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New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 15 public schools will offer Meatless Monday as part of a pilot program, with the potential to expand throughout the school system. Every Monday, students in the pilot will enjoy breakfast and lunch menus featuring meatless meals. De Blasio also added a personal commitment to start the practice at Gracie Mansion, his official residence ...we are now going to be instituting Meatless Mondays as well...Were starting a new habit and Im looking forward to it. New York joins a growing group of cities that are reducing meat consumption, with recent Meatless Monday proclamations issued in Pittsburgh, Sacramento, and Vancouver, B.C. Global leaders, including Argentinian President Mauricio Macri and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, have also committed to practicing Meatless Monday. Cutting back a little on meat will help make our city healthier and our planet stronger for generations to come, said de Blasio. He added that both the obesity and climate change crises can be meaningfully addressed by adopting a more plant-based diet. According to research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, scientific adviser to the Meatless Monday campaign, livestock production is a major driver of climate change, contributing to nearly 15 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Based on predictions, if upward trends of meat and dairy consumption continue, global mean temperature rise will more than likely exceed 2 degrees Celsius, the level that scientists agree we must stay below to avoid the most catastrophic climate change scenarios. In addition to reducing climate impact, diets that favor plant-based instead of animal protein can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Sid Lerner, founder of The Monday Campaigns and the Meatless Monday movement, said, Were thrilled that NYC schools will participate in Meatless Monday to introduce kids to delicious plant-based options that can create healthy eating habits for life. Congratulations to the mayor for his leadership in taking Meatless Monday into the future, for our health and the health of the planet. The Meatless Monday movement has been integrated into schools, restaurants, hospitals, college campuses, corporations, and communities. Free resources to start Meatless Monday are at www.meatlessmonday.com/­­start-a-campaign. Want to get involved? Contact us today! The post New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish

January 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish Kathy Freston is a writer and plant-based diet advocate. Her latest book is The Book of Veganish, which is packed with plant-based recipes and interesting facts about eating less meat. We chatted with her to learn more about her remarkable new book.   You were interviewed on the Oprah Winfrey Show in 2011, the same show where Oprah announced she would be implementing Meatless Monday in the Harpo cafeteria. The word veganish popped up a few times during the interview. Is this a concept youve been thinking about for a while? Yes, I think when most people hear the word vegan, and if they grew up like me eating chicken, hamburger and steak, they think vegan is so restrictive. Like oh my god, all my favorite foods are going away. Ill never be able to eat cheese fries again. Veganish takes the pressure off to be absolute. Theres this joy and relief to explore other food choices.   The whole feel of your book is so fun and hip. Was it put together with millennials in mind? Absolutely. Young adults are the ones who have the world in their hands. They want to make a difference. And eating less meat is one of the most focused ways to have a meaningful life - for the environment, for animals and for your own human health and your family. The book is meant to be happy! To be fun and inspiring. I love that most of the book is young adults weighing in. Theyre young fresh voices. You really get a sense of this growing community.   Lets talk about the recipes. What was your goal in putting this collection together? Robin Robertson is the chef who wrote the recipes. Shes all about comfort food, speed and taste. For me, protein was the most important thing. Even though protein intake is not a problem in vegan diets, most people are still obsessed with it. So our goal was to get as much protein as possible and to get the veggies so they tasted good and werent boring. And Robin rocked it! You can make everything in 10 to 20 minutes using simple ingredients you have around the house.   We love that so many of the recipes are one pot meals. Apparently millennials arent even eating as much cereal these days because of the clean up! Right. Whats nice is that a lot of the recipes are one-dish meals and are also great for leftovers. You can pack them and take them to the office or to class the next day.   What recipes would you suggest for newbies? Either someone new to veganism, or someone who wants to introduce their friends or family to meatless eating via Meatless Monday? The mac and cheese is so comforting. And I love the tacos, theyre really meaty. Theres also a great burrito with tons of protein and some spinach or kale. Its just really hearty!   Sounds like Mexican food is where its at! Thanks for chatting, we cant wait to cook up these dishes! The post Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.

Will Grazing on Mini-Meals Help You Lose Weight?

