mayonnaise - vegetarian recipes

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mayonnaise vegetarian recipes

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce

December 16 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce Its no secret. I love tofu.  I use it all the time to make everything from lasagna to cheesecake. Tofu scrambles are a weekly ritual at my house. I even like to dice and bake it to serve it as an appetizer with a flavorful peanut sauce or a zesty sriracha-laced sauce that Ive come to refer to as my 3-2-1 Sauce. The sauce is named after the proportions of its three simple ingredients: 3 parts mayo, 2 parts chili sauce, 1 part sriracha:  3-2-1! If you happen to have some lime juice and cilantro on hand, a bit of each can only improve this flavorful sauce.  I like to serve the dipping sauce on the side, but you can also make extra sauce and toss the tofu in the sauce, then serve it over rice. The nice people at Nasoya were kind enough to send me coupons for their tofu. The tofu I use for this recipe is Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu. Im thrilled that my supermarket now carries it because it saves so much time - no more tofu-pressing needed! Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce For the Tofu: 3 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 pound Nasoya Organic Super-Firm Tofu For the Sauce: 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Thai Sweet Chili Sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce Optional: squeeze of lime juice; minced fresh cilantro For the tofu: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Set aside. Combine the cornstarch and spices in a large plastic zip lock food bag and shake to mix well. Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch cubes and add them to the bag with the seasonings.  Close the bag and shake to coat the tofu. Spread the coated tofu in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet, keeping the tofu pieces separate from each other.  Bake for about 20 minutes, turning once about halfway through. For the sauce: In a small bowl, combine the mayo, chili sauce, sriracha, and a squeeze of lime juice, if using.  Stir to mix well. Sprinkle with a little minced fresh cilantro, if desired. To serve: When the tofu is done baking, transfer it to a plate and serve with the sauce on the side for dipping. The post Baked Tofu with 3-2-1 Sauce appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Basic Brown Bread (Gluten-Free)

August 23 2019 VegKitchen 

Basic Brown Bread (Gluten-Free) This bread is one of my favorites to have around for midday snacking, toasting, or using as bread crumbs. It is delicious toasted and topped with vegan mayonnaise, a fresh garden tomato, and a generous sprinkle of freshly ground black pepper. Reprinted from Great Gluten-Free Vegan Eats* by Allyson Kramer (Fair Winds, (C) 2012), by permission of the author. The post Basic Brown Bread (Gluten-Free) appeared first on VegKitchen.

White BBQ Sauce

July 27 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Here is a different BBQ sauce made with mayonnaise. Its delicious in hot sandwiches and over grilled meat.  

How to Make Cashew Mayonnaise

June 7 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I feel like I need to clarify the title of this post a little bit. Maybe it would be better if I called it “How I Make Cashew Mayo.” I don’t make cashew mayo the traditional way, so this isn’t THE definitive cashew mayo recipe. It’s MY cashew mayo recipe. It’s a little bit different from others because: 1) A lot of cashew mayo recipes are raw. Mine is not. 2) My recipe isn’t raw because I use vegetable broth in it. This adds a little boost of extra flavor. 3) I don’t add anything to sweeten my cashew mayo. See? It’s different. And I can’t promise you that it tastes exactly like real mayo (because it was the 80s when I last had real mayo), but it makes a mean sandwich spread and it’s great on crackers or as a dip for veggies too. Are you ready to get started? Here’s how to make cashew mayo! Put one cup of raw cashews in a bowl and cover them with water. Let them sit for a few hours–about two to four is a good amount. Drain and rinse the cashews, then pop them in your blender or food processor with […]

