mill - vegetarian recipes

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mill vegetarian recipes

Sweet Potato Chaat (Shakarkandi)

April 23 2021 Manjula's kitchen 

Sweet Potato Chaat (Shakarkandi) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Sweet Potato Chaat, Shakarkandi .wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; } I have been wanting to make a sweet potato chaat (Shakarkandi Chaat) for some time now. It's a savory and flavorful chaat, which also happens to be a very popular Delhi street food. I have tried to make this recipe many times but never quite perfected it! Last weekend I had the honor of being a guest judge for a cooking contest which was conducted virtually over Zoom! The contest was for the best air fryer recipe. The winner of this contest, Rashmi Sabjur, happened to make an eggplant chaat. While she was discussing her creative recipe, I got the idea of making a sweet potato chaat in the air fryer. Many people ask me how I am inspired to come up with new recipes…well the answer is people like Rashmi, and of course you all, my viewers! Traditionally, sweet potatoes are cooked over coal, cut into small pieces, and drizzled with lemon juice and spices to make it delicious and flavorful. This spicy chaat is also had a nice crunch. Try this recipe out soon! A special thank you to Rashmi for inspiring me to perfect sweet potato chaat! This recipe is also vegan. This recipe will serve 6. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 25 minutes Total Time 35 minutes Servings 6 people EquipmentCuisinart TOA-60 Convection Toaster Oven Airfryer Reynolds Kitchens Pop-Up Parchment Paper Sheets Ingredients1 large sweet potato sliced in thick rounds For Batter1 1/­­2 Tbsp all purpose flour plain flour, maida 1 1/­­2 Tbsp corn starch corn flour or arrowroot powder 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­4 tsp black pepper 1/­­3 cup water approx Oil spray For Breadcrumbs 1/­­2 cup bread crumb plain unflavored 1/­­2 salt 1/­­4 black pepper For Garnishing 1/­­4 cup whipped yogurt 2 Tbsp hari cilantro chutney 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney For Garnishing (optional)lemon juice sprinkle over chaat chaat masala powder green chili finely chopped ginger finely chopped InstructionsUse a large, sweet potato. Wash and peel and slice them in rounds of about 1/­­4 inch thick. Keep aside. In a bowl take breadcrumbs, add 1/­­2 tsp salt and 1/­­4 tsp black pepper, and mix it all well. In another bowl mix all-purpose flour, corn starch, 1/­­2 tsp salt, and 1/­­4 tsp black pepper. Add the water slowly and make it into a thick batter. I used about 1/­­3 cup of water. I am using parchment paper over air fryer baking tray oil the parchment paper. Coat both sides of a sweet potato slice in the flour batter and then in the breadcrumb mixture. Shake off any excess breading and transfer the sweet potato slices to an airfryer baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining sweet potato slices. Spray the slices with oil. Bake in air fryer for 10 minutes (on 325-degree Fahrenheit). Then turn the sweet potato slices and bake it again for 10 minutes. Maybe you will have to adjust the time and temperature according to your air fryer. The sweet potatoes will have a nice crunch. You may serve them hot or at room temperature with your favorite garnishing. I prefer with yogurt and chutney. NotesServing Suggestions Sweet potatoes have nice crunch, my favorite way to serve this chaat, is to drizzle with yogurt, little cilantro chutney and top it with tamarind chutney if you like hot and spicy sprinkle with finely chopped green chilies and ginger. I have done cilantro chutney and tamarind chutney recipes earlier; you can find these recipes on my website. You will also enjoy some of these vegan and gluten free recipes: Zucchini Lentil Pakoras, Vegan Rice Kheer (Payasam), Apple Banana Pakora, Bhajia, Fritters, Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Bread) The post Sweet Potato Chaat (Shakarkandi) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Sausage Oatmeal Pancakes

