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10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

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5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

yesterday 20:10 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks!

November 4 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! Karva Chauth is a traditional Hindu festival in some parts of India. Married women fast all day, wishing for their husbands health and long life. In some cases, and for those who wish to make this holiday more modern, both husbands and wives may fast together. This is pretty new and Ive seen this only occasionally! My elder daughter-in-law is very traditional and really enjoys this special festival. She takes pleasure in all the rituals associated with Karva Chauth. This years menu is simple but delicious. I plan on making Gatte ki sabji (which is a Rajasthani dish and my daughter-in-laws favorite!), Aloo Methi, Puris, Rice, and of course Gulgula. It will be a satisfying meal for all of the fasting married women!  The post Happy Karva Chauth to all the lovely married folks! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee

November 2 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha CoffeeEnjoy the flavors of fall in every sip of this Homemade Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee, a vegan version of the seasonal coffee shop favorite. Jump to Recipe If youre a fan of sweet and decadent Starbucks drinks, this copycat recipe is one you will want to keep handy for sure. But even if you dont LOVE coffee you will really enjoy this drink! This recipe is especially great for those wanting a homemade and less sweet version than the caramel mocha you can buy at the coffee shop. The sweetness is just right and the chocolate flavor paired with the salted caramel is simply to die for. You will find yourself craving this homemade coffee shop favorite all year round and now that you know how to make it, theres no need for waiting until Starbucks puts it back on the menu.Continue reading: Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha CoffeeThe post Vegan Salted Caramel Mocha Coffee appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps

July 21 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps Chickpea salad sandwiches made in the manner of tuna salad sandwiches have been on menu at my house for years. My latest version is one of the bonus recipes you’ll get when you pre-order my new book, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook. Instead seasoning it to tastes like tuna, I’ve changed up the flavor a bit to give it a smoky nuance reminiscent of a BLT.  In addition to the chickpeas, other protein-rich ingredients in this recipe include cashews and hemp seeds. You can serve this on whole-grain bread if you prefer, but I love it in a wrap. Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps Makes 2 servings - 1/­­2 cup raw unsalted cashews, soaked in hot water for 1 hour, then drained - 1/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 1 tablespoon ground hemp seeds - 1 teaspoon yellow mustard - 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon Liquid Smoke - 1/­­4 cup minced celery - 2 tablespoons minced scallions - 2 large whole-grain tortillas - 4 large butter lettuce leaves - 1 ripe tomato, thinly sliced In a high-powered blender, combine the cashews, water, lemon juice, hemp seeds, mustard, garlic powder, onion powder, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until completely smooth, scraping down the sides of the blender as needed. The dressing will be thick. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the chickpeas, smoked paprika, Liquid Smoke, and about half of the reserved dressing, mashing to break up the chickpeas. Add the celery, scallions, and as much of the remaining dressing as desired.  Season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix well. To assemble, arrange a tortilla on a flat work surface. Place the 2 lettuce leaves in the lower third of the tortillas and top with a row of tomato slices. Spoon half of the chickpea mixture on top of the tomatoes, spreading evenly. Use your hands to gently roll up the wrap.  Repeat with the remaining ingredients. Cut each wrap in half and serve. PRE-ORDER NOW:  If you order The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook before August 11, 2020, youll receive this and other bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following email address plantproteinrev@quarto.com and my publisher will send you the bonus recipes. The post Chickpea Lettuce and Tomato Wraps appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Modern Love Mac & Shews