Potato, Beet and Lentil Salad

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

This Potato, Beet and Lentil Salad is perfectly healthy, delightfully fresh, and wonderfully easy to prepare. This new combination of flavors is a delicious way to enhance any meal and provides so many electrifying nutrients. This salad can be made in advance and kept in the fridge for up to 3 days, making it easy to prep for lunch or for a weekend BBQ. It can even be made using vegan mayo to cater to all of your party guests this summer. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 1  pound  red potatoes,  rinsed, peeled, and cut into bite size cubes 1 1/­­4  cup  beets,  rinsed, peeled, and cut into bite site cubes 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1 1/­­2  cup  cooked, small green lentils 1  tbsp  apple cider vinegar 1  lemon,  juiced 1/­­2  cup  mayonaisse,  or vegan mayo 1 1/­­2  tsp  dijon mustard 1  tsp  ground black pepper 2  cups  chopped kale   Place potatoes and beets in a 3-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add enough cold water to completely cover vegetables, add salt, and bring to a boil. Once water is boiling, reduce heat to a low simmer; do not cover. Cook vegetables approximately 25 minutes or until potatoes and beets are tender. Once done, place potatoes and beets in a strainer to drain water; run cold water over potatoes and beets until cooled. In a large mixing bowl, combine cooled potatoes and beets, lentils, and apple cider vinegar. Set aside. In a small bowl, whisk the lemon juice, mayonnaise, Dijon mustard and ground pepper together. Add the mayonnaise mixture to the potato and beet mixture; combine well. Potato-Beet Lentil Salad can be refrigerated up to 3 days before serving. Serve on top of chopped kale. The post Potato, Beet and Lentil Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

mayonnaise pasta recipe | mayo pasta salad | pasta salad with mayo

October 8 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

mayonnaise pasta recipe | mayo pasta salad | pasta salad with mayomayonnaise pasta recipe | mayo pasta salad | pasta salad with mayo with step by step photo and video recipe. pasta recipes is not native to indian cusine, yet very popular within the indian diaspora. there are even desi versions of pasta made with local indian spices. but this recipe is dedicated to mayonnaise pasta topped with creamy and rich eggless mayonnaise. The post mayonnaise pasta recipe | mayo pasta salad | pasta salad with mayo appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

mayonnaise sandwich recipe | mayo sandwich | veg mayonnaise sandwich

December 24 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

mayonnaise sandwich recipe | mayo sandwich | veg mayonnaise sandwichmayonnaise sandwich recipe | mayo sandwich | veg mayonnaise sandwich with step by step photo and video recipe. sandwich recipes are always helpful when you are short of time yet crave for something healthy and tasty. mayo sandwich recipe is one such recipe which can be prepared within minutes. this recipe of veg mayonnaise sandwich is very similar to dahi sandwich recipe. Continue reading mayonnaise sandwich recipe | mayo sandwich | veg mayonnaise sandwich at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Grilled Portobello Burgers with Garlic Mayo

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

These portobello mushrooms are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender. When served, they are loaded up with sweet grilled red onions and savory garlic and chive mayonnaise. This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Makes 4 burgers - Marinade - 2 teaspoons chili powder - 1 teaspoon dark or light brown sugar - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 teaspoon onion powder - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil   - Burgers - 4 portobello mushrooms, stems and gills removed - 1/­­3 cup mayonnaise - 1 teaspoon chopped chives -  1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt - 1 small red onion, sliced (keep rings intact) - 4 buns - 4 lettuce leaves - Olive oil for grilling Directions Mix all marinade ingredients in a small bowl. Place mushrooms on a baking sheet. Drizzle marinade over mushrooms and rub liberally to coat all sides. Let sit for 15 minutes. Preheat grill to high heat. To make garlic mayo, stir together mayonnaise, chives, garlic powder and salt in a small bowl. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Brush grill grate with olive oil. Place mushrooms and onion rings on grill. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes on each side, until both are darkened and tender. To serve, spread bottom of each bun with mayonnaise, top with lettuce and a few onion rings. Add mushroom and cover with top bun. The post Grilled Portobello Burgers with Garlic Mayo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan

June 6 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Street Fair Corn from NYC VeganI love New York — and I REALLY love NYC Vegan, the fantastic new cookbook by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment aka the Vegan Mos.  It’s such a fun book, billed with personal anecdotes and stories about New York City.  Best of all, of course, are the wonderful recipes — all the great food New York is know for, made deliciously vegan.  One of my favorites is the Street Fair Corn (below) which I will be making regularly this summer. Kudos to Michael and Ethan for a job well done and for bringing New York City into our kitchens!  If you don’t own NYC Vegan, do yourself a favor and order a copy today. Street Fair Corn Summer in New York City means weekend street fairs. The fairs have no rides or games. Instead, avenues are closed to traffic for several blocks, where dozens of vendors sell food. One of the most popular foods is Mexican Street Corn--freshly grilled sweet corn coated in a mixture of cheese and spiced mayonnaise. We created a vegan version of this dish that tastes even better than the original. (From NYC Vegan, copyright (C) 2017 by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment. Used by permission. Photo by Jackie Sobon.) Serves 4 Ingredients - 1/­­4 cup nondairy mayonnaise - 1/­­4 cup nondairy sour cream - 1/­­4 cup nondairy parmesan, plus more for serving - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder, plus more for serving - 1 medium clove garlic, finely minced - 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley - 4 ears sweet corn, shucked - 1 lime, cut into wedges Preparation - Heat a grill for direct-heat grilling, or heat a grill pan over high heat on the stove. While the grill is heating, in a medium mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, nondairy parmesan, chili powder, garlic, and cilantro. Stir until completely combined. - Place the corn directly on the hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until cooked through and charred in spots on all sides, about 8 minutes total. - Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a serving plate. Use a pastry or basting brush to generously coat each ear of corn with the mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with extra cheese and chili powder and serve immediately with lime wedges.     The post Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

The Best Vegan Banh Mi Sandwich

March 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

According to Eat Chay, there are certain layers of flavors that makes the perfect Banh Mi: pâté + butter + mayonnaise + coriander + chillies + cucumber + pickled carrots […] The post The Best Vegan Banh Mi Sandwich appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Plantain Chips with Orange Aioli from Vegan Mexico by Jason Wyrick

November 8 2016 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Plantain Chips with Orange Aioli from Vegan Mexico by Jason Wyrick If you like authentic Mexican flavors, then you’ll LOVE Vegan Mexico, the new book by Jason Wyrick. There’s lots to love about this book, from the warming soups and refreshing salads to the fun dips and hearty sandwiches.  There are also loads of great recipes for Mexican favorites such as tamales, enchiladas, tostadas, tacos, and more. Corn Ice Cream with Candied Pecans, anyone? As everyone who has cooked from Jason’s previous book, Vegan Tacos, already knows — Jason understands Mexican cuisine and how to get as much flavor as possible out of the ingredients.  With so many great recipes in this book, it was difficult to pick just one for this blog tour of Vegan Mexico. Ultimately I went with the Plantain Chips with Orange Aioli — so easy to make and so much flavor.  (If you’re avoiding oil, try making them in your air fryer!)   I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I do. Keep Vegan Mexico in mind for holiday gift-giving if you have any Mexican food-lovers on your list! Plantain Chips with Orange Aioli Chifles con Crema de Ajo Makes 3 cups Plantain chips, which are basically potato chips made with plantains, are common all throughout Central America. They can be found in convenience stores, in markets, and at many roadside stalls, especially in the south of Mexico.  Serve with Crema de Ajo (Orange Aioli). (From Vegan Mexico, copyright (C) 2016 by Jason Wyrick. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press.) Ingredients - 6 cups corn or vegetable oil - 2 medium green plantains - Zest of 2 limes - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon chile de árbol powder or chile powder of your choice - Juice of 2 limes - 1/­­2 cup Crema de Ajo (below) Preparation In a heavy pot at least 2 inches deep (preferably cast iron), heat the oil to 375°F. While the oil is heating, slice off the ends of the plantains and score the skin lengthwise along both ridges, then peel the plantains.  Cut the plantains diagonally into 1/­­8-inch thick slices. In a large mixing bowl, combine the lime zest, salt, and chile de árbol powder and set aside. Working in 4 batches, fry the plantains for about 1 minute until they are crisp and golden. Transfer them to a paper towel to drain. Once all the batches have been fried, transfer the plantain chips to the bowl with the zest, salt, and chile de árbol powder. Add the lime juice and toss to combine.   Crema de Ajo Makes 1 1/­­4 cups Crema de ajo is a fusion of Mediterranean garlic dips, like aioli and toum, with the Yucatecan twist of sour orange juice. You can adjust the garlic up or down as you like. Ingredients - 6 large cloves garlic - 1 cup vegan mayonnaise - 1/­­3 teaspoon salt - 1/­­3 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Juice of 1 orange - Juice of 1 lime Preparation In a blender or food processor, purée the garlic, mayonnaise, salt, pepper, orange juice, and lime juice until smooth.     The post Plantain Chips with Orange Aioli from Vegan Mexico by Jason Wyrick appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegane Mayonnaise – drei Zutaten

