flavorful, and add life to the meal. One of my favorite parts about this dish is how much variety goes into the bowl. You can pick and choose your favorite vegetables, and create a combination of raw and cooked vegetables with a tasty sauce. I went with sautéed shiitake mushrooms and sweet potatoes, which I served with raw shredded carrot, eggs, pickled cucumbers (I used store-bought, but I’ve linked to a recipe in the ingredient list if you can’t find them!), kimchi, and a gingery chili garlic sauce drizzled over everything. These bowls are so flavorful and satisfying that it took only […]

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos

May 8 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos Serves 2 hungries Tempeh and mushrooms get all sticky and charred, burnt ends and everything, in an easy to throw together sauce that is smoky, sweet (but not too) and a little spicy. Some slaw to cool it down and lend some fresh crunch, some sliced avocado for creaminess and because avocado on everything always. Now youve got yourself a taco tuesday on a friday because you dont know what day it is! Recipes Notes ~ I marinate the tempeh for up to an hour (but not longer than that) but if youve got 15 minutes, no problem, it will still be yummy, just a little less soaked through. ~ This marinade it soooo good for a million things. Try it on baked tofu or even veggies like cauliflower or brussels. Ingredients For the tempeh marinade: 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 1 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon canola oil (plus additional for cooking) 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon 5-spice For cooking: 8 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced thin (about 1/­­8 inch thick, not paper thin) 1 8 oz package tempeh, diced For slaw: 4 cups thin sliced red cabbage (tough core removed) 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon agave Small glug olive oil 1/­­4 cup finely chopped cilantro Pinch salt To assemble: Sliced avocado 6 8-inch tortillas warmed up Directions 1 – Vigorously mix all tempeh marinade ingredients in a mixing bowl. Add the tempeh and toss to coat. Let marinade 15 minutes to an hour.  2 – Mix all the slaw ingredients together and taste for seasoning. Let wilt.  3 – Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. When good and hot, cook mushrooms in canola oil until moisture is released and theyve browned a bit, about 7 minutes.  4 – Add the tempeh, reserving some marinade. Cook for about 10 minutes, flipping often, until caramelized on the edges.Add more marinade as needed.  5 – Heat tortillas your preferred way and assemble. Slaw on bottom, then tempeh, then tuck in sliced avocado. Sprinkle avo with a little lime juice and salt if you like. Serve asap!

Pesto-Roasted Veggie Sandwiches

May 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I never need an excuse to go to  bakery. I might go there to get something for a meal, but I won’t leave without a tarte tatin or eclair. In seeking new and different ways to use pesto, I wanted to do something sandwichy. Yes, it’s a word! Sandwichy! For this recipe, I bought a crusty loaf of sourdough bread from our local French bakery, and then yellow squash, zucchini, and portabella mushrooms from the grocery store. I had pesto, Parmesan cheese, and an onion on hand. Because roasting is pretty much my default way of preparing vegetables, I thought I’d marinate the veggies in a pesto and olive oil mixture and then throw them in the oven until they got all caramelized and delicious. If you prefer grilling your vegetables, that would work too, of course--I mean, basically the idea is to cook the vegetables before putting them on the sandwich, you know? These sandwiches are bound to become a weekend staple in our household. Most Saturdays, we swing by the farmers market to pick up fresh veggies and the bakery is on the way home. And on Saturdays, we’re usually so busy, the last thing we want to […]

Vegan Asparagus and Mushroom Pasta

April 29 2020 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Asparagus and Mushroom Pasta Sautéed asparagus, mushrooms, and garlic combine with pasta and a light fat-free sauce in this delicious plant-based meal. Optional soy curls or chickpeas add heartiness, making this Asparagus Mushroom Pasta a very filling vegan main dish.(...) Read the rest of Vegan Asparagus and Mushroom Pasta (889 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2020. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Asparagus, Gluten-free, Pasta, Weight Watchers Points The post Vegan Asparagus and Mushroom Pasta appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Singapore Mei Fun