June 4 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Modern Love Mac & Shews Modern Love Community Cookzine! Photo by Isa Chandra. Art by Jason Meyer. Click image to buy! It’s our world famous Mac & Shews! With a few caveats. Firstly, this recipe has basically been on the internet for a while now. Also, this isn’t the EXACT recipe Modern Love uses. It’s simplified for home cooks. But it certainly gets the job done when you’re away from Brooklyn or Omaha and need your fix. And finally, this isn’t a regular blog post but, then again, these aren’t regular blog times. Now I don’t want to make this recipe intro too long because I know that twitter HATES that. But! I need to tell you about Modern Love Community Cookzine. Well, what happened was, my restaurant — Modern Love Brooklyn — closed at the beginning of the pandemic. We thought we would be done for good. It was heartbreaking, but I have my health and my cats, so ok. I have a lot to be grateful for. Then, after a few weeks, my business partner and I realized we have this empty restaurant. It’s still not safe enough to open. But, we thought, let’s get people their jobs back in as safe a way as possible, AND help the community on top of that. Let’s cook amazing, free (or dirt cheap) meals. Modern Love Community Meals was born. On top of feeding hundreds of people a week, we also decided, hey, let’s do a Community Cookbook, that seems to be the thing! Easy. No prob. So we started this CookZINE (zine, because I am punk) and gathered together some of the city’s best chefs to give us tips, stories and recipes. So now, here we are, and I’m asking you to please buy it. BUT WHY SHOULD I BUY IT?!!? Because it will help fund our Community Meals project. And it will help get the restaurant back open. And so we kinda need you to! BUT I DON’T WANT TO HELP YOU! Ok we know no one is actually saying that. But in addition to helping us you get all those amazing tips, stories and recipes we mentioned! What a deal. And you can spend anywhere from $5 to $50 to support us. In turn, we will continue to support the community. And be able to open our doors safely for pickup. STILL NOT CONVINCED? OR READY TO BUY NOW? Look at some of the gorgeous art! This is by Erica Rosey, for a section called Menuhoods, where a chef creates menus for the neighborhood they’re from. This is Greenpoint. (Also featured: Crown Heights and Sheepshead Bay.) Greenpoint, by Erica Rose Levine OK. That’s the pitch. Thanks for listening! I hope you enjoy the recipe and the zine and we can’t wait to feed you again! OH PS, here is the link to buy one. Recipes Notes ~ If you don’t have a high speed blender, do not despair. Just soak the cashews for at least 2 hours (preferably overnight) and proceed with your regular old blender. You can also boil them for 20 minutes if you are super short on time and didn’t plan ahead. ~ We use home roasted red pepper at the restaurant, but you can totally use one from a jar. But if you wanna’ try it, homemade is way better. I won’t write the directions here, just google it. Ingredients 1 pound macaroni 1 cup whole unroasted cashews 1 cup vegetable broth 1 roasted red pepper, chopped 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon chickpea miso 1 tablespoon onion powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Directions 1 – Bring 6 quarts of salted water to a boil in a large pot for the macaroni. 2 – While the water is coming to a boil, make the sauce. Place all sauce ingredients in a high-speed blender (see recipe note if you don’t have one) and blend until completely smooth. This can take anywhere from a minute to 5 minutes depending on your blender. Scrape down the sides of the blender with a rubber spatula from time to time. 3 – Once water is boiling, cook pasta. Drain pasta in a large colander and add immediately back to the pot. It should still be piping hot and wet with pasta water. Do not rinse and do not wait. This part is important because you need the wet, hot pasta to get the sauce creamy and awesome and clinging to the pasta. 4 – Add the sauce to the pasta pot and use the rubber spatula to mix. Turn the heat on low and stir for about 2 minutes to get everything warmed through. Taste for salt and seasoning.

Smoked Cheddar Mac & Cheese with Baked BBQ Tofu

May 22 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Two years in a row, I have made my husband Noodles & Company mac & cheese rip-offs for his birthday. Last year, I did Truffle Mac, and this year, I did a vegetarian version of their BBQ Pork Mac & Cheese recipe. I don’t really know how this became a thing for us, but I guess it has. I don’t think anyone can beat us when it comes to nonsensical traditions to mark important occasions, which is okay with us, because mac & cheese is far superior to sappy greeting cards anyway. This item isn’t always on the Noodles & Company menu, but when it was, Chris and I were both intrigued. We wondered if they could sub out the pork for tofu, but neither of us wanted to be that person, so we didn’t ask. For months, I promised him I would try to make a meatless version at home. When tackling this recipe myself, I knew that I couldn’t just use any kind of tofu--it had to be baked! The last thing you want in your mac & cheese are soft cubes of tofu. Baked tofu has a firm, chewy texture because baking in the oven dries it […]

