meatless - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce

Pineapple Salsa

Gobi Aloo Wrap – Cauliflower, Potato & Toasted Red Lentil Vegan Hummus Wrap

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Waffles










meatless vegetarian recipes

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better

March 23 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste BetterPeanut butter is everything: savory and sweet, fatty and salty, crunchy and creamy. Its uses are truly endless, serving as the basis of stews, sauces, chilis, chutneys, and, of course, desserts. Peanuts, also known as goobers, ground nuts, or monkey nuts, are nutritionally dense, rich in both healthy fats and plant-based protein. Peanuts and peanut butter have long shelf lives, are inexpensive, and can add a tasty new dimension to any number of recipes. Sure, you can eat peanuts by the handful (or spoonful), but then youd be missing out on the peanuts wildly diverse culinary applications. This Monday, branch out and do some experimenting by making any one of these novel peanut recipes. Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal A dollop of peanut butter transforms a bowl of oatmeal from meh to mmmmm. This oatmeal is packed with protein and fiber, making it a perfect was to start your morning. For the Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal, click here. Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans The secret to this smooth, salty, dreamy chili is a cup of creamy peanut butter. Try it and taste the magic for yourself. For the Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans recipe, click here. Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes The best of breakfast collides with a lunch box staple. A great meal for kids, adults, and adults who act like kids. For the Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes recipe, click here. Peanut Noodles Packed with plant protein, this flavorful noodle dish incorporates unique Southeast Asian ingredients like sambhal olek (Indoenisan chile sauce) and Sichuan peppercorns. Give it a try if you want to put your taste buds on an adventure. For the Peanut Noodles recipe, click here. Spicy Peanut Chutney Top soups, pastas, stews, or sandwiches with this delightful blend of roasted peanuts, garlic, sesame seeds, coconut, and chile flake. Its the perfect blend of sweet, nutty, and spicy. For the Spicy Peanut Chutney recipe, click here. Sweet Potato Peanut Stew Creamy and decadent, you can whip up this West African stew in under 30 minutes. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. For the Sweet Potato Peanut Stew recipe, click here. Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Light and refreshing, serve these Thai spring rolls as an appetizer or in place of a salad. The peanut dipping sauce adds a tangy punch of flavor. For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gallo Pinto

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Gallo pinto is a traditional rice and beans dish native to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Although definitely meatless, the name translates to “spotted rooster” and is thought to reflect the speckled appearance of the dish. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 3-4 - 3 cups cooked rice - 2 cups cooked black beans - 2 tablespoons coconut oil or grape seed oil - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 red pepper, finely chopped - 2/­­3 cup corn kernels (fresh or frozen) - 2 cloves of garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger - 1 tablespoon vegetarian Worcestershire Sauce - 1 tablespoon soy sauce - 1 tablespoon Costa Rican Lizano sauce or salsa - several grinds salt and pepper Serve with (optional): - fresh cilantro - 1 egg per person, sunny-side up - corn tortillas, 1-2 per person Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until softened and translucent. Add pepper, sauté 1-2 minutes. Add corn and garlic. Add spices and sauces and mix thoroughly. Stir in rice and beans until mixture is heated through and well combined. Add salt and pepper to taste. In a separate skillet, fry one egg per person. Serve warm topped with an egg, and garnished with plenty of cilantro and additional sauces to taste. The post Gallo Pinto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pineapple Carrot Muffins