April 29 2016 seitan is my motor 

Ich liebe Mayonnaise und könnte alles damit zukleistern. Auf ein Baguette mit Tomaten, Basilikum und gebratenem Tempeh gehört unbedingt Mayo. Zu den Pommes esse ich natürlich immer Mayo und nie Ketchup. Und manchmal mache ich einfach den Kühlschrank auf und esse einen Löffel direkt aus dem Glas. So ist das. Mittlerweile gibt es verschiedene veganeRead more The post Vegane Mayonnaise – drei Zutaten appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Spelt Berry Salad

April 25 2016 Meatless Monday 

This protein-packed salad combines whole grain spelt, edamame, fresh herbs and vegetables, and a light dressing  lemon juice and apple cider vinegar dressing. The result is a satisfying meal perfect for lunch or dinner. This recipe comes to us from our friends at M Cafe. Serves 8-12 - 1 cup (6 oz) whole spelt berries - 2 cups frozen edamame - 1 cup carrot, diced - 1 cup celery, sliced - 1 cup green bell pepper, diced - 1 cup cucumber, diced - 1/­­4 cup scallions (green tops only), chopped - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped - 1/­­3 cup dill, chopped - 1/­­2 cup vegan mayonnaise - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­4 cup raw apple cider vinegar - 1 tbsp. vegan honey or brown rice syrup - 1/­­4 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon white pepper Soak spelt berries for at least 4 hours or overnight.  Drain well, and add to a pot of lightly salted boiling water (at least a quart). Boil for 20 - 30 minutes, or until grains are completely tender.  Drain well and rinse under cool water.  Drain again and set aside. Meanwhile, make dressing by combining mayonnaise, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, honey, salt and pepper in small bowl. Set aside. In large mixing bowl, combine cooked spelt berries with chopped vegetables and herbs.  Fold in dressing, and let sit for a few minutes to allow flavors to blend before serving. The post Spelt Berry Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse

January 28 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse We did a little survey on instagram a few days ago where we asked what type of recipes you would like to see more of here on the blog. Lots of fun and creative suggestions popped up. The sum of it was pretty clear though. There seem to be a never-ending need for Quick Family Dinners, Budget Recipes, Healthy Breakfasts and more Vegan dishes. We will certainly take these topics in mind for future updates. If you have more suggestions, go ahead and leave a comment below. To kick things off we have looked at what we have done in the past years and have chosen 3 of our favourite recipes in each category. If you haven’t tried these recipes already, they might be a good starting point. Quick Family Dinners - Filled Spinach Crepes - Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes   - Fresh Pea & Mint Soup Budget - Shakshuka - Mung Bean Stew - Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup Healthy Breakfasts - 3 x Breakfast Oatmeals - Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch - Raw Buckwheat Porridge De Luxe Vegan Dinners - Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Dates and Almonds - The No Recipe Curry - Sweet Potato, Carrot & Red Lentil Soup Savoury Snacks also seem to be a thing that we need to make more of so that will come up soon. Today’s recipe is a vegetarian version of the French fish stew Bouillabaisse and ironically it doesn’t seem to be even close to the topics that you are asking to see more of. It is not super quick, more like an hour or so. Saffron and white wine are on the ingredient list, so not a budget recipe (although all other ingredients are quite cheap). And to be honest, the kids didn’t like it very much. Elsa picked out the carrots, parsnip and the white beans and left the rest untouched! It is vegan though, if you skip the aioli. But if we look past the fact that this apparently is an entirely unwanted recipe from your side, we do have some good news: You are going to love it anyway! And so will the guests that you invite over for a vegetarian dinner this weekend. You see, this French stew is filled with flavour from white wine, fennel, garlic and saffron, sweetness from the slow cooked tomatoes, carrots and parsnips, and it gets a mild taste of the ocean from a sheet of nori algae (the ones you use for rolling sushi). We like to keep the vegetables chunky to replace the fish and seafood. We also roast fennel slices for a fancier presentation. Our idea was that they would look like two prawns in the middle of the plate, but, ehm, I don’t know, they just look like roasted fennel to me. They do taste good, almost crusty on the outside and soft and buttery on the inside. We serve it with homemade aioli but you can also use store-bought, to save time (or simply mix mayonnaise with garlic). If anyone is reading this from Marseille, we are sorry if we have insulted your traditional recipe. I am sure we have made a bunch of wrongdoings (for example excluding the main ingredient), but we did it with good intentions and love in our hearts. Vegetarian Bouillabaisse Serves 4-6 This takes around one hour to make. You can skip the roasted fennel on top if you are in a hurry and don’t care about fancy presentations. If you prepare it in the morning, it will taste even more flavourful when you serve it in the evening (or the day after). And if you are making it for kids, you can replace the wine with more vegetable stock. 2 tbsp butter, coconut oil or olive oil 2 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp anise seeds 2 yellow onions, peeled, one finely chopped and the other coarsely 4 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 3 large carrots, peeled and sliced in thick coins 2 parsnips, peeled and sliced in thick coins 1 fennel bulb, coarsely chopped 250 ml /­­ 1 cup dry white wine 2 potatoes, peeled and cut in quarters 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins whole tomatoes (or crushed) 2 cups vegetable stock 1 g saffron powder 1 sheet nori, crushed or finely chopped (optional) 1 tbsp fresh thyme 1 cup large white beans To serve 1 fennel bulb fresh thyme and dill zest from 1/­­2 orange (optional) 4 pieces of sourdough bread Aioli 2 egg yolks* 1 tbsp lemon juice or vinegar (+ more for seasoning) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold pressed rapeseed oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped or grated sea salt and pepper, to taste  Place a large sauce pan on medium heat. Melt butter or coconut oil and then add fennel seeds and anise seeds, onions and garlic. Sauté for a couple of minutes or until the onions have softened. Add carrots, parsnips and the chopped fennel and after a couple of minutes the white wine. Let simmer for five minutes and then add potatoes, tomatoes, vegetable stock, saffron, nori and thyme. Give it a good stir and then leave to simmer for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, set the oven to 435°F/­­225°C. Slice the remaining fennel in thick pieces lengthwise, drizzle with oil and salt and place on a baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes or until soft and slightly burnt at the edges. When the cooked vegetables are soft and the stew tastes flavourful, add beans and let simmer for a few more minutes before serving. Making Aioli: Making Aioli: Whisk egg yolks* and lemon juice (or vinegar) in metal bowl to blend well. Whisking constantly (by hand with a balloon whisk) while drizzling in the oil very slowly, 1 teaspoonful at a time, until sauce is thickened. Stir in finely chopped garlic and season the aioli with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Serve the soup in wide bowls, top with roasted fennel, dill, a dollop of aioli, orange zest and a piece of sourdough bread. *Raw egg is not recommended for infants, elderly, pregnant women or people with weakened immune systems. Be sure to use pasteurized egg yolk instead.

mayonnaise cheese sandwich recipe | grilled cheese mayo sandwich

May 21 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

mayonnaise cheese sandwich recipe | grilled cheese mayo sandwichmayonnaise cheese sandwich recipe | grilled cheese mayo sandwich with step by step photo and video recipe. sandwich recipes are very common across india, since its inception to indian cuisine. in indian cuisine it has been adapted to the indian taste buds particularly with the stuffing. one such creamy and filling sandwich recipe is the mayonnaise cheese sandwich recipe filled with creamy mayo and cheesy sauce. The post mayonnaise cheese sandwich recipe | grilled cheese mayo sandwich appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Big Bang Tofu