Spaghetti LoMein

April 15 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Spaghetti LoMein In our small town, the most vegan-friendly food available has been the local Chinese take-out restaurant.  Sadly, they closed down during this pandemic. To satisfy our cravings, I’ve included a few stir-fries in my menu rotation.  One of our favorites is Spaghetti Lo Mein.  (I make it with spaghetti because most traditional lo mein noodles contain egg and are therefore not vegan.) This recipe is quite versatile.  Use fresh veggies if you’ve got them, but frozen veggies work quite well too. The last time I made them I used frozen bell pepper strips and substituted sliced zucchini for the mushrooms.  Use what you’ve got! Here’s the recipe from my quarantine-friendly cookbook, Cook the Pantry: Spaghetti Lo-Mein If you are using leftover cooked pasta, steam the broccoli for 3 to 5 minutes. If you dont have fresh vegetables on hand for this recipe, substitute frozen stir-fry vegetables, cooked according to package directions. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. -  8 ounces spaghetti noodles - 2 cups broccoli florets - 2 tablespoons tamari or other soy sauce - 3 tablespoons cup hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 1 teaspoon sriracha (optional) - 1/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons dry sherry (optional) - 1 tablespoon neutral-tasting oil such as grapeseed oil - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips - 2 cups sliced mushrooms - 1 carrot, shredded - 1/­­3 cup sliced scallions - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 cup reconstituted Soy Curls  or diced extra-firm tofu or seitan (optional) Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender.  About 3 to 5 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, add the broccoli. Drain the pasta and broccoli and set aside. While the pasta is cooking, combine the tamari, hoisin, sesame oil, and sriracha, if using.  Add the water and sherry, if using. Mix well and set aside. Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, bell pepper, mushrooms, carrot, scallions, and ginger. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 3 minutes.  Add the Soy Curls, if using and stir to combine.  Stir in the reserved noodles and the sauce mixture, and gently toss to combine until heated through.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Makes 4 servings The post Spaghetti LoMein appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Recipe | Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas

March 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

There are two things you should know about this recipe: 1. The name is a lie. There’s no queso in these quesadillas. But calling them “dillas” makes them sound like something cutesy off of a children’s menu, doesn’t it? 2. Yes, if it sounds familiar, it’s because I made these with leftovers from my Sweet Potato & Kale Wraps. I decided to save the recipe for a rainy day and its day has finally come! So yeah, about #2. We had tortillas and fillings leftover after making those wraps. But, as you saw, I am no burrito wrapper, so the second night around, I made these Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas for dinner. Instead of binding everything together with cheese like in a traditional quesadillas, I used mashed sweet potatoes. Is this weird? Okay, fine, maybe it sounds weird, but sweet potatoes and kale go really well together (this is one of my most popular posts, after all!) and so do sweet potatoes and black beans. Oh, and one note about the chorizo: if you can purchase Field Roast locally, use their Mexican Chipotle sausage. Their sausage is made with real vegetables, grains, and spices and it’s minimally processed. (Yes, […]

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World

February 2 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Pizza is one of the most popular foods on Earth… who doesn’t love it?! And in recent years, with the rise of veganism, plant-based pizzas have become even more delicious and creative than ever. From nut-based mozzarella to vegan meat toppings, we’re excited by what the vegan scene has to offer. Here is our 2020 list of the Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World.  10. Hank Vegan Pizza – Paris This pizzeria was established 4 years ago by Hank Vegan Burger. They’re a funky establishment offering pizza by the slice, in notable square-shaped slices. You’ll find vegan cheese, Beyond Meat, and a daily special on the menu. Choose from several salad-drink sets, and round it off with dessert if you like.  Visitors on HappyCow consistently note it as the “Best Pizza in Paris.” Bon appétit! 9. Screamers Pizzeria – Brooklyn Screamer’s is a popular, casual-style pizzeria in Brooklyn. Reviewers state that it’s “OMG” and “Simply The Best Vegan Pizza Ever.” There are 19 different pizzas to choose from, plus calzone and garlic knots. You can also build your own from a variety of veggie and vegan meat toppings. I scream, you scream, we all scream for…. PIZZA! […] The post Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World appeared first on HappyCow.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits

September 18 2020 VegKitchen 

Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits These simple Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits are so moist and flaky, they practically melt in your mouth. Fantastic to serve with fall meals, especially as an accompaniment to chili or other stews, these are also a welcome addition to your vegan Thanksgiving menu. Recipe contributed by Cathe Olson from The Vegetarian Mothers Cookbook. The post Soft Vegan Sweet Potato Dinner Biscuits appeared first on VegKitchen.