April 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Singapore Mei FunQuarantine cooking can be fun — as in mei fun!  Mei fun noodles are very thin Chinese rice noodles (also called rice vermicelli). It is a popular street food in Singapore. Basic mei fun can be somewhat bland, usually stir-fried with shiitake mushrooms, soy sauce, and a few other ingredients, with additional condiments served on the side. Singapore mei fun, on the other hand, is distinctive for its addition of curry powder. It usually features a number of vegetables, and some type of protein food — my version calls for tofu, but you can substitute seitan, tempeh, or soy curls. If rice vermicelli noodles are unavailable, you can make this with angel hair pasta instead (cooked al dente before adding to the skillet). Also feel free to change up the vegetables used (zucchini instead of broccoli, or green peas instead of snow peas, for example). The seasoning can also be adjusted to your taste, add more red pepper flakes (or a drizzle of Sriracha) for more heat, or use more or less curry powder. Here is the recipe for Singapore Mei Fun.  Since I.m limiting my trips to the supermarket, I was out of bell pepper, snow peas, broccoli, and cilantro, so I just used cabbage, carrots, and frozen green peas - and it was still super-delicious.  Use what you got!  This is what my quarantine version looked like last night: This recipe is from my most beautiful cookbook, Vegan Without Borders.  If you don’t have this book, now is a great time to get it — it’s like taking a culinary tour around the world, right in your own home! Singapore Mei Fun - 8 ounces rice vermicelli (mei fun noodles) - 4 teaspoons vegetable oil, divided - 8 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cut into 1/­­2-inch dice - 1/­­4 cup soy sauce, divided - 1 to 2 tablespoons good-quality Madras curry powder (I used 2 tablespoons  S&B curry powder blended with water) - 1 medium-size yellow onion, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into thin matchstick strips (or shredded cabbage) - 1 carrot, coarsely shredded - 2 ounces snow peas, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces (or frozen green pea) - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 to 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (omit if you dont want it spicy) - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 cups small broccoli florets, lightly steamed (or steamed green beans cut into 1-inch pieces) - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional) Soak the rice noodles according to the package directions until softened. Drain well and set aside. Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until nicely browned, adding 2 tablespoons of the soy sauce and a sprinkling of curry powder while cooking. Remove from the skillet and set aside on a plate. Reheat the skillet with the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the onion, bell pepper, carrot, and snow peas, and stir-fry 2 to 3 minutes to soften. Stir in the remaining curry powder and stir-fry 10 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of soy sauce, along with the sugar, salt, and red pepper flakes, stirring to mix well. Stir in the broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the drained rice noodles and return to a boil, stirring to coat the noodles in the sauce. Add the steamed broccoli and reserved tofu, and cook, stirring, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed by the noodles. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot sprinkled with cilantro. Serves 4 Recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (c) 2014 by Robin Robertson The post Singapore Mei Fun appeared first on Robin Robertson.

