mineral - vegetarian recipes

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mineral vegetarian recipes

Bali Butter

March 12 2019 My New Roots 

Bali Butter I miss Bali. Or maybe I just miss the warmth, the sun, the vibrancy, the life bursting forth from every nook and cranny. I miss living outside, I miss my eyes being assaulted by colours, and layers upon layers of wild sounds, but hey, its March in Ontario and this is a familiar feeling. Are you feeling it too? A couple weeks ago when I was in the depths of yet another snowstorm, feeling like spring may never come, I came up with this recipe to remedy my winter woes. Its called Bali Butter - and its the most delicious thing to cross my lips since I could see grass outside my window. A rich combination of cashews, coconut, and cacao, blended together with coconut sugar and salt, its like the nut butter of DREAMS in all of its salty-sweet-crunchy-chocolatey glory. And I am really excited to share this one with you, wherever you and no matter what season youre experiencing. What does one do with Bali Butter, you ask? Let me tell you, it goes on all. the. things. Pancakes, waffles, smoothie bowls, toast, rice cakes, ice cream, fruit salad, porridge, yogurt, and fingers! You can stuff dates with Bali Butter, stick them in the fridge and have something delicious on hand to satisfy those salty-sweet-fat cravings too. Slice a banana lengthwise, slather Bali Butter in the middle and sandwich it together again. I even like it with carrot sticks. No joke. I chose to use coconut sugar in my Bali Butter because its one of the main sweeteners used on the island and you can easily find it everywhere. Some of you may be curious about using liquid sweetener as an alternative, but the problem with using something like maple syrup or honey, is that it causes the nut butter to seize up. Fat is hydrophobic (translation: its afraid of water) and will stiffen when it comes into contact with anything that contains it. Using a solid sweetener, like coconut sugar, avoids this problem and keeps the finished product relaxed and runny. If you dont want to use coconut sugar and you dont mind a less-spreadable version of Bali Butter, sweeten it with whatever you have on hand. I think Ive talked about all of these ingredients respectively, but for the heck of it, lets recap why theyre awesome! Coconut - Once a maligned food for its saturated fat content, coconut has taken center stage in the wellness world, as scientific research has confirmed that the type of fat in coconut integrates differently in the body, compared to other saturated fats. MCTs (medium-chain-triglycerides) are a type of fat that can be broken down quickly and used as fuel, instead of being stored, so its prefect for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. Coconut also contains a surprising amount of protein, about 14% by weight, and impressive amounts of manganese.   Cashews - Contrary to popular belief, cashews have a lower fat content than most nuts. And 66% of their fats are heart-healthy, monounsaturated fats, like those found in olive oil. Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. They also contain good amounts of fiber, so that they keep you feeling full for longer.  Cacao - One of the best sources of magnesium found in nature, in addition to containing high amounts calcium, zinc, iron, copper, sulfur, and potassium, cacao is a nutritional powerhouse. It also contains many chemical compounds that enhance physical and mental well-being, including alkaloids, proteins, magnesium, beta-carotene, leucine, linoleic acid, lipase, lysine, and some neurotransmitters such as dopamine and anandamide - which explains why eating chocolate makes you feel so darn good! Coconut sugar - Sometimes called coconut palm sugar, this incredibly delicious sweetener is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts.  Some notes on the recipe. Its very important that you make coconut butter to start, as it creates the liquid base to help the get the cashews going in the food processor. Once youve made the coconut-cashew butter, feel free to stop there (it tastes incredible on its own), or go all the way as I have and add the cacao, coconut sugar and salt. I like to leave my Bali Butter out of the fridge, since it remains liquid and spreadable at room temperature. If you refrigerate it, Bali Butter with harden completely. You can roll it into balls and make yourself some pretty delicious little energy bites when its in this state, but its impossible to drizzle when chilled.   If youre into smooth nut butters, simply leave the cacao nibs out of the equation. They arent necessary for any other purpose than crunch, which I personally feel is essential, but I wont judge anyone for skipping them. Even though youre obviously crazy     Print recipe     Bali Butter  Makes 3 cups /­­ 750ml Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 375g raw cashews 3 cups /­­ 240g unsweetened desiccated coconut   3/­­4 tsp. large flake sea salt (I used Maldon) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 23g raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. coconut sugar 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs seeds from 1 vanilla bean Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Spread cashews out evenly on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Toast for about 10 minutes, keeping an eye on them so that they dont burn! Remove from oven and let cool. 2. While the cashews are in the oven, toast the coconut in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until slightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. Depending on the size of your skillet, you may want to work in batches. 3. Place the coconut in a food processor. Blend on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the coconut is creamy and smooth (this make take up to 10 minutes, depending on the strength of your food processor - be patient!). 4. Add the cashews to the food processor and blend on high until creamy and smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on high. Taste and adjust saltiness /­­ sweetness /­­ chocolate levels to suit your taste. 5. Store Bali Butter in an airtight glass container at room temperature (out of the fridge) for one month. The post Bali Butter appeared first on My New Roots.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney HealthStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! We hear a lot about how not eating meat just one day a week is good for the planet, but what about how good it is for our health? It turns out, Meatless Monday is also an easy way to take steps towards a healthier lifestyle and better health. Cutting out meat just one day a week and choosing plant-based foods instead can help promote kidney health . In fact, eating less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Your hard-working and multi-tasking kidneys work round the clock to remove wastes from your body, balance your bodys fluids and minerals, make hormones that control blood pressure and form red blood cells, and much more. You cant live without your kidneys! Were very pleased to say that Meatless Monday has partnered with the National Kidney Foundation  to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets in support of kidney health. Gail Torres, RN, MS, RD, Senior Clinical Communications Director at the National Kidney Foundation explains, “Studies show that eating less meat may play a key role in keeping your kidneys healthy and in improving your health overall. This doesnt mean you need to cut meat out completely from your diet, but rather, to replace some meat with plant-based foods, such as soy and nuts. She continues, This change in diet helps your body make less acid, which puts less stress on your kidneys. It also lowers your intake of saturated fat, which can harm blood vessels and lead to heart and kidney disease. Less meat in the diet is also linked to preventing and controlling diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main causes of kidney disease.” 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. But heres the good news! You can kickstart your Mondays by swapping out meat for plant-based foods to help promote kidney health. See this weeks Meatless Monday recipe for Corn-Stuffed Zucchini, courtesy of National Kidney Foundation. Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. To spread the word about Meatless Monday and kidney health, download our fun and shareable free graphics, here. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video