Top 10 Black-Owned Vegan Restaurants in America

June 11 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Within the HappyCow community, we have the choice not only to eat vegan, but also to choose who we support by visiting their businesses. Today we are highlighting the Top 10 Black-owned vegan restaurants in America, because we believe that they deserve more attention than they have previously gotten. Many of these establishments specialize in veganised Southern food classics, from fried chick’n to mac n cheeze,  Jambalaya to bread pudding, bringing the powerful flavours of the South to life for vegans. Some of them also serve up international cuisine, baked goods, or raw foods. As with all of our feature list articles, these rankings are based off of ratings and reviews from HappyCow users. We hope that by bringing attention to these beloved establishments within our community, we may increase positivity and awareness for their integral role in our food culture. Have you visited one on the list? Comment below, or tag us on social media @HappyCow. Let’s spread the love by sharing, and by supporting these and other Black-owned businesses within our communities and around the world. 10. Shandal’s Vegetarian Cafe – Bridgeport, Connecticut On the Menu: Cafeteria-style Jamaican cuisine: Rasta Pasta, stew, various other veggie options. Open: Tuesday – […] The post Top 10 Black-Owned Vegan Restaurants in America appeared first on HappyCow.

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep

June 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better SleepSometimes its just impossible to fall asleep; and, sure, it could be due to excitement or stress, but many restless nights might be a result of the food we had for dinner (or dessert). What we eat plays an important role in how we sleep, because fruits, vegetables, legumes, and even spices contain a complex array of nutrients that all have different effects on our bodies. And while some ingredients can help quell restless nights, others may have the opposite effect, keeping you wired and jittery for hours. So, the next time youre planning your weekly dinner menu, be sure to keep your sleep schedule in mind. Check out our list of plant-based foods to eat (and avoid) before bed for a better sleep. What to Eat:   Almonds A welcomed addition to a strawberry kale salad , trail mix, or Asian noodle bowl , almonds are packed with all the nutrients necessary for healthy eating. But almonds also contain certain minerals that make them useful sleep aids , specifically high amounts of magnesium, which has been found to reduce inflammation and levels of cortisol, a stress-hormone attributed to disrupting sleep.   Bananas Universally beloved for its convenience and mellow flavor, the banana is also a good source of tryptophan, an amino acid associated with sleep. Have breakfast for dinner with a plate of banana buckwheat pancakes or a bowl of banana maple oatmeal , and set yourself up for a sound snooze. Chamomile Tea Its well known, and well documented, that herbal teas can help you relax, but chamomile tea is particularly capable of improving your sleep . Chamomile contains apigenin, an antioxidant that binds to certain receptors in the brain that may promote sleepiness and reduce insomnia.   Kiwi Who wouldve thought this odd, little, green fruit could be the answer to your restless nights? Okay, maybe thats an overstatement, but research does show that kiwis contain high of serotonin, a brain chemical that helps regulate the sleep cycle. Kiwis can be tricky to eat, so we recommend throwing them into the blender for a late-night kiwi-basil smoothie .   Oatmeal Complex carbohydrates, like oats, have the power to induce drowsiness before sleep. Oats -- one of our favorite inexpensive Meatless Monday pantry staples -- contain melatonin, making them a potentially useful sleep aid if consumed before bed.   What to Avoid:   Beans The humble legume is packed with a bounty of nutritional benefits -- protein, fiber, minerals -- but beans may not be the best things to eat right before bed. Eating a bowl of chili or rice and beans before sleep, although delicious, is asking for a night of indigestion and gas pains.   Broccoli Broccoli is a great addition to any diet, but it shouldnt be consumed close to bed time. Fibrous foods, like broccoli, take the body longer to digest, which may keep you awake at night.   Candy An evening full of candy or other sugary treats will have you tossing and turning in bed. Candy is typically composed straight sugar, which can cause wild swings in blood-sugar levels. The initial sugar crash may help you fall asleep, but afterward youll be stuck wide awake.   Cured Meats Preserved meats contain high concentrations of the amino acid tyramine, which signals the brain to release norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that readies the body for action. Levels of norepinephrine are lowest during sleep and highest during dangerous or stressful situations. Not an ideal combination for night time. Thankfully, there are plenty of plant-based swaps to satisfy your cravings for salty, fatty foods. Spicy Food Finishing off a spicy bowl of curry or cauliflower Buffalo wings will awaken your taste buds, but it will also keep you awake. Chile peppers can be good for you, but eating them before bedtime can lead to indigestion, heart burn, and elevated body temperature -- physical qualities that impair sleep.   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan

March 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan I hope you’re prepared for cooking during quarantine.  I know I am.  But I owe my preparedness in the path of hurricanes for many years.  Hurricane preparedness was so much a part of our lives, that we actually wrote a book about it!  And now, that the same kind of preparedness is helpful during these strange days of self-isolation. Even though we’re allowed to venture out for groceries, I prefer to keep my interactions with the outside world to a minimum.  That’s why we made one trip to the store last week and shopped for enough food to last a month. The canned and dried beans and pasta was the easy part. I also stocked the freezer with an extra supply of frozen spinach, collards, broccoli, and other green veggies because I knew the fresh, more delicate produce would be the first things we needed to use up. I then loaded up the fridge with plant milk, tofu, and lots of fresh produce. I planned menus that used the most delicate product first, so now, over a week since shopping, we’re nearly out of fresh greens — I have enough lettuce for about three more salads. But we still have a lot of other hardy veggies like cabbage, carrots, celery, winter squash, and of course, white and sweet potatoes.  I bought a lot of fruit that I’m keeping refrigerated to last longer, pulling out only what we’ll use in a day each morning. Here is a list of what I plan to cook in the weeks ahead using what I have on hand: Stay-at-home Menu Plan - Chili Mac & salad - Tacos - Pizza & salad - Hakka noodle stir-fry - Lentil soup - Stuffed kabocha squash - Shepherds Pie - Ramen bowls - Vegetable fried rice - Tofu tetrazzini with green beans - Saag with tofu and basmati rice - Enchiladas - Pasta Fagiole - Tofu scramble - 15-bean soup - Seitan Pot Roast with Cabbage, Carrots & Potatoes - Artichoke Mac UnCheese - Three bean pasta salad - Veggie Dogs w/­­sauerkraut - Chickpea salad wraps - Singapore mei fun - Hoppin John If you have a copy of my book Cook the Pantry or Vegan Unplugged, you’ll find lots of useful tips and recipes using pantry ingredients.  I’ll be sharing some of those recipes in the weeks ahead.  For now, I’ll leave you with the recipe from Cook the Pantry for Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas or as they are now known, Quarantine Quesadillas.  Stay safe! Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas aka “Quarantine Quesadillas” Frozen spinach and canned white beans combine with garlic and spices to make a delectable filling for these hearty quesadillas.  No cheese needed.  Serve with your favorite salsa. - 1 tablespoon olive oil (or 2 tablespoons water to water-saute) - 2 or 3 garlic cloves, pressed or minced - 10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - Large flour tortillas Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat.  Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds.  Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper to taste.  Add the beans, lemon juice, coriander, and cumin.  Cook, stirring, until the spinach is cooked and the flavors are blended, about 5 minutes.  Mash the beans well while cooking. Set aside. Place a large tortillas on a flat work surface. Spread a thin layer of the spinach mixture evenly over half of the tortilla. Fold the remaining half of the tortilla over the half with the filling and press gently to enclose and spread the filling close to the edges. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Place the quesadilla in the hot skillet.  Flatten with a spatula and cook until lightly browned on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip the quesadillas and cook until the other side is golden brown.  Cut into wedges. Repeat with more tortillas and filling as desired. Serve hot with salsa. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. The post Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy Mushroom Spinach Pasta

March 8 2020 Vegan Richa 

Creamy Mushroom Spinach PastaA quick recipe for vegan mushroom and spinach pasta that is ready in under 30 minutes. Loaded up with sautéed balsamic mushrooms and fresh spinach, all tossed in a heavenly creamy cashew sauce. Jump to Recipe I have been on a major pasta spree lately. Having made this Vegan Spinach Artichoke Pasta Bake about 7 times last month, I felt it was time to throw another creamy vegan pasta dish into the mix. This creamy vegan mushroom spinach pasta! It rivals any fancy pasta dish you can find on an Italian restaurant menu. But without the cream, and with all the cozy and comforting flavors you crave in pasta. This recipe for spinach pasta is a quick and easy vegan weeknight dinner that is creamy, garlic-rich, and simply fun to slurp up with your family. The cooked pasta is coated in a creamy, slightly cheesy, velvety cashew sauce that can be made in a blender within minutes. To take this to the next level of pasta deliciousness, were adding sautéed balsamic mushrooms for a boost of umami and fresh spinach for a touch of color. Continue reading: Creamy Mushroom Spinach PastaThe post Creamy Mushroom Spinach Pasta appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Top 10 Vegan Restaurants in London