April 17 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sausage Oatmeal Pancakes Makes 6 big pancakes Some recipes make you question everything you thought you knew. Who am I? How did I get here? Is it a good place to be? The answer seems simple. I love pancakes. I love oatmeal. I love vegan sausages. But combining a million good things doesnt always mean you will end up with a good thing. I mean, I love oil and I love water but you know the rest. So I fucked around and found out. And I am here to tell you: combining all these things leads to an even better thing. Pancakes that are savory, with a fluffy yet hearty texture. The most filling delicious breakfast! A steady stream of maple syrup poured over the top doesnt hurt one bit. I also sprinkled with a little flake sea salt to up that sweet and salty combo. Without further ado, Oatmeal Sausage Pancakes. Your new favorite breakfast. Recipe notes: ~I do have a recipe for homemade breakfast sausages but Im not giving it to you yet. I would recommend either Field Roast Maple Breakfast Links or Beyond Sausage. Field roast is a little more on the sweet side so whatever floats your boat! ~ I have a lot of pancake tips all over the site, but Im not sure Ive ever written this one: If your pancakes arent cooking through, try covering them while cooking. ~ I love cooking pancakes in refined coconut oil! So buttery and yum. But you can cook in oil or vegan butter as well. I recommend Miyoko’s Butter for topping them, too. Ingredients 7 oz vegan sausages 1 1/­­4 cups all-purpose flour  1/­­2 cup quick cooking rolled oats  2 1/­­4 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt  1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened soymilk (or fave vegan milk) 1/­­4 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 tablespoon safflower (or any mild vegetable oil) 1 tablespoon sugar  1/­­2 teaspoon vanilla Refined coconut oil for cooking Directions Refined coconut oil for cooking  In a non-stick pan over medium heat, cook the sausages in a little oil. Once cooked, set them aside to cool completely. When they are cool enough to handle, tear them into tiny pieces. No need to wash the pan, you will be using it for pancakes in a bit and the sausage oil will taste good! Pop them in the freezer to cool completely while you make the pancake batter. Combine flour, oats, baking powder and salt in a mixing bowl. Make a well in the center and add milk, applesauce, oil, sugar and vanilla.  Use a rubber spatula to stir the wet a bit to combine, then incorporate it with the dry, mixing just until everything is moistened. Fold cool, crumbled sausages into the batter. Let batter rest 10 minutes.  Preheat pan over medium heat. Melt coconut oil for each pancake. Scoop a scant 1/­­2 cup into the pan and cook until bubbly, then cover with a lid for another minute or two so it cooks through. Flip and cook on the other side till lightly brown. Proceed with the rest of the pancakes! When serving, sprinkle with flake sea salt after pouring the syrup if you love sweet and salty. I also threw on some maple butter, yum.

Easy Vegan Bran Muffins

January 15 2021 VegKitchen 

Easy Vegan Bran Muffins Traditional all bran muffins have been given a plant based makeover, in these easy vegan bran muffins. This healthy and delicious breakfast muffin can be even more fun with the addition of your favorite mix-ins. Try adding raisins, dried cranberries, dried blueberries, chocolate chips, or diced apples. Your imagination is the limit! I loved the traditional All Bran Muffins that I had growing up. So of course, I had to do my best to make a vegan-ized version of that very special treat. The easy vegan bran muffins are one of my favorite make-ahead breakfast recipes. They’re quick and simple to throw together over the weekend, and have breakfast ready all week long. These vegan bran muffins are: Super healthy! Packed with fiber Ready in just 30 minutes Kid-friendly And did I mention that they’re totally delicious too? Tips & Tricks Wheat Bran – I used this wheat bran from Bob’s Red Mill. But you can use your favorite brand. Flour – I used a whole wheat flour for my vegan muffins, as it’s a bit healthier. But you can also substitute all purpose flour and the recipe works just fine. Ground Flax Seed – Don’t skip the flax seed […] The post Easy Vegan Bran Muffins appeared first on VegKitchen.

Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread)

December 24 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Methi Bajra Paratha Parathas always have been a family-favorite treat. Lately I have been trying to make gluten-free breads. A combination of bajra and besan with methi parathas taste delicious. These spicy Methi Bajra Parathas have a biscuit texture, which makes it very enjoyable. They also pair well with gravy-based dishes like Mixed Dal, Aloo Tamatar or you can serve with plain yogurt. You can enjoy these as a proper meal, or even as a great on-the-go lunch! I also enjoy these parathas with just hot cup of chai. This recipe will serve 2, and make 4 Parathas. Course Breakfast Cuisine Indian Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients 1/­­2 cup millet flour bajra atta 1/­­2 cup besan 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 tsp chili flakes 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1 Tbsp sesame seeds til 1 Tbsp oil 1/­­4 cup fenugreek leaves option is using dry leaves 1/­­2 cup hot water use as needed Also Need4 tsp oil to cook the parathas InstructionsMix all the ingredients for paratha together, millet flour, besan. Cumin, salt, chili flakes, turmeric, asafetida, sesame seeds, oil, and fenugreek leaves. Notes: if you dont have fresh fenugreek leaves use dry methi known as Kasuri Methi. Make the dough using hot water, you will need about 1/­­2 cup of water. Dough should be firm and pliable. Notes: dough should be prepare just before making paratha. Dived the dough into 4 equal parts, oil your palm and roll them between your palms, to make them round petites. Heat the skillet on medium high heat. To test, sprinkle a couple of drops of water on the skillet. The water should sizzle right away. Roll the paratha in about 6 circle, roll them between two pieces of plastic that makes the rolling easy, I am using zip log bag. Place the methi bajra paratha over the skillet. When start to change color, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. After a few seconds, spread one teaspoon of oil on the aratha. Flip it again and lightly press the with a spatula. Flip again and press with the spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat same process for the remaining. NotesServing suggestions: - Masala Lauki Ki Sabji - Matar With Spicy Gravy - Spinach raita The post Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon

December 8 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon I am one of those who enjoys cooking and eating, a real foodaholic. About three months back when our family got together, Alex, my husband, was given the challenge to see if he can go on a gluten free diet for 10 days. He agreed to do so if I also joined him. They knew for me and Alex no meal is complete without any kind of bread: my favorites are roti and paratha. I decided to take the challenge with him anyway. After ten days, Alex went back to his normal diet, but I decided to continue. I was feeling better and more energetic. But after 10 days when my challenge time was over, I decided occasionally I will cheat a little bit. Surprisingly, I am glad I did that; it was difficult in the beginning, but now I am liking it. Being gluten free has opened a wide selection of grains for me to experiment with new recipes. I knew about them but did not use them much. I started reading about these grains my grandmother raved about and learning about their nutritional values. Knowing all that has made it easy for me to try these grains in my recipes. I do have many gluten free recipes of bread like Dosa, Oat Dosa, Moong Dal Dosa, Besan Puda, but these were part of our regular diet anyway. When making them, I never considered that I was making these recipes because they were gluten free. One of the gluten-free grains I began using was millet. My last recipe for millet (bajri) soup was one of those recipes. My family enjoyed this soup and suggested millet soup can be a part of our winter menu. My next recipe that is coming up is Sorghum (jowar) Dosa. I have already tried this recipe a few times. It is quick, easy, and tasty. Sorghum Dosa is also a good alternative to regular dosa because this dosa batter does not need to be fermented. An added benefit is that Sorghum Dosa is also vegan and gluten free. The post Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Millet Soup (Bajra Raab)

December 4 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) Millet Soup! Lately, I have been experimenting with some different recipes that are both healthy and delicious. I decided to try a recipe for "Millet Soup", which is a traditional warm soup in Rajasthan and Gujarat, and this soup is known Bajra Raab. Millet is gluten free and full of many nutrients. It is also super easy to make. It is amazing how a bowl of hot soup can be so filling and comforting, especially as the days get colder and darker. The main ingredients in this soup are millet flour, yogurt, and some spices to enhance the flavor. Enjoy! This recipe will serve 2. Course Soup Cuisine Indian Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 Tbsp millet flour bajra 2 tsp oil divided 1/­­2 cup yogurt 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­8 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp ginger finely shredded 8 curry leaves 1 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped 1 tsp green chili thinly sliced optional. 1/­­8 tsp black pepper 3/­­4 tsp salt 2 1/­­2 cup of water InstructionsIn a small pan over low medium heat add 1 teaspoon of oil with millet flour and dry roast for about 2 minutes, the flour will have a light aroma, turn off the heat, and remove roasted flour from pan. Note: millet flour should be at room temperature before adding to yogurt. Take yogurt in a bowl and add the water slowly to make lump free batter. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a saucepan over low medium heat, oil should be moderately hot add mustard seed and cumin seeds as seeds crack add turmeric, curry leaves, ginger and cilantro and stir. Add yogurt mix, keep stirring till it comes to a boil. Lower the heat and add millet flour, stir making sure no lumps. Let it boil for about five minutes stir occasionally. Add salt, black pepper and green chilies, let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Serve Millet Soup hot. NotesYou will also like to see the recipes for Carrot Ginger Soup, Sindhi Kadhi, Stir-Fry Cabbage salad. The post Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

ragi roti recipe | ragi rotti | nachni roti | finger millet roti

July 28 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

ragi roti recipe | ragi rotti | nachni roti | finger millet rotiragi roti recipe | ragi rotti | nachni roti | finger millet roti with step by step photo and video recipe. rotti recipes are very common across india, but millet based recipes are hugely popular with south indian. it is generally served for morning breakfast, but can be served for any meal. one such hugely popular and healthy south indian breakfast recipe is ragi roti recipe known for its taste and flavour. The post ragi roti recipe | ragi rotti | nachni roti | finger millet roti appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

5 Easy Ways to Support Restaurants During This Time

May 11 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

As a restaurant guide and worldwide resource serving millions online, HappyCow considers businesses to be more than just listings on a map. They are the entire foundation of our community – the spirit of HappyCow and of what brings our members together worldwide. Amidst the restrictions and temporary shutdowns brought about by COVID-19, we’re on the forefront of the struggle for businesses  to survive through this time. We know how hard it’s been for many restaurants to make ends meet, and we’re here to try and offer support. Today we’re bringing you 5 ways to be an active advocate for restaurants you love in your community, including ways to help out without dishing out any cash. Do you have any more easy ways to support restaurants during this time? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below or on social media.  1. Order Take-Out or Delivery This is the most obvious and easy win-win option; whether ordering directly from a particular restaurant, or through DoorDash, Deliveroo, or UberEats. Ordering take-out, delivery, or curb-side pick-up is a great way to safely buy a meal from your favourite business. Many restaurants on HappyCow are now marked with “Take-Out” and “Delivery” […] The post 5 Easy Ways to Support Restaurants During This Time appeared first on HappyCow.