October 10 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Big Bang Tofu The quick and easy sauce in this recipe is made with just three ingredients, but it provides a big bang of flavor as a coating for the lightly fried tofu. When making the sauce, mix in the sriracha a little at a time and taste as go, to be sure turns out at the heat level you prefer. I like to serve this Big Bang Tofu over rice or quinoa with sautéed greens on the side. The sauce also makes a great dip for roasted cauliflower florets.   Big Bang Tofu - 1/­­3 cup Asian sweet chili sauce - 1/­­3 cup vegan mayonnaise ((I like Just Mayo)) - 1 to 2 tablespoons sriracha sauce - 14 to 16 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed - 2 tablespoons cornstarch - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon safflower oil or other neutral oil - In a small bowl, combine the chili sauce, mayonnaise, and sriracha. Mix well until thoroughly blended. Set aside. - Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch dice and place in a bowl. Sprinkle with the cornstarch and salt and pepper to taste and toss to coat the tofu. - Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Toss the tofu with the reserved sauce and serve hot. Recipe from MORE Quick-Fix Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing. The post Big Bang Tofu appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad

May 30 2017 Vegan Dad 

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad This is a recipe I developed over two years ago that never saw the light of day. With BBQ season now upon us I thought would dust it off. There is perhaps nothing I love more that a marinated, grilled oyster mushroom. And certainly e veryone will think youre a fun guy when you make this traditional side salad as the main meal--all done on the barbecue! INGREDIENTS Dressing: ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) soy milk (more as needed) ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) vegan mayonnaise ?      2 tsp (10 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 small cloves garlic, minced ?      1 tbsp minced capers ?      1/­­2 tsp each light soy sauce, brown sugar ?      1/­­4 tsp each apple cider vinegar, mustard powder, onion powder ?      1 tsp miso ?      pinch ground ginger ?      salt and pepper to taste Salad: ?      2 small hearts of romaine lettuce ?      1/­­4 cup (60 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil ?      seasoned salt ?      16 large shitake mushrooms, stems removed ?      3/­­4 lb (375 g) oyster mushrooms, stems on ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) croutons METHOD Oil grill and preheat barbecue to med-high  Dressing:  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper and thin with more soy milk to get desired consistency.  Salad:  1. Slice romaine in half lengthwise, leaving core intact.  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and cayenne. Lightly brush over cut side of romaine. Set romaine aside on a tray.  3. Place mushrooms (cut oyster mushrooms into smaller pieces if needed) in remaining lemon juice mixture in a baking tray. Toss to coat. Season with seasoned salt. Let marinate for 15 mins  4. Place romaine cut-side down on grill. Place mushrooms on grill. Barbecue romaine for about 3 mins on the oiled side, and mushrooms, about 3-5 mins per side.  5. Set each romaine half on a plate. Divide shitake mushrooms evenly among the plates. Remove stems from oyster mushrooms and divide among the plates. Scatter with croutons. Drizzle with dressing. Serve.

Veganize It!

