mineral - vegetarian recipes

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Chilli garlic noodles recipe | garlic noodles recipe | chinese noodles

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

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mineral vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple

September 11 2017 Veggie num num 

Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple Hello, Veggie People, it’s been a long time once again! While all’s been quiet over here, Cam and I have been busy building something exciting and I’m happy to say it’s ready to go!! Now available on the App Store is Nutro – an App developed to help those on a Plant-Based Diet thrive! Whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or just reducing meat in your diet, eating the right plant-foods is key to adequate nutrient intake and overall wellbeing. I wanted to create an easy-to-use resource that could help get the balance right without the guesswork. It started out with a simple enough idea of gathering together a list of plant-foods highest in those nutrients we all need the most when cutting out meat and animal products. This leads me to think on the best way to share this with others. Having a husband with the tech knowledge made the leap from a list of foods to a useable app one that made complete sense. Nutros directory of nutrient dense plant-foods allows you to easily identify the right foods to boost intake of key essential nutrients – like iron, protein, calcium and vitamin B12 – the right foods to support good health and keep you plant strong when cutting out the meat and animal products. It’s not always easy to understand the nutrients our body needs to stay healthy or where to find these nutrients in a plant-based world. Nutro identifies key vitamins and minerals of particular importance to those on a plant-based diet and shows you exactly which plant-foods offer the best source. The idea behind Nutro is simple, supporting health and happiness on a meat-free diet is achievable. And while I highly recommend seeking professional guidance to get the best tailored and up-to-date information on a diet to meet your specific nutritional needs, Nutro is a handy resource that can help make balanced, healthy plant-based eating a little easier. If you’d like to check it out, jump onto the app store and please leave a comment below if you have something to say!! I’d love to hear your thoughts, ideas, comments, constructive criticism, feedback and all the rest Follow along on with me and Nutro social @ facebook, instagram, pinterest, twitter. The post Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple appeared first on Veggie num num.

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat From left: Greg Lofts, Martha Stewart Living Magazine; Joan Zimmer, Premium Peanut; Xiaoran Liu, Harvard School of Public Health; Karl Zimmer, Premium Peanut;  Cherry Dumaul, Meatless Monday; Karen Weisberg, National Culinary Review & Culinology The 21st Peanut Institute Annual Media Retreat in Napa Valley brought together nutrition and food science experts from the Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham & Womens Hospital, and University of Georgia. They shared the latest research about peanuts with attending media from 17 print and online publications. In addition to the latest peanut research findings, the attendees learned about the global growth of Meatless Monday and examples of how some of the 40-plus countries in the movement are using peanuts in their cuisines. Attendees also tried out their culinary skills at the kitchens of the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone. Peanut Institute members joined the media representatives in teams to cook up various meatless recipes with a variety of peanut flavorings. In terms of the top three takeaways from the Peanut Institute Retreat, they are: 1. Peanuts have more protein than any other nut, which helps keep you satisfied between meals. They also have 19 vitamins and minerals, and an abundance of bioactive compounds. Research shows that the unique package of nutrients found in peanuts helps reduce the risk of heart disease, and even the risk of death. 2. There are 100,000 miles of blood vessels in the body and research shows that eating peanuts can help keep them healthy. A study performed by Penn State shows that the bioactives, protein and arginine in peanuts helps keep arteries flexible after a high fat meal. Peanuts are particularly high in arginine, an amino acid that helps keep blood vessels flexible and healthy. This is important for all age groups and especially athletes. 3. Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, an internationally recognized sports nutritionist and author discussed the benefits of peanuts and peanut butter for athletic performance. Peanut butter is one of the best sports foods around; it is a great pre- or post-workout snack, and is loved by the NBA and other athletes. The high protein content in peanuts helps repair muscles while the arginine helps keep blood vessels open. All participants of The Peanut Institute’s annual nutrition and culinary retreat  at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in Napa Valley, CA The post Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Sizes Up SuperfoodsMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve your health. This is the third article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. For many adults, being time-pressed has become the norm. Theyre driven to pack more into any given moment. With this mind, perhaps its no surprise that theres a recent surge of interest in superfoods - plant foods that pack in more nutrition than other food items. Sure, this food trend is hot right now, but does the reality actually live up to the hype? Turns out the answer is yes, as long as youre consuming the right foods for the right reasons. According to Diana K. Rice, a registered dietitian who works with Meatless Monday, Many plant-based foods pack in more fiber, minerals and fiber than other dietary choices, said Rice. So if youre looking to improve the quality of your diet, its a great idea to rely on these foods over choices like processed carbohydrates and animal products. But dont expect superfoods to deliver a miracle cure for your medical problems, cautions Rice. She explains, No single food is going to help you lose weight, give you clearer skin or achieve whatever other health goal youre after. The main reason to eat superfoods is that they are nutritious and convenient. One easy way to pack more superfoods into yoir diet is to adopt the practice of Meatless Monday. When you choose not to eat meat one day a week, theres a lot of room left in your diet to fill with nutrient-packed superfoods, Rice said. And when you try tasty new dishes containing plant-based superfoods on a Monday, youll be more likely to incorporate them into your diet over the rest of the week, too. To kick off your new Meatless Monday habit, Rice recommends these plant-based superfoods: Peanuts: Not only is this plant-based source of protein highly affordable, its adored by the masses for its appealing flavor. In addition to seven grams of protein per one ounce serving, peanuts are a terrific source of folate and resveratrol - yes, the red wine nutrient! Found in whole peanuts (as well as grape skins), resveratrol is an antioxidant thats linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think outside the peanut butter sandwich with Peanut Noodles or Peanut Butter Chili.   Avocados: This fruit is a super substitute for animal products on Meatless Monday because its healthy fat content satisfies the same craving you might have for a juicy steak. But since the fats found in avocados are mostly heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, theyre doing your body a favor along with your tastebuds. Grill them and top with salsa for a new twist or try them with pasta in this Pea and Avocado Penne.   Kale: Sure, kale isnt as trendy as it once was. Nowadays, foods like collard greens and Brussels sprouts are stealing the spotlight. However, kale rose to popularity for good reason - it scores a perfect 1000 on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index, meaning that it packs in more nutrition per calorie than most other foods. In particular, its a great source of vitamins A, K, C and fiber. Give it a spin in this Forbidden Rice Salad or try a new variation on your lasagna with this kale-packed version.   Mushrooms: Not many foods pack in a hefty dose of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin. But one portabella mushroom can pack in 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D, which is more than half of the recommended daily intake level. Theyre an especially good choice for people who are averse to sun or live in northern climates, plus they offer the crave-able umami flavor found in meat. Try them in Mushroom Tikka Masala or Mushroom Hemp Tartlets.   Tomatoes: No, not the pale pink slice thats suspiciously topping your sandwich. Were talking deep, dark red tomatoes - especially canned tomatoes - that are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant thats linked to heart health and reduced cancer risk. Pump up your lycopene intake with dishes like Shakshouka with Rainbow Chard and Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup. The post Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles

June 17 2016 My New Roots 

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles Fudgesicles were a mainstay in the freezer of my childhood, and my go-to sugar fix if the cookie jar was empty. Since weve been blessed here in Copenhagen with a warm spring and early start to the summer season, day after day of blue skies and sundresses has jumpstarted my summer food fantasies. I felt like revisiting the frosty, chocolate-y pops that were such a relief in the sweltering heat, but this time, with a healthy plan of attack. In my cookbook, I made a killer ice cream from avocados and cashews. Knowing how creamy and delicious this combination was, I wanted to recreate a similar base, with dates as the sweetener and raw cacao powder as the chocolate element. So, I made a couple versions of these fudgesicles, since I wanted to eat more be thorough. The first experiment was with just cashews and avocado. The results were pretty delicious but pretty expensive, and a few of my taste-testers found the ice cream bars a little dry in the mouth. For the second version I scaled way back on the cashews and used coconut milk to enhance juiciness while maintaining creaminess. I also upped the cacao. Because chocolate. It was a perfectly balanced combination, and the version I am presenting you with today. The magical version. These are so lusciously creamy, sinfully rich-tasting – the kind of thing you put in your mouth and kind of can’t believe what’s happening. Vegan, almost raw, and full of whole food ingredients, they are also downright filling! They make a fabulous mid-morning or afternoon pick-me-up, especially with the raw cacao component, a deliciously effective, energy-boosting food. Dress them up with your favourite add-ins, or keep it simple and enjoy them as the five-ingredient bliss bars that they are. Cashew News! I was snacking on some cashews the other day (as one does) and offered some to a friend of mine, who declined. Her reason? Cashews are so fattening. Wait a minute, what? who started this ugly rumour?! Maybe this is news to you too, but cashews are actually one of the lowest-fat nuts out there. Weighing in at only 67% fat, next to almonds at 76%, hazelnuts at 86%, and macadamia nuts at 93%, cashews rank pretty low on the scale - and lets keep in mind that 66% of the fat in cashews is the heart-healthy, monounsaturated variety. Rejoice! And while we are clearing up misconceptions, cashews are not technically nuts, but seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, an edible fruit native to South America. Cashew trees are in the same botanical family as mango and pistachio. The multi-step process to make cashews edible is quite involved, and typically includes steaming the whole seed pod, removing the outer shell, drying, and skinning. The inner shell layer of the cashew nut contains a caustic resin that can cause significant skin rashes, and is toxic if ingested. The raw cashews that you purchase at a grocery store health food shop are not typically raw, just not roasted. Because of the steaming step in conventional cashew processing, cashews cannot be considered a truly raw product. Truly raw cashews are available on specialty websites and in some health food stores, but at a premium since separating the cashews from their shell without the nut coming into contact with the resin is time consuming and must be done by hand. Cashews are an excellent source of the mineral copper. Copper helps our body utilize iron, eliminate free radicals, and build bone and connective tissue. It is also an essential component of a wide range of enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) which aids energy production and antioxidant defence. One-third of a cup of cashews delivers over 100% of your recommended daily intake of copper. A high-speed blender is recommended for this recipe, but if you dont have one make sure you blend until the mixture is as smooth as possible. You can add water to thin the mixture if it is too thick to blend, but keep in mind the more water you add, the less creamy the bars will be - more crystalline. No matter what, they will taste amazing. Because they’re magic. The fudgesicle recipe below is unreasonably delicious as-is, but it can act also as a base for you to flavour as you like! You can add toppings after removing the fudgesicles from their mold too. This involves melted raw or regular chocolate and your creative spirit! Dip or drizzle the chocolate over the frozen bar, and sprinkle away. MAGIC WANDS. This would make a very popular activity at a kids birthday party. Or my birthday party. Stop looking at me like that. Ive included some options for both flavourings and toppings to inspire you, but these are merely suggestions. I know all of you super enthusiastic foodies out there will come up with some stellar combos. Let me know in the comments if you do!     Print recipe     5-Ingredient Vegan Magical Fudgesicles Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 Liter /­­ 10 fudgesicles Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g unroasted, unsalted cashews 1 14-oz can /­­ 400ml full-fat coconut milk 1 large, ripe avocado 1 cup /­­ 250g pitted, packed soft dates 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g raw cacao powder (cocoa powder will also work) Optional add-ins: a few pinches sea salt vanilla (seeds from 1 pod, powder, or extract) a few drops of food-grade essential oils (peppermint, orange, almond etc.) finely diced fresh fruit (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, mango etc.) a pinch of cayenne pepper espresso powder finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) Optional toppings: melted raw chocolate (recipe here) or melted dark chocolate cacao nibs finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) dried fruit (I used raspberry on the ones pictured) citrus zest (lemon, orange, lime) hemp seeds unsweetened desiccated coconut bee pollen Directions: 1. Place cashews in lightly salted water and let soak for 4-8 hours (overnight is fine). 2. Drain the cashews and rinse well. Add to a blender (a high-speed blender is highly recommended) with the remaining ingredients (and any flavourings, if using) and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Add water only if necessary - you want to mixture to remain quite thick. 3. Spoon mixture in popsicle molds. Firmly knock the molds on the counter a few times to remove any air bubbles. Insert a popsicle stick into each mold and place in the freezer until set - at least 6 hours. To remove popsicles, run the mold under hot water until you can easily pull a fudgesicle out. 4. If you want to decorate your fudgesicles, dip or drizzle them with melted chocolate and sprinkle with desired toppings. Eat immediately, or place back in the freezer to set until ready to enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * In other very magical news, my latest Cody app video series is now online! This one is all about my favourite subject: SNACKS!!! Super-Charged Snacks to be exact. And every recipe is brand-new, incredibly delicious, and of course über healthy. If you haven’t seen the Protein-Rich Cacao Brownie video on my Facebook page yet, go have a look! You can preview all of the recipes here and purchase the plan too (it’s on sale!). Thank you so much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! Big love and gratitude, Sarah B. The post 5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles appeared first on My New Roots.

Kale is the New Spinach

June 7 2016 VegKitchen 

Kale is the New Spinach Kale, a dark leafy green vegetable, thats become a favorite in recent years, is packed with vitamins and minerals. Its health benefits are indisputable,as one of the foods richest in vitamin A, vitamin K, beta carotene and even calcium. Kale is one of the oldest cultivating vegetables on earth and until the Middle Ages it was one of the most popular vegetables in Europe.