February 19 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Will Grazing on Mini-Meals Help You Lose Weight? Nope! It’s a myth. A research review published in 2014 in the journal Advances in Nutrition found no proof that meal frequency plays a significant role in weight management. Why might that be? For one thing, most people underestimate the calories they consume. So if youre not keeping close tabs, those multiple mini-meals can easily jack up your daily calorie count. Worse yet, a University of Missouri study found that overweight women who consumed six mini-meals a day had higher blood fat levels than those who consumed the same total calories from an old-school regimen of three meals. One possible explanation is an increased intake of nutritionally empty packaged snacks such as pretzels and chips in contrast to more wholesome meals. What about the extra calorie burn from continual noshing? While our bodies may expend energy to process foods during digestion, frequent nibbling isnt likely to stoke metabolism in any meaningful way. When British scientists fed volunteers either two larger or five smaller meals totaling the same daily calorie count, they found that regardless, the volunteers burned virtually the same number of calories over a 24-hour period. Regular exercise will do much more to kick-start your metabolism than frequent eating could ever achieve. That said, judicious snacking could help some people avoid becoming overly hungry and, in turn, overeating come mealtime. Bottom Line: A healthy weight is much more about how many total calories you consume and the quality of those calories than how often you eat during the day. Snack Smart Make eating between meals work for, not against you. Stay mindful. A Yale University study found that adults were more likely to overindulge in snacking when parked in front of the TV ?and exposed to food advertising. Scarfing down food while watching your favorite sitcom or surfing ?the Web distracts you from noticing the amount youre eating and registering fullness cues. Power up with protein. Research shows that higher-protein snacks ?are more satiating, which could help keep overall calorie intake in check. Plain Greek yogurt, edamame, nut butters, and hemp seeds can add ?a protein punch to snack time. Keep it real. Snacks can help you nail your daily quota for vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber--but you need to reach for wholesome options such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, and whole grains. How about you? What are your tricks for smarter snacking?

4 Veg-Friendly Ways to Celebrate Thanksgiving

November 14 2014 Vegetarian Times 

4 Veg-Friendly Ways to Celebrate ThanksgivingPhotography: Terry Cummings Since the very beginning, ?the cornerstones of a Thanksgiving celebration have been fabulous food and good company. And when served ?with a heaping helping of benevolence, youve got the makings of a truly meaningful holiday. Give your Thanksgiving a compassionate revamp with these options that benefit humans ?as much as the (spared) animals. Adopt a Turkey Historically, the holiday season has been rough on our feathered friends, but shifting the old turkey day paradigm in a kinder direction is easy with the help of Farm Sanctuarys Adopt A Turkey program. Each turkey sponsored comes with a picture and a certificate describing their personality, so people can come to recognize them as individuals, says Farm Sanctuary President Gene Baur. It opens up the conversation. Sign up at farmsanctuary.org. Eat & Greet Attending a farm-animal-sanctuary-sponsored event can be a revelatory experience for the whole family. It shows you can create new Thanksgiving traditions that are kind and compassionate, says Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuarys Terry Cummings. At Thanksgiving with the Turkeys (pictured above), guests dined on delicious vegan food and visit with the resident rescues. Similar events are scheduled at sanctuaries around the country. Find an event near you at sanctuaries.org. Party Heart-y ? Coordinate a community Thanksgiving event showcasing the tasty benefits of ?a meat-free diet. FARMs Compassionate Holidays site teems with resources--an event registry, recipes, and tips for a festive holiday celebration. Its a way to bring people together and spread our message of compassion, says FARMs Michael Weber. Prefer a scaled-down soirée? Visit Mercy for Animalss Pardon a Turkey site for menu ideas and turkey facts to impress your guests. Dine Out in Veg Style At veg restaurants from San Francisco to D.C., tucking into a scrumptious Thanksgiving feast--and leaving the cleanup to someone else--is a time-honored tradition. Thanksgiving is our busiest day of the year, says Mark Doskow of New Yorks legendary hot spot Candle 79. Nowhere near the Big Apple? Los Angeles’s Crossroads and the Windy Citys Chicago Diner offer special Thanksgiving menus too. For more, visit vrg.org, and search for Thanksgiving. Are you celebrating Thanksgiving veg-style? Share in the comments below!