March 2 2020 Meatless Monday 

These delectable muffins are naturally sweetened with pineapple and agave nectar. They’re freezer friendly too, so make a batch and munch on one every morning for the next two weeks. This recipe comes to us from Catherine of Weelicious. Serves 14 - 1 1/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 3/­­4 cup wheat flour - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­2 teaspoons baking soda - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup butter, melted - 1/­­2 cup agave nectar* - 2 eggs - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1/­­2 cup pineapple, chopped fine and drained well - or - 1 8 ounce can crushed pineapple, drained well - 1 cup carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 cup walnuts** * Agave (ah-Gah-vay) nectar is similar in taste & texture to honey but has a lower impact on blood sugar when compared other sweeteners. Agave can be found in the health food or specialty food aisle of most grocery stores. **optional Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare muffin tins with paper muffin cups. In a large bowl combine the flours, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl combine the butter and agave using a whisk or an electric beater to combine. Add the eggs to the butter agave mixture and whisk to combine. Add the vanilla, pineapple, carrots and walnuts to the butter mixture and stir until incorporated. Stir the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and mix until just combined, making sure not to over mix. Pour the batter into regular size, paper lined muffin cups. Bake for 22-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes and enjoy! The post Pineapple Carrot Muffins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sautéed with fresh peas and lemon juice and then tossed with steamed fava beans, artichoke hearts and fresh baby spinach. This salute to spring veggies is made decadent when goat cheese and fresh mint are thrown in, all served atop a slice of toasted rye bread. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 4 - 2 1/­­2 cups fava beans - 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 small leeks, finely diced - 2 1/­­2 cups peas - zest & juice 1/­­2 lemon - 3.5 ounces baby spinach - 1 10 ounce can artichoke hearts, quartered - 3.5 ounces goat cheese*, crumbled - 6 slices rye bread, toasted - fresh mint, for garnish *Optional Steam or boil the fava beans for 3-4 minutes, or until just tender. Rinse under cold water and peel when cooled. Place 2 of the tablespoons of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the leeks and fry over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until soft. Add the fava beans and toss, coating in oil. Add the peas and continue to cook over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the peas are just tender. Add the lemon zest, artichoke hearts and baby spinach. Toss until well mixed and thoroughly heated through. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the crumbled goat cheese and toss to combine. Whisk the lemon juice with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Serve 1/­­4 of the fava beans and peas on top each piece of toasted rye bread. Drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil mixture and finish with a few fresh mint leaves. The post Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Glazed Daikon Radish with Walnuts

