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Baked Gobi Manchurian – Cauliflower Manchurian

October 8 2021 Vegan Richa 

Baked Gobi Manchurian – Cauliflower ManchurianIn this lightened-up take on the Indian-Chinese restaurant-favorite Gobi Manchurian, cauliflower florets are baked up until crispy, then drenched in a sweet and spicy delicious manchurian sauce! Serve it as an appetizer or main dish. Gluten-free option.  I’m always excited when I can present you with an easy spin on a restaurant favorite and today I have a good one for you! One of those special-occasion restaurant menu items that we all love to order when eating out but never considered making at home. Cauliflower Manchurian! This makes a great addition to the festival menu! What is Cauliflower Manchurian? Gobi Manchurian, or Cauliflower Manchurian, is a super popular take-out and restaurant menu item. This  Indo-Chinese dish is typically fried but I prefer to bake the florets in the oven. Baking gives cauliflower an amazing texture; you won’t miss the greasy, fried coating. The crispy oven-baked florets are then tossed with a delicious sweet, spicy, and tangy Manchurian sauce! This easy vegan dish makes for the most delicious appetizer but it can also be served as a main  when paired with rice. The ingredient list for making cauliflower manchurian is on the longer side but don’t be intimidated by that. Most ingredients are pantry staples and the preparation is so easy so it’s so worth it! Manchurian sauce is a very versatile sauce. You can add some Crisped tofu,  veggie meatballs or vegan chicken to the sauce or add in some noodles. MORE CAULIFLOWER RECIPES - Taco Spice roasted Cauliflower - Spicy Pepper Cauliflower Bites - Mango Sriracha Cauliflower - Aloo Gobi - Baked - Nashville Cauliflower Bites - Kung Pao Cauliflower More Indo Chinese dishes - Tofu 65 – tofu with curry leaf infused sweet and sour sauce  - Hakka Noodles - Noodles with cabbage, carrot, veggies and an easy sauce Gf option - Tofu Paneer Chilli - Sweet and spicy sauce with crisp tofu GF Continue reading: Baked Gobi Manchurian – Cauliflower ManchurianThe post Baked Gobi Manchurian – Cauliflower Manchurian appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Cook a Meal Worth Eating Under the Stars with These Actually-Good Camping Recipes

August 31 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Cook a Meal Worth Eating Under the Stars with These Actually-Good Camping Recipes With minimal equipment, double-duty groceries, and clever hacks, this campsite-ready menu will elevate your outdoor experience The post Cook a Meal Worth Eating Under the Stars with These Actually-Good Camping Recipes appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Beyond Breakfast Sausage Wakes Up the Menu at Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf

August 26 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Beyond Breakfast Sausage Wakes Up the Menu at Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf A new meatless option for when youre on the go The post Beyond Breakfast Sausage Wakes Up the Menu at Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Barack Obama’s 60th Birthday Bash Is a Meat-Free Affair

August 8 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Barack Obama’s 60th Birthday Bash Is a Meat-Free Affair The former president is partying with close friends in Marthas Vineyard and dining on a Questlove-curated menu of plant-based options The post Barack Obama’s 60th Birthday Bash Is a Meat-Free Affair appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Loaded Baked Potato Wedges with Creamy Cheese Sauce and Tofu Bacony Bits