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos

May 8 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

BBQ 5-Spice Tempeh Mushroom Tacos Serves 2 hungries Tempeh and mushrooms get all sticky and charred, burnt ends and everything, in an easy to throw together sauce that is smoky, sweet (but not too) and a little spicy. Some slaw to cool it down and lend some fresh crunch, some sliced avocado for creaminess and because avocado on everything always. Now youve got yourself a taco tuesday on a friday because you dont know what day it is! Recipes Notes ~ I marinate the tempeh for up to an hour (but not longer than that) but if youve got 15 minutes, no problem, it will still be yummy, just a little less soaked through. ~ This marinade it soooo good for a million things. Try it on baked tofu or even veggies like cauliflower or brussels. Ingredients For the tempeh marinade: 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 1 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon canola oil (plus additional for cooking) 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon 5-spice For cooking: 8 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced thin (about 1/­­8 inch thick, not paper thin) 1 8 oz package tempeh, diced For slaw: 4 cups thin sliced red cabbage (tough core removed) 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon agave Small glug olive oil 1/­­4 cup finely chopped cilantro Pinch salt To assemble: Sliced avocado 6 8-inch tortillas warmed up Directions 1 – Vigorously mix all tempeh marinade ingredients in a mixing bowl. Add the tempeh and toss to coat. Let marinade 15 minutes to an hour.  2 – Mix all the slaw ingredients together and taste for seasoning. Let wilt.  3 – Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. When good and hot, cook mushrooms in canola oil until moisture is released and theyve browned a bit, about 7 minutes.  4 – Add the tempeh, reserving some marinade. Cook for about 10 minutes, flipping often, until caramelized on the edges.Add more marinade as needed.  5 – Heat tortillas your preferred way and assemble. Slaw on bottom, then tempeh, then tuck in sliced avocado. Sprinkle avo with a little lime juice and salt if you like. Serve asap!

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes

April 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes Beans are the pillars of the pantry; theyre easy to prepare, packed with plant-based protein and a host of other vitamins and minerals, versatile, flavorful, and adaptable. We love adding them to stews, transforming them into burgers, or serving them cold and dressed for a bright and hearty salad. With so many varieties available, from pinto beans and black-eye peas to navy beans and chickpeas, your recipe options are truly endless. Depending on how you cook them, beans can be creamy and elegant or toothsome and refreshing, which is why its important to have a stock of both canned beans and dried beans in your pantry. This Monday, grab a can of beans and experiment with one of our top 10 favorite bean recipes. Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup All the flavors of your favorite Italian restaurant -- roasted garlic, crushed tomatoes, dry white wine -- packed into one hearty, comforting bowl of soup. For the Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup recipe, click here .     Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad Tahini is made from pulverized sesame seeds; its creamy nuttiness is magic when used as a dressing for this colorful quinoa bean salad. For the Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad recipe, click here .     Navy Bean Bruschetta  Sure, traditional bruschetta is made with diced fresh tomatoes, but this version boasts a bit more protein thanks to a base of navy beans. For the Navy Bean Bruschetta recipe, click here .     New Orleans Red Beans and Rice For authentic red beans and rice, youve got to start with dry beans. Soak overnight and boil with some aromatics for a bean dish that is unlike anything youve ever tasted before. For the New Orleans Red Beans and Rice recipe, click here .     Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger Although the recipe calls for a handful of ingredients, you can make the base of these burgers using just farro (a yummy, toothsome grain) and white beans. Add any other additional vegetables, seasonings, or bread crumbs to round out the flavor and texture. For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger recipe, click here .       Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili This chili is rich and smoky thanks to the liberal use of chipotle and ancho chili powder, cumin, and, of course, lots and lots of black beans. For the Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili recipe, click here .       Quick and Easy Hummus To make hummus requires four ingredients -- chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, salt -- and a food processor. Yep, thats it. Enjoy. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here .       Vegetarian Hoppin John Though traditionally made with ham or bacon, this vegetarian version of Hoppin John doesnt lack for flavor thanks to hot sauce, liquid smoke, and yummy black-eyed peas. For the Vegetarian Hoppin John recipe, click here .     Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs Meatless meatballs made with roasted red peppers and kidney beans mimic beautifully the meat versions. The flavor is all there, too, with onion and garlic, herbs, and non-dairy Parmesan cheese. For the Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs recipe, click here .   Pinto Bean Falafel Most falafel recipes call for chickpeas, but this version using pinto beans is creamier than traditional versions, but with all the same flavor. For the Pinto Bean Falafel recipe, click here .     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Freezer-Friendly Greens & Tofu Scramble Wraps

