mini - vegetarian recipes

mini vegetarian recipes

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

paneer ki sabji | quick paneer curry recipe | paneer sabzi recipe

November 19 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

paneer ki sabji | quick paneer curry recipe | paneer sabzi recipepaneer ki sabji | quick paneer curry recipe | paneer sabzi recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. paneer based curries have always been a top preferred one for most of the vegetarian indian background. however these curries are generally fancy and may require additional spices and ingredients to make an ideal fancy paneer curry. however you can also make a simple no-fuss paneer ki sabji with the minimal ingredients available in your kitchen which would match any restaurant style curry. The post paneer ki sabji | quick paneer curry recipe | paneer sabzi recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks!

November 4 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! Karva Chauth is a traditional Hindu festival in some parts of India. Married women fast all day, wishing for their husbands health and long life. In some cases, and for those who wish to make this holiday more modern, both husbands and wives may fast together. This is pretty new and Ive seen this only occasionally! My elder daughter-in-law is very traditional and really enjoys this special festival. She takes pleasure in all the rituals associated with Karva Chauth. This years menu is simple but delicious. I plan on making Gatte ki sabji (which is a Rajasthani dish and my daughter-in-laws favorite!), Aloo Methi, Puris, Rice, and of course Gulgula. It will be a satisfying meal for all of the fasting married women!  The post Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Tofu Fresco Cotija

October 23 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tofu Fresco Cotija Makes about 2 cups photo by Kate Lewis, recipe by llovani This tofu-based cotija is very easy for the beginner vegan cheesemaker. Tangy and crumbly and even a little melty from coconut oil, cotija is the perfect cheese for topping spicy, saucy things like refried beans, fajitas or tucked into tacos. It adds a beautiful splash of brightness to create contrast, and of course, delicious, cheezy flavor. This recipe is from The Modern Love Community Cookzine, which you can download for free! There is also an amazing Chilaquiles recipe in there to crumble this all over. Ingredients 14 oz block extra firm tofu, cubed medium 1/­­3 cup melted refined coconut oil 1/­­4 cup unsweetened plain rice milk 1 1/­­2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions In a medium pot, submerge tofu cubes in water. Bring to a boil for five minutes. Drain and allow them to cool completely.  Once cool, use cheesecloth to squeeze water out and get it as dry as possible.  Place tofu and the remaining ingredients in a food processor fit with a metal blade and pulse until it resembles cottage cheese. Lightly grease a 3 cup bowl or pyrex to use as a mold. Transfer cheese to the bowl and press down firmly to make sure there arent any air pockets. Cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours. When ready to use, it should crumble nicely in your fingers. 

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions

October 7 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions This is the kind of food I crave when it feels like fall is really here to stay. Fried potatoes were a staple growing up in Russia, and wild foraged mushrooms were often cooked up with onions and served alongside potatoes similarly to this. The whole thing tastes kind of like a walk in the autumn woods. Frying the potatoes is a little fussy, but the resulting golden coins that are crispy on the outside and creamy inside are seriously worth it. We parboil the potatoes, which makes it infinitely easier to get them cooked through and crispy but not burnt when frying. I also love leaving the skins on the potatoes to not only skip a tedious step, but also because they turn nice and crispy from the frying. Hope you’ll give this dish a try one chilly fall evening! Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1½ lbs baby potatoes (any waxy kind) sea salt olive oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms or other mushrooms of choice - sliced 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary (optional) freshly ground black pepper handful of parsley or dill - chopped Instructions Put the potatoes in a pot, cover with water and salt well. Bring to a boil and boil until just cooked, 10-15 minutes. Drain the potatoes, let cool, and slice into ⅛ coins. Meanwhile, heat a large cast iron pan (or another non-stick pan) over medium heat and add enough oil to coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and rosemary, if using, stir once to coat in the oil, then let the mushrooms brown, undisturbed, for about 10-15 minutes. Once the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid they release evaporates, season them with more salt and black pepper, mix to coat. Remove the mushrooms and onions from the pan and set aside for now. Wipe the pan if needed. Add more oil to generously coat the bottom of the pan and turn the heat up to medium-high. Add about a third of the potatoes to the pan and season them with salt. The potatoes should cover the pan in one layer and shouldnt be too crowded. Fry the potatoes for about 5 minutes, until the undersides are golden and crispy, then flip and fry the other side for another 5 minutes, or until golden. Transfer the fried potatoes to a plate and continue frying the rest of the potatoes in batches. Add more oil between batches if necessary. Once all the potatoes are done, return them to the pan along with the mushrooms and onions, mix carefully until warmed back through. Serve the potatoes and mushrooms right away, sprinkled with parsley or dill. 3.5.3226 The post Fried Potatoes with Mushrooms and Onions appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cuban-Inspired Black Beans and Rice