August 2 2021 Vegan Richa 

Loaded Baked Potato Wedges with Creamy Cheese Sauce and Tofu Bacony BitsLoaded Vegan Baked Potato Wedges – These crispy baked potato wedges are perfection! Baked until crispy and topped with vegan cashew cheese sauce, tofu bacon, and scallions. These just might be potato perfection! This easy recipe for Baked Loaded Potato Wedges will blow you away with the delicious combo of crispy baked potatoes,  tofu bacon bits, and a creamy vegan cashew cheese sauce. While you could eat these loaded potato wedges as a meal or side dish, I love serving these as a shared appetizer or a Game Day snack. Having a few is delicious, but having a whole sheet pan on your own is quite gluttonous so you might want to share. If youre hosting a party, a movie night or a game day get-together, make sure to put these delicious loaded potato wedges on the menu and you will be everyone’s favorite! These Vegan Cheesy Potato Wedges are perfect for when youre craving something cheesy and comforting. The potatoes are baked not fried.  They are baked on the same sheet pan as the tofu bacon which makes for easy clean-up. While the potato wedges are baking, we whip up my favorite vegan cashew cheese sauce. It only takes minutes and you’ll love the creamy rich texture. I like to make some extra and serve pasta with vegan cheese sauce and bacon the next day. You can also slice the potatoes into halves to make loaded baked potatoes! More Vegan Game Day Foods & Snacks - Firecracker crispy tofu wings - Spinach artichoke dip  - Thai Layered Dip -because Peanut sauce. - Spicy Pepper Crisp Cauliflower bites with celery ranch - Zucchini chickpea Fritters - Cajun Chickpea Fries Continue reading: Loaded Baked Potato Wedges with Creamy Cheese Sauce and Tofu Bacony BitsThe post Loaded Baked Potato Wedges with Creamy Cheese Sauce and Tofu Bacony Bits appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Michelin-Star Chef Turns Acclaimed London Restaurant Vegan

June 27 2021 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Gauthier Soho Michelin-star and multi-award winning chef, Alexis Gauthier, has turned his acclaimed London restaurant, Gauthier Soho, completely vegan. The French fine-dining restaurant re-opened on June 23, as Covid-restrictions lifted in the city. After 10 years in service, the restaurant’s menu is now entirely plant-based. “I believe it is our duty as human beings to leave the planet in a better state than we found it, and a very good place to start is addressing the impact we make with our needless and selfish consumption of animals. I am a classically trained French chef who held Michelin stars for 12 years and the thought of someone like me being vegan would have been insane five or ten years ago. But now the world is waking up. This is the future.” Chef Alexis Gauthier A Past & Future with Plants When Chef Gauthier opened his restaurant in 2011, he had a strong interest in serving plant-focused dishes. At that time, 20-30% of the restaurants bookings were already vegetarian tasting menus, according to the restaurant’s website. Five years later, when Gauthier went vegan himself, the idea of removing animal products from the kitchen became more personally compelling. However it took a few […] The post Michelin-Star Chef Turns Acclaimed London Restaurant Vegan appeared first on HappyCow.

New Vegan Magazine - Plant Powered Planet

June 2 2021 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

New Vegan Magazine - Plant Powered Planet In the launch edition of Plant Powered Planet vegan chef Tony Bishop-Weston issues a call to arms to make sure all pubs, restaurants, cafes, hotels have good value for money delicious and exciting vegan options on their menu as Covid restrictions finally ease.  Plant Powered Planet Magazine - Read More More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

10 Best Vegan Taco Restaurants in the World

May 24 2021 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Who doesn’t love tacos? Friends all around the world are fans of this versatile Mexican classic. Whether filled with veggies, hot sauce, or plant-based meats, you may be wondering where exactly to sample the best vegan versions. That’s what we’re here for! This is HappyCow’s list of the 10 best vegan taco restaurants in the world. 10. VEGuerrero – Mexico City, Mexico This authentic Mexican restaurants offers a variety of vegan meats, including their own house-made seitan. Their mission is to expand the plant-based gastronomic experience, through ethical culinary culture. Now that’s something we’re into! Very nice food and amazingly cheap! AnthonyMontaner on HappyCow 9. Tiki Loco – Dallas, USA This eclectic Mexican cafe opened in the Deep Ellum neighborhood of Dallas in 2018, and became fully vegan a year later. Almost everything on the menu is also gluten-free, which is a big win. It’s the only restaurant where I loved everything we ordered and we ordered a lot. VickyLorenzen on HappyCow 8. Tacotarian – Las Vegas, USA This plant-based Mexican eatery offers a variety of unique vegan taco fillings, such as jackfruit barbacoa, mushroom asada, chorizo, and no carne asada. There’s something interesting on the menu for everyone. This […] The post 10 Best Vegan Taco Restaurants in the World appeared first on HappyCow.