December 6 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video Hi friends! Today we’re sharing a new video as part of a video series we are working on, where well be going through a whole day of plant-based meals, as well as little tricks, ideas, and inspirations around the kitchen. We’ve always been fascinated with peoples everyday routines (which is why we have the self-care interview series), and we love getting a peak at how they sustain themselves throughout the day, so we thought it would be fun to film something similar. Todays video has a shortcut recipe for creamy steel cut oats, as well as ideas for lunch, a pick-me-up hot chocolate, dinner, and an end of day treat. All the recipes mentioned in the video are linked below. Let us know what you think! Ever since I discovered steel cut oats, I haven’t been able to go back to rolled oats for porridge purposes. They just seem so sad and mushy, compared to the al dente, textured goodness that are steel cut oats. The only thing that puts steel cut oats at a disadvantage is that they take a while to cook – 30 or so minutes, which is an amount of time that most busy people don’t have in the mornings. Thankfully, there’s a shortcut! It involves quickly bringing your steel cut oats to a boil the night before and leaving them to sit overnight, and you end up with a pot of creamy, dreamy oats in the morning. In the fall, I like to have them with apples, but the possibilities for flavoring and toppings are endless here. Here are all the other recipes mentioned in the video: Nettle Infusion – full of vitamins and minerals, great for hair, nails, and skin, and I actually like the taste, too. Harissa – a powerful, North African condiment that can really take a meal to the next level. Our Plant-Based Meal Plan – the link is to the most recent meal plan we posted, but you can also see all of our meal plans here. Black Bean Sweet Potato Soup – this is such a cozy, fall soup (that uses harissa!) Tahini Hot Chocolate – I drink a variation of this drink every day that I’m working from home. It’s a great pick-me-up, and full of healthful ingredients, too. Red Lentil Stew – this Ottolenghi recipe is so solid and delicious. We also have a step-by-step, no-recipe red lentil soup recipe saved in our Instagram highlights. Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats   Print Serves: 1 Ingredients ¼ cup steel cut oats pinch of sea salt a few shakes of cinnamon, or to taste 1¾ cup water 1 apple lemon juice (optional) 2 teaspoons coconut sugar (optional) plant milk of choice - for reheating (optional) hemp hearts or other nuts or seeds - for sprinkling on top almond butter - for garnish Instructions The night before you want steel cut oats for breakfast, combine the steel cut oats, salt, cinnamon, and water in a pot with a lid. Place the pot over high heat and bring up to a boil. Turn off the heat immediately as the oats start boiling. Leave the pot with the oats to sit on the stove top, covered, until morning. In the morning, the oats will be cooked and creamy. The next morning, cut your apple in half and core. Grate half of the apple and mix it into the pot with the oats. Slice or cube the other half of the apple, for topping the porridge. Optionally, mix the apple slices/­­cubes with a few squeezes of lemon juice and coconut sugar for a more impactful topping. Reheat the oats with the grated apple over medium high heat, mixing regularly. If the oats seem too watery, cook them for about 5 minutes, and theyll thicken up. On the other hand, if youd like the oats to be more creamy, reheat them with a splash of plant milk or water for a creamier consistency. Serve, topped with sliced apple, hemp heart or other nuts/­­seeds, and almond butter. Notes This recipe is highly customizable: use any seasonal fruits or berries you have on hand in place of apples, mix in cacao powder and top with banana for chocolate oats, switch up the toppings...the possibilities are endless! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies

November 3 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies It seems like everyone around has been sick with a cold recently, so we thought it our duty share another recipe involving our favorite golden broth formula that’s helped numerous friends and family fight so many colds. The broth is infused with all kinds of anti-inflammatory and mineral-rich ingredients that are said to be immunity powerhouses – think ginger, turmeric, black pepper, garlic, kombu, shiitake, bay leaf, and more. It also tastes deeply nourishing and delicious, and has the most beautiful color. There are so many ways it can be served, too. Drink it on its own, use it as a base for dahl or curry, or very simply pour it over noodles and top with some seasonal vegetables, like in this recipe. Today we are also sharing some natural cold remedies that we find to be powerful, especially when employed during the very first signs of a scratchy throat. Oregano Oil This stuff is serious! It’s both anti-viral and anti-inflammatory, and works wonders when taken consistently during the first signs of sickness. It’s incredibly potent and should be diluted with a carrier oil (I use this one), and it burns quite a bit when going down. You do get used to it though. I usually hold it under my tongue for about 15 seconds before swallowing. Salt Water Gargle This is an ancient folk remedy that’s still prescribed by modern doctors…enough said. If I wake up with a scratchy throat, I make a point of gargling with salt water every few hours, which feels incredibly soothing, helps take down any swelling, thins down mucus build up, and more. I use the ratio of about 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt to 1 glass of water. Sang Ju Yin Sang Ju Yin is a Chinese herbal formula recommended to us by our acupuncturist. I’ve had a few instances, where it completely healed me of an early cold. I’m a total convert now, and make sure to keep it on had at all times. Vitamin C All Day It’s great to eat Vitamin C-rich foods during cold season, but I find that supplementing with lots of Vitamin C is especially helpful when showing the first signs of a cold. Since you can’t really overdose on Vitamin C, I take it very often, about every 1-2 hours when fighting a cold. Just a warning that taking a bunch of Vitamin C can cause an upset stomach, which doesn’t happen to me personally, but I know that it’s a common side effect. I also make sure that I’m getting sufficient Vitamin D, either from the sun or supplements. Garlic The natural antibiotic that’s in everyone’s kitchen! I know a lot of people who will chew on a whole clove of garlic when they start feeling sick. I’m not brave enough for that, but I did realize from Trinity’s self-care interview that you can just swallow a whole clove or garlic like a really large pill (how did I not think of that?). My tip is to choose a very small clove of garlic, since they can be pretty uncomfortable to swallow, and to score it a tiny bit before swallowing. I also recently tried Amanda’s trick of putting a clove of garlic in my ear (kind of feels like iphone headphones), which really wasn’t as big of a deal as I thought it would be, and it helped. Probiotic Foods The link between our gut health and overall health is undeniably strong. I try to uptake my intake of things like sauerkraut, kimchi, and other living foods when feeling under the weather. Neti Pot For me, the worst part of having a cold is the stuffed and runny nose. Once my nose starts down this path, it doesn’t stop for at least a week, and it’s total agony. Rinsing my nasal passages with the help of a neti pot right before bed makes a world of difference when I’m sick. I’m also currently on the market for a nice, handmade ceramic neti-pot. There’s so many good ones on Etsy! Diffuse Essential Oils Purify the air in your living space and show some love to your nasal pathways and throat by diffusing pure essential oils. It’s helpful to have an ultrasonic diffuser (I have one from Saje), but you don’t have to have one. You can heat up a pot of water, drop some essential oils in the heated water, and stand over the pot, inhaling the steam. Or you can put some essential oils on the floor and walls of your shower while taking a hot shower, which will give a similar effect to the diffuser. My favorite essential oils to breathe in during a cold are: eucalyptus, lavender, and lemon. Liquid Gold Up your intake of turmeric any way you can! Make the recipe in this post, or try our Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy, or Fresh Turmeric Moon Milk. Check out Diaspora Co. for some super-potent, organic, heirloom turmeric powder. Hydrate and Rest These two are such no-brainers, but sometimes none of the other stuff works, and you just need to go to bed early, sleep in, and drink liters and liters of lemon water in between. I love rubbing some vetiver essential oil on the soles of my feet before bed for deep, quick relaxation. What do you do to help your bod fight and heal when you feel a cold coming on? We’d love to hear! Golden Broth Rice Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 small yellow onion - chopped sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - minced 1½-inch piece of fresh ginger - minced 1 tablespoon turmeric powder 2 dried shiitake caps 2-inch piece kombu 2 bay leaves 8 cups purified water 1 small or ½ large butternut squash - peeled, seeded, and cubed 1 broccoli head juice from 2 limes - divided 10 oz rice noodles cilantro - for garnish toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add onion, salt and red pepper flakes, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and turmeric, and stir around for 2 more minutes. Add shiitake, kombu, bay leaves, water and more salt to taste, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. If you have time, turn off the heat and let the broth infuse for another 30 minutes. Remove the rehydrated shiitake caps, slice, and return to the pot. Remove the kombu and discard. Add butternut squash to the pot, adjust the heat back to a simmer and cook for 7 minutes. Add broccoli and cook for another 5-7 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add half of the lime juice. Check for salt, adjust if needed. Soak the rice noodles in well-salted hot water according to the instructions on the package. Drain the noodles, divide between plates, and ladle the soup over the noodles. Squeeze more lime juice over each bowl, and garnish with cilantro. Optionally, drizzle with some sesame oil and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Adaptogenic Date Shake