July 27 2020 VegKitchen 

Cuban-Inspired Black Beans and Rice This simple dish of black beans served over rice has come to be known as a regional standard in Florida due to the popularization of black beans by the Cuban-American community. Once you have your cooked beans on hand, this recipe requires a minimum of effort. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Cuban-Inspired Black Beans and Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup

June 26 2020 VegKitchen 

I love these Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup. I designed this recipe so each pancake is a meal in itself, with texture not usually expected from a pancake and a big flavor profile with a minimal amount of work. Theyre fun, delicious, filling, and perfect for a cold morning and a cup of hot tea. The post Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Spring Berry Salad with Lemon Verbena Vinaigrette

June 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

This light salad recipe is made with fresh spring berries and a lemon verbena vinaigrette. It’s the perfect way to use lemon verbena from the garden! All I Want is Salad We got back from Georgia on Monday night and I’m now ready for my next vacation. I think after you travel, you’re supposed to feel well-rested and satisfied, but traveling only makes me want to travel more. I spent most of the car ride home Googling hotels in Hawaii and the cost of airfare to the Florida Keys. So I guess I haven’t had my fill of travel this summer. But I did leave Georgia with my fill of fabulous desserts, courtesy of my Aunt Darlene. (You’re watching her on The American Baking Competition, right?!) She made mini-cheesecakes and gorgeous stenciled cookies and brownies topped with gold leaf for my cousin’s wedding. Oh, and there was cake too, of course. And then the next day, we got to eat the rejects--more cookies, more brownies, and orange blossom macarons. So! Much! Food! Bingeing on sweets is always the best motivation for getting back on track with my diet. When we were leaving Savannah, I told Chris that all I wanted […]

Shawarma Tofu

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

You may be familiar with Shawarma, a traditional mix of spit-roasted meats served in a pita, so youll love this meatless spin on a classic Levantine dish. To your health, or L’Chaim! Recipe by Adi Shapira, from Cooking Meatless Monday Israel (in Hebrew). Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 2 and half cups of hard tofu, cut into thin strips with a carrot peeler - 4 tablespoons olive oil - 2 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced half rings - 1 carrot, peeled and cut into thin strips with a carrot peeler   - Spices: - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon cumin - 1 tablespoon shawarma spice - 1 tablespoon sweet paprika - Optional: - Chili pepper - Salt - 1 teaspoon garlic powder   - Serving suggestion: chopped parsley, tahini salad   Preparation: Place in a bowl: the strips of tofu, a tablespoon of olive oil, and all the spices. Stir. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan. Add the onion and fry for about 7 minutes, until golden. Add the carrots and fry while occasionally stirring another 2 minutes. Add the seasoned tofu and stir well. Stir until the tofu is golden at the edges. Transfer to a serving dish or place in a pita bread pocket, finish with chopped parsley and tahini salad. Serve! The post Shawarma Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos

May 8 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos Serves 2 hungries Tempeh and mushrooms get all sticky and charred, burnt ends and everything, in an easy to throw together sauce that is smoky, sweet (but not too) and a little spicy. Some slaw to cool it down and lend some fresh crunch, some sliced avocado for creaminess and because avocado on everything always. Now youve got yourself a taco tuesday on a friday because you dont know what day it is! Recipes Notes ~ I marinate the tempeh for up to an hour (but not longer than that) but if youve got 15 minutes, no problem, it will still be yummy, just a little less soaked through. ~ This marinade it soooo good for a million things. Try it on baked tofu or even veggies like cauliflower or brussels. Ingredients For the tempeh marinade: 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 1 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon canola oil (plus additional for cooking) 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon 5-spice For cooking: 8 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced thin (about 1/­­8 inch thick, not paper thin) 1 8 oz package tempeh, diced For slaw: 4 cups thin sliced red cabbage (tough core removed) 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon agave Small glug olive oil 1/­­4 cup finely chopped cilantro Pinch salt To assemble: Sliced avocado 6 8-inch tortillas warmed up Directions 1 – Vigorously mix all tempeh marinade ingredients in a mixing bowl. Add the tempeh and toss to coat. Let marinade 15 minutes to an hour.  2 – Mix all the slaw ingredients together and taste for seasoning. Let wilt.  3 – Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. When good and hot, cook mushrooms in canola oil until moisture is released and theyve browned a bit, about 7 minutes.  4 – Add the tempeh, reserving some marinade. Cook for about 10 minutes, flipping often, until caramelized on the edges.Add more marinade as needed.  5 – Heat tortillas your preferred way and assemble. Slaw on bottom, then tempeh, then tuck in sliced avocado. Sprinkle avo with a little lime juice and salt if you like. Serve asap!

Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to Follow

April 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to FollowFood and Instagram go together like strawberries and chocolate. To satisfy our appetite for mouthwatering meals, a number of amateur and professional cooks are creating and sharing amazing plant-based recipes that you recreate from the comfort of your own kitchen. This Monday, check out our list of favorite plant-based Instagram influencers to follow; theyve got tips for everything from cashew cheese to no-bake coconut cake to basil risotto. Remember, many of these influencers also have websites and YouTube channels as well, so say hello to your new virtual cooking companions! @alphafoodie Samira Kazan, the creator of the @alphafoodie Instagram and alphafoodie.com , is dedicated to showcasing beautifully vibrant ingredients and finished dishes. Her videos are a beautiful blend of technique and presentation. Check out her creative recipes for plant-based Cheddar cheese and gluten-free banana bread. @deliciouslyella A queen of plant-based meal preparation, Ella Mills is an icon when it comes to making simple and delicious food without using animal products. Breakfast bowls, smoothies, sweets, savory grains, and delectable veggies, Ella can do it all, and you can too; check out her Instagram page and blog deliciouslyella.com for step-by-step instructions on how you can recreate her edible masterpieces. @minimalistbaker The mantra of the Minimalist Baker is clear: simple recipes that make you feel good, 10 ingredients, 1 bowl, or 30 minutes or less -- all eaters welcome. With creative ideas for plant-based cakes, brownies, soups, breads, and so much more, youll be using the Minimalist Bakers Instagram as both a source of cooking insights and artful inspiration. @frommybowl Caitlin Shoemaker, the creator of @frommybowl , develops easy-to-follow, vegan recipes that actually taste good. Her food is health-forward, and many of her recipes incorporate a variety of nutritionally-dense ingredients. But most importantly, Shoemakers food looks, well, fun; shes got recipes for no-bake toasted coconut cheesecake, vegan strawberry shortcake, and a gorgeous feel-good red lentil soup. And while her Instagram page doesnt include many videos, you can always check out Shoemakers YouTube channel and website to see her in action. @hotforfood If you want a virtual cooking buddy, look no further than Lauren Toyota, the foodie philosopher behind the Instagram @hotforfood . Charisma and a whimsical approach to food, makes Toyota an excellent source for plant-based cooking. Shes got tons of videos on her Instagram and website , which makes her more of a culinary coach than Instagram influencer. @pinchofyum With over one million followers, @pinchofyum is doing a lot of things right. They have recipes for all of your comfort food favorites -- gnocchi, macaroni and cheese, banana-oat pancakes -- many of which use only vegetarian-friendly ingredients. Scroll through their feed or look at some of their instructive cooking videos and website recipes . @vanillaandbean To satisfy your need for elegant images of food, look no further than @vanillaandbean . This Instagram feed is full of rustic plates, counter tops, and casserole dishes teeming with beautiful meals and ingredients, many of which are plant-based. For full recipes, check out vanillaandbean.com , and let your appetite run wild. @veggie_­inspired Jenn Sebestyen, creator of @veggie_­inspired and author the Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, is a master at coaxing delicious flavors out of plant-based ingredients. Her recipes are easy to follow and appeal to all varieties of eating lifestyles, also available on her website . @woon.heng Woon Heng is a wonderfully inventive home cook (and Meatless Monday contributor) who focuses on cooking up plant-based meals with an Asian flare. Her dishes are unique and easy on the eyes; one look at her Instagram feed will have you stocking up on soy sauce, sesame oil, fresh chile, and udon noodles. Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to Follow appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this MondayOur daily food choices have a direct impact on the health of the planet. And while its true that all foods need resources to produce, research shows that meat and dairy have the greatest impacts on the environment. This isnt too hard to picture; raising animals to feed billions of people requires huge inputs of land, feed, water, and energy to be processed, stored, and transported. While the environmental impacts of food production can seem daunting, thankfully there are easy and delicious ways to reduce our individual and collective foodprints through eating a more plant-based diet and reducing food waste . But you dont need to go vegan to make a difference; starting small, like going Meatless Monday, is meaningful and can also lead to eating more plant-based foods throughout the week. Meatless Monday Tips for Plant-based Eating Add more fruits and vegetables to your meals Make meals from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery Stock your pantry with plant-based staples for quick and easy meals Enjoy a wide variety of plant-based proteins Load up your spice cabinet for flavorful meatless meals Reduce food waste with inexpensive foods that wont go bad Get the whole family involved with The Kids Cook Monday meatless recipes Just how much of a difference does it make replacing animal products with plant-based foods? To help quantify the power of plant-based eating, weve collaborated with our academic partners at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to gather the facts and figures behind plant-based foods and the environment. According to calculations from Johns Hopkins, if sixty percent of Americans ate plant-based just one day, it would save the equivalent of 104,000 Olympic swimming pools of water and the land area of the California Redwood Forests. Hungry for more reasons to go Meatless Monday? Check out the facts below to see the impact that livestock production as on the environment, and how you can help minimize those effects by reducing meat and adding more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and grains into your diet. Water Animal agriculture is responsible for about 70 percent of the worlds freshwater use. By 2050, water demand for livestock production is expected to leave half the worlds population living in water-stressed environments. Research shows that eating a more plant-based diet can decrease agricultural water use by 50 percent. Deforestation The meat industry is the most significant driver of deforestation, clearing approximately 50 million square miles of forest for agricultural purposes each year. Combining pasture and land used for feed crops, 80 percent of the worlds farmlands are used for livestock production. Soil Health Animal agriculture damages soil quality and compromises the health of the ecosystem. Industrial livestock production, through its intensive land management practices, reduces soil fertility and leaves previously fertile regions barren and more prone to natural disaster such as wildfires, flooding, and dust storms. Wide-scale shifts toward more plant-based diets would carry tremendous benefits for soil health and biodiversity. Biodiversity Livestock production has led to over 60% decline in species populations since 1970. Animal agriculture disrupts delicate eco-systems, making it one of the greatest human contributors to species decline. Global Emissions Meat and dairy production remain the most significant contributors of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and of these sources, livestock production is the largest, accounting for an estimated 14.5 percent of global GHG emissions from human activities, according to the United Nations. Interested in learning more about the connection between the food system and the health of the environment? Click here for more facts and figures from our academic partners at Johns Hopkins University. The post Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Sticky Debate About Honey