January 6 2020 Oh My Veggies 

It’s always my goal to create recipes that aren’t just tasty, but that are doable. For me, part of “doable” is ingredients that are readily available. This isn’t just about you, it’s also about me--I live in a smallish town and I don’t want to be schlepping all over the place for ingredients either. But I was working on a tofu scramble for a while and it just wasn’t coming together and I finally had to acknowledge the fact that I needed to go to Raleigh to get some nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is a flaky little deactivated yeast that tastes like cheese. So it’s great for vegan cooking. It’s a good source of vitamins (some brands, like Bob’s Red Mill, are fortified with Vitamin B12) and even contains some protein. If, like me, you can’t find it at your local grocery store, you can buy nutritional yeast on Amazon. But since I needed the nutritional yeast right away, I didn’t order it online and went to Earth Fare, 40 minutes away, to get it. I got home and since I was going to use it the next day, I decided to leave it on the countertop, as I sometimes […]

Lemon Almond Biscotti

December 17 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Lemon Almond Biscotti Makes 16 Biscotti Photo By VK Rees Classic flavors with the the lemon on blast! I used to eat biscotti like these at an espresso spot in Little Italy. Just me and my journal, a coffee and a million honking taxis on a relaxing NYC afternoon. I am sure they loved that someone who spent like 3 bucks was taking up a table, writing her memoir for like 2 hours. This is a fun one where you get to drizzle icing all over everything, so have your inner child or your actual child at the ready. Biscotti seems a little fancy somehow, but I actually make it when I’m lazy because it’s like two gigantic cookies instead of scooping out individual ones and the slicing is satisfying in easy. Ingredients 1/­­4 cup unsweetened vegan milk 1/­­4 cup fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 3/­­4 cup granulated sugar 1/­­2 cup melted refined coconut oil 2 tablespoons fresh grated lemon zest 1  teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­4 teaspoon almond extract 1 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 cup sliced almonds For the lemon glaze: 2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted if clumpy 1/­­2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon melted refined coconut oil Directions 1 – Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease a large baking sheet. 2 – In a large mixing bowl, whisk together milk, lemon juice and flaxseeds. Beat in the sugar, melted coconut oil, lemon zest and extracts. Mix for about two minutes until relatively smooth.  3 – Sift in half of the flour, along with the cornstarch, baking powder, and salt. Stir just until incorporated, a few dry spots are ok. 4- Mix in the almonds, then add the remaining flour and use your hands to form a stiff dough. 5 – Divide dough into two 5-inch by 3-inch logs. Transfer logs to baking sheet.  6 – Bake for 25 minutes until puffed up. Remove from oven and cool for 30 to 40 minutes, until firm and just warm to the touch.  7 – Preheat oven to 350 F again.  Transfer the loafs to a cutting board. Use a bread knife to slice into 1-inch slices. Do this in one swift motion, do not saw that the cookies, just press down.  8 – Place each cookie cut side down on cookie sheet. Bake for 20 more minutes, flipping the cookies halfway through.  9 – Remove from oven and place on a cooling rack to cook completely.  10 – Make the glaze by mixing everything together until there are no lumps. 11 – Place cooling rack of cookies over the sink. Use a spoon to drizzle the lemon glaze over cooled cookies while they are still on the cooling rack, and let the excess fall into the sink for easy cleaning. Let set in a cool room or in the fridge for 30 minutes or so.

Vegan Almond Coconut Granola

December 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Almond Coconut GranolaThis Homemade Baked Almond Coconut Granola is super easy to make and so delicious with the perfect amount of sweetness and the ultimate crunch from nuts, chia seeds and rolled oats! You will want to sprinkle it on everything! Vegan Glutenfree So much better than store-bought granola mixes. Homemade granola – I just LOVE that it is so easy to make and so customizable. You can make it plain, or add in all your favorite dried fruits, nuts, seeds, chocolate chips, spices, etc. This vegan recipe for crunchy coconut almond granola has just about everything I love: crunchy granola with big flakes of coconut and whole almonds mixed in.  I also add some chia seeds and assorted nuts for extra crunch. The “glue” that holds this vegan baked granola together is a blend of coconut oil, maple syrup, almond butter, coconut sugar and a dash of cinnamon too. So this is basically refined sugar-free and provides a rounder, more caramel-y sweetness than storebought granola. Youll pour the wet ingredients over the dry granola ingredients to make it all sticky, and allow for it to bake up all nice and crunchy! Take your time here  -as it bakes youll get those nice big clusters of granola throughout. Did I mention that it will make your kitchen smell amazing? MORE GRANOLA FROM THE BLOG - Date Caramel Granola  - no Oil- no refined sugar - Sunbutter or pb Granola Bars - Maple pecan Cardamom granola  - Lentil Cranberry Granola - candied pecans  - Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola - Quinoa Chivda - savory  Indian Trail mix Lately, my favorite way to enjoy this coconut almond granola is on a bowl of coconut yogurt – my favorite breakfast these days! It’s just so crunchy and tasty with the perfect amount of sweetness. Also a wonderful snack. Of course, you can also just enjoy it with your favorite plant-based milk like a bowl of cereal – maybe with chopped up fruit on top. But honestly, it is so good I could just eat it by the handful.Continue reading: Vegan Almond Coconut GranolaThe post Vegan Almond Coconut Granola appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Sticky Debate About Honey