Best Vegan Easter recipes

March 24 2021 Oh My Veggies 

Spring is in full swing which means Easter is right around the corner. While many people think of ham and jelly beans at Easter time, there’s a whole world of Easter-worthy vegan dishes out there too! Easter is a great opportunity for a vegan feast, because of all the delicious seasonal spring fruits and veggies – like carrots and lemon and strawberries. Whether you celebrate Easter by going to church or by hunting for eggs, its a great time to try out some new dishes. We’ve picked our favorites vegan Easter recipes to share here, but make sure you head over to VegKitchen to find even more vegan easter recipes for your brunch and dinner menus. Here’s a collection of vegan recipes to make your Easter Sunday that much more delicious! Vegan Scrambled Eggs If you’re looking for a great alternative to eggs for breakfast or brunch, try this delicious eggless scramble instead! It’s delicious on its own, or wrapped up in a tasty breakfast burrito! Find the recipe here: Vegan Scrambled Eggs Vegan Lentil Meatloaf If you’re looking for a show-stopping main dish for your Easter menu, this vegan-friendly lentil meatloaf is a surefire crowd pleaser. It’s hearty and […]

Comfort & Joy

December 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Comfort & Joy Light a few candles, set the stage with a pretty assortment of plates and glasses, then gather around the table and linger over a seasonal menu thats as warm and inviting as an open fire on a cold winter evening. The post Comfort & Joy appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood

December 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

When most people hear the phrase, You are what you eat, they think about it in terms of body size or physical medical issues -- such as being overweight or underweight or having Type 2 diabetes. But research shows your food choices also affect your mental health, mood, and temperament. Eating a healthy diet containing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds --with the addition of fortified foods and supplements when indicated -- can support mental well-being, says Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Phytonutrients, which have a protective effect, and fiber, which is responsible for the health of our gut microbiome, are exclusive to plants and have been associated with improved mental health outcomes. Mental Health Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet Theres no shortage of research being done on the mood-boosting and mental health effects associated with the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based fuel. These include: - Anxiety and stress. The arachidonic acid, found only in animal products like eggs and chicken, sets off multiple chemical reactions in the body that eventually lead to an increase in inflammation, says Dr. Kasey Nichols, NMD, licensed physician and member of the Arizona Naturopathic Medical Association (AzNMA). When this inflammation reaches the brain, it subsequently can cause feelings of anxiety and stress, as well as depression. People who avoid foods with arachidonic acid typically report a more positive mood and improved mental health. One survey-based study found decreased rates of stress and anxiety in those eating a vegan vs. omnivorous diet, and that vegetarians had reported better mood than non-vegetarians. - Depression. Research suggests eating more plant-based foods can improve quality of life, mood and reduce symptoms of depression. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry analyzed the dietary patterns and risk of depression in 3,486 participants over a five-year period. Individuals eating whole foods reported fewer symptoms of depression compared to those who ate mostly processed foods. - ADHD. Although diet isn’t the driving cause or cure for ADHD, Dr. Nichols says some research has shown that switching to a plant-based diet could help with its symptoms. One study showed that preschoolers who chose processed dietary patterns were significantly and positively correlated with ADHD symptoms, while those who chose vegetarian dietary patterns were negatively correlated with ADHD symptoms. Cognition. Some research has shown that eating more plant foods can prevent a cognitive decline later in life, says Dr. Nichols. One study found that those who consistently ate more plant-based foods were 18-33% less likely to develop cognitive impairment than those who didn’t. - Focus. Looking to improve productivity in the workplace? One study showed that employees who ate plant-based foods reported improved job performance and missed fewer workdays. Related: 8 Ways to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 2 Things to Watch on a Plant-Based Diet While eschewing animal products is a healthy lifestyle choice, it requires a thorough understanding of how to create balanced and complete meals. There are a couple areas youll need to pay special attention to, to ensure youre reaping all of the healthy benefits: - Nutrient deficiency. If done improperly, a plant-based diet could lack important nutritional needs that can negatively affect mental health. A deficiency in nutrients found in animal products -- like choline, vitamin B-12, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and amino acids -- have been linked to depression, poor mood regulation, poor metabolism, low energy, as well as memory and attention span difficulties. Plant-based eaters in developed countries need to be the most concerned about lacking brain-healthy nutrients like DHA, vitamin B12, vitamin K2, zinc, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin D3, says Dr. Nichols. It is usually common knowledge that vegan diets need to be supplemented with B12, but many people are under the impression that colorful fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of most other vital nutrients. Dietary supplements are a great way counter any deficiency. - Caloric deficiency. Switching to a plant-based diet may end up resulting in a significant reduction in calories. Many find that they lose a few pounds, but if the reduction becomes too extreme and lacks key nutrients and carbohydrates, you may become more irritable, or hangry, and easily distracted, says Dr. Nichols. If youre losing too much weight, add some more healthy fats (such as coconut oil and avocados) into your diet. Related: Plant-Powered Brain Health Boost Your Mood with These Plant-Based Must-Haves Its easy to fall into a rut during meal prep and planning -- many people are creatures of habit who gravitate toward the same menu week after week. But if your go-to meals arent well-rounded, this could leave you lacking in essential nutrients. In order to ensure youre getting the full spectrum of nutrition your body and mind need to thrive, make sure youre including the following: - Omega 3s. Omega 3 fatty acids have been implicated in improved mental health outcomes, says Dr. Shah. Plant-based diets generally limit or exclude fish, which is a major source of omega 3 fatty acids, so they may be low in this key nutrient. Instead, youll find your omega 3s in foods such as chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seed, and walnuts. - Tryptophan. The brain uses the amino acid tryptophan to produce serotonin, the feel-good neurotransmitter. Its found in chicken, eggs, cheese and fish, but plant-based sources of tryptophan include leafy greens, sunflower seeds, watercress, soybeans, pumpkin seeds, mushrooms, broccoli and peas. - B vitamins. Known to boost mood by increasing such neurotransmitters as serotonin, dopamine, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), B vitamins may be the key to boosting your spirits, too. Choose from beans, legumes and lentils, fortified cereals and sunflower seeds. The effects of going plant-based vary from person to person, so it’s best to consult your doctor first to make sure it’s the right move for you, says Dr. Nichols.   The post How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks!