May 3 2018 My New Roots 

Adaptogenic Date Shake Each year, my now friend Sasha Swerdloff of Tending the Table genius organizes a trip for women in the food world (bloggers, cookbook authors, chefs, nutritionists, photographers etc.) to get together, hang out, share delicious food, and get to know each other beyond a screen (...see? Genius!) This year I actually got to attend - ok truth: I shamelessly invited myself because I wanted to meet this talented troupe of ladies IRL. The group decided to gather in Palm Springs, much to my delight as I needed to escape two kinds of hell: overdue home renovations and Ontario in February. The days were magically sunny, delicious, and life-affirming. We cooked a lot, then let our food get cold taking too many photos of it. We swam, we hiked, we yoga-ed, we laughed, and conspired together. Besides all of the heart-warming togetherness, one of the highlights for me, was visiting a date farm just outside the city limits, to understand where our favourite whole food sweetener comes from (and to gorge ourselves, naturally). I had never seen dates on a tree before, and was moved to learn from the passionate farmer himself just how these sweet miracles grow. Dates grow on palm trees, and they fastidiously follow the calendar – you can practically set your watch to a date palms seasonal cycle. The first day of spring the tree is in full bloom and the hard work begins, as the farmer pollinates each one by hand. The ratio of male to female trees is about 1 to 30, since the male trees are only necessary to produce the pollen, and the female trees are the ones that produce the fruit. Between the first day of spring and the first day of summer, the tree sets up its entire crop for the year. All the work (trimming, feeding, etc.) must take place during this season, since its during this period is when the fruit ripens, turning from green, to yellow, to brown. The dates are ready to eat from the first day of autumn, and then the harvest begins. During this season, the fruit is either left on the tree and protected with cloth bags to prevent rain, birds and insects from spoiling the fruit, or picked when ripe. The farmer told us that the best place for the dates is to remain on the tree for freshness, but if the load is too heavy, it will not bloom as well the following year, thus effecting the trees output. After decades of date farming, he was as wide-eyed and passionate about his fruit as an eager young man, which really made us all swoon. It is truly one of my favourite things in this world, to see how and where food is grown, and to meet and connect with the people who lovingly produce it. We all left with full bellies and hearts, and of course, our bags bulging with dates.    Along the dusty, desert road home we saw so many signs for date shakes, since this is the land where this indulgent treat was invented back in the 1930s. None of us caved and bought one, but my mouth was definitely watering, and I was excited to get back and make one for myself. The original recipe is simple, and calls for dates, vanilla ice cream, milk, and sometimes a dash of cinnamon and nutmeg. I knew this was the perfect makeover opportunity, and high-vibed my date shake with coconut milk instead of dairy, hemp seeds, and adaptogens. So why the adaptogens? Well, I felt like the already-pretty-healthy date shake could use a boost, and what better way to make something more supportive than with a dose of stress-reducing, adrenal-loving, hormone-balancing, potions to get you back into balance? Yahs! I had these four choices on hand, but there are a lot of options once you start to dig around the health food store a little. Here is a little about each one and why I chose them. Ashwaganda: helps the body adapt to stress and bring us back into balance. It encourages deeper sleep, supports the immune system, and energy levels. He Shou Wu: builds the blood, harmonizes adrenal gland function, nourishes hair, skin and nervous system, increases antioxidant activity. Maca: increases stamina, elevates mood, helps to balance hormones in both men and women, supports fertility and healthy libido. Licorice: balances hormones, helps the body adapt to stress, supports the immune response, and aids learning and memory. *Some adaptogens during pregnancy, breastfeeding, and while on medication are not recommended, so check with your natural health care provider before trying any of them. The farm we visited grew seven types of dates, and we loved trying them all. The unanimous favourite was the growers very own variety that he created himself, called Black Gold. He also mentioned that this was the best type of date for a date shake, but considering the fact that you maaaaay not get a chance to visit Palm Springs anytime soon, Ill go ahead and recommend using Medjool dates for the shakes, since they are widely available, and their thin skin blends very easily into a smooth consistency. If you cannot find Medjool, try Deglet Noor instead, or soak your dates in warm water for half an hour before blending. Dates are a great source of energy, and provide a generous amount of filling dietary fibre with very little fat. Dates are mineral rich, delivering potassium, manganese, magnesium and copper, as well as an assortment of B-vitamins. Seek out dates that are plump and juicy-looking (if youre buying from a market, ask to try them first), that their skin is intact, and that they are neither glossy or dusty. I store my dates in an airtight glass jar in the fridge to extend their shelf life, and protect their flavour and nutrients. Kept this way, dates will last up to six months. Outside of the fridge at room temperature, dates will last about a month and a half, or you can freeze them for up to a year. The banana in this blend up is totally optional, and I actually really liked the version without, even though it was less thick and milkshakey. If you want to add more dates for sweetness and flavour, live it up. I found that this amount, about 3 Medjool dates, was just perfect for me, even without the banana. The spices are also optional, but help to disguise any strong flavours from the adaptogens, which admittedly can sometimes taste like the inside of a barn, or everyones favourite: feet? Mmmmm. Right. Lets cover that up. All in all, this is a delicious and filling way to start your morning, or the perfect afternoon pick-me-up. Its creamy, smooth, sweet and totally balanced. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!        Print recipe     Adaptogenic Date Shake Serves 1 (makes 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ ml) Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g pitted Medjool or Deglet Noor Dates 1/­­2 – 1 frozen banana (optional) 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 2 Tbsp. hulled hemp seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. licorice root 1/­­2 tsp. ashwaganda 1/­­2 tsp. maca 1/­­4 tsp. ho shu wu pinch vanilla powder (or 1/­­2 tsp. pure vanilla extract) pinch ground cinnamon pinch ground nutmeg 3-4 ice cubes Directions: 1. Brew the licorice tea by combining 1 cup /­­ 250ml boiling water with 1/­­2 tablespoon of chopped licorice root. Let steep covered for 15-30 minutes. 2. Place all ingredients in the blender. Measure out 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml of licorice tea, add it to the blender, and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness and spice to your liking. Enjoy immediately. I just want to give a huge shout out to Sasha and all the women who attended the retreat – it was truly a beautiful experience. And if anyone out there is looking for some inspiration and general awesomeness, follow these wonderful people, below: Sasha Swerdloff – Tending the Table Renne Byrd – Will Frolic for Food Lily Diamond – Kale and Caramel Kimberly Hasselbrink – Kimberly Hasselbrink Shelley Westerhausen – Vegetarian Ventures Lindsay Kluge – Ginger Botanicals Trisha Hughes – Go Eat Your Beets Carly Diaz – Carly Diaz Eva Kosmes Flores – Adventures in Cooking Sophie MacKenzie – Wholehearted Eats Hope you’re all enjoying the first breaths of Springtime. Sending love, gratitude, and sunshine, Sarah B. Show me your shakes on Instagram: #mnrdateshake *   *   *   *   *   * Hey ya’ll! One more thing before I go: new Wild Heart High Spirit retreats are being planned! I’ll share more news about the retreats soon, but if you want to be the first to know when tickets are available, go to www.goldencircleretreats.com and join the email list. I’m so excited to welcome another group of women to this magical experience! The post Adaptogenic Date Shake appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple

September 11 2017 Veggie num num 

Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple Hello, Veggie People, it’s been a long time once again! While all’s been quiet over here, Cam and I have been busy building something exciting and I’m happy to say it’s ready to go!! Now available on the App Store is Nutro – an App developed to help those on a Plant-Based Diet thrive! Whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or just reducing meat in your diet, eating the right plant-foods is key to adequate nutrient intake and overall wellbeing. I wanted to create an easy-to-use resource that could help get the balance right without the guesswork. It started out with a simple enough idea of gathering together a list of plant-foods highest in those nutrients we all need the most when cutting out meat and animal products. This leads me to think on the best way to share this with others. Having a husband with the tech knowledge made the leap from a list of foods to a useable app one that made complete sense. Nutros directory of nutrient dense plant-foods allows you to easily identify the right foods to boost intake of key essential nutrients – like iron, protein, calcium and vitamin B12 – the right foods to support good health and keep you plant strong when cutting out the meat and animal products. It’s not always easy to understand the nutrients our body needs to stay healthy or where to find these nutrients in a plant-based world. Nutro identifies key vitamins and minerals of particular importance to those on a plant-based diet and shows you exactly which plant-foods offer the best source. The idea behind Nutro is simple, supporting health and happiness on a meat-free diet is achievable. And while I highly recommend seeking professional guidance to get the best tailored and up-to-date information on a diet to meet your specific nutritional needs, Nutro is a handy resource that can help make balanced, healthy plant-based eating a little easier. If you’d like to check it out, jump onto the app store and please leave a comment below if you have something to say!! I’d love to hear your thoughts, ideas, comments, constructive criticism, feedback and all the rest Follow along on with me and Nutro social @ facebook, instagram, pinterest, twitter. The post Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple appeared first on Veggie num num.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash

April 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Food magazines and online food publications are all about bright and green spring recipes right now, but I know that a lot of us are still waiting for that first asparagus to pop up, and for rhubarb to show its blush at the stores and markets. I’m checking in with one more transitional meal today, still cozy and hearty, but very vegetable-forward. There’s a step-by-step video, too :) Have you ever tried braising or roasting whole leeks? It’s a revelatory way of preparing the vegetable, since leeks usually play a secondary role, where they get thinly sliced and pretty much disappear into whatever dish they are in. Cooking leeks whole yields surprisingly delicious results, and brings forward their sweet, mildly oniony flavor. The texture becomes incredibly buttery, and the modest vegetable becomes completely transformed. One thing that makes me nervous about cooking with leeks is throwing away the majestic, green tops, since most recipes only call for the more tender, white parts of the leek. I always save the tops to include in homemade vegetable broth, and I suggest making a quick broth out of the tops and cauliflower stems here (although you can of course use store-bought broth as well). The cauliflower and white bean mash is the perfect, hearty pairing to the braised leeks. It’s smooth and peppery, with a studding of fresh herbs throughout. Both components of the dish keep well and make for great leftovers. I can imagine the mash working well served with roasted carrots or grilled asparagus for another quick meal. Enjoy! Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the braised leeks 5-6 large leeks with long white parts 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee sea salt freshly ground black pepper veggie broth - reserved from boiling green parts of the leeks or store bought for the cauliflower white bean mash 1 cup dried white beans - soaked overnight 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves (optional) one 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee pinch red pepper flakes 1 large yellow onion - chopped 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 small head of cauliflower - cut into florets leek broth from above or any veggie broth freshly ground black pepper handful each parsley and dill - chopped (optional) olive oil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions to braise the leeks Cut the dark green parts off the leeks. Wash the green parts thoroughly and place into a large soup pot together with leftover cauliflower core and stems, cover with water. Bring to a boil over the high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. You can also add any vegetable scraps you have on hand to this broth. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. This step could be done the day before. You can of course skip this step entirely and just use store-bought or pre-cooked vegetable broth. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half vertically and place into the sink or a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak a bit and carefully wash all the dirt from between the layers. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the washed and dried leeks to the pan face down in a single layer. Leave to cook undisturbed until golden on one side. Flip, add salt and pepper and let the other side caramelize. Add leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the leeks partially. Establish a strong simmer, cover the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the leeks are tender throughout. Add more broth if too much evaporates. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Serve the leeks on top of the cauliflower white bean mash, below. to make the cauliflower white bean mash While the leek broth and leeks are cooking, drain and rinse the beans and add to a large pot. Cover the beans with plenty of water, add garlic, bay leaves and kombu, if using, and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered. Start checking the beans for doneness after 30 minutes and continue to cook until tender, if necessary. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain the beans and set aside. This step can be done the day before. The cooking liquid from the beans can be reserved and used as vegetable broth in other dishes, as well as frozen for up to 2 months. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat, add red pepper flakes, onion and a pinch of salt and cook for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, until fragrant. Add cauliflower, a large pinch of salt, black pepper and the leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 7-10 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add more liquid if too much evaporates to ensure that the cauliflower is being steamed. Add in cooked beans at the end, toss to warm them through. Add the cauliflower and beans to a food processor, along with a splash of the leek broth/­­any veggie broth. Process until smooth. Test for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add parsley and dill and pulse to incorporate. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your food processor. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with the braised leeks from above. Notes 1. If you dont have time to cook dried beans, you can use 3 cups already cooked/­­canned white beans in this recipe. 2. Although kombu is optional, its a great thing to throw into the pot when cooking beans, as it helps make beans more digestible, as well as contributes its minerals. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and VeggiesMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the second article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Its long been known that a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables is good for your physical health. Lower blood pressure and less risk of heart disease are among the many benefits. But did you know fruits and veggies can also be good for your mental health? Absolutely true. According to a recent study, higher consumption of fruit and vegetables may increase feelings of well-being, happiness and life satisfaction. In addition, the study participants who ate more fruits and vegetables tended to be more curious and more creative than those who didnt. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that dietary patterns emphasizing fruits and vegetables may be linked to better psychological health.[i] A recent study found that higher fruit and vegetable consumption may increase well-being, curiosity and creativity, possibly related to micronutrients and carbohydrate composition.[ii] This is probably related to the fact you are giving your body and brain more healthy vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and fiber, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. This conclusion is supported by a separate study that found growing evidence that suggests that eating more fruits and vegetables is linked to better psychological health. So which foods help you feel happier, more creative and brimming with curiosity? Well, for starters, try roasted carrots and other root vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams and squash. Also, fresh berries are highly recommended to lift your spirits - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, take your pick! And to jump-start your good mood, weve got a special recipe thats sure to make you smile. Root Vegetable Samosas   References: [i]Rooney C, McKinley MC, Woodside JV. The potential role of fruit and vegetables in aspects of psychological well-being: A review of the literature and future directions. TheProceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2013; 72: 420-432. doi:10.1017/­­S0029665113003388 [ii] Conner TS, Brookie KL, Richardson AC, Polak MA. On carrots and curiosity: eating fruits and vegetables is associated with greater flourishing in daily life. Br J Health Psychol. 2015; 20(2):413-27. The post The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt

January 19 2017 VegKitchen 

Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt Pink Himalayan salt is a special type of rock salt that contains plenty of health benefits, particularly because it offers more than 84 natural elements in their mineral form.The post Pink Himalayan Salt: 5 Reasons to Ditch Regular Table Salt appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!