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Daikon radish is an underused treasure of the veggie world. The Daikons strong, spicy flavor is mellowed as its sautéed in coconut oil, then contrasted beautifully against walnuts and agave nectar. This recipe comes to us from Danica of Soundly Vegan. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - 2 teaspoons coconut oil - 4 cups Daikon radish*, cut into bite-sized pieces - 1 tablespoon light miso* - 1 tablespoon agave nectar** - 1/­­3 cup raw walnuts - Daikon radish tops, chopped *Found in the Asian markets or the Asian or vegetable section of most grocery stores.   **Found in health food stores or the sweetener section of most grocery stores. Place the coconut oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat. Sauté the radish slices in the pan, stirring occasionally, for 4-6 minutes, or until they are slightly softened. Place the miso and the agave nectar together in a large bowl and stir until well combined. Add the sautéed radishes and walnuts. Toss well to coat. Spread the radish tops around the pan evenly and cover. Take the pan off the stove and set aside for 3-5 minutes, or until the Daikons greens wilt. Remove the frying pans lid and pour any condescended steam on the lid back into the pan. Pour the radish tops and any liquid that has accumulated into the bowl with the radishes and walnuts. Mix until all ingredients are well combined and the veggies are coated in agave glaze. Divide into servings and enjoy. The post Glazed Daikon Radish with Walnuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All TimeYes, you read that correctly. To celebrate the start of 2020, weve made a list of our 20 most popular recipes of all time. This collection represents YOUR favorite Meatless Monday meals, and its a must-read for anyone looking to incorporate more plant-based cooking into their daily diet. From Thai spring rolls and shawarma tofu to Vietnamese mango salad and Mediterranean vegetable noodle soup, weve got something for everyone. Best of all, these recipes are all super simple to make, with many of them taking less than 30 minutes to prepare. Here are our top 20 Meatless Monday recipes of all time: 20) Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles For the Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles, click here. 19) Vietnamese Mango Salad For the Vietnamese Mango Salad, click here. 18) Shawarma Tofu For the Shawarma Tofu, click here. 17) Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers, click here. 16) Banana Date Smoothie For the Banana Date Smoothie, click here. 15) Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles For Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles, click here. 14) Easy Veggie Lo Mein For the Easy Veggie Lo Mein, click here. 13) Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup For the Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup, click here. 12) Grilled Avocado with Salsa For the Grilled Avocado with Salsa, click here. 11) Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal For the Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal, click here. 10) Grilled Vegetable Tacos For the Grilled Vegetable Tacos, click here. 9) The Meatball Shops Veggie Balls For the Meatball Shops Veggie Balls, click here. 8) Vegetable Pancit For the Vegetable Pancit, click here. 7) Zucchini Tomato Curry For the Zucchini Tomato Curry, click here. 6) Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad For the Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad, click here. 5) Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice) For the Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice), click here. 4) Italian White Beans and Kale For the Italian White Beans and Kale, click here. 3) Kale Potato and Carrot Curry For the Kale Potato and Carrot Curry, click here. 2) Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. 1) Jamaican Jerk Tofu For the Jamaican Jerk Tofu, click here.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!Theres no better time to commit to healthier habits than the New Year. But making a resolution is easy; keeping it, now thats the hard part. We believe going meatless on Monday should be as simple and delicious as possible. Thats why were offering up our top 20 tips for incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet. Armed with this toolbelt of tricks, techniques, pantry staples, swaps, gadgets, and apps, youll be able to approach every Meatless Monday with the confidence and culinary gusto of a seasoned gourmand. And remember, you can sign up for our Meatless Monday newsletter to receive weekly recipes, tips, articles, and food-industry updates that will help keep you focused, full, and on track.   1. Always keep an avocado on hand. Add to sandwiches instead of cheese, top your toast or bulk up a smoothie. 2. Learn to love your oven; it has a magical effect on vegetables - roast, bake or crisp! 3. Use condiments (pesto, salsa, hummus, harissa, tapenade) LIBERALLY! 4. Stock your freezer with frozen fruits, vegetables, and plant-based burgers. 5. Try different legumes (black beans, lentils, chickpeas, pigeon peas, butter beans, cannellini beans). Tip: dried legumes are very inexpensive and go a long way. 6. Go with whole grains like brown and wild rice, farro, quinoa, and bulgur. 7. Fortify your cupboard with plant-based snacks like popcorn, nuts, roasted chickpeas, dried fruit, granola, and dark chocolate. 8. Get familiar with tofu. When prepared properly (press it before cooking), its an excellent source of plant-based protein. You can also blend it into smoothies or batters. 9. Experiment with plant-based meats and burgers. Its usually pretty hard to tell the difference vs beef burgers. 10. Find a favorite nut-milk and try using it in your coffee, cereal, and recipes. There are plenty to choose from. 11. Keep coconut oil close by and use it as an alternative to butter. 12. Stock-up your spice rack. Spices from different regions of the world will add flavor and complexity to ordinary recipes and ingredients. 13. Working out? Invest in some plant-based protein powders. 14. Find fast-food and quick-service restaurants that offer up a variety of plant-based options. 15. Expand your culinary scope: Many global cuisines put greater emphasis on plant-based dishes. Look at some Indian, Thai, Mediterranean, Chinese, or Japanese cookbooks for inspiration. 16. Pump up pasta with a mix of vegetables and legumes. 17. Keep a bag of corn meal in the cupboard and use for sweet polenta, polenta fries, cornbread, and griddle cakes. 18. Invest in gadgets: Tofu press, immersion blender, juicer, spiralizer, and mandolin can add some flare to traditional vegetables. 19. Download apps for meatless eating. Happy Cow, Fork Over Knives, Vanilla Bean, and Food Monster are all great ways to find meatless options and get some recipe inspiration. 20. Catch a meatless movie like The Game Changers, What the Health, Cowspiracy, or Food Inc to learn more about the food system and plant-based eating.   Want more of tips, hacks and recipes? Follow us at @MeatlessMonday on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Find great plant-based recipes in our recipe gallery!   The post Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort FoodsInexpensive, packed with protein, and easy to store, tofu is an indispensable wonder food that you simply must have in your refrigerator at all times. Tofu is sold in different levels of firmness, which can range from silken (pillowy and custard-like) to extra firm (spongy). The less-firm varieties have higher water content, making them better for cream and dairy replacements. Tofu can also be used to boost the nutritional quality of your favorite dishes; blend a block of silken tofu into your typical roux-based cheese sauce for a plant-based protein boost, and no one will notice the difference. This Monday, experiment with tofu by incorporating this versatile ingredient into some of your favorite classic comfort foods. Our top tofu tips and hacks: o Press your tofu to remove water before cooking or marinating o Freeze and thaw tofu to achieve a texture more similar to meat o Marinate tofu with your favorite sauces, avoid oil-based marinades o Press, cube and air-fry or bake tofu with your favorite seasonings for easy and delicious toss-ins for salads, stir fry, burritos and beyond Alfredo Sauce Traditional Alfredo sauce is heavy, rich, but oh so delicious. Try using tofu for a version thats light, creamy, lower in calories, and higher in protein. Whats the secret? Just blend together silken tofu, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, vegan butter, and a healthy amount of nutritional yeast. Liberally coat some fettuccine and enjoy. Buffalo Wings When battered, breaded, and baked, tofu becomes crisp on the outside, just like your favorite chicken wings. To make tofu wings, simply dredge extra-firm tofu blocks in cornstarch, dip them in a plant-based milk, coat in bread crumbs, seasonings and bake or air-fry until brown. You can create your own Buffalo sauce by mixing together hot sauce (Franks RedHot is the classic), butter or non-dairy butter substitute, and granulated garlic. Drooling for more? Check out this Crispy Tofu Finger recipe. Caesar Dressing No eggs or anchovies required to make this plant-based Caesar dressing . Blend together silken tofu, lemon juice and zest, garlic cloves, capers, Dijon mustard and nutritional yeast. Pour over some grilled romaine lettuce, and your first course it ready to go. Chicken Fried Tofu Chicken fried steak is a southern staple, but the technique, which involves a thinly sliced protein thats been breaded and pan-fried, can be made with tofu to produce the same crispy, comforting outcome. The recipe is straightforward : Simply drain, slice, and press tofu to remove as much moisture as possible; dip slices into a batter (use plant-based milk, flour, and some vinegar or lemon juice); and, finally, cover in your breading. Put the finished steaks on a wire cooling rack and bake, air-fry or sauté until golden and crispy. Jalapeno Poppers Ideal for game days and gatherings, the jalapeno popper has achieved mythical status as one of the ultimate appetizers. For a plant-based version , swap out the cream cheese for a tofu cream cheese -- which you can buy or easily make on your own . To make these plant-based bites, seed the jalapenos, slice down the middle, stuff with your tofu cream cheese and whatever other goodies you have available -- non-dairy cheese, scallions, chile powder -- and give them a quick roast in the oven until nice and charred, and top with some crushed potato chips for a little texture. Jamaican Jerk Tofu This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican jerk seasoning is sure-to-please. Its sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. The recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu is super simple: Just press and slice the tofu, submerge in the jerk marinade, and cook in a hot skillet. Lasagna Food doesnt get more comforting than lasagna. Approach this dish as you would your favorite lasagna recipe , but instead of ricotta cheese, blend together pressed tofu, nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Tofu Parmigiana   Italian night has never been easier. Press, bread, and sauté slices of tofu until their golden brown; add some tomato sauce to the bottom of a baking dish, line it with the lightly-fried tofu, top with remaining sauce, top with traditional or non-dairy mozzarella, and pop into the oven. Check out one of our favorite recipes here .   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Peanut Stew