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry

March 10 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry With a possible pandemic on the horizon, I’ve stocked up on toilet paper and hand sanitizer — just in case.  But I’ve also stocked up on enough food supplies to get us through the next couple of months, in case of quarantine. I’ve been using the tips and recipes in my book, Cook the Pantry, to dictate my grocery list and keep my pantry full if the situation worsens.  The quick and easy recipes in Cook the Pantry use mostly items from your pantry and freezer (along with some optional fresh produce, if you have it on hand). One of my favorite recipes from the book is the Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys.  It’s the best of two popular New Orleans culinary icons joining forces to create the ultimate sandwich made with artichokes and a piquant olive relish. Here’s the recipe: Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys Makes 2 servings Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. - 3 scallions, chopped - 1 garlic clove, crushed - 1/­­3 cup pickled vegetables, well-drained - 1/­­3 cup pimiento-stuffed green olives, well-drained - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, well-drained and halved - 1/­­2 teaspoon Cajun spice blend - 3 tablespoons Creole mustard - 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise - 2 small sub rolls - 1 cup shredded lettuce - 1 large tomato, thinly sliced - Pickled sliced jalape?os - Tabasco or other hot sauce, to serve 1. In a food processor, combine the scallion and garlic and process until finely minced. Add the pickled vegetables, olives, and pulse to make a relish. Set aside. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts, season with the spice blend, and cook until nicely browned, about 5 minutes per side. 3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread the mayonnaise and mustard on the inside top and bottom of the bread. Spread the lettuce onto the bottom of each sandwich, followed by tomato slices. Top with the relish mixture, a few slices of jalape?os, and the artichokes. Serve at once with Tabasco. In case you don’t already own Cook the Pantry, below is a list of the 100 recipes in the book. Check it out — you don’t need to be quarantined to enjoy these easy and delicious recipes. Cook the Pantry: Vegan Pantry-to-Plate Recipes in 20 minutes or Less Soup, Stew, Chili Tortilla Soup Chipotle Corn Chowder White Beans and Greens Soup Hot and Sour Noodle Soup Black Bean Soup with a Whisper of Sherry Shiitake Happens Mushroom Soup Pretty Good Gumbo Minestrone Soup Curry-Spiced Pumpkin Bisque Creamy Peanut Soup Pantry Plus Gazpacho Vegetable Bricolage Everyones Favorite Black Bean Chili Red Bean Chili Moroccan-Spiced Vegetable Stew Chana Masala Bowls Salad Savvy Five-Minute Couscous Salad Amazing Technicolor Chickpea Salad Moroccan Couscous Salad Tabbouleh Salad Pantry Pasta Salad Hearts of Palm Ceviche Composed Marinated Vegetable Salad Pinto, Corn, and Red Pepper Salad Threes a Crowd Bean Salad White Bean Niçoise Salad Taco Salad with Corn and Black Bean Salsa Southwest Salmagundi Asian Noodle Salad with Peanut Dressing Zucchini Pasta Salad Suddenly Sushi Salad Asian Noodle Slaw Avocado Goddess Salad Three-Tomato Pasta Salad Sesame Soba Salad Sandwiches, Burgers, and Pizza Crab-Free Sandwiches Bean and Spinach Burritos Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys BBQ Jack Sandwiches Homestyle Hash Burgers Black Bean and Walnut Burgers Samosadillas Artichoke Tartines Black Bean and Spinach Quesadillas Chunky Chickpea Sandwiches Texas Caviar Wraps Artichoke-Spinach Pizza Pizza Nicoise Black and White Pizza BBQ Chickpea Pizza Cheeseburger Pizza Jalapeno-Hummus Pizza Pinto Bean Nacho Pie Stovetop Suppers Hoppin John and Collards Paella from the Pantry Cheesy Grits and Greens with Smoky Mushrooms Polenta Fiesta Quick Quinoa Pilaf Asian-Style Vegetable Pancakes with Dipping Sauce Dinnertime Scramble Tofu and Broccoli Stir-Fry Layered Tortilla Skillet Lemongrass Jasmine Rice Greek Freekeh and Spinach with White Beans Pantry Bulgur Pilaf Tuscan Chickpea Fritatta Red Beans and Quinoa with Chipotle Queso Chickpea-Artichoke Cakes with Dill Aioli Black Bean Picadillo Jerk Tempeh with Coconut Quinoa Top Shelf Couscous Pilaf Pantry Pasta Plus Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Capellini with Palm-Heart Scampi Sauce Penne and Broccoli with Red Bell Pepper-Walnut Sauce Kitchen-Sink Capellini Ramen Fagiole Pasta Marinara Puttanesca in a Pinch Rotini with Creamy Pumpkin Sauce Penne with White Beans and Olivada Speedy Lasagna Rice Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce Spaghetti Lo-Mein Artichoke-Cannelini Pasta Manchurian Black Bean Noodles Sweet Treats Rawklava Easy as Chocolate Pie Peanutty Energy Balls Almond-Cranberry Haystacks Coconut Lime Drops No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies Bananas Foster Dessert Nachos No-Fuss Chocolate Fondue Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble Ginger-Walnut Rum Balls Chocolate-Almond Truffles Pecan Pie Squares Mangos with Pistachios and Cranberries Fudgy Brownie Mug Pastry-Wrapped Chocolate and Walnut-Stuffed Dates The post In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)