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If theres one hot-button issue among vegans, its honey. While some vegans will eat it and use it, others wont, which can cause some heated debates among this group. So why not just get right to the point: Is honey vegan? The basic buzz on honey Honey bees collect nectar from flowering plants, which they regurgitate into honeycomb cells. With a little fanning from their wings to remove excess moisture, the end result is honey. The amazing fact? Making one pound of honey requires 556 worker bees, and the average worker bee will only make one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime, according to the Ontario Beekeepers Association. Because honey is so high in sugar, it then becomes an energy source for the bees, helping fuel the roughly 12,000 beats their wings take every minute. Of course, bees have been making honey ever since their existence, and its said theyve been around for about 30 million years. How long humans have been eating honey isnt entirely clear, but honey has certainly found its way into the human food system, showing up on breakfast tables, getting baked into breads and muffins, and being mixed into granolas. Honeys also a popular medicinal cure. The case against honey being vegan The first argument against honey not being vegan (though it certainly is vegetarian) is the obvious one: Honey comes from an animal, and vegans eschew any animal-based products. Animals arent ours to use, steal from or manipulate as we see fit, says Amber Canavan, senior campaigner and spokesperson for PETA in Portland, Ore. And while you might not equate bees with farmed animals like chickens, pigs and cows, there is cruelty in the raising of bees. Theyre killed and harmed in the process, Canavan says. She points to commercially bred honey bees who are kept crammed in file-cabinet type hives. When hives are ready for harvesting, its nearly impossible to open the hive and get honey out without crushing numerous bees who are trying to protect the hive, she adds. Now move to queen bees, who are often treated like female cows in the dairy industry, being artificially inseminated by force, Canavan says. Beekeepers might even clip the wings of queen bees so they cant escape and move the hive. And speaking of moving, bees are often trucked around the country, especially in the commercial industry, to pollinate plants in a given destination. Because honey bees arent native to this country, moving them around like this could introduce issues for local pollinators, she adds. Related: How to Choose Sugar Substitutes Finally, taking honey from the bees may threaten the bees health, according to The Vegan Society. Not only is their honey supply then decreased, many commercial beekeepers will take the honey off and feed them high-fructose corn syrup, which isnt good for their health, says Paul Cronshaw, co-founder and director of operations for the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association in California, vegan and hive keeper whose hives are cruelty- and chemical-free. Putting honey on the table In spite of the above arguments, there are vegans who do consume and use honey, Cronshaw being one of them. My philosophy is that the bees are using honey as a survival food in a house that Im providing, and I take only a minimal amount for rent, he says, adding that this was the first year hes taken from them in years because of the now-ended drought in California. As a result, the bees produced more honey this year and were able to pay more rent. Whats his rationale for using honey? I use honey for medicine and other reasons, he says. Those reasons include helping with sore throat, improving oral health, and aiding with wound healing. Case in point: He was bitten on the hand by a dog recently and used Manuka honey to heal while honey helped him survive a foot injury on a nine-day backpacking trip in the Sierras a few years ago. And while nobodys advocating supporting commercial beekeepers, supporting local ones can help the bee population survive. Numerous studies, after all, point to the collapse of bees who help pollinate numerous food crops. Although honey bees arent in danger of extinction, they are in decline, albeit a big slower because humans are their shepherds or keepers, he adds. If you do decide to use honey, Cronshaw recommends connecting with local beekeepers to find out how they practice beekeeping. Most local beekeepers arent trucking their hives around the country, arent using harmful fillers after taking the bees honey and are working hard not to kill bees. You can raise bees without killing them, he says. The good news is that you dont have to eat or use honey if you dont want to. There are so many alternatives on the market now, Canavan says. Not only can you choose from things like maple syrup, stevia, blackstrap molasses and agave syrup, theres even vegan honey. You can also help local pollinators by planting plants they like and creating a pollinator-friendly yard.   The post The Sticky Debate About Honey appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