Climate Week NYC Embraces Meatless Monday

September 15 2014 Meatless Monday 

Climate Week NYC Embraces Meatless MondayThe United Nations Climate Summit will meet in New York on September 23 to discuss actionable plans to fight climate change, during Climate Week NYC. Why is Meatless Monday involved? Because practicing MM is good for the environment. When you reduce your meat intake, you minimize water usage because the production of beef requires 1,850 gallons of water, while the production of vegetables requires 39 gallons of water. And when you reduce your meat consumption, you reduce your carbon footprint because beef production creates 30kg of greenhouse gas per kg of food, while carrots, potatoes, and rice require .42, .45, and 1.3kg respectively. Check out all the facts at Why Meatless? Meatless Monday makes a splash at Climate Week NYC events.  An all-vegetarian lunch will be served at The Climate Group’s kick-off event at the Morgan Library.  And superstar chef and Meatless Monday supporter Marcus Samuelsson has agreed to be the guest chef at the prestigious Equator Prize private reception at Lincoln Center for United Nations dignitaries held prior to the Equator Prize Awards. Join Meatless Monday at The Peoples Climate March in Manhattan starting at 11:30 am, Sunday, September 21 in Central Park. Get details on how to meet our staff at the event and signage to download and print on Meatless Monday’s Climate Week page. If you cant make it to the march, you’re welcome to share Meatless Monday Climate Week graphics via social media. You can also participate in the discussion on Twitter with the hashtags #MFMclimatepledge, #CWNYC, and #MeatlessMonday.   You can also take a stand by pledging to go meatless on Monday with us at Meatless Monday.  According to United Nations, [UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon] has asked [summit] leaders to bring bold announcements and actions to the summit that will reduce emissions, strengthen climate resilience, and mobilize political will for a meaningful legal agreement in 2015. The prevailing thought leading up to this summit is the cost of inaction is greater than the cost of action. And its a thought that has considerable traction. After all, its not just global leaders and politicians that are rallying around the cause. Case in point--The Peoples Climate March organizers are expecting more than a hundred thousand participants. The Peoples Climate website reads, With our future on the line and the whole world watching, well take a stand to bend the course of history. Well take to the streets to demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities Meat Free Monday founder Sir Paul McCartney says, Going meat free one day a week is a simple way to contribute to a more sustainable future. So, McCartney and UK leader Greg Barker have also launched a Meat Free Pledge for Climate Week to help show world leaders that going meatless on Mondays helps fight climate change.  The Meatless Monday team has been working diligently with our UK partners to promote the pledge and we hope you’ll lend your name to the cause and pledge your support for going meatless on Mondays specifically to support stopping climate change. What events will Meatless Monday take part in? o  An all-vegetarian (Meatless Monday) lunch--served at the Climate Groups kick-off event at the Morgan Library. o  The Peoples Climate March--starting at 11:30 am, Sunday,  September 21 Central Park West. o  Equator Prize Ceremony: Building the Movement for Inclusive Climate and Development Solutions--September 22. Take a stand with us and be heard, join Climate Week NYC. Heres a link to the full calendar of events. The post Climate Week NYC Embraces Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Paul McCartney & MFMCelebrate 5 years;Offer Fans A Cameo

August 4 2014 Meatless Monday 

Paul McCartney & MFMCelebrate 5 years;Offer Fans A CameoMeat Free Monday--Meatless Mondays friend with a British accent--turns 5 this year. To mark the occasion and promote the cause, Paul McCartney and Meat Free are making a music video to go along with the Meat Free Monday song. And theyve opened up an opportunity for you to be a part of the video--share a photo of yourself with some of the lyrics from the Meat Free Monday song, and you might just be included in the video. “Having one designated meat free day a week, Paul says, is actually a meaningful change that everyone can make, that goes to the heart of several important political, environmental, and ethical issues all at once.” The Meat Free Monday website goes on to say of the success of the movement, The awareness campaign has had an incredible response so far. Some of the worlds leading authorities on climate change have endorsed meat reduction as an effective way of fighting global warming… And a huge number of celebrities and high profile chefs back Meat Free Monday... The Meatless Monday initiative is global, in 23 languages and 36 countries. And while there are many variations: Meatless Monday, Meat Free Monday, Lunes Sin Carne, and Köttfri M?ndag (to name a few,) we all have the same two core goals: better health for people and better health for the environment through reducing meat consumption. So we dont mind sharing the stage when its someone elses time to shine. We celebrated our 10th year anniversary a few months ago. Now its Meat Free Mondays turn to celebrate. Meat Free Mondays success is our success--join us in celebrating 5-year benchmark and contribute to the video. How many more opportunities do you think youll get to collaborate with a former Beatle? The post Paul McCartney & MFM Celebrate 5 years; Offer Fans A Cameo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning

July 8 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning I started writing a text about summer food. About being offline and trying to unwind. A happy text about nothing of importance, really. With too many sad reports on the news recently, finding meaning in these short texts can sometimes be difficult. Millions of refugees keep filling up camps in countries around Syria. Or climb onto small boats in Libya hoping that they will make it across the Mediterranean sea. Meanwhile, prejudices, hate and racism are on the rise both in the US and here in Europe. So how can we make a blog post about summer food feeling meaningful at all? Luise and I often talk about this. I am sure everyone does. This feeling of wanting to do more but not being sure what, or how to do it. A recipe can seem so irrelevant in the midst of it all. It looks like we might get involved in some voluntary work in relation the refugee situation in Syria within the next couple of months. But until then, we are trying to see meaningfulness around us. The truth is of course that food does matter. It is important, in many more ways than just for our physical survival. Food is memories, heritage, happiness, family and food is love. Food gathers people around a table and makes us talk. Many of our best memories are connected with food. We solve problems over food. We celebrate. We become friends. So maybe a food blog isn’t that meaningless. Food is after all more than just a recipe. And talking about meaning. Another truth that Luise and I try to live by, is that the most responsible thing we can do at the moment is infusing our children with kindness. Talking to them about how it never will matter how much money you have, the colour of your skin, if you are a man or a woman, where you are born or who you choose to love. We are all humans. And we are all equal. If we can all just pass that on to our children, they will hopefully grow old in a world with less hate and fear and more love than the one we are currently living in. By writing this text, I have also passed that simple message on to you. Prepare the recipe in today’s blog post, share the meal with your friends or family and talk about the importance of kindness. It might be a cliche, but we believe it is one worth sharing. This is a simple summer dinner that we did the other day after we had prepared a large batch of the Egyptian spice blend Dukkah. Calling the meal simple might be a slight exaggeration as you actually have to prepare the spice blend as well as making the rest of the dinner. But it will be worth it. You will find that Dukkah can be added to an infinite amount of meals this summer. It carries a lot of flavour and adds both richness and crunch to whatever you pair it with. There are lots of Dukkah recipes to be found online so instead of adding yet another to the mix, we are simply sharing a slightly adapted version of Yotam and Sami’s brilliant Dukkah from their Jerusalem book. In this recipe the Dukkah is generously sprinkled over roasted summer carrots and onions that rest on a bed of herby quinoa with a creamy feta cheese and yogurt spread on the side. Any roasted vegetables can of course be added to this meal and they can just as well be grilled on a bbq. It’s a summery, creamy, very flavourful and absolutely delicious dish. And hopefully more than that. Enjoy! Much love and happy summer! David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Roasted Carrots with Dukkah, Quinoa & Feta Yogurt Cream Serves 4 Oven roasted summer carrots & onions 1 lb /­­ 500 g (approx. 8 large) carrots 4 onions, shallots or red onions 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp maple syrup sea salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Scrub the carrots under water and trim off the top greens. Cut the carrots lengthwise if they are thick (and keep thin carrots whole). Place on a baking tray. Peel off the outer layer of the onion and trim the top off. Cut into large chunks. Place on the baking tray next to the carrots. Stir together oil, maple, salt and pepper and drizzle over the vegetables, toss to cover. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Herby Quinoa 1 cup /­­ 170 g uncooked quinoa (or 2 1/­­2 cups pre-cooked) 1 large handful flat leave parsley a generous drizzle of olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice sea salt & black pepper Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and salt and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and let simmer for about 10-15 minutes, set aside and let cool. Chop parsley and stir through the quinoa together with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Feta & Yogurt Cream 5 oz /­­ 150 g feta cheese 1 cup /­­ 250 ml plain yogurt sea salt & black pepper Place feta cheese in a mixing bowl and mash with a fork, add yogurt and combine until creamy. Add salt and pepper to taste, set aside. Dukkah spice blend (adapted from Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g hazelnuts 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 3 tbsp coriander seeds 1 tbsp fennel seeds 1 tbsp cumin seeds 2 tbsp sesame seeds 1 tsp nigella seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Preheat the oven to 160°C /­­ 320°F. Spread the hazelnuts on a baking tray and place in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until cracked and golden. Meanwhile heat a skillet or frying pan to medium heat. Add sunflower seeds, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and cumin and dry roast for no more than a minutes while stirring. Now add sesame seeds and nigella seeds and keep stirring until the sesame seeds turns light brown, it takes about 30 seconds. Set aside and add salt. Rub the hazelnuts between the palms of your hands (or a towel) to remove and discard some of the skin. Place all ingredients in a pestle and mortar and coarsely crush the spice blend. Store in an airtight container for up to a month. Assembling: Spread the quinoa in a serving dish or on a large platter. Arrange the oven roasted carrots and onions on top. Spoon the feta and yogurt cream into a small bowl and place in the dish. Sprinkle the vegetables with a generous amount of Dukkah. Serve.