November 4 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! Karva Chauth is a traditional Hindu festival in some parts of India. Married women fast all day, wishing for their husbands health and long life. In some cases, and for those who wish to make this holiday more modern, both husbands and wives may fast together. This is pretty new and Ive seen this only occasionally! My elder daughter-in-law is very traditional and really enjoys this special festival. She takes pleasure in all the rituals associated with Karva Chauth. This years menu is simple but delicious. I plan on making Gatte ki sabji (which is a Rajasthani dish and my daughter-in-laws favorite!), Aloo Methi, Puris, Rice, and of course Gulgula. It will be a satisfying meal for all of the fasting married women!  The post Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee

November 2 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha CoffeeEnjoy the flavors of fall in every sip of this Homemade Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee, a vegan version of the seasonal coffee shop favorite. Jump to Recipe If youre a fan of sweet and decadent Starbucks drinks, this copycat recipe is one you will want to keep handy for sure. But even if you dont LOVE coffee you will really enjoy this drink! This recipe is especially great for those wanting a homemade and less sweet version than the caramel mocha you can buy at the coffee shop. The sweetness is just right and the chocolate flavor paired with the salted caramel is simply to die for. You will find yourself craving this homemade coffee shop favorite all year round and now that you know how to make it, theres no need for waiting until Starbucks puts it back on the menu.Continue reading: Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha CoffeeThe post Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Met Gala is Celebrating ‘American Independence’ with Its First Plant-Based Menu

August 5 2021 Vegetarian Times 

The Met Gala is Celebrating ‘American Independence’ with Its First Plant-Based Menu We want to be the future of American food, of plant-based food. That conversation is happening now, says Chef Marcus Samuelson The post The Met Gala is Celebrating ‘American Independence’ with Its First Plant-Based Menu appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

A New ‘Chicken’ Tender from Beyond Meat Appeared on Hundreds of Restaurant Menus This Week

July 9 2021 Vegetarian Times 

A New ‘Chicken’ Tender from Beyond Meat Appeared on Hundreds of Restaurant Menus This Week Its Beyond Meats first big foray into faux-chicken since 2012 The post A New ‘Chicken’ Tender from Beyond Meat Appeared on Hundreds of Restaurant Menus This Week appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Bbq Cauliflower Wings