March 2 2020 Meatless Monday 

Sweet potato peanut stew, or groundnut stew, is called Mafe in West Africa. The stew uses a savory sauce made from peanut butter and tomatoes and is common throughout West and Central Africa. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. The sweet potato, a much-loved African heritage food, is a featured ingredient. Serves 4 - 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1 medium-size yellow onion, diced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1 large sweet potato, chopped into medium-size cubes - 2 large carrots, cut into thin rounds - 2 green zucchini, cut into thin half-rounds - 1 small can (15oz) of diced tomatoes, no salt added - 2 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon curry power - 1/­­4 cup natural peanut butter - 3 sprigs of fresh thyme, minced, or 1 teaspoon dried thyme - Sea salt to taste   Heat the oil in one of the soup pots on medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic until translucent (3-4 minutes). While the onions and garlic cook, chop up the sweet potato, carrots, and zucchini. Add sweet potato and vegetables to the pot; saute for 3-4 minutes. Add the diced tomatoes, vegetable broth, and curry powder, and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, add the peanut butter and the thyme to the stew. Let it cook, covered, for another 3-5 minutes. Salt to taste, serve and enjoy!   Active time: 20 minutes Total time: 30 minutes The post Sweet Potato Peanut Stew appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for BakingEggs play a crucial role in many of our favorite baked goods, giving structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. But like other forms of intensive livestock farming, egg production also takes a toll on the health of the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, and contamination of soil and water. Plant-based egg replacers are designed to give us all that we love about eggs without the environmental baggage. But, please remember that every plant-based egg alternative wont work in every application, so look for plant-based baking recipes or do some experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies. Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda. Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST . Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs.   Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery . The post The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in Beijing