November 2 2020 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter Visit Kickstarter to pre-order: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2TE62bO  My first book has been a bestseller for almost eight years, but ever since the sequels came out, I’ve wanted to go back and massively upgrade the visuals on the original book: to re-do the cover artwork and re-shoot most of the food photos. After publishing 5 other books and spending additional years in the kitchens of the world, I knew I could improve the recipes, add outstanding dishes that didn’t make it into the first versions, and bring more culinary authenticity and cultural awareness to the entire book. The newly updated, re-photographed and freshly illustrated edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures is my classic, first journey in the world of vegan cookbooks reimagined and upgraded. Its my tribute to powerful memories, awesome individuals, and fantastic meals that Ive made, found, and shared with countless others like you. I’ve wanted to re-create my first cookbook for years, but the opportunity didn’t really arise until the surprises and challenges that have been this monster of a year, 2020. Yasai Izakaya Genki, Tokyo 2019 You see, I’d planned to return to Japan and continue my adventures from late 2019. Ultimately, now, Id be wrapping up The Lotus and the Artichoke – JAPAN. But when Corona hit, not only did it cancel nearly all my events and most of my income, like for so many people, lockdowns and border closures meant drastic changes not just daily life but to our travel plans as well. The struggle to return to a form of life that is more predictable and free has been different for all of us. As life has become more routine and restricted, our travels have been more in our minds and through the eyes of others-- through art, music, video and social media. A big part of my own escape these last months has been getting into the kitchen and diving back into my first cookbook - revisiting the intense dishes, unforgettable places and global flavors that shaped my life and projects over the last eight years. Ive cooked for the family, for friends, and for neighbors. Hopefully opportunities for more lunch and dinner parties and big cooking events will shape up soon! updated world map & photo collage for WORLD 2.0 edition NEW in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0: - brand NEW cover art & illustration! - NEW introduction & kitchen info! - more travel stories! - 8+ totally NEW recipes (not found in earlier editions!)  - 70+ newly photographed dishes!  - 100+ updated & improved recipes!  - better recipe names with respect to cultures & inspirations - 8+ additional pages of adventures & travels! As with all 6 of my cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. - My fully updated and re-envisioned first cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide -  224 pages with 100+ recipes and over 90 full-page color photos  - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in over 50 countries.  - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients  - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Palak Paneer – North Indian spinach with tofu paneer Pad Thai – rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime Omelette *NEW RECIPE* Mombasa Red Curry – with sweet potatoes & tofu Buka – Nigerian stew & Jollof – Senegalese rice *NEW RECIPES* Koshary – Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW RECIPE* Mini Meat Pies – made with lentils & vegetables Lasagna – with smoked tofu, cashew cheese, zucchini & mushrooms Recipes in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0 AMERICAS -  Salade a la Montréal arugula, pears, walnuts & lemon dressing -  Lower East Side Salad avocado and tomatoes on quinoa & carrot ginger dressing -  Jersey Summer Salad spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, walnuts & raspberry dressing -  Pancakes American breakfast classic -  Waffles *NEW*  -  French Toast another American breakfast classic -  Tofu Scramble with mixed vegetables -  Omelette *NEW*  -  North End Pasta Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce -  Ithaca Mac & Cheeze baked casserole -  TLT Tempeh Lettuce Tomato sandwich -  Black Bean Burgers 90’s style classic burgers -  Three Bean Chili with assorted vegetables -  Mango Pear Crumble with ginger & cinnamon -  Roasted Walnut Brownies double chocolate delight -  Oatmeal Cranberry Walnut Cookies American classic -  Guacamole Latin American avocado dip -  Salsa Latin American spicy tomato dip ASIA -  Cold Sesame Noodles Chinese dim-sum classic -  Wontons Chinese steamed dumplings with soy ginger dipping sauce -  Congee savory rice porridge *NEW*  -  Horenso Goma-ae Japanese chilled sesame spinach -  Miso Soup Japanese classic with tofu -  Teriyaki Tempeh Japanese stir-fry