How to Take Avocados to the Next (Vegan Superfood) Level

May 9 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Take Avocados to the Next (Vegan Superfood) Level Obsessed. Thats usually what follows avocados in the say the first word that comes to mind game. And I hear you: avocados are pretty awesome. Theyre also having a moment. In a time where the idea of fat has finally moved beyond being an admonished food group and onto a proudly promoted part of a healthy diet, avocado has quickly risen as a superstar, easily ranked amongst the worlds healthiest foods. Even better, avocado is delicious and highly versatile (as Im sure I dont need to convince you). Lets look at some of the ways you can boost your favorite avocado applications even further with the addition of superfoods. Avocado Toast | One look at any food-oriented Instagram feed, and youll quickly notice avocado toast is a serious thing. But why stop at just avocado? Try boosting your favorite toast with a sprinkle of hemp seeds and chia seeds for extra protein. You can also add microgreens and crumbled seaweed like nori for additional minerals and protective antioxidants. Avocado Smoothies | So, youve discovered that a chunk of avocado in a smoothie makes it unbelievably creamy, have you? What you may not know is there are certain superfoods that go exceedingly well with this type of smooth base ... in particular cacao (think chocolate pudding) and acai ( like the creamiest acai bowl youve ever had). Add either - or both - of these superfoods into your next smoothie with an avocado base and enjoy a truly deluxe superfood drink! Avocado Dips | Avocados most famous use is perhaps as a dip, in particular guacamole. The strong flavors of this easy-to-make recipe are more than just delicious - theyre a great place to tuck in other superfoods unnoticed which boost and balance nutrition, yet dont really contribute to the overall taste. Since avocado dips are already expectedly green, my favorite additions are green powders, like wheatgrass, which add the power of a big serving of leafy green vegetables in a motivatingly innocuous form. Just mix in a small scoop into your next dip and prepare to be amazed at how little you notice this uber-healthy addition. Avocado Desserts | You can use avocado in all kinds of desserts - from ice creams to baked goods - where it functions like a creamy fat (and a great butter replacement, I might add). To help mask avocados taste in this application, I like to use superfoods like maca and cacao together to create a very rich malty flavor thats extremely harmonious to the fresh richness of avocado. Plus, combining these foods together creates a seriously energizing dessert, the most nutritious of ways! Whats your favorite way to eat avocados, and how do you plan on boosting it with superfoods?

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Spelt Flour

February 2 2016 Vegetarian Times 

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Spelt FlourWe asked our friends at the Natural Gourmet Institute to weigh in on popular, healthy ingredients and cooking methods. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a  comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether youre a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course. While spelt may be an ancient grain, its finding its way into lots of modern recipes. And no wonder: its a perfect choice for health-conscious cooks who want to add more variety to their current stable of grains, and it’s a fitting alternative to whole wheat products. Some people claim spelt is better than whole wheat, touting its nutty flavor. While taste may be a valid distinguishing quality, spelt is nutritionally on par with whole wheat --it boasts fewer calories, but it has less fiber and other nutrients than its counterpart. Another big difference? Spelt is technically not wheat. Though it does contain gluten,  spelt’s gluten is more soluble than that of wheat gluten, and therefore acts differently during the cooking process. Health Benefits of Spelt Spelt provides lots of nutritional benefits, and boasts an impressive mineral and vitamin content. It is high in fiber, and a good source of essential vitamins and minerals such as iron, magnesium, and B vitamins. Here are a few favorite recipes utilizing spelt: Spelt pizza dough--Spelt flour is a sub-in for flour in any pizza dough recipe. Many people swear by the texture and flavor that it provides versus other heartier flours.  Spelt salad--Toast about 1 cup of spelt kernels in a dry skillet until browned, rinse well with cold water. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and simmer spelt until tender, about an hour. Use this as a base for a salad serving eight to ten people. What else to include? Try a protein such as tofu or beans, veggies like bell peppers and onion, and a spicy peanut butter sauce to top it off. Spelt waffles - Spelt flour can act as a 1:1 replacement for whole wheat flour. So try it out in waffles to create a light, airy final product with a nutty flavor. These waffles can also include spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg. Shredded apple can be a great addition too. Kayleen St. John is the resident nutritionist at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet. 

A Healthy New Year’s Resolution: Go Meatless on Monday!

December 28 2015 Meatless Monday 

Looking for a resolution this new year? Try going meatless on Monday! Ditching the meat once a week can do your health, your bank account, and the planet a lot of good. So whether you’re interested in getting healthy, saving money, or trying to save the world in 2016, pledging to make Meatless Monday part of your weekly routine is a great way to get started with your new year’s resolution. Here’s why! Going meatless is great for your health Introducing a diet focused on plant-based foods - vegetables, fruits, and whole grains - has been shown to improve cardiovascular health and help prevent heart disease. Studies also show that diets focused on foods that come from plants can help curb obesity and lead to a longer lifespan. Some evidence even suggests that consuming large quantities of red or processed meats may lead to an increased risk of colo-rectal cancers. Plant foods also provide an array of vitamins and minerals that are crucial for health and well-being, both for growing bodies and for adult health. By eating less meat each week, you leave more room on your plate for plant-based meals that can help you get healthier and stay that way! Skipping meat once a week can keep you (and your wallet) feeling full Eating your greens can help save you lots of green! Not only is meat expensive and a big chunk of the average weekly omnivores food budget, but eating less meat can lead to fewer hospital and healthcare bills. Meatless sources of protein like legumes and other vegetables tend to cost less per serving than meat, so they make an economical (as well as healthy) choice. In the US chronic, preventable diseases like heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes account for 75% of the $2 trillion spent annually on medical care. Reducing the risk of these conditions by eating less meat is one good choice for your wallet and for public health bills in general. Its one way to take action on climate change Meat production incurs a massive environmental cost in resources like grain, water, and fossil fuels. Food and water for the growing of livestock, and then fuel for the processing, shipping, and refrigeration of meat, takes a toll on the environment and is rapidly evolving as one of the leading causes of climate change around the world. Livestock animals also produce a large quantity of greenhouse gases like methane, further damaging the earths atmosphere. By reducing the demand for meat by eating a little less each week, anyone can chip away at the environmental costs of agriculture right from the dinner table. There are lots of specific, science-backed reasons to try Meatless Monday; make one small resolution every week and have a happy, healthy new year! The post A Healthy New Year’s Resolution: Go Meatless on Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash

April 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Food magazines and online food publications are all about bright and green spring recipes right now, but I know that a lot of us are still waiting for that first asparagus to pop up, and for rhubarb to show its blush at the stores and markets. I’m checking in with one more transitional meal today, still cozy and hearty, but very vegetable-forward. There’s a step-by-step video, too :) Have you ever tried braising or roasting whole leeks? It’s a revelatory way of preparing the vegetable, since leeks usually play a secondary role, where they get thinly sliced and pretty much disappear into whatever dish they are in. Cooking leeks whole yields surprisingly delicious results, and brings forward their sweet, mildly oniony flavor. The texture becomes incredibly buttery, and the modest vegetable becomes completely transformed. One thing that makes me nervous about cooking with leeks is throwing away the majestic, green tops, since most recipes only call for the more tender, white parts of the leek. I always save the tops to include in homemade vegetable broth, and I suggest making a quick broth out of the tops and cauliflower stems here (although you can of course use store-bought broth as well). The cauliflower and white bean mash is the perfect, hearty pairing to the braised leeks. It’s smooth and peppery, with a studding of fresh herbs throughout. Both components of the dish keep well and make for great leftovers. I can imagine the mash working well served with roasted carrots or grilled asparagus for another quick meal. Enjoy! Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the braised leeks 5-6 large leeks with long white parts 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee sea salt freshly ground black pepper veggie broth - reserved from boiling green parts of the leeks or store bought for the cauliflower white bean mash 1 cup dried white beans - soaked overnight 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves (optional) one 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee pinch red pepper flakes 1 large yellow onion - chopped 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 small head of cauliflower - cut into florets leek broth from above or any veggie broth freshly ground black pepper handful each parsley and dill - chopped (optional) olive oil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions to braise the leeks Cut the dark green parts off the leeks. Wash the green parts thoroughly and place into a large soup pot together with leftover cauliflower core and stems, cover with water. Bring to a boil over the high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. You can also add any vegetable scraps you have on hand to this broth. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. This step could be done the day before. You can of course skip this step entirely and just use store-bought or pre-cooked vegetable broth. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half vertically and place into the sink or a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak a bit and carefully wash all the dirt from between the layers. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the washed and dried leeks to the pan face down in a single layer. Leave to cook undisturbed until golden on one side. Flip, add salt and pepper and let the other side caramelize. Add leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the leeks partially. Establish a strong simmer, cover the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the leeks are tender throughout. Add more broth if too much evaporates. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Serve the leeks on top of the cauliflower white bean mash, below. to make the cauliflower white bean mash While the leek broth and leeks are cooking, drain and rinse the beans and add to a large pot. Cover the beans with plenty of water, add garlic, bay leaves and kombu, if using, and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered. Start checking the beans for doneness after 30 minutes and continue to cook until tender, if necessary. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain the beans and set aside. This step can be done the day before. The cooking liquid from the beans can be reserved and used as vegetable broth in other dishes, as well as frozen for up to 2 months. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat, add red pepper flakes, onion and a pinch of salt and cook for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, until fragrant. Add cauliflower, a large pinch of salt, black pepper and the leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 7-10 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add more liquid if too much evaporates to ensure that the cauliflower is being steamed. Add in cooked beans at the end, toss to warm them through. Add the cauliflower and beans to a food processor, along with a splash of the leek broth/­­any veggie broth. Process until smooth. Test for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add parsley and dill and pulse to incorporate. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your food processor. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with the braised leeks from above. Notes 1. If you dont have time to cook dried beans, you can use 3 cups already cooked/­­canned white beans in this recipe. 2. Although kombu is optional, its a great thing to throw into the pot when cooking beans, as it helps make beans more digestible, as well as contributes its minerals. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and VeggiesMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the second article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Its long been known that a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables is good for your physical health. Lower blood pressure and less risk of heart disease are among the many benefits. But did you know fruits and veggies can also be good for your mental health? Absolutely true. According to a recent study, higher consumption of fruit and vegetables may increase feelings of well-being, happiness and life satisfaction. In addition, the study participants who ate more fruits and vegetables tended to be more curious and more creative than those who didnt. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that dietary patterns emphasizing fruits and vegetables may be linked to better psychological health.[i] A recent study found that higher fruit and vegetable consumption may increase well-being, curiosity and creativity, possibly related to micronutrients and carbohydrate composition.[ii] This is probably related to the fact you are giving your body and brain more healthy vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and fiber, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. This conclusion is supported by a separate study that found growing evidence that suggests that eating more fruits and vegetables is linked to better psychological health. So which foods help you feel happier, more creative and brimming with curiosity? Well, for starters, try roasted carrots and other root vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams and squash. Also, fresh berries are highly recommended to lift your spirits - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, take your pick! And to jump-start your good mood, weve got a special recipe thats sure to make you smile. Root Vegetable Samosas   References: [i]Rooney C, McKinley MC, Woodside JV. The potential role of fruit and vegetables in aspects of psychological well-being: A review of the literature and future directions. TheProceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2013; 72: 420-432. doi:10.1017/­­S0029665113003388 [ii] Conner TS, Brookie KL, Richardson AC, Polak MA. On carrots and curiosity: eating fruits and vegetables is associated with greater flourishing in daily life. Br J Health Psychol. 2015; 20(2):413-27. The post The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt

January 19 2017 VegKitchen 

Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt Pink Himalayan salt is a special type of rock salt that contains plenty of health benefits, particularly because it offers more than 84 natural elements in their mineral form.The post Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!

August 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!National Farmers Market Week, August 7-13, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season!   Hungry for more fresh farmers market finds? Tour the Union Square Greenmarket with Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony Restaurant in NYC: The post Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit Fathers

June 13 2016 Meatless Monday 

Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit FathersThis week Kimatni D. Rawlins takes our hero challenge to a new level--helping fathers become fit for their families. A former college athlete, Kimatni lost sight of his health goals in the early years of raising a young family, but later experienced a personal epiphany that inspired him to shed 50 pounds through a plant-based diet and daily workouts. The founder of the fitness and wellness website Fit Fathers, Kimatni today uses his knowledge as a certified fitness instructor and nutritionist to create programs that speak to men at all fitness levels. Learn more about his work and his enthusiasm for Meatless Monday in our recent interview below. You were a 250-pound running back in college. What stressors happened in those post-college years that turned you into a self-acclaimed couch potato? Work, partying, traveling, and entrepreneurship. After years of football at Georgia Tech I was a bit worn and didnt exert that same effort as I did on the field. Basically, I chose to let excuses run my life. Did you experience a specific wakeup call to get healthier? Was going meatless part of this change? At age 45 I actually wanted to relive my playing days at Tech, yet I lacked the energy and stamina needed to obtain the goal. I finally said, Enough is enough, and signed up for the Mens Health Urbanathlon in Chicago. I finished in the middle of the pack but was very exhausted after the 9-mile, 7-obstacle course. That moment I decided to study the body and how it metabolizes energy. It all led back to the foods we eat and those we choose to discard. Slowly I began eliminating chicken, fish, and dairy. Red meat and pork was never an option. Then, the icing on the cake was after my wife (also a vegan) and I watched the movies Forks Over Knives and Food, Inc. What are the positive changes youve experienced from being on a vegan diet? I have energy for days, my doctor says that my health numbers are that of an 18-year-old athlete, and I feel fluid and light on my feet after meals. I have since run a marathon and a few Urbanathlons, and every year I complete at least three half-marathons. I also train a few clients and lead group workout sessions for schools, non-profits, and work groups. Did getting into shape make you a better father? How? Yes, of course. Together my wife and I prepare well-balanced meals for the kids instead of relying on processed school lunches and fast foods. The girls (now 12 and 9) are little vegan chefs and also prepare plant-based meals for the family, especially when we have guests over. Additionally, I have the energy to expend with them after my workday is over. No longer do I let an excuse supersede our values, which are staying active, eating clean, and energizing our lives. What are the challenges men face that cause them to lose sight of their health? Do fathers in particular face special challenges in balancing home and work life? Far too often men continue to rely on the female of the household for shopping, cooking, and meal preparation. If she eats poorly, then most likely so will he. If she eats healthily but is often away, then dad is at a disadvantage if he doesnt know how to grocery shop or cook. Fit Fathers helps offset these behavioral patterns by providing recipes, nutrition tips, meal plans, etc. Today you are a physical trainer, active marathoner, and athlete. Can hard-core athletes really be successful without eating meat? Yes, thats me. Its amazing because I could barely run a mile when I was a meat-eating footballer. Keep in mind fruits, veggies, and grains are complex carbohydrates, which are humans main source of fuel, converted into glucose to be transported into every cell for energy. What repairs and accelerates the growth of cellular tissue is the macronutrient protein and its found in all foods. Beans, for example, provide needed protein, dietary fiber (which the majority of Americans lack), and various vitamins and minerals. Thus, veggies are also comprised of protein so a plant-based diet will never be devoid of any major food group. Moreover, we only need 5 to 10 per cent of our daily caloric intake to stem from proteins. Heard of Scott Jurek? He follows a pure vegan diet and is virtually unbeatable in 100-mile-plus ultra runs. Can you capsulize your health program in a few words? Yep! We have two key mantras. Lead by example so your child becomes the example and Eat Clean, Stay Active, and Energize Your Life. Why does Meatless Monday appeal to you? How do you incorporate it into your programs? We love Meatless Monday. It helps people let go of animal protein one step at a time while nourishing their bodies, reducing their carbon footprint, and ultimately giving animals another reason to breathe. Many of my close friends and followers have gone plant-based after starting their lifestyle change with a Meatless Monday. It works! Readers can follow the Fit Fathers movement at www.FitFathers.com and @FitFathers.    The post Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit Fathers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