February 15 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

London is known to be one of, if not the most vegan-friendly city in the world. With so much buzz lately on London, we figured we’d go ahead and give you a little more! To read about why London is so great for vegans, with some data to back it up, read our recent post on the rise of Vegan London. But on to the food – where are the top 10 best vegan restaurants in London?  Here are the ones you’ve got to try. Farmacy Everything on the menu is plant-based and free from dairy, refined sugars, additives and chemicals, and the best part? This vegan restaurant is putting the modern twist on the classics. Mediterranean fusion cuisine including pizza, pasta, and salads will keep you coming back. VeganE A place with something for everyone, stop in to VeganE. Big flavor and big portions thrown in with great service make it a must-visit in London. Try something with cheese – as their reviews rave about having the best cheesy dishes around! Purezza Purezza is the UKs first vegan Italian restaurant, who opened its London branch in March 2018. (The flagship outlet is in Brighton.) The menu features a wide […] The post Top 10 Vegan Restaurants in London appeared first on HappyCow.

Recipe | Vegetable Baked Ziti

January 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

This January marks the eighth year that I’ve been doing Weight Watchers. While my weight has fluctuated since reaching my goal and I’m now actively trying to lose weight again, I really feel like it was joining Weight Watchers that prompted me to learn how to cook and get creative in the kitchen. Because before Weight Watchers? Our meals were pretty much take out, stir fry, or pasta. Pasta showed up on the menu at least once a week. I’d make a whole box (!!!) and my husband and I would split it. He’d put lots of sauce on his, while I’d put a little bit of sauce and a mountain of grated Parmesan on mine. I was under the impression that a ginormous bowl of pasta was a typical serving–after all, that’s what most restaurants serve, right? It was a shock to find out that those big boxes of pasta that my husband and I were eating by ourselves are meant to serve eight people. Oops. One of the first changes I made when I joined Weight Watchers was downsizing those pasta portions. But clearly, two ounces of pasta alone just wasn’t going to cut it. So I started […]

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.

December 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.Youve probably heard of Meatless Monday. Maybe youve even considered giving it a try. Well, weve got your motivation right here -- the 19 reasons to go meatless on Monday in 2020. With the human population set to reach 10 billion by as early as 2050, the current approach to food production is no longer sustainable. Studies show that a reliance on animal products like dairy, beef, pork, and poultry is doing irreversible damage to the environment and is having a negative impact on personal health. Pretty heavy issues, but Meatless Monday can be part of a delicious solution to tackle these global problems. For 2020, we are encouraging everyone to ditch meat one day a week to help preserve the planet and live a healthier life. Improve Your Health Eating animal products has shown to increase instances of a myriad of metabolic and chronic health problems. Cut out meat one day a week to improve your wellbeing:   1. Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. Lessen the probability of developing type 2 diabetes. 3. Lower chances of having a stroke. 4. Preserve your kidneys. 5. Maintain a healthy weight. Save the Environment  Theres an inextricable link between livestock production and environmental degradation. For a number of reasons (many of which are listed below), a reduction in the consumption of animal products can help stall the destruction of our oceans, forests, and atmosphere. Enjoying plant-based meals instead of meat on Mondays can be help address climate issues including: 6. Forests are cleared for livestock production. 7. Animal feed production requires intensive use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, and fossil fuels. 8. Animal waste is a leading factor in the pollution of land and water resources. 9. Beef, pork, and poultry emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other harmful greenhouse gases. 10. Livestock production uses 75% of the earths agricultural land. 11. Industrial livestock production displaces small, rural producers. 12. A quarter-pound of beef requires 425 gallons of water to produce (enough to fill 6,800 glasses of fresh drinking water). 13. Livestock manure can contain a variety of pathogens such as coli, growth hormones, and antibiotics. 14. Livestock waste streams contaminate drinking water and groundwater. Plant-based Goodness   Feel good about the food youre eating while saving money and exploring new ingredients. Thanks to the boom of flexitarian and plant-based eating, its never been easier, more convenient or delicious to go Meatless Monday. 15. Abundance of delicious plant-based meats to satisfy any of your cravings. There are so many high-protein meatless products now available at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains - making it easier than ever to enjoy your favorite foods - entirely plant-based. 16. Make Meatless Monday a reason to get the team together. Round up your friends and family to enjoy plant-based meals with on Mondays. 17. Almost all of your favorite restaurants offer a hearty plant-based option. So you can still frequent your favorite local, just explore new parts of the menu on Mondays. 18. Provides an opportunity to explore new ingredients. There are so many fruits, vegetables and grains to choose from, every Meatless Monday meal can be a new culinary adventure. 19. Youll likely save money on your grocery bill!   Interested in learning more about why you should give Meatless Monday a try? Weve got all the information (and plant-based recipes) that youll need to get started. The post Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Travel Tips for Plant-Based Eating On-The-Go