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If theres one hot-button issue among vegans, its honey. While some vegans will eat it and use it, others wont, which can cause some heated debates among this group. So why not just get right to the point: Is honey vegan? The basic buzz on honey Honey bees collect nectar from flowering plants, which they regurgitate into honeycomb cells. With a little fanning from their wings to remove excess moisture, the end result is honey. The amazing fact? Making one pound of honey requires 556 worker bees, and the average worker bee will only make one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime, according to the Ontario Beekeepers Association. Because honey is so high in sugar, it then becomes an energy source for the bees, helping fuel the roughly 12,000 beats their wings take every minute. Of course, bees have been making honey ever since their existence, and its said theyve been around for about 30 million years. How long humans have been eating honey isnt entirely clear, but honey has certainly found its way into the human food system, showing up on breakfast tables, getting baked into breads and muffins, and being mixed into granolas. Honeys also a popular medicinal cure. The case against honey being vegan The first argument against honey not being vegan (though it certainly is vegetarian) is the obvious one: Honey comes from an animal, and vegans eschew any animal-based products. Animals arent ours to use, steal from or manipulate as we see fit, says Amber Canavan, senior campaigner and spokesperson for PETA in Portland, Ore. And while you might not equate bees with farmed animals like chickens, pigs and cows, there is cruelty in the raising of bees. Theyre killed and harmed in the process, Canavan says. She points to commercially bred honey bees who are kept crammed in file-cabinet type hives. When hives are ready for harvesting, its nearly impossible to open the hive and get honey out without crushing numerous bees who are trying to protect the hive, she adds. Now move to queen bees, who are often treated like female cows in the dairy industry, being artificially inseminated by force, Canavan says. Beekeepers might even clip the wings of queen bees so they cant escape and move the hive. And speaking of moving, bees are often trucked around the country, especially in the commercial industry, to pollinate plants in a given destination. Because honey bees arent native to this country, moving them around like this could introduce issues for local pollinators, she adds. Related: How to Choose Sugar Substitutes Finally, taking honey from the bees may threaten the bees health, according to The Vegan Society. Not only is their honey supply then decreased, many commercial beekeepers will take the honey off and feed them high-fructose corn syrup, which isnt good for their health, says Paul Cronshaw, co-founder and director of operations for the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association in California, vegan and hive keeper whose hives are cruelty- and chemical-free. Putting honey on the table In spite of the above arguments, there are vegans who do consume and use honey, Cronshaw being one of them. My philosophy is that the bees are using honey as a survival food in a house that Im providing, and I take only a minimal amount for rent, he says, adding that this was the first year hes taken from them in years because of the now-ended drought in California. As a result, the bees produced more honey this year and were able to pay more rent. Whats his rationale for using honey? I use honey for medicine and other reasons, he says. Those reasons include helping with sore throat, improving oral health, and aiding with wound healing. Case in point: He was bitten on the hand by a dog recently and used Manuka honey to heal while honey helped him survive a foot injury on a nine-day backpacking trip in the Sierras a few years ago. And while nobodys advocating supporting commercial beekeepers, supporting local ones can help the bee population survive. Numerous studies, after all, point to the collapse of bees who help pollinate numerous food crops. Although honey bees arent in danger of extinction, they are in decline, albeit a big slower because humans are their shepherds or keepers, he adds. If you do decide to use honey, Cronshaw recommends connecting with local beekeepers to find out how they practice beekeeping. Most local beekeepers arent trucking their hives around the country, arent using harmful fillers after taking the bees honey and are working hard not to kill bees. You can raise bees without killing them, he says. The good news is that you dont have to eat or use honey if you dont want to. There are so many alternatives on the market now, Canavan says. Not only can you choose from things like maple syrup, stevia, blackstrap molasses and agave syrup, theres even vegan honey. You can also help local pollinators by planting plants they like and creating a pollinator-friendly yard.   The post The Sticky Debate About Honey appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

5 Simple Ways to Support Local Restaurants

May 11 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

As a restaurant guide and worldwide resource serving millions online, HappyCow considers businesses to be more than just listings on a map. They are the entire foundation of our community – the spirit of HappyCow and of what brings our members together worldwide. Amidst the restrictions and temporary shutdowns brought about by COVID-19, we’re on the forefront of the struggle for businesses  to survive through this time. We know how hard it’s been for many restaurants to make ends meet, and we’re here to try and offer support. Today we’re bringing you 5 ways to be an active advocate for restaurants you love in your community, including ways to help out without dishing out any cash. Do you have more ways to support local restaurants right now? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below or on social media.  1. Order Take-Out or Delivery This is the most obvious and easy win-win option; whether ordering directly from a particular restaurant, or through DoorDash, Deliveroo, or UberEats. Ordering take-out, delivery, or curb-side pick-up is a great way to safely buy a meal from your favourite business. Many restaurants on HappyCow are now marked with “Take-Out” and “Delivery” icons, making […] The post 5 Simple Ways to Support Local Restaurants appeared first on HappyCow.