with vegetables -  General Tsos Chicken Cantonese classic -  Sesame Ginger Tofu Chinese fusion -  Tom Kha Thai coconut soup with tofu & vegetables -  Pad Thai rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime -  Pad Horapa Makua Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews -  Bai Cha Cambodian fried rice with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Gói Cuôn Vietnamese fresh spring rolls with ginger peanut sauce -  Pho Vietnamese noodle soup with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Banh Mi Vietnamese seitan sandwich -  Mirza Ghasemi Persian eggplant -  Gajar Masala grated carrots with pineapple, dates & cashews -  Aloo Raita Indian potatoes and cucumbers in yogurt -  Poha Indian flattened rice with potatoes & spices -  Gobi Tikka Indian baked marinated cauliflower -  Pakoras Indian spinach fritters with apple tamarind chutney -  Masoor Dal North Indian red lentils -  Chole Bhature Indian chickpeas with fried flatbread -  Hyderabadi Biryani South Indian rice dish -  Dhokla South Indian savory steamed chickpea cake -  Masala Dosa South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling -  Sambar South Indian vegetable & lentil stew -  Coconut Coriander Chutney South Indian condiment -  Paneer Makhani North Indian tomato curry with tofu paneer -  Mutter Paneer North Indian peas with tofu paneer -  Palak Paneer North Indian spinach with tofu paneer -  Navratan Korma North Indian creamy vegetable curry -  Vegetable Jalfrezi North Indian spicy mixed vegetables -  Dal Makhani North Indian creamy bean curry -  Sindhi Bhindi Masala North Indian okra -  Bengan Bhartha North Indian eggplant -  Chilli Paneer Indo-Chinese tofu paneer -  Vegetable Manchurian Indo-Chinese dumplings -  Halva Indian semolina sweet -  Saffron Mango Lassi Indian yogurt shake -  Naan North Indian flatbread -  Nariyal Chaval South Asian coconut rice -  Haldi Chaval North Indian golden rice with turmeric -  Jeera Chaval North Indian rice with cumin seeds AFRICA -  Plasas & Fufu Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava -  Koshary Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW* -  Tanjine Moroccan stew with couscous *NEW* -  Mombasa Red Curry with sweet potatoes & tofu -  Ful Medames North African spicy bean dip *NEW* -  Hummus North African & Middle Eastern chickpea spread -  Buka Nigerian stew mushrooms and soy meats *NEW* -  Jollof Senegalese seasoned rice *NEW* EUROPE -  Endive Sprout Boats with sesame soy dressing -  Field Greens & Seared Apples with chickpea ginger parsley dressing -  Borscht Russian beet soup -  Blintzes Russian-Ukrainian cr?pes -  Gazpacho cold tomato & cucumber soup -  Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup classic & creamy -  Roasted Root Vegetables with rosemary & spices -  Rotkohl German stewed red cabbage -  Kartoffelpuffer German potato pancakes with homemade applesauce -  Semmelknödel Bavarian bread dumplings -  Auflauf German zucchini & potato casserole -  Zwiebelkuchen German baked flatbread with onions & smoked tofu -  Schnitzel Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets -  Käsespätzle Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cheeze sauce -  Tofu Mushroom Stroganoff with fresh herbs -  Quiche French savory pie -  Cashew Mushroom Risotto with sun-dried tomatoes -  Lasagna with smoked tofu, zucchini & mushrooms -  Tempeh Stuffed Mushrooms with garlic & herbs -  Stuffed Peppers with tomato rice & smoked tofu -  Spinach & White Beans with sun-dried tomatoes & herbs -  Vegan Meat Pies with lentils & vegetables -  Turkish Bulgar Pilaf with Tofu-Feta & fresh herbs -  Grah Balkan bean stew with seitan -  Gibanica Balkan cheese pie -  Bratäpfel baked apples stuffed with dates, figs & walnuts -  Apfelstrudel Austrian-German apple pastry -  Lebkuchen traditional German Christmas cookies -  Tarte au Citron French lemon pie -  Mandeltorte German-Swedish almond pie Dal Makhani – North Indian creamy bean curry Masala Dosa – South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling, sambar & coconut chutney Pad Horapa Makua – Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews Borscht – Russian beet soup Blintzes – Russian-Ukrainian tofu cheese cr?pes with jam Beaner Schnitzel – Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets Käsespätzle – Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cashew cheese sauce Pasta Famiglia – Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce Teriyaki Tempeh – Japanese stir-fry with vegetables Hyderabadi Biryani – South Indian rice with vegetables Chilli Paneer – Indo-Chinese spicy stir-fry with tofu paneer Vegetable Manchurian – Indo-Chinese dumplings The Lotus and the Artichoke – World Adventures from World Adventures 2.0, my updated, re-photographed & illustrated original cookbook is only available for pre-order on Kickstarter for 21 days!