December 16 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Travel Tips for Plant-Based Eating On-The-GoThis holiday season, having options is the best defense against unknown dining circumstances. When your choices are limited to bacon-wrapped scallops, prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, Swedish meatballs, and those loveable mini hot dogs -- youll be wishing you had a spoonful of almond butter or some plant-based snacks tucked away in your back pocket. But with a little bit of planning and foresight, you can maintain your Meatless Monday routine in any setting. Whether youre on the road, in the air, trapped at your in-laws house, or just hungry, our Meatless Monday travel guide can help you navigate any potential dining debacle. Photo Source: ATW80   Here are our 8 Meatless Monday travel tips for plant-based eating on-the-go: Theres an App for That Happy Cow and Vanilla Bean are two great apps that can help you find meatless meals all around the world. Use these apps to locate nearby restaurants and grocery stores with plant-based options, with referrals by other plant-based travelers, just like you. Just Add Water Water is life, especially when youre a road-weary traveler looking for something to eat. A bottle of water will quench your thirst, but it can also be combined with protein powder for a more complete meal. Prepare Pre-Boarding Getting on a plane? Dont have anxiety over the lack of meatless airline food. Bring some light snacks or protein-packed foods that are easy to carry like trail mix, hummus, or single-serve nut butters. You can also bring a dehydrated soup, oatmeal, or rice and ask the flight attendant for a cup of hot water for mixing. And for your in-flight meal, many airlines offer a meatless option, just make sure to preorder it beforehand. Know Your Restaurant Options When youre on the highway heading to your next holiday destination, you will get hungry. That means, if you forget to pack a lunch, youll likely be dining at the next rest stop. This isnt the worst thing in the world. Weve compiled a list of meatless and plant-based options available at the most popular national fast-food and quick-service restaurant chains. Check out our list of 14 chains offering Meatless Monday options. Pack More Snacks Than You Need Sustenance, sustenance, sustenance. When the hunger pangs hit, you need to have something in your bag, purse, coat pocket, or glove compartment. Nuts, seeds, dried fruit, veggies, or even healthy crunchies like chips or puffs will allow you to make it to your next meal without being overcome with hanger. Eat Breakfast! Is breakfast the most important meal of the day? When youre traveling a hearty helping of oatmeal, fresh fruit, granola, or cereal can set you up for eating success later in the day. Meatless breakfast options are plentiful, but if you need some inspiration, weve got them here! Explore New Cuisines Dont just stick to the standard roadside fare (although we do love a good diner). When youre traveling, whether to a different country or your cousins house, consider sitting down to an unfamiliar cuisine. Chinese, Indian, Mediterranean and other Southeast Asian countries specialize in a variety of plant-based and vegetarian dishes. Whip out your smart phone and start looking up menus. Find a Supermarket Nearby If youve got an extended stay at a hotel, its wise (and cost effective) to visit a nearby supermarket at least once. You can stock up on plant-based snacks and ready-to-eat meals. Many hotel rooms offer a microwave or a kitchenette where you can heat something up.   Interested in learning more tips and tricks to enhance your Meatless Monday experience? Click here to access our full Meatless Monday recipe collection. The post Meatless Monday Travel Tips for Plant-Based Eating On-The-Go appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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