August 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!National Farmers Market Week, August 7-13, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season!   Hungry for more fresh farmers market finds? Tour the Union Square Greenmarket with Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony Restaurant in NYC: The post Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles

December 18 2018 My New Roots 

Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles   Everyone has strong food memories around holidays or special occasions in their life. I can completely recall the distinct taste of boxed cake from my childhood birthdays. Summer vacations were steeped in melting grape juice popsicles made by my grandmother. And one of my favourite treats during Christmas, was undoubtedly Turtle chocolates. The iconic striped box was always within arms reach during the holidays, so as soon as the tree went up, it was like a Pavlovian response…the Turtle cravings began! If you live outside of North America, you may not be familiar with these pecan-chocolate-caramels (and for this, I feel very sad for you), but today, rejoice! Im posting my own version, which is a healthier spin on this classic candy that you can whip up yourself with just six simple ingredients. The original Turtle candies are relatively basic: pecans, caramel, and chocolate, but seemingly so much more than the sum of these parts. There is a magical synergy in this trinity, each ingredient complimenting and highlighting the others in perfect union. There isnt much to improve upon, so my mission was clearly to health-ify the caramel and find some high-quality chocolate to steer us all away from refined sugar, modified milk ingredients, and emulsifiers. Blech. I started off on my journey by looking online and found that healthyish Turtle recipes exist, but they all use dates and I didnt want that to be the predominant flavour. Plus, I knew that the caramel needed some serious creaminess, so I started by blending up cashew butter with vanilla as the base, then added brown rice syrup to achieve that distinctive gooey-ness that makes Turtles so crave-able. The results were sooooo right on the money, confirmed by several of my closest, discerning friends, lined up to taste test.     Pecans are one of my favourite nuts because they are tender-crisp and so naturally sweet. I love them in baked goods like pecan pie, on top of waffles or pancakes, or in candies like these babies! Pecans are native to North America, and grow in tough, wood-like shells on large, sprawling trees, some of which can live up to 200 years. The name pecan is a Native American word used to describe nuts that require a stone to crack - but you can easily open them by crushing two of their hard shells together. Along with macadamias, pecans contain the lowest amount of protein (5-10%) and the highest amount of fat (80-95%) of all the nuts. The fat that they do contain however, is mostly monounsaturated, with some polyunsaturated fat as well. Pecans are high in minerals, like manganese, copper, and zinc. They also contain a good amount of fiber and protein. There are a wide variety of pecans, but if you live outside North America, you may only have access to one type. Thats okay! The thing to look for is shelled pecans that are uniform in size and colour. Check the date on the package or bulk bin, and smell the nuts beforehand if youre able to - they should be sweet, and well, nutty. If youre shopping in bulk, visit a shop that has a high turnover to ensure that the nuts are fresh. Once you get them home, store shelled pecans in an airtight container at room temperature for up to six months (although try to eat them sooner) and in the freezer for up to a year. Pecans are highly susceptible to absorbing other smells, so keep them locked up tight in glass to prevent them from tasting like garlic, onions, or last nights casserole.     I had hesitations about using brown rice syrup in this recipe, since I know its one of those harder-to-find ingredients, but its just SO perfect in this context that I had to! If you cannot find brown rice syrup, try whipped or creamed honey in its place. I recognize that this isnt an alternative for vegans, but I think it is the only sweetener that would work due to how thick and viscous it is. If the caramel is too runny, if will be impossible to work with. Trust. Its best to store your Turtles in the freezer, and take them out about 10-15 minutes before serving. Theyre also fine at room temperature, but will keep better cold. I actually dig them a little on the frozen side - the caramel is extra thick and chewy at subzero temperatures!         Print recipe     Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles Makes 30 candies Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g raw pecans 400g dark chocolate, 75% or higher (chose organic and fair-trade, if possible) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml cashew butter (raw or roasted) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml brown rice syrup 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 tsp. flaky sea salt (I used Maldon), plus a little more for garnish Directions: 1. Find a baking sheet or tray that will fit in your freezer, then line it with parchment paper. 2. In a medium sized bowl, stir together the cashew butter, rice syrup, vanilla and flaky salt until thoroughly combined. Taste (yum), and adjust the saltiness and vanilla levels to your liking. 3. Scoop a teaspoon of the caramel onto the lined baking sheet, using another spoon to help remove it - this stuff is seriously sticky! 4. Press a whole pecan on one side of the caramel blob, allowing the nut to peek over the edge just a bit, then add two halves to the sides, peeking over the edge just a bit too. Repeat until youve used all the caramel. Place in the freezer for at least one hour, up to 24 hours. 5. Once the caramels have chilled, prepare the chocolate. Heat a few inches /­­ centimetres of water in a small pot and heat on high. Roughly chop the chocolate bar into small chunks and place it in a heatproof bowl. Lower the heat to simmer, then set the bowl over the pot of so that it is sitting well above the water itself. Stir occasionally until the chocolate has completely melted. 6. Remove the caramels from the freezer. One at a time, drop each caramel into the melted chocolate pecan side-down, flip and ensure that the top is entirely coated. Remove from the chocolate with a fork, and drag the bottom along the edge of the bowl to remove any excess chocolate. Place back on the lined baking sheet and sprinkle with a couple flakes of salt. Repeat until youve coated all the turtles in chocolate. Place them inside the freezer until set, then transfer them to an airtight container and store in the freezer or fridge until ready to serve. If you want to see some of the pecans, drop the caramels on their bottom side first, then remove and place on the lined baking sheet. Drizzle enough chocolate over the top to fully cover the caramel (if you dont coat it completely, it may spill out at room temperature), but allowing a few parts of the pecans to show through. This will be my last post before the New Year, my friends! Im off to Bali in a mere 10 days (!!!) and words cannot describe how excited I am for the Wild Heart High Spirit Retreat, and meeting women from all across the world. If youd like to know more about my retreats, visit the Golden Circle Retreats website. Were planning another round for 2019, so sign up to mailing our list to be the first notified when we announce the dates. We are also taking orders for the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread Subscription Box! What better way to start off the new year than with a delicious monthly gift of health to yourself? If you want to learn more, or place your order, visit the shop page here. All love from Canada, and happiest of holidays to you and yours! xo, Sarah B The post Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles appeared first on My New Roots.