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg AlternativesAs most bakers will tell you, baking makes you feel good. It can even be a meditative activity that helps to reduce stress and brings us positive feelings of doing something for others; in this case, creating delicious baked goods for the ones we love. When whipping up plant-based desserts and baked goods, using the right substitute for eggs is critical as it is a key ingredient that gives structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. Dont panic. Some clever cooks have come up with easy to use animal-free alternatives; flax and chia seeds, apple sauce, and aquafaba can all be used in some capacity to replace eggs. But remember that not every egg alternative is equal: aquafaba is used for egg whites, chia seeds are better for browning and color, and silken tofu adds texture and protein. Below is a list of our favorite egg alternatives complete with drool-worthy recipes from a few of our favorite plant-based bloggers. So start experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker , and try making her recipe for easy macaroons . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. If youre a fan of banana, try these heavenly peanut butter banana brownies from Bucket List Tummy . Please note that the recipe also calls for a flax egg (see recipe for flax egg below). Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies, but they can also add a nice texture to this sweet chia cornbread from The Simple Veganista . Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5-10 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Try using them to make these vegan coffee cake streusel muffins by Choosing Chia . Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Silken tofu is best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda, but its also wonderfully decadent in this vegan strawberry cheesecake by Exceedingly Vegan . Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST (theyve got a great recipe for crispy waffles). Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs. Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some more #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery .   The post “Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to Follow