Quote of the Week:Tony Cárdenas

November 17 2014 Meatless Monday 

Quote of the Week:Tony CárdenasOn November 13, Tony Cárdenas, Representative of Californias 29th Congressional District and fan of Meatless Monday, wrote an editorial piece for the Los Angeles Daily News asking all Californians to do their part to conserve water during the record drought. We cant create the rain, but we can take actions in our everyday lives to create a meaningful impact on reducing water usage. One of those actions was to consider the water resources that go into producing different foods when planning meals. Representative Cárdenas cited U.S. Department of the Interior statistics about the staggering amount of water resources needed to produce one pound of chicken (400 gallons) or a pound of beef (1,800 gallons.) He compared those amounts with figures from the Water Footprint Network of the water needed to produce a pound of tomatoes (26 gallons) or a loaf of wheat bread (220 gallons.) I am talking about making a conscious decision to compare the large amount of water it takes to produce that steak or pork chop youre eating, with the likely smaller amount of water needed to produce delicious meatless options. In that spirit my staff and I have taken on the Meatless Monday Challenge. Taking off one day a week from eating meat is a small way to cut down our water use and consumption while reducing our water footprint. Representative Cárdenas also brought up how going meatless one day a week is good for the environment, helping to combat global warming. With the drought and global warming creating such high stakes in our state, all Californians must do their part to examine their personal water usage and cut wherever possible.” From suggestions like turning off the tap while brushing teeth to taking a day off from eating meat, he emphasized that these small steps can really add up. We all have the tools to make a difference. Sometimes, they are disguised as forks and knives. Lets put them to good use. The post Quote of the Week: Tony Cárdenas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

People’s Climate MarchEmbracesMeatless Monday

September 22 2014 Meatless Monday 

People’s Climate MarchEmbracesMeatless MondayOn Sunday, the efforts of over 1,000 organizations and 300,000 participants coalesced into what was the biggest US climate change demonstration to date, the People’s Climate March. Transforming the landscape into a sea of floats and banners, the crowd gathered to courier the message that action needs to be taken. Organizations such as Avaaz, the Sierra Club, and Meatless Monday; and companies like Patagonia and Pepsi all came out to show support for the People’s Climate March, which kicks off Climate Week NYC. Now, although the crowd has mostly cleared and many of the signs have gone down, it’s Monday and it’s a great time to activate because there is still plenty to do. Meatless Monday makes a splash at Climate Week NYC events.   To start the day, Meatless Monday is partnering with Beyond Meat and Meat Free Monday to hold a special VIP brunch for environmental leaders and celebrities.  And on Monday September 22, an all-vegetarian lunch will be served at The Climate Group’s kick-off event at the Morgan Library.  Chef-owner of Red Rooster Harlem and Meatless Monday supporter, Marcus Samuelsson has curated the menu for the prestigious Equator Prize private reception at Lincoln Center for United Nations dignitaries held prior to the Equator Prize Awards. Then on Tuesday September 23, the United Nations Climate Summit will meet to discuss actionable plans to fight climate change, during Climate Week NYC. If you can’t participate in person, you can participate via Twitter with the hashtags #MFMclimatepledge, #CWNYC, and #MeatlessMonday. You can also take a stand by pledging to go meatless on Monday with us at Meatless Monday. And also take the pledge with Meat Free Monday. Why is Meatless Monday involved? Because practicing MM is good for the environment. When you reduce your meat intake, you minimize water usage because the production of beef requires 1,850 gallons of water, while the production of vegetables requires 39 gallons of water. And when you reduce your meat consumption, you reduce your carbon footprint because beef production creates 30kg of greenhouse gas per kg of food, while carrots, potatoes, and rice require .42, .45, and 1.3kg respectively. Check out all the facts at Why Meatless? According to United Nations, [UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon] has asked [summit] leaders to bring bold announcements and actions to the summit that will reduce emissions, strengthen climate resilience, and mobilize political will for a meaningful legal agreement in 2015. The prevailing thought leading up to this summit is the cost of inaction is greater than the cost of action. And its a thought that has considerable traction. After all, its not just global leaders and politicians that are rallying around the cause. The Peoples Climate website reads, With our future on the line and the whole world watching, well take a stand to bend the course of history. Well take to the streets to demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities Meat Free Monday founder Sir Paul McCartney says, Going meat free one day a week is a simple way to contribute to a more sustainable future. So, McCartney and UK leader Greg Barker have also launched a Meat Free Pledge for Climate Week to help show world leaders that going meatless on Mondays helps fight climate change.  The Meatless Monday team has been working diligently with our UK partners to promote the pledge and we hope you’ll lend your name to the cause and pledge your support for going meatless on Mondays specifically to support stopping climate change. The post People’s Climate March Embraces Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