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Everything You Should Know About Building Muscle While Eating Vegetarian

October 7 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Contrary to popular belief, it is actually possible to gain muscle while on a vegetarian diet. Many people still think that the supposed lack of protein in a vegetarian diet does not allow for sufficient results in the gym. However, this is nowhere near the truth. Whether youre eating meat or not, building muscle involves a strict dietary regimen designed to optimize the quantities of the nutrients your body requires. Your diet should include minerals, fiber, vitamins, and of course protein to ensure you get the desired results. Similar to non-vegetarian fitness enthusiasts, vegetarian gym goers need to follow a prescribed dietary regime and have a good understanding of their body. If you optimize your diet, you shouldnt have any problems building muscle while eating vegetarian. Types of Vegetarians There are four different vegetarian categories and each involves different dietary habits. It is important to have a clear understanding of which category you belong to because it can largely determine your gym diet. All vegetarians can generally be classified into the following four categories: Pescetarians, who eat fish Lacto-ovo vegetarians, who eat dairy and eggs Lacto-vegetarians, who eat dairy products Vegans, who are solely on a plant-based diet There is […]

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat From left: Greg Lofts, Martha Stewart Living Magazine; Joan Zimmer, Premium Peanut; Xiaoran Liu, Harvard School of Public Health; Karl Zimmer, Premium Peanut;  Cherry Dumaul, Meatless Monday; Karen Weisberg, National Culinary Review & Culinology The 21st Peanut Institute Annual Media Retreat in Napa Valley brought together nutrition and food science experts from the Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham & Womens Hospital, and University of Georgia. They shared the latest research about peanuts with attending media from 17 print and online publications. In addition to the latest peanut research findings, the attendees learned about the global growth of Meatless Monday and examples of how some of the 40-plus countries in the movement are using peanuts in their cuisines. Attendees also tried out their culinary skills at the kitchens of the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone. Peanut Institute members joined the media representatives in teams to cook up various meatless recipes with a variety of peanut flavorings. In terms of the top three takeaways from the Peanut Institute Retreat, they are: 1. Peanuts have more protein than any other nut, which helps keep you satisfied between meals. They also have 19 vitamins and minerals, and an abundance of bioactive compounds. Research shows that the unique package of nutrients found in peanuts helps reduce the risk of heart disease, and even the risk of death. 2. There are 100,000 miles of blood vessels in the body and research shows that eating peanuts can help keep them healthy. A study performed by Penn State shows that the bioactives, protein and arginine in peanuts helps keep arteries flexible after a high fat meal. Peanuts are particularly high in arginine, an amino acid that helps keep blood vessels flexible and healthy. This is important for all age groups and especially athletes. 3. Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, an internationally recognized sports nutritionist and author discussed the benefits of peanuts and peanut butter for athletic performance. Peanut butter is one of the best sports foods around; it is a great pre- or post-workout snack, and is loved by the NBA and other athletes. The high protein content in peanuts helps repair muscles while the arginine helps keep blood vessels open. All participants of The Peanut Institute’s annual nutrition and culinary retreat  at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in Napa Valley, CA The post Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Garden Juice Fruit and Root Salad Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Avocado Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Sizes Up SuperfoodsMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve your health. This is the third article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. For many adults, being time-pressed has become the norm. Theyre driven to pack more into any given moment. With this mind, perhaps its no surprise that theres a recent surge of interest in superfoods - plant foods that pack in more nutrition than other food items. Sure, this food trend is hot right now, but does the reality actually live up to the hype? Turns out the answer is yes, as long as youre consuming the right foods for the right reasons. According to Diana K. Rice, a registered dietitian who works with Meatless Monday, Many plant-based foods pack in more fiber, minerals and fiber than other dietary choices, said Rice. So if youre looking to improve the quality of your diet, its a great idea to rely on these foods over choices like processed carbohydrates and animal products. But dont expect superfoods to deliver a miracle cure for your medical problems, cautions Rice. She explains, No single food is going to help you lose weight, give you clearer skin or achieve whatever other health goal youre after. The main reason to eat superfoods is that they are nutritious and convenient. One easy way to pack more superfoods into yoir diet is to adopt the practice of Meatless Monday. When you choose not to eat meat one day a week, theres a lot of room left in your diet to fill with nutrient-packed superfoods, Rice said. And when you try tasty new dishes containing plant-based superfoods on a Monday, youll be more likely to incorporate them into your diet over the rest of the week, too. To kick off your new Meatless Monday habit, Rice recommends these plant-based superfoods: Peanuts: Not only is this plant-based source of protein highly affordable, its adored by the masses for its appealing flavor. In addition to seven grams of protein per one ounce serving, peanuts are a terrific source of folate and resveratrol - yes, the red wine nutrient! Found in whole peanuts (as well as grape skins), resveratrol is an antioxidant thats linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think outside the peanut butter sandwich with Peanut Noodles or Peanut Butter Chili.   Avocados: This fruit is a super substitute for animal products on Meatless Monday because its healthy fat content satisfies the same craving you might have for a juicy steak. But since the fats found in avocados are mostly heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, theyre doing your body a favor along with your tastebuds. Grill them and top with salsa for a new twist or try them with pasta in this Pea and Avocado Penne.   Kale: Sure, kale isnt as trendy as it once was. Nowadays, foods like collard greens and Brussels sprouts are stealing the spotlight. However, kale rose to popularity for good reason - it scores a perfect 1000 on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index, meaning that it packs in more nutrition per calorie than most other foods. In particular, its a great source of vitamins A, K, C and fiber. Give it a spin in this Forbidden Rice Salad or try a new variation on your lasagna with this kale-packed version.   Mushrooms: Not many foods pack in a hefty dose of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin. But one portabella mushroom can pack in 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D, which is more than half of the recommended daily intake level. Theyre an especially good choice for people who are averse to sun or live in northern climates, plus they offer the crave-able umami flavor found in meat. Try them in Mushroom Tikka Masala or Mushroom Hemp Tartlets.   Tomatoes: No, not the pale pink slice thats suspiciously topping your sandwich. Were talking deep, dark red tomatoes - especially canned tomatoes - that are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant thats linked to heart health and reduced cancer risk. Pump up your lycopene intake with dishes like Shakshouka with Rainbow Chard and Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup. The post Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles

June 17 2016 My New Roots 

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles Fudgesicles were a mainstay in the freezer of my childhood, and my go-to sugar fix if the cookie jar was empty. Since weve been blessed here in Copenhagen with a warm spring and early start to the summer season, day after day of blue skies and sundresses has jumpstarted my summer food fantasies. I felt like revisiting the frosty, chocolate-y pops that were such a relief in the sweltering heat, but this time, with a healthy plan of attack. In my cookbook, I made a killer ice cream from avocados and cashews. Knowing how creamy and delicious this combination was, I wanted to recreate a similar base, with dates as the sweetener and raw cacao powder as the chocolate element. So, I made a couple versions of these fudgesicles, since I wanted to eat more be thorough. The first experiment was with just cashews and avocado. The results were pretty delicious but pretty expensive, and a few of my taste-testers found the ice cream bars a little dry in the mouth. For the second version I scaled way back on the cashews and used coconut milk to enhance juiciness while maintaining creaminess. I also upped the cacao. Because chocolate. It was a perfectly balanced combination, and the version I am presenting you with today. The magical version. These are so lusciously creamy, sinfully rich-tasting – the kind of thing you put in your mouth and kind of can’t believe what’s happening. Vegan, almost raw, and full of whole food ingredients, they are also downright filling! They make a fabulous mid-morning or afternoon pick-me-up, especially with the raw cacao component, a deliciously effective, energy-boosting food. Dress them up with your favourite add-ins, or keep it simple and enjoy them as the five-ingredient bliss bars that they are. Cashew News! I was snacking on some cashews the other day (as one does) and offered some to a friend of mine, who declined. Her reason? Cashews are so fattening. Wait a minute, what? who started this ugly rumour?! Maybe this is news to you too, but cashews are actually one of the lowest-fat nuts out there. Weighing in at only 67% fat, next to almonds at 76%, hazelnuts at 86%, and macadamia nuts at 93%, cashews rank pretty low on the scale - and lets keep in mind that 66% of the fat in cashews is the heart-healthy, monounsaturated variety. Rejoice! And while we are clearing up misconceptions, cashews are not technically nuts, but seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, an edible fruit native to South America. Cashew trees are in the same botanical family as mango and pistachio. The multi-step process to make cashews edible is quite involved, and typically includes steaming the whole seed pod, removing the outer shell, drying, and skinning. The inner shell layer of the cashew nut contains a caustic resin that can cause significant skin rashes, and is toxic if ingested. The raw cashews that you purchase at a grocery store health food shop are not typically raw, just not roasted. Because of the steaming step in conventional cashew processing, cashews cannot be considered a truly raw product. Truly raw cashews are available on specialty websites and in some health food stores, but at a premium since separating the cashews from their shell without the nut coming into contact with the resin is time consuming and must be done by hand. Cashews are an excellent source of the mineral copper. Copper helps our body utilize iron, eliminate free radicals, and build bone and connective tissue. It is also an essential component of a wide range of enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) which aids energy production and antioxidant defence. One-third of a cup of cashews delivers over 100% of your recommended daily intake of copper. A high-speed blender is recommended for this recipe, but if you dont have one make sure you blend until the mixture is as smooth as possible. You can add water to thin the mixture if it is too thick to blend, but keep in mind the more water you add, the less creamy the bars will be - more crystalline. No matter what, they will taste amazing. Because they’re magic. The fudgesicle recipe below is unreasonably delicious as-is, but it can act also as a base for you to flavour as you like! You can add toppings after removing the fudgesicles from their mold too. This involves melted raw or regular chocolate and your creative spirit! Dip or drizzle the chocolate over the frozen bar, and sprinkle away. MAGIC WANDS. This would make a very popular activity at a kids birthday party. Or my birthday party. Stop looking at me like that. Ive included some options for both flavourings and toppings to inspire you, but these are merely suggestions. I know all of you super enthusiastic foodies out there will come up with some stellar combos. Let me know in the comments if you do!     Print recipe     5-Ingredient Vegan Magical Fudgesicles Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 Liter /­­ 10 fudgesicles Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g unroasted, unsalted cashews 1 14-oz can /­­ 400ml full-fat coconut milk 1 large, ripe avocado 1 cup /­­ 250g pitted, packed soft dates 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g raw cacao powder (cocoa powder will also work) Optional add-ins: a few pinches sea salt vanilla (seeds from 1 pod, powder, or extract) a few drops of food-grade essential oils (peppermint, orange, almond etc.) finely diced fresh fruit (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, mango etc.) a pinch of cayenne pepper espresso powder finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) Optional toppings: melted raw chocolate (recipe here) or melted dark chocolate cacao nibs finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) dried fruit (I used raspberry on the ones pictured) citrus zest (lemon, orange, lime) hemp seeds unsweetened desiccated coconut bee pollen Directions: 1. Place cashews in lightly salted water and let soak for 4-8 hours (overnight is fine). 2. Drain the cashews and rinse well. Add to a blender (a high-speed blender is highly recommended) with the remaining ingredients (and any flavourings, if using) and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Add water only if necessary - you want to mixture to remain quite thick. 3. Spoon mixture in popsicle molds. Firmly knock the molds on the counter a few times to remove any air bubbles. Insert a popsicle stick into each mold and place in the freezer until set - at least 6 hours. To remove popsicles, run the mold under hot water until you can easily pull a fudgesicle out. 4. If you want to decorate your fudgesicles, dip or drizzle them with melted chocolate and sprinkle with desired toppings. Eat immediately, or place back in the freezer to set until ready to enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * In other very magical news, my latest Cody app video series is now online! This one is all about my favourite subject: SNACKS!!! Super-Charged Snacks to be exact. And every recipe is brand-new, incredibly delicious, and of course über healthy. If you haven’t seen the Protein-Rich Cacao Brownie video on my Facebook page yet, go have a look! You can preview all of the recipes here and purchase the plan too (it’s on sale!). Thank you so much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! Big love and gratitude, Sarah B. The post 5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles appeared first on My New Roots.


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