April 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to FollowFood and Instagram go together like strawberries and chocolate. To satisfy our appetite for mouthwatering meals, a number of amateur and professional cooks are creating and sharing amazing plant-based recipes that you recreate from the comfort of your own kitchen. This Monday, check out our list of favorite plant-based Instagram influencers to follow; theyve got tips for everything from cashew cheese to no-bake coconut cake to basil risotto. Remember, many of these influencers also have websites and YouTube channels as well, so say hello to your new virtual cooking companions! @alphafoodie Samira Kazan, the creator of the @alphafoodie Instagram and alphafoodie.com , is dedicated to showcasing beautifully vibrant ingredients and finished dishes. Her videos are a beautiful blend of technique and presentation. Check out her creative recipes for plant-based Cheddar cheese and gluten-free banana bread. @deliciouslyella A queen of plant-based meal preparation, Ella Mills is an icon when it comes to making simple and delicious food without using animal products. Breakfast bowls, smoothies, sweets, savory grains, and delectable veggies, Ella can do it all, and you can too; check out her Instagram page and blog deliciouslyella.com for step-by-step instructions on how you can recreate her edible masterpieces. @minimalistbaker The mantra of the Minimalist Baker is clear: simple recipes that make you feel good, 10 ingredients, 1 bowl, or 30 minutes or less -- all eaters welcome. With creative ideas for plant-based cakes, brownies, soups, breads, and so much more, youll be using the Minimalist Bakers Instagram as both a source of cooking insights and artful inspiration. @frommybowl Caitlin Shoemaker, the creator of @frommybowl , develops easy-to-follow, vegan recipes that actually taste good. Her food is health-forward, and many of her recipes incorporate a variety of nutritionally-dense ingredients. But most importantly, Shoemakers food looks, well, fun; shes got recipes for no-bake toasted coconut cheesecake, vegan strawberry shortcake, and a gorgeous feel-good red lentil soup. And while her Instagram page doesnt include many videos, you can always check out Shoemakers YouTube channel and website to see her in action. @hotforfood If you want a virtual cooking buddy, look no further than Lauren Toyota, the foodie philosopher behind the Instagram @hotforfood . Charisma and a whimsical approach to food, makes Toyota an excellent source for plant-based cooking. Shes got tons of videos on her Instagram and website , which makes her more of a culinary coach than Instagram influencer. @pinchofyum With over one million followers, @pinchofyum is doing a lot of things right. They have recipes for all of your comfort food favorites -- gnocchi, macaroni and cheese, banana-oat pancakes -- many of which use only vegetarian-friendly ingredients. Scroll through their feed or look at some of their instructive cooking videos and website recipes . @vanillaandbean To satisfy your need for elegant images of food, look no further than @vanillaandbean . This Instagram feed is full of rustic plates, counter tops, and casserole dishes teeming with beautiful meals and ingredients, many of which are plant-based. For full recipes, check out vanillaandbean.com , and let your appetite run wild. @veggie_­inspired Jenn Sebestyen, creator of @veggie_­inspired and author the Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, is a master at coaxing delicious flavors out of plant-based ingredients. Her recipes are easy to follow and appeal to all varieties of eating lifestyles, also available on her website . @woon.heng Woon Heng is a wonderfully inventive home cook (and Meatless Monday contributor) who focuses on cooking up plant-based meals with an Asian flare. Her dishes are unique and easy on the eyes; one look at her Instagram feed will have you stocking up on soy sauce, sesame oil, fresh chile, and udon noodles. Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Plant-Based Instagram Influencers You NEED to Follow appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this MondayOur daily food choices have a direct impact on the health of the planet. And while its true that all foods need resources to produce, research shows that meat and dairy have the greatest impacts on the environment. This isnt too hard to picture; raising animals to feed billions of people requires huge inputs of land, feed, water, and energy to be processed, stored, and transported. While the environmental impacts of food production can seem daunting, thankfully there are easy and delicious ways to reduce our individual and collective foodprints through eating a more plant-based diet and reducing food waste . But you dont need to go vegan to make a difference; starting small, like going Meatless Monday, is meaningful and can also lead to eating more plant-based foods throughout the week. Meatless Monday Tips for Plant-based Eating Add more fruits and vegetables to your meals Make meals from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery Stock your pantry with plant-based staples for quick and easy meals Enjoy a wide variety of plant-based proteins Load up your spice cabinet for flavorful meatless meals Reduce food waste with inexpensive foods that wont go bad Get the whole family involved with The Kids Cook Monday meatless recipes Just how much of a difference does it make replacing animal products with plant-based foods? To help quantify the power of plant-based eating, weve collaborated with our academic partners at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to gather the facts and figures behind plant-based foods and the environment. According to calculations from Johns Hopkins, if sixty percent of Americans ate plant-based just one day, it would save the equivalent of 104,000 Olympic swimming pools of water and the land area of the California Redwood Forests. Hungry for more reasons to go Meatless Monday? Check out the facts below to see the impact that livestock production as on the environment, and how you can help minimize those effects by reducing meat and adding more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and grains into your diet. Water Animal agriculture is responsible for about 70 percent of the worlds freshwater use. By 2050, water demand for livestock production is expected to leave half the worlds population living in water-stressed environments. Research shows that eating a more plant-based diet can decrease agricultural water use by 50 percent. Deforestation The meat industry is the most significant driver of deforestation, clearing approximately 50 million square miles of forest for agricultural purposes each year. Combining pasture and land used for feed crops, 80 percent of the worlds farmlands are used for livestock production. Soil Health Animal agriculture damages soil quality and compromises the health of the ecosystem. Industrial livestock production, through its intensive land management practices, reduces soil fertility and leaves previously fertile regions barren and more prone to natural disaster such as wildfires, flooding, and dust storms. Wide-scale shifts toward more plant-based diets would carry tremendous benefits for soil health and biodiversity. Biodiversity Livestock production has led to over 60% decline in species populations since 1970. Animal agriculture disrupts delicate eco-systems, making it one of the greatest human contributors to species decline. Global Emissions Meat and dairy production remain the most significant contributors of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and of these sources, livestock production is the largest, accounting for an estimated 14.5 percent of global GHG emissions from human activities, according to the United Nations. Interested in learning more about the connection between the food system and the health of the environment? Click here for more facts and figures from our academic partners at Johns Hopkins University. The post Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for BakingEggs play a crucial role in many of our favorite baked goods, giving structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. But like other forms of intensive livestock farming, egg production also takes a toll on the health of the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, and contamination of soil and water. Plant-based egg replacers are designed to give us all that we love about eggs without the environmental baggage. But, please remember that every plant-based egg alternative wont work in every application, so look for plant-based baking recipes or do some experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies. Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda. Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST . Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs.   Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery . The post The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps

January 2 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether you’re hitting the slopes or seeking a cozy retreat, we’ve got a list of the best getaways in the Swiss Alps this winter season! And we’ve included a (vegan) food guide to each location. Zermatt What To Do: Zermatt is the place to be in southern Switzerland for skiing, climbing, and hiking. Placed below the famous Matterhorn Peak, you’ll find shops and boutiques galore. Not a ski fan? Try your hand (or feet) at ice skating or curling, instead. A sweet spot for the adventurers and tourists alike, Zermatt’s got activities for all. Where To Eat: You can start with coffee and lovely views at Cup’s Italian Coffee House. A vegan pastry is usually available, along with non-dairy milks, smoothies, and yogurt. Stop skiing long enough for amazing Alps views and lunch at Trockener Steg. They offer a salad and pasta bar that’s sure to be navigated easily for vegan options. If you’re looking for a trendy place for dinner, try Geez – but be sure to ask for no fish sauce and to clarify that the vegetarian offerings be made vegan, if necessary. Bern What To Do: This highly populated Swiss city (over 1 million) is the capital […] The post 7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps appeared first on HappyCow.


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