4 Ways to Give Your Vegan Baking a Makeover

May 10 2016 Vegetarian Times 

4 Ways to Give Your Vegan Baking a Makeover Just because youre looking to follow a healthy lifestyle, doesnt mean you have to sit out on all the fresh-baked fun! There are many tricks that natural food chefs and nutritionists alike use to help raise nutrient density, therefore lessening the guilt. While these ingenious methods may not give us the liberty to eat breakfast bread like its a leafy green salad, they do offer a wonderful compromise in creating better-for-you, great-tasting treats. These are some of my favorite tricks to use: Sneak in Fruit and Vegetable Purees | To achieve moist baked goodies, like a soft cookie or dense brownie, most chefs rely on large amounts of butter or oil (which, as you can imagine, raises the calorie and fat content of a dessert faster than you can say oh no, I really shouldnt). The good news is there are many other ways to keep moisture in desserts that are far healthier! Using fruit or vegetable purees is a go-to method of mine, as it not only keeps desserts moist, but purees also help sweeten, add flavor, and provide extra fiber at the same time. For fruits, the most versatile varieties include mashed bananas and applesauce. As for vegetables, purees of pumpkin, squash, and even carrots work excellently. How much to use ranges from recipe to recipe - as a baseline, I often use about half of the normal amount of oil a recipe calls for, and substitute the other half with a puree in a 1:1 ratio. This way, you wont sacrifice any flavor! Celebrate With Smart Sweeteners | I talk a lot about using different types of sweeteners, but it bears repeating - theres simply no need to use empty sugars like white cane sugar and corn syrup when we have a world of great sweeteners that actually offer some benefits! Use low-glycemic coconut sugar as a one-to-one replacement for all your white sugar needs, and try healthier liquid sweeteners like yacon syrup or maple syrup when you need something in liquid form. Use Superseed Eggs | While eggs do offer protein, these days, many people are increasingly avoiding them due to eggs being a high cholesterol, acid forming (and thus inflammation promoting), and/­­or allergenic food. To keep everyone in your cookie list happy, try using a binder replacement of flaxseeds or chia instead, which offer protein, healthy fats, fiber, and minerals! Once these seeds are ground into a powder, they can be mixed with water and left to sit for 10 minutes to form a jelly-like substance that acts very egg-like in recipes that dont require eggs to rise (this includes all cookies, brownies, and many cakes). To use this egg-hack, just remember this ratio: 2 tablespoons powder + 1/­­3 cup water = 2 eggs. Boost With Superfoods | Healthy eating isnt all about what you take out; its also about what you put in. If your recipe of sugar, oil, and flour seems pretty nutritionally dire, think about what you can add into the recipe that will subtly raise its healthy value. For example, adding in real cacao nibs into chocolate chip cookies not only adds a chocolaty crunch, but loads of important minerals too. Replacing a couple tablespoons of flour with unflavored or vanilla protein powder stealthily adds bonus protein and fiber. Or try adding in the enjoyable sweet chew of antioxidant-rich dried mulberries to create a treat as extra delicious as it is nutritious.

How Do I Cook with Seaweed

April 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Sea vegetables deserve way more attention than they get from sushi bars and maki rolls.  Mineral dense and a great source of iron, magnesium and potassium, seaweed is the unique source of plant-based EPA; an omega-3 fatty acid otherwise only found in animal products.  And theres an entire world of sea vegetables out there.  Here are a few of the most common varieties. Nori: The sushi staple also makes great wraps for veggie rolls.  Dulse: After a quick soak in cold water, the brownish/­­ dark purple seaweed makes a wonderful addition to salads.  Kombu: The fat, dried strips of sea kelp are most often used as flavoring agents. They can be added to vegetable broths as they cook, then thinly sliced to add texture, umami flavor, and richness to soups.