February 8 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Veganize It! My new cookbook is called VEGANIZE IT! Easy DIY Recipes for a Plant-Based Kitchen.  It officially hits the shelves on March 7, so I wanted to give you a sneak peek of whats inside. My goal in writing this book was to provide the ultimate guide for making homemade vegan foods from everyday ingredients — and share great ways to use those ingredients.  Like all my cookbooks, the recipes are geared to busy home cooks who want to get a great dinner on the table but dont want to spend all day in the kitchen.  With VEGANIZE IT, you can be as DIY as you want to be, or not.  For example, if you want to make lasagna completely from scratch, there are recipes for homemade ricotta, a melty mozzarella-like cheese, homemade pasta, and a wonderful baked tomato sauce.  If you dont have time to make all the components, you can simply pick and choose what you want to make from scratch and what you prefer to buy ready-made - such as making homemade ricotta and tomato sauce, but using storebought lasagna noodles and vegan mozzarella. In that sense, VEGANIZE IT is really two cookbooks in one:  all the DIY vegan basics such as dairy-free sour cream, mayonnaise, butter, and plant-based meats and seafood made from wheat, soy, beans, and vegetables.  But what makes this book really special is that each chapter goes one step further to include recipes that incorporate one or more of those basic recipes, all made inexpensively, using simple cooking methods and easy-to-find ingredients — so, for example, you can use the cashew cream cheese to make Spinach-Artichoke Dip or Chocolate Cheesecake.  Make the andouille sausage, and youre just one step away from a great jambalaya. Im really excited about VEGANIZE IT and I hope you will be too.  Sample recipes (and a blog tour!) are coming soon.  For now, though, Id like to give you a brief tour around the recipe chapters with a list of just some of the recipes youll find inside along with a few of the gorgeous photos by William and Susan Brinson. DIY DAIRY-FREE AND EGGLESS... Cheesy Broccoli Soup Spinach and Mushroom-Bacon Quiche Chickpea Flour Omelets Breakfast Nachos with Smoky Queso Sauce Bacon-Topped Mac UnCheese  PLANT-BASED MEATS... BBQ Seitan Ribs Burmese Tofu Iron Kettle Chili Better Made Tacos with Avocado Crema Seitan Oscar with Béarnaise Sauce       FLOUR POWER... Cheesy Crackers Handcrafted Lasagna Perfect Pot Pie Cheesy Sausage Biscuits Benedict Pizza VEGAN CHARCUTERIE... Maple Breakfast Sausage DIY Jerky Banh Mi Sandwich Haute Dogs Wellington Join the Club Sandwich       INSTEAD OF SEAFOOD... Lobster Mushroom Bisque Clam-Free Chowder Vegan Crab Louis Fish-Free Tacos Tof-ish and Chips with Tartar Sauce       SWEETS FROM SCRATCH... Luscious Lava Cakes Strawberry Shortcake Lemon Meringue Pie Tiramisu Bellini Trifle         VEGANIZE IT is available for pre-order now…. The post Veganize It! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet

June 20 2016 Meatless Monday 

Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet Rip Esseltyn is a real man. Okay, he got the nickname Rip when he was two days old, not because of his lean ripped look.  But it fits.  An all-American swimmer in college, he became a world class triathlete, which is when he adopted a plant-strong diet. After ten years in that grueling profession he needed a break. Friends suggested he might want to be a firefighter. Its an awesome profession, said Rip. You help people, you save lives. Its like a big old slumber party. You get to go through red lights and stop signs with sirens blazing. And you do good deeds. Cook good food. No two shifts are ever the same. He applied to the Austin fire department, one of 4000 applying for twelve positions. Its more competitive than getting into Harvard, he joked. It took two years but in 1997, he made the transition from full time triathlete to full time firefighter. Triathlete, Texas firefighter, stand-up guy – he definitely qualifies as a real man.  And he grills veggies. And occasionally fruits. At the firehouse we had a nice grill in the backyard and we would grill every chance we got. Portabella mushrooms, bell peppers, corn on the cob, onions, every kind of squash you can imagine, white button mushrooms, romaine lettuce...oh and pineapples. I love grilling. Of course, when he first started at the firehouse, they were doing a lot of grilling but it wasnt veggies. Oh it was an abomination, recalled Rip. I like to say the four major food groups of the Texas male firefighter are:  Big old honking burgers with cheese and mayonnaise on white bread with a side of deep fried French fries; Beef fajitas with sour cream and cheese, full fatty beans and white rice – and if there are onions and bell peppers theyre slathered in oil and butter; Pizza with as much pepperoni, ham and hamburger meat you can throw on that guy; And the other food group is bluebell ice cream. They have bowls of bluebell for breakfast lunch and dinner. For years, he brought his own food, did his own thing. But then in April 2003, Rip was sitting out of the front porch of the fire station with a couple of his fellow firefighters and they made a bet on who had the lowest cholesterol. Its fortunate they did because one of the men, whose family had a history of heart disease, found out his cholesterol was 344 mg/­­dl. That put a scare into the whole crew and over a period of time they started to change what they ate. Rip challenged his friend with the dangerously high cholesterol to go all in with a plant-based diet for 28 days and see what happened. The cholesterol number plummeted to 197 mg/­­dl. That led Rip to develop the Engine 2 Diet which turned into a pilot study and eventually into a New York Times bestseller. In that book he shares some helpful grilling tips. Vegetables, fruits, and tofu and other meat substitutes are delicious when cooked over coals or a wood fire. Toss them lightly with a marinade first. Spray the bars of the grill with a fat-free cooking spray or employ one of those neat-o perforated skillets or cooking baskets. In his latest book, My Beef with Meat, he includes a recipe for BBQ Seitan Grilling Kabobs and a Grilled Romaine salad. He also warns that when youre grilling any kind of meat - chicken, beef, pork, or fish - what you are really doing is growing carcinogens on it. There are two that appear only in grilled meat: heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS.)” He told us that the great thing about veggies is they dont have the inherent building blocks to create any of these carcinogens. Grill veggies and you get all char and no carcinogens. For the last five years Rips been working with Whole Foods to spread the word about eating plant-based food. He has a line of Engine 2 health food products, exclusive to Whole Foods, that includes everything from cereals and almond milk to pizza crust and veggie burgers. Finally, he talked with us about how fat and cholesterol in animal products can clog arteries to the heart, head, and…other extremities important to real men.  In contrast, when youre eating whole plant-based food it keeps your blood vessels useful and elastic.  “So Id say real men eat plants,” said Rip, “and drop the blue pill in exchange for a bunch of green leafy vegetables.   The post Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Three-Ingredient Vegan Mayonnaise