March 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)This easy Indian Aloo Matar – Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free option included. Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a delicious Indian weeknight recipe that comes together quickly and needs very basic ingredients most of which you probably already have at home! One of those recipes that I can always make, even when I dont know what else to make because the fridge is almost empty! Aloo Matar! Bonus, it’s my mom’s recipe so obviously it’s the best and tested until perfect! What is Aloo Matar? Aloo translates to potato and matar to peas – potatoes and peas, that’s what we’re cooking today. But in the most delicious manner! This is a simple vegetarian Indian dish originating in the Punjab region of India. It is made of potatoes and peas in a spicy thick onion tomato gravy. The dish is made throughout the country in a few different versions. While some Aloo Matar recipes use a creamy coconut base, others simmer the potatoes in a tomato sauce. We are cooking the tomato version which is a bit lighter and lower in calories. Potatoes are used in tons of Indian recipes. Often they are paired with other vegetables like cauliflower in aloo gobi or spinach or beans! I love cooking with potatoes as they are a.) available all year long, b) cheap, c) delicious and oh so comforting. Right in the end, I listed you all my favorite Indian potato recipes. This recipe has just potatoes, green peas, onion, garlic, ginger, green chili, tomatoes, and a few basic Indian spices. A very simple and beginner-friendly recipe that you just cannot go wrong with. Its lightly spiced, so absolutely doable even for kids and/­­or sensitive tummies. Ingredients needed for making this Indian Pea & Potato Curry: - Peas: You can use fresh or frozen peas. Make sure not to overcook them or they will lose their pretty color. - Potatoes: Make sure to cut them into even-sized cubes so that they are all cooked at the same time. If you chop them too small, they will get mushy and might dissolve in the curry. As a short-cut, or if you have leftovers to use up, you could add boiled potatoes. Obviously, this takes off some of the cooking time. - Ground Spices: Cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne pepper, garam masala. Flavor central! - The holy trinity of ginger, onion, and garlic is added to the toasted spices to form the base of the gravy. - Fresh green chilie adds a bit of heat, but don’t worry – this dish is not spicy. Thai green chili pepper or Serrano pepper works well here. However, if you don’t tolerate any spice, leave it out. - Fresh tomato puree is added for color, body, and texture. I make it from scratch pureeing two fresh tomatoes. You could use canned diced tomatoes and puree them or  half the amount of canned tomato puree as it is more concentrated. Tips and Substitutions for making Aloo Matar: - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. Saute spices in broth or water. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top for additional flavor. How to make the best Aloo Matar: Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and cook them for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or using a food processor. Transfer the potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. Now, add in the onion, garlic, ginger, chilies and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. Mix in the ground spices and stir in the tomato puree. Let everything cook for 3-4 mins to thicken it some more. Add the potatoes, salt and water, and cover and cook for 15 mins. Check for seasoning (add salt, if needed) and add more water if it has gotten too thick. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are fork-tender. Garnish your vegan Aloo Matar with more chopped cilantro and crushed pepper flakes. What shall I serve with Aloo Matar? I like serving this potato and pea curry with plain Basmati rice or a bowl of fragrant seasoned rice like this turmeric lemon rice. However, this pea potato curry also pairs extremely well with roti or any vegan flatbread of choice. More delicious Indian potato curry recipes from the blog: - Instant Pot Saag Aloo (Sweet Potato and Chard) - Potato Eggplant Curry - Chickpea Sweet Potato Spinach Curry - Aloo Gobi -Baked    Mums Aloo Matar This easy Indian Aloo Matar Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free version included.   - 2 tsp oil (divided) - 3 medium potatoes cubed small. - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds - 1 tsp coriander seeds - 1/­­4 cup chopped onion - 4 cloves of garlic (finely chopped) - 1 inch ginger (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 hot green chile (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­3 to 1/­­2 tsp cayenne - 2 medium to large tomatoes (pureed) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup water - 1/­­2 cup peas - 1/­­2 cup chopped cilantro (loosely packed divided) - optional additions: sprinkle garam masala towards the end (1/­­2 tsp dried fenugreek leaves) - Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and Cook for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or a food processor. -  Transfer potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Wait till it's get hot. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. - Add the onion, garlic, ginger chilie and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. - Add the ground spices and mix in. Add tomato puree and cook for 3-4 mins to thicken. - Add the potatoes, salt and water and cover and cook for 15 mins. - Check and add more water if needed. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are tender to preference. -  Taste and adjust salt and flavor. Garnish with more cilantro, pepper flakes. - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top. - The nutrition facts do not include rice or any sides.        The post Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan) appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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