UN Climate Change Summit and Climate Week NYC Approaches

September 15 2014 Meatless Monday 

UN Climate Change Summit and Climate Week NYC Approaches  The United Nations Climate Summit will meet in New York on September 23 to discuss actionable plans to fight climate change, during Climate Week NYC. According to United Nations, [UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon] has asked [summit] leaders to bring bold announcements and actions to the summit that will reduce emissions, strengthen climate resilience, and mobilize political will for a meaningful legal agreement in 2015. The prevailing thought leading up to this summit is the cost of inaction is greater than the cost of action. And its a thought that has considerable traction. After all, its not just global leaders and politicians that are rallying around the cause. Case in point--The Peoples Climate March organizers are expecting more than a hundred thousand participants. The Peoples Climate website reads, With our future on the line and the whole world watching, well take a stand to bend the course of history. Well take to the streets to demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities Why is Meatless Monday involved? Because practicing MM is good for the environment. When you reduce your meat intake, you minimize water usage because the production of beef requires 1,850 gallons of water, while the production of vegetables requires 39 gallons of water. And when you reduce your meat consumption, you reduce your carbon footprint because beef production creates 30kg of greenhouse gas per kg of food, while carrots, potatoes, and rice require .42, .45, and 1.3kg respectively. Check out all the facts at Why Meatless? Meatless Monday makes a splash at Climate Week NYC events.  An all-vegetarian lunch will be served at The Climate Group’s kick-off event at the Morgan Library.  And superstar chef and Meatless Monday supporter Marcus Samuelsson has agreed to be the guest chef at the prestigious Equator Prize private reception at Lincoln Center for United Nations dignitaries held prior to the Equator Prize Awards. Join Meatless Monday at The Peoples Climate March in Manhattan starting at 11:30 am, Sunday, September 21 in Central Park. Get details on how to meet our staff at the event and signage to download and print on Meatless Monday’s Climate Week page.  If you cant make it to the march, you’re welcome to share Meatless Monday Climate Week graphics via social media. You can also participate in the discussion on Twitter with the hashtags #MFMclimatepledge, #CWNYC, and #MeatlessMonday.   You can also take a stand by pledging to go meatless on Monday with us at Meatless Monday.    Meat Free Monday founder Sir Paul McCartney says, Going meat free one day a week is a simple way to contribute to a more sustainable future. So, McCartney and UK leader Greg Barker have also launched a Meat Free Pledge for Climate Week to help show world leaders that going meatless on Mondays helps fight climate change.  The Meatless Monday team has been working diligently with our UK partners to promote the pledge and we hope you’ll lend your name to the cause and pledge your support for going meatless on Mondays specifically to support stopping climate change. What events will Meatless Monday take part in? o  An all-vegetarian (Meatless Monday) lunch--served at the Climate Groups kick-off event at the Morgan Library. o  The Peoples Climate March--starting at 11:30 am, Sunday,  September 21 Central Park West. o  Equator Prize Ceremony: Building the Movement for Inclusive Climate and Development Solutions--September 22. Take a stand with us and be heard, join Climate Week NYC. Heres a link to the full calendar of events.   The post UN Climate Change Summit and Climate Week NYC Approaches appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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