April 29 2016 seitan is my motor 

Mayonnaise is one of my favourite condiments. I use it as a sandwich spread, as a dip, and of course I eat it with fries. And sometimes I eat a spoonful all by itself. There. There are a couple of vegan mayonnaises on the market and I think they are super convenient to have. ButRead more The post Three-Ingredient Vegan Mayonnaise appeared first on seitan is my motor.

The Best Club Sandwich Ever

February 15 2016 Meatless Monday 

A club sandwich without the meat? It’s easy with veggie turkey and veggie bacon! Be sure to pick up ripe tomatoes and avocados for your sandwich so that the veggies are the star of the show. This recipe comes to us from Kinzie of To Cheese or Not To Cheese? Serves 4 - 8 slices sourdough bread, toasted - mayonnaise, to taste - 8 slices veggie turkey - 1 tomato, sliced - 4 large lettuce leaves - 8 pieces veggie bacon - 1 avocado, sliced Spread mayonnaise to taste on toasted sourdough bread. For each sandwich, on one slice of toasted bread layer: 2 slices veggie turkey, 2 slices tomato, 1 large lettuce leaf, 2 pieces veggie bacon and 2 slices avocado. Complete the sandwich with the other slice of toasted bread. Cut diagonally and enjoy. Repeat process 4 times, or until you’ve made enough sandwiches to satisfy. The post The Best Club Sandwich Ever appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Bean Potato Salad

December 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

This picnic staple has a rustic feel, because it features tender new potatoes which can be eaten whole. Fresh dill and tangy mustard kick the flavor up a notch, while snap peas and green beans add a refreshing crunch. This recipe comes to us from Tony of Real Men Eat Green. Serves 6 - salt, for preparing the water - 5 cups new or nugget potatoes, left whole or cut in half -  1/­­2 cup snap peas, trimmed -  1/­­2 cup green beans, trimmed - 1 tablespoons mustard - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar - 2 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped - 1 cup egg free mayonnaise substitute - 1 cup celery, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - a pinch cayenne pepper* *optional Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.   Add the potatoes to the pot and boil until for about 10-12 minutes, or until tender when poked with a fork. Add the snap peas and green beans to the pot and cook them with the potatoes for another 2-3 minutes, or until they begin to become tender, but still keep their crunch.     While the potatoes and peas are cooking, whisk together the mustard, vinegar, dill and mayonnaise substitute. Stir in the chopped celery.   Drain the potatoes, green beans and peas and place together in a large bowl. Toss the vegetables with the mustard dressing until thoroughly coated. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Taste again for seasoning and add some additional chopped dill or cayenne pepper if you like your potato salad slightly spicy. The post Green Bean Potato Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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