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Beets

January 29 2016 Vegetarian Times 

One Ingredient, Three Ways: BeetsWe asked our friends at the National Gourmet Institute to weigh in on popular, healthy ingredients and cooking methods. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a  comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether you’re a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course.   Have you noticed a number of new beet products on store shelves lately? From beet hummus to beet-infused sports drinks, beets are now in the spotlight, and for good reason. A 2015 review in the journal Nutrients found that beets and their concentrate hold promise in treating oxidative stress and inflammation. But the health benefits associated with beets dont stop there. They’ve also been shown to lower blood pressure, slow the progression of dementia, enhance exercise performance, lower blood glucose, and increase insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes. This chenopod packs fiber, essential minerals, vitamin C, and more. Here are three easy ways to integrate beets in your  diet: Beet Salad: Albeit a more traditional avenue, nothing beats (unable to resist the pun) a fresh salad with citrus, goat cheese, walnuts and herbs for flavor. Note that golden, or yellow, beets have a mild flavor compared to their red counterparts, so consider incorporating some to broaden the flavor profile of a salad. Sauce: Beets are versatile, and can be part of a simple beet and horseradish sauce–like that served as part of a Seder--or replace some of the tomato in a non-traditional beet marinara. Embrace a root-to-frond mindset and use the beet greens to create a pesto sauce, or simply sauté them with garlic. Chocolate beet cake: While beets dont always replace a single ingredient in cooking, their water content can help add moisture to baked goods. Try adding some to your next chocolate cake! Kayleen St. John is the resident nutritionist at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet. 

8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat

December 21 2015 Meatless Monday 

During the holiday season families around the world gather around the table to share a meal and get into the spirit of the season. While many traditional holiday feasts have meat on the table, this year could be the year you try out a meatless holiday! These savory, hearty meals are fit for any family banquet. Gatherers Pie, In My Bowl Youve heard of shepherds pie (usually made with lamb or mutton) and cottage pie ( a similar dish made with beef). Both are traditional foods of the winter months in many parts of the world, having a layer of protein and vegetables baked under a top layer of mashed potatoes. Turn this recipe into a meatless dish that has all the heartiness and flavor, with tons of nutritional value!   Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Manitoba Harvest These tasty, crusty tartlets make an excellent starter or horderves for your festive meals. Made with hemp hearts (which add an extra boost of protein and savory umami flavor), mushrooms, and goat cheese, these morsels pair rich flavors with flaky pastry.   Vegducken, Epicurious Now famous on the internet for several seasons, the Turducken (a dish that consists of turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) now has a new twist: a meatless version! The Vegducken is a butternut squash stuffed with an eggplant stuffed with a zucchini. This recipe also includes gravy and stuffing recipes (all meatless, of course) that pair with your freshly-roasted Vegducken.   Wild Rice, Lentil & Cranberry Stuffed Delicata Squash, Oh My Veggies Your meatless main course becomes the main event of the evening with stuffed delicate squash! Go overboard this season with squash boats stuffed with wild rice, lentils and cranberries. Youll get all those holiday flavors and a heaping helping of vitamins and fiber.   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie, Ezra Pound Cake Another take on the classic shepherds pie or cottage pie, this lentil pie is 100% vegan and is sure to please even the most ravenous carnivores at your table. This recipe also uses a trendy twist on mashed potatoes for the top layer: cauliflower! Lots of chefs and cooks are experimenting with cauliflower in recipes that have ordinarily called for a variety of other ingredients. Use a mix of mashed potatoes and cauliflower for your version, or experiment with an all cauliflower mash for your table! Heres a note from the recipes creator, a two-cup portion is 400 calories, with 5.5 grams of fat, 16 grams of fiber, 19 grams of protein and more than 100 percent of your daily requirements for vitamins A and C.   Seitan Stuffed with Walnuts, Dried Cranberries, and Mushrooms, Fat Free Vegan Have you discovered seitan? Seitan is made from heat, and has a wonderful texture that soaks up flavor as it cooks. This moist, stuffed seitan has all the flavors of its filling - walnuts, cranberries, mushrooms, and seasonings. Follow the recipes advice for reheating, using the microwave will help keep it moist, the oven will dry it out a bit.   Mushroom Wellington with Spinach, Ramsons & Bramble Youve heard of beef Wellington, a classic culinary feat for students learning to be professional chefs. This mushroom Wellington has all of the flavor and all of the artistry of a classic beef Wellington - just none of the beef! This version of the dish calls for walnuts and oats instead of plain bread crumbs, which adds whole grain vitamins and minerals to an already healthy dish.   Autumn Vegetables w/­­ Balsamic Glaze, Veggie Chick These hearty glazed vegetables make an excellent side dish for your holiday table, late night snack, omelet the next morning, and lunch the following day! Roasted fall/­­winter vegetables are a treat to eat at any meal when they are fresh and in season.   Anytime family gathers around the table its a time for celebration. Enjoy some of thee meatless recipes together, and have a happy holiday! The post 8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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