February 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in BeijingEarlier this month, to celebrate Chinese New year, The Good Food Fund in China -- in collaboration with Meatless Monday and Slow Food International -- hosted a series of events, known collectively as The Good Food Festival. Local community leaders in Xinzhuang Village, Beijing took a stance to advocate for more sustainable food choices. Through a collection of workshops, seminars, and cooking contests, The Good Food Festival sought to expand the community’s capacity and knowledge for dietary change by teaching attendees the many benefits of a diet rooted in plant-based foods. By introducing the changes in diets throughout history, Jianyi (founder of the Good Food Fund) discussed the issues surrounding the increasing consumption of animal protein, and the increasingly high environmental costs we all face. He encouraged everyone to make a change starting from the most important meal of the year-New Year’s Eve! While these decisions can sometimes be culturally and logistically challenging, events such as The Good Food Festival demonstrate how people can come together to advocate for progressive change, while still staying true traditions. Wishing everyone the best in the new year. ????! The post Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in Beijing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu Almond Stir-Fry

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Hoisin is a Cantonese dipping sauce made from sweet potatoes, vinegar, garlic and chili peppers; you can find it in the Asian ingredients section of most supermarkets. Here, it adds immense flavor to tofu, which gets a pre-soak in vegetable broth for even more flavor. This recipe was created by Trudy Slabosz, who writes the blog veggie.num.num. Serves 4 For the tofu: - 1 package (10.5 ounces) firm tofu, cubed - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 egg white - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon salt For the sauce: - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce To complete the Tofu Almond Stir-Fry: - 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 5 shallots, sliced - 5 ounces button mushrooms, sliced - 1 can (15 ounces) baby corn, drained - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 1 green bell pepper, sliced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 1/­­2 ounces blanched almonds, toasted To prepare the tofu: In a medium bowl, soak the tofu cubes in vegetable broth for 30 minutes. Strain the tofu and reserve the broth. Drain tofu on a bed of paper towels. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg white, corn starch, hoisin sauce and salt. Add the drained tofu and gently toss to coat well. To prepare the sauce: In a medium saucepot over high heat, bring the reserved broth, cornstarch, hoisin and soy sauce to a boil. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes, or until the sauce darkens and thickens slightly. To complete the Stir-Fry: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu ; cook 10, turning occasionally, until crisp and golden on all sides. Transfer to a fresh bed of paper towels to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the same skillet. Add the shallots, mushrooms, baby corn, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes, or until the mushrooms are tender, but the bell peppers are still crisp. Add the tofu; cook 1 minute more, tossing gently, until the tofu is heated through. Pour the sauce over the stir-fry and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the almonds The post Tofu Almond Stir-Fry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Mash

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted until brown, then blended with Greek yogurt and vegetable broth for a flavorful, creamy cauliflower puree. This cauliflower mash can be served on the side in place of mashed potatoes and offers a healthy dose of the vitamin K! This recipe is from Ashley of Sprout. Serves 4 - 1 head cauliflower, cut into 1 inch florets - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup plain Greek yogurt - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth, divided - whole wheat breadcrumbs, for garnish - fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil. Season with the salt and pepper. Spread the florets onto a baking sheet in 1 layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges of the cauliflower are deep brown. Transfer the roasted cauliflower florets to a blender. Add the yogurt and 1/­­2 cup of the vegetable broth to the blender. Blend until smooth. If cauliflower mash seems too thick, add a little more vegetable broth, 1 tablespoon at a time until the mash has reached desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide into 4 portions, sprinkle each with breadcrumbs and parsley. Enjoy! The post Cauliflower Mash appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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