June 23 2021 Vegan Richa 

Bbq Cauliflower WingsMy Vegan Beer Battered BBQ Cauliflower Wings are perfect for game day but also make for an incredible shared appetizer, side dish or even a fun dinner party menu item. Get ready for the perfect vegan game day snack! BBQ Cauliflower Wings – saucy, crispy,  and crunchy on the outside, with the perfect juicy and soft interior. Trust me, you wont be able to stop eating these Baked Cauliflower Wings! Cauliflower is one of my secret weapons when it comes to making snacks, appetizers, and game day food! There are endless ways to turn it into something addictive and I love how the florets take on a meat-like quality when you prepare them in certain ways. Ive prepared cauliflower in every way imaginable but battered in a beer batter and baked until crisp and golden, then covered in a finger-licking-good spicy bbq sauce might be one of my most favorite ways. Who can say no to a big platter of gloriously golden crunchy cauliflower bites drenched in hot bbq sauce? Not me Our BBQ Baked Cauliflower Wings are first coated in a spiced gluten-free beer batter made from rice flour and tapioca starch then baked, coated in spicy bbq sauce and baked again! And there you have it – one of the most delicious vegan appetizers or party snacks Ive ever tasted! Guys, I know you will love these Cauliflower Wings! No need to fry them – they crisp up nicely in the oven! The ingredients couldnt be easier and the spice level can be adapted to your taste. MORE CAULIFLOWER RECIPES - Kung Pao Cauliflower - Taco Spice roasted Cauliflower - Spicy Pepper Cauliflower Bites - Sticky Sesame Cauliflower  - Aloo Gobi - Baked - Nashville Cauliflower Bites Continue reading: Bbq Cauliflower WingsThe post Bbq Cauliflower Wings appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lazy Vegan Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

May 30 2021 Vegan Richa 

Lazy Vegan Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and DinnerFor busy weeknights pick any of these Lazy Vegan Recipes to get a simple breakfast, lunch, or dinner on the table in no time! These easy plant-based meals are perfect for beginners and seasoned chefs alike. Also included: One pot and one skillet recipes as well as Instant Pot recipe ideas. Get a meal on the table in no time with these Lazy Vegan Recipes Even if you’re one of those people who truly love to cook, you simply dont always have the time or energy to spend hours in the kitchen. When you’re pressed for time around meal o’clock and energy is low, these Lazy Vegan Recipes will come to the rescue! Theyre my go-to easy meals when life is busy and I just dont feel like spending much time in the kitchen. Super quick prep times and off-hands preparation make these recipes lifesavers. I have a good mix of breakfast casseroles, make-ahead breakfasts, light lunches, and set-and-forget dinners. Most of these are one-pot or one-skillet meals so clean-up will also be lower.  Trust me, making any of these easier than pondering over that take-out menu! These super-simple vegan meals can be prepped in 10-15 minutes, with minimal fuss. Breakfast Tofu Bhurji Vegan Bhurji Tofu Bhurji - Vegan Bhurji or Akoori . Indian Scrambled eggs. Tofu scrambled with onion, tomato, cilantro and cumin for a delicious Eggless Bhurji Scramble Breakfast. Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Recipe.Can be soyfree with chickpea flour tofu TRY THIS RECIPE Lemon Poppy Seed Vegan Baked Oatmeal  For a Vegan Baked Oatmeal Recipe that tastes like a lemon and poppy seed muffin, look no further than this gluten-free and vegan Lemon Poppy Seed Oatmeal. TRY THIS RECIPE Chickpea Flour Scramble Breakfast Recipe Easy peppery Chickpea flour Scramble. Soy-free Breakfast Scramble. Make with lentil flour or lentil batter for variation. Vegan Gluten-free Soyfree Recipe. When doubling the recipe, use a tbsp or so less water. TRY THIS RECIPE Continue reading: Lazy Vegan Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and DinnerThe post Lazy Vegan Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Easter Recipes