Comforting Wholesome Pear Muffins

October 19 2020 seitan is my motor 

Comforting Wholesome Pear MuffinsThese cute pear muffins are made with mini pears and a special kind of whole wheat flour. They are lower in sugar and low in fat. Suitable for breakfast, as a nutritious snack and of course they make a great dessert.

Gooda Cheez (Vegan Gouda Cheese)

September 11 2020 VegKitchen 

This impressive, dome-shaped “Gooda Cheez” recipe makes a vegan cheese with a creamy texture reminiscent of Gouda. Slice it into wedges for a delectable snack or appetizer. Recipe contributed by Jo Stepaniak, reprinted from The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook. The post Gooda Cheez (Vegan Gouda Cheese) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps

July 21 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps Chickpea salad sandwiches made in the manner of tuna salad sandwiches have been on menu at my house for years. My latest version is one of the bonus recipes you’ll get when you pre-order my new book, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook. Instead seasoning it to tastes like tuna, I’ve changed up the flavor a bit to give it a smoky nuance reminiscent of a BLT.  In addition to the chickpeas, other protein-rich ingredients in this recipe include cashews and hemp seeds. You can serve this on whole-grain bread if you prefer, but I love it in a wrap. Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps Makes 2 servings - 1/­­2 cup raw unsalted cashews, soaked in hot water for 1 hour, then drained - 1/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 1 tablespoon ground hemp seeds - 1 teaspoon yellow mustard - 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon Liquid Smoke - 1/­­4 cup minced celery - 2 tablespoons minced scallions - 2 large whole-grain tortillas - 4 large butter lettuce leaves - 1 ripe tomato, thinly sliced In a high-powered blender, combine the cashews, water, lemon juice, hemp seeds, mustard, garlic powder, onion powder, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until completely smooth, scraping down the sides of the blender as needed. The dressing will be thick. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the chickpeas, smoked paprika, Liquid Smoke, and about half of the reserved dressing, mashing to break up the chickpeas. Add the celery, scallions, and as much of the remaining dressing as desired.  Season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix well. To assemble, arrange a tortilla on a flat work surface. Place the 2 lettuce leaves in the lower third of the tortillas and top with a row of tomato slices. Spoon half of the chickpea mixture on top of the tomatoes, spreading evenly. Use your hands to gently roll up the wrap.  Repeat with the remaining ingredients. Cut each wrap in half and serve. PRE-ORDER NOW:  If you order The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook before August 11, 2020, youll receive this and other bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following email address plantproteinrev@quarto.com and my publisher will send you the bonus recipes. The post Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps appeared first on Robin Robertson.

aloo chana chat recipe | aloo chole chaat | aloo chanay ki chaat

June 17 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo chana chat recipe | aloo chole chaat | aloo chanay ki chaataloo chana chat recipe | aloo chole chaat | aloo chanay ki chaat with step by step photo and video recipe. chaat recipes are a common appetizer or a favorite snack recipe which are typically eaten at street food vendors. there are common assumptions made about these recipes, that it is a complex and better eaten outside. however, making chaat recipes like aloo chana chat recipe is extremely simple and can be made within minutes with minimal ingredients available in most of the kitchens. The post aloo chana chat recipe | aloo chole chaat | aloo chanay ki chaat appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg AlternativesAs most bakers will tell you, baking makes you feel good. It can even be a meditative activity that helps to reduce stress and brings us positive feelings of doing something for others; in this case, creating delicious baked goods for the ones we love. When whipping up plant-based desserts and baked goods, using the right substitute for eggs is critical as it is a key ingredient that gives structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. Dont panic. Some clever cooks have come up with easy to use animal-free alternatives; flax and chia seeds, apple sauce, and aquafaba can all be used in some capacity to replace eggs. But remember that not every egg alternative is equal: aquafaba is used for egg whites, chia seeds are better for browning and color, and silken tofu adds texture and protein. Below is a list of our favorite egg alternatives complete with drool-worthy recipes from a few of our favorite plant-based bloggers. So start experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker , and try making her recipe for easy macaroons . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. If youre a fan of banana, try these heavenly peanut butter banana brownies from Bucket List Tummy . Please note that the recipe also calls for a flax egg (see recipe for flax egg below). Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies, but they can also add a nice texture to this sweet chia cornbread from The Simple Veganista . Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5-10 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Try using them to make these vegan coffee cake streusel muffins by Choosing Chia . Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Silken tofu is best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda, but its also wonderfully decadent in this vegan strawberry cheesecake by Exceedingly Vegan . Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST (theyve got a great recipe for crispy waffles). Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs. Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some more #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery .   The post “Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking

May 4 2020 Meatless Monday 

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based CookingCulinary secrets exist, and they can elevate your cooking from good to give-me-seconds. Dinner may never be the same after you start adding a tablespoon of smooth peanut butter to your chili, a splash of soy sauce to your tomato sauce, or a touch of vinegar to soups and stews. When it comes to improving the taste, texture, and flavor profile of your meatless dishes or recreating plant-based versions of animal-based ingredients, its all about knowing the right techniques. Maybe your tofu Buffalo wings didnt come out crispy because you forgot to press the tofu, or your kale not as tender because you didnt massage the leaves. Sure, these suggestions may seem minor, but they can dramatically affect the outcome of a recipe. As we are all doing more home cooking, take a look at the list below and see how you can incorporate these cooking hacks into your next Meatless Monday meal. Add a Spoonful of Peanut Butter to Chili It might sound crazy, but the secret to many award-winning chili recipes is a heaping amount of smooth, creamy peanut butter. The subtle hint of sweet paired with the peanuts inherent nuttiness is enough to balance out the spice and acid of vegetarian chili.   Press Tofu for Crispy Wings Removing the moisture from tofu allows it to get nice and crispy, an important step if youre baking, pan frying, or cooking up Jamaican jerk tofu tacos . To properly press tofu, line a plate with paper towels or clean kitchen towel and place the block of tofu on top. Place another layer of paper towel on the tofu block and apply something heavy -- book, cutting board, pan -- on top. Let it press for at least 20 minutes, replace the paper towels and let it rest for another 10 minutes for extra an extra chewy meaty texture. Massage Kale for Tender Salads Kale needs some TLC to become, well, tender. To break down the tough fibers, rip the leaves off the rib (or stem), add to a bowl, coat with some olive oil, and knead them (as if you would bread dough) for around four minutes. Add them to a Mediterranean salad for a quick weeknight meal. Blend Cauliflower for an All-Purpose Cream Sauce Add richness, depth, and creaminess to any dish with this magic, all-purpose cauliflower sauce . To make this simple sauce, boil cauliflower spears until tender. While boiling, sauté sliced garlic in olive oil until fragrant. Drain the cauliflower and scrape all of the garlic-infused oil into a blender and blend until smooth. Photo Source: FoodieWithFamily Refrigerate Coconut Milk for Easy Whipped Cream Simple, easy, and decadent, refrigerating a can of coconut milk overnight results in a thick and creamy whipped topping for desserts, waffles, or coffee. Add some vanilla extract and powdered sugar for some extra flavor and sweetness.         Freeze Bananas for Nice Cream The best kept secret that every plant-based eater knows about, frozen banana soft serve will change the way you think about dessert. Simply peel a few bananas, throw them in the freezer, and blend them up with some frozen fruit the next day. Maybe add a splash of lemon juice, nut butter, or a sprinkle of maple syrup if so inclined. Photo Source: Detoxinista   Use Avocado in Place of Butter With a one-to-one ratio, you can use avocado to replace butter in most baked goods and desserts. And while avocado wont impart a noticeable flavor, you can also avoid butter by using a non-dairy butter substitute (also a one-to-one ratio).         Make Your Own Plant Parmesan Cheese Parmesan elevates anything from pastas and risottos to soup and roasted vegetables. Recreate the sharp umami flavor of Parmesan with a combination of nutritional yeast, walnuts (or cashews), salt, and garlic powder. Give the mixture a couple of pulses in the food processor and youre good to go. Photo Source: MinimalistBaker Customize a Creamy Tofu Herb Dip Tofu comes in all different types and textures. Blend soft silken tofu together with salt and fresh herbs -- basil, parsley, chive, cilantro, rosemary -- for a quick and easy dip for crudité. Add some avocado or a splash of citrus to round out the flavor. Photo Source: CrowdedKitchen   Finish Cooking Pasta in Sauce for a Creamier Consistency   Contrary to the instructions on the box, pasta should actually be slightly underdone when you drain it. After draining, immediately toss the pasta into the simmering sauce for another two minutes. This helps the pasta absorb the sauce, but it also releases the starch within the pasta, giving the sauce a creamier consistency.       Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post 10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!