March 25 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Easter Recipes Planning a plant-based Easter feast? You’ve come to the right place. I’ve rounded up all my favorite Vegan Easter recipes right here, so you can plan the perfect menu. From easy appetizers, to hearty main dishes, to sweet desserts – there’s something for everyone. Easter is the perfect holiday for putting together a vegan brunch or dinner. With all of the fresh, seasonal product of spring – these recipes are filled with light leafy greens, fresh asparagus, beets, carrots, and bright, citrusy flavors. So much deliciousness! Use these mix and match vegan menu suggestions to create a memorable Easter feast for your family and friends. Vegan Easter Appetizers Deviled Tomatoes Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Beet Muhummara Spinach or Arugula Strudel Green Pea, Parsley, and Pistachio Dip Raw Vegan Cheddar Cheese Spread Rosemary Roasted Mushrooms Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Vegan Easter Soups Greek-Flavored Spinach and Orzo Soup Vegan Tomato Gazpacho Lemony Leek and Mushroom Soup Creole Carrot Soup Vegan Cream of Broccoli Soup Creole Eggplant Soup Classic Leek and Potato Soup Vegan Easter Salads Spring Greens Salad with Endive and Oranges Mixed Greens Salad with Beets and Walnuts Asparagus with Mustard-Dill Sauce Beet and Red Cabbage Slaw Orange and […] The post Vegan Easter Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Manjulas All-Time Favorite Appetizers

January 11 2021 Manjula's kitchen 

Manjulas All-Time Favorite Appetizers There is something unique about appetizers: they are the most wanted and interesting part of the meals. Appetizers can be served any time but in India mostly it is served at teatime and is known as snacks. This is a wonderful feeling among all where we can forget about all the rules of healthy eating. While mingling with friends, we indulge in these aromatic and good-looking treats. Appetizers provide a great time for icebreakers, where you can get to know better people you may be unfamiliar with. It is easy to make these delicious looking appetizers the center of the conversation. When I invite friends for dinner in a small group or big parties, appetizers are the most important part of the meal. I always put most effort toward appetizers and make the rest of the menu around them. I always serve appetizers in small portions, making sure my guests have the space to also enjoy the dinner. As every other cuisine food can be healthy or just plain delicious, it is on the individual what they want. But I think sometimes it is good to indulge yourself and your friends. Punjabi Samosa Crispy Vegetable Pakoras Crispy Potato Balls Baked vegetable Idli Samosa pinwheels Paneer Pakoras Khasta Kachori Dhokla The post Manjula’s All-Time Favorite Appetizers appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon

December 8 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon I am one of those who enjoys cooking and eating, a real foodaholic. About three months back when our family got together, Alex, my husband, was given the challenge to see if he can go on a gluten free diet for 10 days. He agreed to do so if I also joined him. They knew for me and Alex no meal is complete without any kind of bread: my favorites are roti and paratha. I decided to take the challenge with him anyway. After ten days, Alex went back to his normal diet, but I decided to continue. I was feeling better and more energetic. But after 10 days when my challenge time was over, I decided occasionally I will cheat a little bit. Surprisingly, I am glad I did that; it was difficult in the beginning, but now I am liking it. Being gluten free has opened a wide selection of grains for me to experiment with new recipes. I knew about them but did not use them much. I started reading about these grains my grandmother raved about and learning about their nutritional values. Knowing all that has made it easy for me to try these grains in my recipes. I do have many gluten free recipes of bread like Dosa, Oat Dosa, Moong Dal Dosa, Besan Puda, but these were part of our regular diet anyway. When making them, I never considered that I was making these recipes because they were gluten free. One of the gluten-free grains I began using was millet. My last recipe for millet (bajri) soup was one of those recipes. My family enjoyed this soup and suggested millet soup can be a part of our winter menu. My next recipe that is coming up is Sorghum (jowar) Dosa. I have already tried this recipe a few times. It is quick, easy, and tasty. Sorghum Dosa is also a good alternative to regular dosa because this dosa batter does not need to be fermented. An added benefit is that Sorghum Dosa is also vegan and gluten free. The post Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits

September 18 2020 VegKitchen 

Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits These simple Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits are so moist and flaky, they practically melt in your mouth. Fantastic to serve with fall meals, especially as an accompaniment to chili or other stews, these are also a welcome addition to your vegan Thanksgiving menu. Recipe contributed by Cathe Olson from The Vegetarian Mothers Cookbook. The post Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits appeared first on VegKitchen.


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